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2024 AWP Conference Schedule

The 2024 AWP Conference & Bookfair in Kansas City, Missouri schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, type of event, and event format. This schedule is subject to change. A version accessible to screen readers is also available.

The schedule includes events taking place in-person at the Kansas City Convention Center in Kansas City, Missouri and prerecorded virtual events that will be available to watch on-demand online. A select number of in-person events will also be livestreamed for online viewing. Check out the #AWP24 Virtual Events Guide to see all of the events that will be made available to watch online. Under the advanced search, you can also use the “Event Format” search option to filter the schedule to view all in-person events, all virtual events, livestreamed events only, or prerecorded virtual events only. Please note that due to staff and resource limitations, not all in-person events can be livestreamed.

Please note: The schedule you build on awpwriter.org will not transfer to the mobile app as these systems are independent. If you would like to build your schedule on the conference mobile app, download the #AWP24 mobile app now.

Scroll over participants’ names in blue to read their biographies.

 

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Wednesday, February 7, 2024

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

V101.

VIRTUAL: Autistic Writers On The Inaccessibility Of Professional Writing Spaces

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Five Autistic writers consider what it means to be excluded from professional writing spaces. Many Autistic people struggle with sensory overwhelm; this issue is exacerbated by large gatherings of people. Writing is the easy part for Autistic minds. Networking, public events, relationships—these present major hurdles for people whose minds work differently. The panelists will share their experiences navigating the inaccessible world of literary spaces. How can these spaces become more accessible?


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Chris Martin is a tilted listening animal languaging. He teaches and learns at Unrestricted Interest and curates Multiverse, a series of neurodivergent writing from Milkweed Editions. He is the author of May Tomorrow Be Awake: On Poetry, Autism, and Our Neurodiverse Future (HarperOne, 2022).


Twitter Username: becomingweather

Julia Lee Barclay-Morton, PhD, is an award-winning writer/director with writing produced and published internationally. Her debut collection was The Mortality Shot (Liquid Cat Books); her work has been recently published in Prairie Schooner, PANK, and Nomadic Press. Barclay-Morton lives in New York City, writing a memoir about her autism diagnosis at 57. More: TheUnadaptedOnes.com


Twitter Username: wilhelminapitfa

Website: https://www.theunadaptedones.com

Said Shaiye is an Autistic & ADHD Somali writer and photographer. His debut book, Are You Borg Now?, was a 2022 Minnesota Book Award Finalist in Memoir. He has published work in Indiana Review, Texas Review, Obsidian, and elsewhere. He holds an MFA and teaches college writing in the the twin cities.

Virtual

V102.

VIRTUAL: Climate Fiction: African-Diaspora Ecology

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Climate fiction is gaining popularity in African literature among indigenous African writers and those who reside in the diaspora. As a genre, this event aims to shed light and explore how the works of various writers engage with pressing ecological problems in Africa or the diaspora. To accomplish this, writers will have the opportunity to read either an excerpt of a long work or a short work. After which, there will be a panelist discussion facilitated by an appointed moderator.


This virtual event was pre-recorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

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Linda N. Masi is the author of the novel Fine Dreams, winner of the Juniper Prize for fiction. Some of her other work appear in Tupelo Quarterly, BlackBerry: A Magazine, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA from the University of Mississippi and is completing a PhD at Texas Tech University.


Twitter Username: RealLindaNMasi

Osahon Ize-Iyamu is a Nigerian writer of fiction that explores the effect of environmental degradation in Nigeria. His story “More Sea than Tar,” which highlights the flooding crisis in Nigeria, has been included in educational materials globally. He has also spoken at Berlin’s 2022 Climate Cultures Festival.

Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki is an African speculative fiction writer, editor, and publisher from Nigeria. He has won the Nebula, as well as the Nommo, British and World Fantasy awards. He has also been a finalist in the Hugo, Locus, Sturgeon, British Science Fiction and NAACP Image awards.

Author Aya de León teaches creative writing at UC Berkeley. She is acquiring editor at Fighting Chance Books, seeking climate justice fiction. She produced the online conference Black Literature vs. the Climate Emergency, (available on YouTube) and works on climate with the Movement for Black Lives.


Twitter Username: ayadeleon

Website: https://ayadeleon.wordpress.com

Bibiana O. Ossai, a Nigerian born writer, is the winner of the Equinox Journal 2019 Poetry Contest and a recipient of the Marilyn Boutwell Creative Writing Award from Long Island University's humanities department. Her works appear in The River, Book Smuggler's Den, Refractions.


Twitter Username: SaintOaksCom

Website: https://www.bibianaossai.com/

Virtual

V103.

VIRTUAL: Embracing the Body: A Journey of Illness and Celebration

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Throughout our lives, we encounter various health challenges and gender expectations on our bodies that test our physical and emotional well-being. However, there is beauty to be found in celebrating our bodies. This panel of poets shares and discusses poetry of resilience and celebration of our bodies to find meaning and perspective. The panel explores the transformative power of writing that honors the courage it takes to embrace the diversity of our bodies.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Maria Maloney is the author of two books of poetry, The Lost Letters of Mileva and Cracked Spaces. She is the founder and publisher of Mouthfeel Press and the outreach coordinator for the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Latino Día de los Muertos / Day of the Dead annual festival.


Twitter Username: maloney_ninfa

Carolina Monsivais is the author of three collections of poetry: Somewhere Between Houston and El Paso, Elisa’s Hunger, and Descent. She holds an MFA from NMSU and a PhD from UTEP. Monsivais has worked many years with survivors of patriarchal violence and is a founding member of Poets Against Walls.


Twitter Username: carotlicue

Elisa A. Garza has published two chapbooks, Between the Light / entre la claridad and Familia. Her full-length collection Regalos was a finalist for the National Poetry Series. Since her cancer diagnosis, she no longer teaches, but continues to write and work as an editor.

Katherine Hoerth is the author of five poetry books including Goddess Wears Cowboy Boots, which won the Helen C. Smith Prize from the Texas Institute of Letters. She is an associate professor of creative writing at Lamar University and serves as Director of Lamar University Literary Press.

Laura Cesarco Eglin’s latest poetry collections are Between Gone and Leaving—Home and Time/Tempo. She’s the translator of claus and the scorpion by Lara Dopazo Ruibal and Of Death. Minimal Odes by Hilda Hilst. She’s the publisher of Veliz Books and teaches at the University of Houston-Downtown.

Virtual

V104.

VIRTUAL: Excavating the Past: Writers and Characters Who Research

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The perfect telling detail can bring heroes and locales to life. It’s crucial for writers to not only know where and how to conduct research, but also, what constitutes a juicy factual find. Five novelists at varied stages of their careers—who have all penned historical fiction with a pop culture bent, often with protagonists who must themselves excavate the past—reveal their research secrets.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

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Sarah Tomlinson, a former music journalist, has been a ghostwriter since 2008, penning more than twenty books, including five New York Times bestsellers. In 2015, she published the memoir, Good Girl. Her debut novel, The Last Days of the Midnight Ramblers, is forthcoming from Flatiron Books in 2024.


Twitter Username: duchessofrock

Website: www.sarahtomlinson.com

Sara Sligar is the author of the novel Take Me Apart (MCD/Farrar, Straus & Giroux). She holds a PhD in English from the University of Pennsylvania and now lives in Los Angeles, where she teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Southern California.


Twitter Username: saraxsligar

Alex Segura is the bestselling and award-winning author of Secret Identity, which the New York Times called “wittily original” and named an Editor’s Choice. Secret Identity was also listed as one of the Best Mysteries of the Year by NPR, Kirkus, Booklist, the South Florida Sun Sentinel, and more.


Twitter Username: alex_segura

Steph Cha is the author of Your House Will Pay, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the California Book Award, and the Juniper Song crime trilogy. She’s a book critic and television writer, as well as the current series editor of the Best American Mystery & Suspense anthology.


Twitter Username: stephycha

Katie Gutierrez's writing has appeared in the Washington PostHarper's BazaarTexas Monthly, and more. Her debut novel, More Than You'll Ever Know, was published by William Morrow in 2022.


Twitter Username: katie_gutz

Virtual

V105.

VIRTUAL: Ghostwriting 101: Insights and Advice for Those Seeking a Lucrative Career

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“No one wants to hear from the ghostwriter,” says the ghostwriter of Prince Harry’s Spare. Except those wanting to know the secrets behind this lucrative way to support a creative career. Discover how to break into ghostwriting. Learn the nuts and bolts needed for a wheelhouse of services. Find out what to consider in taking on clients and what worked and what didn’t in seeing a project through. We’ll reveal the form’s challenges and joys and how it shaped (for good or bad) our writing journeys.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

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Kate St. Vincent Vogl teaches at the Loft. She is the author of Lost & Found: A Memoir of Mothers, which ABC news featured. She cowrote Lady Ref as well as Iron Horse Cowgirls. Her essays appear in best-selling anthologies like Why We Ride; her fiction received a Minnesota State Arts Board grant.


Twitter Username: katevogl

Website: www.katevogl.com

Hope Edelman has published seven nonfiction books of her own, including the bestsellers Motherless Daughters and Motherless Mothers, and has cowritten Along the Way with Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez. She teaches workshops throughout the year and is currently collaborating on a nineties rock memoir.


Twitter Username: hope_edelman

Website: www.hopeedelman.com

Isidra Mencos is the author of Promenade of Desire—A Barcelona Memoir, an IPPY Awards silver medalist and Best Book Awards finalist. Her essay, “My Books and I” was listed as Notable in the Best American Essays 2019. She has ghostwritten books for CEOs and people without a high school degree.


Twitter Username: isidramencos

Kate Hopper is a writing coach, editor, and the author of Use Your Words: A Writing Guide for Mothers and Ready for Air: A Journey Through Premature Motherhood, and coauthor of Silent Running, a memoir. She leads retreats and teaches online and in Ashland University’s low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: mnkatehopper

Website: http://www.katehopper.com

Pauleanna is a celebrity ghostwriter and founder of WritersBlok, who helps high-profile leaders and doers turn their personal stories into powerful brand —when clients want to speak up and shake the room—she gets the call.


Twitter Username: pauleannar

Virtual

V106.

VIRTUAL: Haunting, Healing, and Female Voice: Women Who Write Horror

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This multigenre panel explores ways in which women writers of horror, at various stages of their careers, uniquely interact with haunting, dread, healing, and conceptions of femininity in their work. Focuses include how “horror,” “haunting,” and “healing” intersect in each panelist’s writing, and in what ways the ever-changing female experience plays a role in her work. Panelists will also offer insight into how writers of any genre might approach haunting, horror, and dread in their writing.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Lauren Brazeal Garza is a PhD candidate in literature at UT Dallas. Her published poetry collections include Gutter, which chronicles her homelessness as a teenager. Her recent work includes an epistolary novel of poems and flash fiction that features fictional interviews with Texan ghosts.


Twitter Username: lbrazealgarza

Jennifer Givhan is a Mexican-American and Indigenous poet and novelist and the recipient of the Southwest Book Award and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and PEN/Rosenthal Emerging Voices. She is the author of eleven books and raises her children in New Mexico.


Twitter Username: JennGivhan

Website: jennifergivhan.com

Erika T. Wurth’s novel White Horse is a New York Times editors pick, a Good Morning America buzz pick, and an Indie Next, Target Book of the Month, and BOTM Pick. She is a Kenyon and Sewanee fellow, and a narrative artist for Meow Wolf. She is an urban Native of Apache/Chickasaw/Cherokee descent.


Twitter Username: erikatwurth

Website: http://www.erikatwurth.com/

Hailey Piper is the Bram Stoker Award-winning author of Queen of Teeth, No Gods for Drowning, The Worm and His Kings, and other books of dark fiction. A Locus Award Finalist and member of the HWA, she's also published over ninety short stories in various venues. She lives with her wife in Maryland.


Twitter Username: HaileyPiperSays

Erin E. Adams is a first-generation Haitian American writer and theatre artist. She received her BA with honors in literary arts from Brown University, her MFA in acting from The Old Globe, and her MFA in dramatic writing from the NYU Tisch School of the Arts.


Twitter Username: Iameeadams

Virtual

V107.

VIRTUAL: How to Talk to a Writer: The Dos and Don’ts of Giving (and Receiving) Feedback

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For years, “brutal honesty” was the standard for feedback in writing programs and critique groups. Today, we hear talk of “feedback sandwiches” and the power of positive feedback, but how do these approaches serve? Our panel of instructors and authors will offer insights on how to give feedback in a way that serves and supports students across genres and backgrounds. Attendees can also expect insights on how feedback recipients themselves can manage the process to make the most of this resource.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Joni B. Cole is the author of seven books, including Good Naked: How to Write More, Write Better, and Be Happier and Toxic Feedback: Helping Writers Survive and Thrive. She teaches creative writing at her own Writer's Center of White River Junction in Vermont and other graduate programs and conferences around the country.

Juan J. Morales is the author of three poetry collections and a forthcoming book with UNM Press. He is a CantoMundo Fellow, the editor of Pilgrimage Magazine, an associate dean in the College of Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences, and a professor of English at Colorado State University Pueblo.


Twitter Username: moralesjuanj

Emily Bernard is the author of Black is the Body, winner of the Christopher Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose. She is a 2020 Andrew Carnegie Fellow and the Julian Lindsay Green and Gold Professor of English at the University of Vermont.


Twitter Username: emilyebernard

Tim Horvath is the author of Understories, which won the New Hampshire Literary Award, and Circulation. His stories appear in Conjunctions, AGNI, Hayden's Ferry Review, and elsewhere. He is a visiting assistant professor in the Stony Brook MFA in writing and literature and an editor at Conjunctions.


Twitter Username: tim_horvath

Website: www.timhorvath.com

Gary Jackson is the author of the poetry collections origin story and Missing You, Metropolis, and coeditor of The Future of Black: Afrofuturism, Black Comics, and Superhero Poetry. He’s an associate professor in English and creative writing at the College of Charleston.

Virtual

V108.

VIRTUAL: Legends in Modern Storytelling

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Despite our temporal distance from the mythologies of the past, authors continually reconnect and weave our cultural legends together, contemporizing age-old tales and finding the roots where our shared human experience is most honest, urgent, magical, and intertwined. Our diverse panel of three fiction authors and a literary journal’s editor-in-chief discuss how legendary tales influence their writing and publication. Together we explore how stories of old speak to the pressing issues of today.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

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Dani Hedlund is the founder and CEO of the international nonprofit Brink Literacy Project and the editor-in-chief of the literary and art collection, F(r)iction.


Twitter Username: DMHedlund

Website: tetheredbyletters.com

Madeline Miller is a writer, classicist, and former high school teacher. Her first novel was The Song of Achilles, which was awarded the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction (now the Women's Prize). Her second novel, Circe, was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller.


Twitter Username: MillerMadeline

Dan Chaon’s most recent book is Sleepwalk: A Novel. Other works include the short story collection Stay Awake, a finalist for the story prize; the national bestsellers Ill Will and Await Your Reply; and Among the Missing, a National Book Award finalist. He retired from Oberlin College in 2018.


Twitter Username: danchaon

Rebecca Roanhorse is a NYTimes bestseller and a Nebula, Hugo, and Locus Award-winning speculative fiction writer. She has written eight novels, multiple short stories and has been published in over a dozen languages. She edited the Best American SFF 2022, and she also writes for TV and Marvel Comics.

Alix E. Harrow is a New York Times bestselling and Hugo award-winning writer now living in Virginia with her husband and their two semi-feral kids. She is the author of The Ten Thousand Doors of January, The Once and Future Witches, and various short fiction.

Virtual

V109.

VIRTUAL: Lessons from Louis K. Lowy: How to Build Legacy and Foster Community

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Join us for an enlightening and practical discussion on the life and work of Louis K. Lowy, a beloved Miami writer whose passing left a significant void in his local community. Through an exploration of Louis's prolific writing, mentorship, and friendship, panelists, including friends and fellow writers, will offer actionable insights and tips on how to build a lasting legacy, foster a supportive writing community, and navigate the emotional landscape of loss.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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John Dufresne is the author of two story collections, six novels, and four books on craft, including Flash! a Guide to Writing Very Short Fiction and Storyville: an Illustrated Guide to Writing Fiction. He teaches creative writing at Florida International University, and is at work on a novel.

Omar Figueras is a professor at Miami Dade College and sits on the advisory board of Reading Queer. In January 2019, he received a KWLS Teacher & Librarian Scholarship, and in the summer of 2020, with the sponsorship of the Humanities Edge Grant, he created the MDC Student Writers Conference.


Twitter Username: omar_figueras

Born in Port-au-Prince, M.J. Fievre is the author of the Badass Black Girl series. She's a senior editor at Mango Publishing and a program coordinator at the Miami Book Fair.


Twitter Username: @MJ_Fievre

Website: www.mjfievre.com

Hector Duarte, Jr. is a writer and high school teacher out of Miami, Florida. He edited for The Flash Fiction Offensive and has published widely throughout the internet and in print. His debut short-story collection Desperate Times Call was released by Shotgun Honey books in 2018.

Virtual

V110.

VIRTUAL: Letters of Love: Proclaiming the Voices of Sanity and Humanity Amidst the War

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The reading event will feature three female poets from Ukraine and the United States, who will read from their latest poetry collections on the war in Ukraine. Today is a Different War, a short collection by Lyudmyla Khersonska (Arrowsmith, 2023) and Love Letters to Ukraine from Uyava (River Paw Press, 2023) by Kalpna Singh-Chitnis will offer fresh perspectives on War in Ukraine.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Lyudmyla Khersonska lives in Odessa, Ukraine. She is the author of six books of poetry. A Russophone poet, she speaks about Russia’s war in Ukraine. Her poems have been translated into many languages. Her name was on the list of 33 International Women Writers Who Are Bold for Change.

Kalpna Singh-Chitnis is the author of five poetry collections and founder of River Paw Press. Her works have been published in notable journals and translated into fifteen languages. A Pushcart nominee, she has received the Naji Naaman Literary Prize, Bihar Rajbhasha Award, and Rajiv Gandhi Global Excellence Award.


Twitter Username: AccessKalpna

Website: www.kalpnasinghchitnis.com

Anita Nahal, PhD, CDP, is a Pushcart Prize-nominated Indian American author-academic. She has four poetry books, four for children, five edited anthologies, among others. Her first novel is due in 2023. Anita teaches at the Univeristy of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC. More on her at: www.anitanahal.com

Virtual

V111.

VIRTUAL: Poetry as a Means of Healing and Transformation in Times of Trauma and War

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In the tapestry of human existence, where life entwines joy and sorrow, there lies a profound art, a sublime expression that transcends time and space. Poetry, like a true companion and friend beckons us to embrace and offers solace and healing in times of unspeakable trials—moments of trauma, war, and eventual peace. The event will explore how poetry bares wounds and echoes the weight of our collective suffering and communicates with those who contribute to our trials to bring transformation and healing.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Kalpna Singh-Chitnis is the author of five poetry collections and founder of River Paw Press. Her works have been published in notable journals and translated into fifteen languages. A Pushcart nominee, she has received the Naji Naaman Literary Prize, Bihar Rajbhasha Award, and Rajiv Gandhi Global Excellence Award.


Twitter Username: AccessKalpna

Website: www.kalpnasinghchitnis.com

Octavio Quintanilla is the founder of the literary festival VersoFrontera & publisher of Alabrava Press. His poetry collection, The Book of Wounded Sparrows, is forthcoming from Texas Review Press. He teaches literature and creative writing at Our Lady of the Lake University. IG: @writeroctavioquintanilla


Twitter Username: OctQuintanilla

Candice Louisa Daquin is a licensed trauma psychotherapist specializing in adult survivors of abuse, as well as senior editor with Indie Blu(e) Publishing. Works include coeditorship of anthologies We Will Not Be Silenced (#metoo), SMITTEN (Lesbian poetry), and The Kali Project (female Indian poets).

Olena O'Lear (the pen name of Olena Brosalina) is a Ukrainian poet, translator, literary critic, and editor, PhD born in Kyiv. She is the author of two poetry collections and a number of translations of works by J. R. R. Tolkien and other authors. She works as a translator at Astrolabe Publishing.


Twitter Username: OlenaOLear

Website: http://rivnodennya.in.ua/olir/

Volodymyr Tymchuk is a Ukrainian writer and lieutenant colonel of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, participating in the Russian-Ukrainian war. He has published over a dozen poetry collections and anthologies and has been awarded the Bohdan Khmelnytskyi Prize & the Markiyan Shashkevych Regional Prize.


Twitter Username: @slovodiem

Virtual

V112.

VIRTUAL: Queer & Trans Asians Writing as Rebellion by Asian American Writers' Workshop

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The Asian and Arab community has been fraught with public and political violence directly enacted by colonization, displacement, and policing. What does it mean to uplift Queer Asian writers in a time of upheaval and resistance? What does it mean to rejoice queerness in the cusp of difficulties? How do we reframe narratives to compose transformation for our communities? Writers will share nuanced approaches to writing as they present complex, multiability, queer, and anticolonial writing.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

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Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet, writer, and A+ napper. K. has featured in the New York Times, PBS News Hour, The Rumpus, VIDA Review, and RaceForward. They are a MacDowell and Lambda Literary Fellow. Their book More Than Organs received a 2021 Stonewall Honor Award and is a 2021 Lambda Literary Award Finalist.


Twitter Username: brownroundboi

Kirin is a writer from Albuquerque, New Mexico living in Amsterdam. She was a PEN Emerging Voices Fellow, San Francisco Writers Grotto Fellow, AWP Writer to Writer mentee, and a Steinbeck Fellow. She received residencies from the Vermont Studio Center and Tin House. Find her work at kirinkhan.com


Twitter Username: kirinjaan

Zeyn Joukhadar is the author of The Map of Salt and Stars and Stonewall and Lambda Literary award-winning The Thirty Names of Night. His work appears in Salon, the Paris Review, Kink, This Arab Is Queer, and elsewhere. He is a Radius of Arab American Writers (RAWI) board member and Periplus mentor.


Twitter Username: ZeynJoukhadar

Website: ZeynJoukhadar.com

River 瑩瑩 Dandelion is an award-winning poet, transformative educator, and liberatory healing practitioner. A Tin House resident, Lambda Literary fellow, and Kundiman fellow, River is the author of remembering (y)our light. www.riverdandelion.com, IG: @rememberingourlight, & Twitter @rivertransforms.


Twitter Username: rivertransforms

Virtual

V113.

VIRTUAL: Shame, Fear, and Rage in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

(, , , , Cindy Juyoung Ok)

Much as Walter Benjamin defines the politicization of aesthetics (in which art becomes a tool for perpetuating institutional power), so too has emotion become politicized and commodified. We are accepted and praised when we function efficiently, and when we conform to known categories. But our less palatable emotional tenors are essential to understanding the complexities of human experience. What new political frameworks and social possibilities might arise if we embrace emotional outbursts?


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Rhoni Blankenhorn is a Filipina American writer and educator based in New York City and Tucson, Arizona. She has received support from The Center for Book Arts, Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and elsewhere. She is an MFA candidate in poetry and translation at Columbia University.


Twitter Username: rhonierika

Emily Simon is a writer and teacher living in New York City. She is the author of In Many Ways (2023) and the poetry chapbook Reign is Over (2021). Her poems have appeared in The Quarterless Review, Florida Review, Salt Hill, and Some Kind of Opening.

Born in Shanghai, Lynn Xu is the author of the full-length collection Debts & Lessons and And Those Ashen Heaps That Cantilevered Vase of Moonlight, and the chapbooks June and Tournesol. She teaches at Columbia University and coedits Canarium Books.

Asa Drake is a Filipina American poet and essayist in Central Florida. She has received support from the 92Y Discovery Poetry Contest, Tin House, and Idyllwild Arts. Her chapbook One Way to Listen was selected by Taneum Bambrick as the winner of Gold Line Press’s 2021 Poetry Chapbook Contest.


Twitter Username: AsaLDrake

Website: https://www.asaldrake.com/

Virtual

V114.

VIRTUAL: The Anti-Ableist Writing Workshop

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Many writing beliefs are ableist in nature, geared toward the neurotypical. Too often, writers who are neurodivergent, disabled, or suffer from chronic illnesses are marginalized. While this applies to all writing spaces, this panel will focus on the writing classroom. Our experienced panelists will share their own struggles with navigating the workshop as well as offering lesson plans, writing prompts, and/or teaching tips geared toward creating more inclusive writing workshops/classrooms.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Tyler Darnell is a writer and teacher in Houston, Texas. His work centers on disability, sexuality, and the way these experiences form and shape story.


Twitter Username: writerthoughts

Christie Collins (PhD, Cardiff University) teaches creative writing and literature at Mississippi State University. Her collection of poems titled The Art of Coming Undone is due out winter 2023 from the London-based publisher, The Black Springs Group.


Twitter Username: byccollins

Website: www.bychristiecollins.com

Julia Rose Lewis earned her doctorate in creative and critical writing from Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales. She taught creative writing at Kingston University London and Cardiff University. She is currently teaching at Indiana University Northwest. She is the author of six poetry collections.


Twitter Username: Lilysbarnmate

Said Shaiye is an Autistic & ADHD Somali writer and photographer. His debut book, Are You Borg Now?, was a 2022 Minnesota Book Award Finalist in Memoir. He has published work in Indiana Review, Texas Review, Obsidian, and elsewhere. He holds an MFA and teaches college writing in the the twin cities.

Virtual

V115.

VIRTUAL: Toward a Romani Women's Canon

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Romani women writers share their rich experiences and provide valuable insights into the representation and misrepresentation of "Gypsies" in literature and beyond. The panelists come from various backgrounds, exemplifying a diverse range of Romani subgroups, including queer, disabled, and non-neurotypical writers, all working across multiple genres, from literary to speculative and mainstream literature and poetry. Panelists will share engaging multimedia presentations and bibliographies.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Glenda Bailey-Mershon is the author of Weaver’s Knot: Poems (Finishing Line Press) and the novel Eve’s Garden (Twisted Road Publications), as well as editor of four Jane's Stories anthologies. Her poetry and essays appear in various anthologies and journals, including the Wagtail Roma anthology.


Twitter Username: gbaileymershon

Website: www.glendabaileymershon.com

Caren Gussoff Sumption is the award-winning author of six books—most recently, her postcolonial, deep space, far-future comedy of manners, So Quick Bright Things Come to Confusion—and more than a hundred short stories. She is autistic, Romany, Jewish, and can't carry a tune (she tries anyway, gods help us).


Twitter Username: spitkitten

V. M. Stone is an author, poet, podcaster, and playwright. She recently completed her first novel, THE DEVIL'S DAUGHTER (yet to be published) and hosts the podcast Sherlock Says. Her most recent play Dispatches from the End of the World is in development, to be staged in summer 2024.

Lynn Hutchinson Lee is a multidisciplinary artist and writer from Toronto Canada. An excerpt from her unpublished novel NIGHTSHADE was first-place winner of the 2022 Joy Kogawa Award for Fiction. Her writing has appeared in international literary publications. She is a member of chirikli collective.


Twitter Username: LHutchinsonLee

Virtual

V116.

VIRTUAL: Unmasking Grief: Writers Confront the Illusion of Post-Pandemic Recovery

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Is the pandemic over? And if so, for whom? Is a 9/11’s worth of death a week in the U.S. simply the new normal, and is that because we undervalue most of the currently ill/dying: the elderly, the chronically ill and the disabled? Literature is a way to process our grief, isolation, fear, anger, and the tremendous cost of what happened. We’ll read work about what and whom we lost and what we felt. We will also urge the literary world to maintain the disability-inclusive aspects of virtual events.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Jan Steckel's debut fiction collection Ghosts and Oceans came out in 2023. Like Flesh Covers Bone won 2019 Rainbow Awards for LGBT Poetry and Best Bisexual Book. The Horizontal Poet won a 2012 Lambda Literary Award. Her chapbooks Mixing Tracks and The Underwater Hospital also won awards.


Twitter Username: horizontalpoet

Website: http://jansteckel.com

Terry Tierney is the author of the irreverent Vietnam-era road novel, Lucky Ride, a poetry collection, The Poet’s Garage, and the upcoming rust belt romance, The Bridge on Beer River. He earned his BA and MA at SUNY Binghamton and a PhD at Emory before surviving several Silicon Valley startups.


Twitter Username: TerryTierney14

Website: http://terrytierney.com

Amaranthia Sepia is a Black, invisibly-disabled creative activist. She is the cofounder of a project with her mother, Claire Jones, called Sista Creatives Rising. Within this project she develops "Art & Mind," a virtual event showcasing underrepresented women & genders.

Claire Jones is a DV and cancer survivor, Buddhist, Frances Perkins Scholar, and Mount Holyoke graduate. Goalcast, BestSelf Media, YOPP published her works. In 2020 she spoke virtually to DV activists at YWCA Central Massachusetts. On August 10, 2023 Jones gave a virtual presentation for Boston Public Library. She's the cofounder of Sista Creative.

Suchandrima Banerjee recently completed her debut novel about a woman who travels across the globe to confront a past trauma at the onset of the pandemic outbreak. Her poetry has appeared/will appear in the San Pedro River Review and the Redwood Anthology. She is a biomedical engineer by profession.


Twitter Username: Suchadream

Virtual

V117.

VIRTUAL: Weaving Comics Pedagogy Into a Multi-level Creative Writing Program

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Comics classes form an integral part of the UBC School of Creative Writing's multi-genre approach, from large undergraduate lectures to small graduate seminars. Comics instructors from the school will share their scaffolded approach to pedagogy within the undergraduate and graduate programs and explore how comics classes connect to other genres taught within the school. The students on the panel will discuss the impact of the school's comics pedagogy on their comics and writing practice.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Sarah Leavitt is the author of three book-length comics: Tangles: A Story About Alzheimer’s, My Mother, and Me (in production as a feature animation); Agnes, Murderess; and Something, Not Nothing (forthcoming fall 2024). She has taught comics classes since 2012 at the UBC School of Creative Writing.

Taylor Brown-Evans is a writer, illustrator, and cartoonist living in Vancouver. His work has appeared in Geist, Matrix, Poetry Is Dead, The Feathertale Review, and Ricepaper Magazine. His 2017 project Songs for a Lost Pod is a comicbook collaboration with musician Leah Abrahamson about a pod of orca.

Eve Salomons is a recent graduate of the UBC creative writing program. They live and make comics in Vancouver, British Columbia, mostly about their own life and sometimes about other people’s.

Emily Chou is a writer-cartoonist from the ancestral and unceded lands of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, and səlilwətaɬ Nations. She has lived in the United Kingdom, Japan, and Italy and recently graduated with an MFA in creative writing from UBC. Her work has appeared in several journals and anthologies.


Twitter Username: _rhymeswithwow

Virtual

V118.

VIRTUAL: When Essays Become Books: the Ins and Outs of Creating Collections

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Essays are a popular genre, and sometimes essayists consider turning their work into a collection. The thought of taking essays and forming a book can feel daunting and perhaps intimidating. What order and structure? Which essays belong? Do I have enough essays for a book? What about previously-published work? Is there pressure to categorize essay collections as memoir? In this session, panelists will discuss the ins and outs of creating essay collections—from initial idea to published work.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Patrice Gopo writes stories steeped in themes of place, belonging, and home. She is the author of two essay collections, Autumn Song and All the Colors We Will See. Her debut picture book, All the Places We Call Home, is based on one of her essays. Please visit patricegopo.com to learn more.


Twitter Username: patricegopo

Website: https://www.patricegopo.com/

Grace Talusan's first book, The Body Papers, won the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing and the Massachusetts Book Award in Nonfiction. She teaches in the nonfiction writing program at Brown University.


Twitter Username: gracet09

Theresa Okokon is a Wisconsinite living in New England. She's is a writer, a storyteller, teacher, and the cohost of Stories From the Stage. Theresa's forthcoming memoir in essays about memory, family stories, and the death of her father is called The Okokon Family Orchestra.

Leslie Contreras Schwartz is a multigenre writer, a 2021 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow, and the 2019–2021 Houston Poet Laureate. She is the winner of the 2022 C&R Press Nonfiction Prize for From the Womb of Sky and Earth, a lyrical memoir.


Twitter Username: @lesliecontrerasschwartz

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. She is the author of the collection Be with Me Always and the editor of the lyric essay anthology A Harp in the Stars. She is the founding editor of the literary magazine After the Art and teaches in the MFA programs at Goucher and West Virginia Wesleyan.


Twitter Username: randonnoble

Website: www.randonbillingsnoble.com

Virtual

V119.

VIRTUAL: Writing a Play or Musical on a Real Person

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Forums of entertainment are often times wonderful ways to learn about the fascinating lives of real people all throughout history. In the event that you are creating a play or musical based on the life of a real person, have you ever wondered how to get permission before proceeding? Join the Dramatists Guild exploring business and craft, such as basic concepts of Right to Publicity, Right to Privacy, and relationship between the subject and their public image in commercial use.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Jessica (she/her) serves as the director of business affairs for the Dramatists Guild. In addition, Jessica has her own solo law practice, The Lit Esquire PLLC, aimed at educating artists of all disciplines about their legal rights to empower them to take control of their careers.

Doug Wright won a Pulitzer and a Tony Award for his play I Am My Own Wife. Broadway musicals include War Paint, Hands on a Hardbody, The Little Mermaid, and Grey Gardens. Films include Quills, an adaptation of his Obie-winning play. Television credits include Tony Bennett's 80th Birthday Special.

Dolores Díaz is a Chicago-based Chicana playwright from the US-Mexico divide that has produced work with various companies including Goodman Theatre, TimeLine Theater, and Stage Left Theatre. She is a Dramatist Guild representative of the Chicago region and a resident artist at Chicago Dramatists.

Robert Maesaka is a St. Louis-based playwright whose work has been performed at Mustard Seed Theatre (White to Gray), the University of South Carolina-Upstate (White to Gray), St. Louis Shakespeare’s Confluence New Play Festival (Tolstoy’s Resurrection), and the Every 28 Hour Play Festival.

Roger Q. Mason (they/them) was recently touted by the Brooklyn Rail as "quickly becoming one of the most significant playwrights of the decade." Their playwriting has been seen on Broadway (Circle in the Square Reading Series), off-Broadway, off-off-Broadway, and regionally. Insta: @rogerq.mason


Twitter Username: RogerQMason

Virtual

V120.

VIRTUAL: Writing Beyond Bone: Black and Brown Disabled Poetics

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This event convenes sick and disabled poetics to center celebration, climate, and critical social justice in writing that pushes against devastation in our daily lives. Here, disabled Black and of color poets discuss nuanced and intricate connections to disability and their writing practice. In this event, we will showcase a vast and complex sick and disabled poetics that center dynamic approaches to collective creativity. This reading and dialogue aims to expand poetry amidst a U.S. landscape.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

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Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet, writer, and A+ napper. K. has featured in the New York TimesPBS News HourThe RumpusVIDA Review, and RaceForward. They are a MacDowell and Lambda Literary Fellow. Their book More Than Organs received a 2021 Stonewall Honor Award and is a 2021 Lambda Literary Award Finalist.


Twitter Username: brownroundboi

Saleem Hue Penny (him/friend) is a Black disabled “rural hip-hop blues'' poet who punctuates his work with drum loops, field sounds, gouache, and birch bark. He works at Zoeglossia, edits at Bellevue Literary Review, performs with O | Sessions Black Listening cohort and is a proud Cave Canem fellow.


Twitter Username: huedotart

Website: https://hueart.org

Walela Nehanda is a Black, queer, disabled, nonbinary cultural worker. Their debut title with Penguin Teen, Bless the Blood, is a cancer memoir in poetic form on navigating medical racism, ableism, transphobia, classism, and abuse. It will be released in February 2024.

Joselia Rebekah Hughes is a Best of Net nominated poet, access worker, and artist. She is a poetry editor at Apogee Journal. Her work has been featured in the Massachusetts Review, Split This Rock: The Quarry, The Whitney Museum, Institute of Contemporary Art: VCU, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: joselia_pdf

Virtual

V121.

VIRTUAL: Writing Queer Stories for the Stage

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Theatre has long been a gathering place where folks share stories in the hopes of seeing their own narratives, hopes, and dreams reflected back to them. For those who live in parts of the country becoming increasingly more hostile toward queer lives, it can also become a safe haven and beacon of hope for community and identity. Join the Dramatists Guild in conversation with a group of writers doing the work to share stories celebrating and uplifting the queer experience.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Jordan Stovall/Wanda Whatever (they/them) is a playwright, arts administrator, queer events producer, and drag artist. They presently serve as the director of outreach and institutional partnerships for the Dramatists Guild, where they have worked since 2016. www.jordanstovall.com

Doug Wright won a Pulitzer and a Tony Award for his play I Am My Own Wife. Broadway musicals include War Paint, Hands on a Hardbody, The Little Mermaid, and Grey Gardens. Films include Quills, an adaptation of his Obie-winning play. Television credits include Tony Bennett's 80th Birthday Special.

Roger Q. Mason (they/them) was recently touted by the Brooklyn Rail as "quickly becoming one of the most significant playwrights of the decade." Their playwriting has been seen on Broadway (Circle in the Square Reading Series), off-Broadway, off-off-Broadway, and regionally. Insta: @rogerq.mason


Twitter Username: RogerQMason

Tabby Lamb is a nonbinary writer. Tabby won a Scotsman Fringe First Award at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2022 for her joyful, queer rom-com, Happy Meal (Roots Touring), which played at the Traverse Theatre before completing a UK and Australia Tour.


Twitter Username: thetabbylamb

Virtual

V122.

VIRTUAL: Writing the Resonant Recent Past

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Writers set their novels in the recent past (late twentieth, early twenty-first centuries) for many reasons—to understand social change, to give voice to long-ignored voices, even to enhance plotting (no cell phones!). But what makes such novels resonate with the present? How can focusing on the recent past give us a clearer lens on our current era? And what considerations should writers keep in mind when writing about a time period that’s familiar, but also irrevocably different?


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Sarah McCraw Crow is the author of the novel The Wrong Kind of Woman. Her writing has appeared in LitHub, Good Housekeeping, BookPage, Calyx, Crab Orchard Review, Stanford Alumni Magazine, Literary Mama, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts and lives in New Hampshire.


Twitter Username: @sarahmcrow

Website: https://sarahmccrawcrow.com

Jennifer Savran Kelly's (she//they) debut novel Endpapers was published by Algonquin in 2023. Her short fiction has appeared in Potomac Review, Black Warrior Review, Green Mountains Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: savranly

Ava Homa is the award-winning author of the novel Daughters of Smoke and Fire, which was selected for Roxane Gay's book club and won the 2020 Silver Nautilus Award. Ava holds a Master's degree in creative writing from the University of Windsor in Canada. Her words have appeared in BBC and the Guardian.


Twitter Username: AvaHoma

Website: http://www.avahoma.com/

Daisy Alpert Florin is the author of My Last Innocent Year, which was a New York Times Editors’ Choice, a Washington Post Staff Pick and an Indie Next pick. She received the 2016 Kathryn Gurfein Writing Fellowship at Sarah Lawrence and was a 2019–20 fellow in the BookEnds novel revision fellowship.


Twitter Username: daisy_florin

Karen Dukess is the author of the novel The Last Book Party, which was a Barnes and Noble Discover New Writers and IndieNext pick. She is the host of the Castle Hill Author Talks, a series of virtual and in-person interviews, and teaches writing in Cape Cod and New York.


Twitter Username: karendukess

Virtual

V123.

VIRTUAL: Writing, Translating, and Publishing Queer Ukrainian Literature

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Russia's war against Ukraine brought a realization that the global literary community had limited knowledge of Ukrainian literature past and present, and also a keen interest to learn more. Obscured by centuries of imperial discrimination and entrenched prejudicial stereotypes, Ukrainian literary voices are finally beginning to be heard. This roundtable spotlights Ukrainian queer literary voices and the challenges of bringing Ukrainian queer texts to English-language audiences.


This virtual event was prerecorded. It will be available to watch on-demand online starting on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 through Thursday, March 7, 2024.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Oleh Kotsyuba is the manager of publications at Harvard University's Ukrainian Research Institute where he directs the program of publishing scholarly monographs, translations of literary works and documents, and of the peer-reviewed journal, Harvard Ukrainian Studies.


Twitter Username: Oleh_Kotsyuba

Website: https://scholar.harvard.edu/kotsyuba/home

Alex Averbuch is a poet, translator, and scholar. He is the author of three books of poetry. His publications have appeared in the Manhattan Review, Copper Nickel, Plume, Birmingham Poetry Review, and Words Without Borders. His book The Jewish King was a finalist for the Shevchenko National Prize.

Vitaly Chernetsky is a professor of Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Kansas. His translations from the Ukrainian include two novels and a poetry collection by Yuri Andrukhovych, a novel by Sophia Andrukhovych, and two children's books by Romana Romanyshyn and Andriy Lesiv.


Twitter Username: globalrhizome

Ivan Kozlenko is a Ukrainian film scholar, writer, culture manager, and a former director of Ukraine's national film archive, Dovzhenko Center. His novel, Tangier, was shortlisted for the national, most prestigious BBC Book of The Year Award in 2017.

Iryna Shuvalova is a Norway-based Ukrainian poet, scholar, and translator. She authored five award-winning books of poetry and coedited Ukraine's first anthology of queer writing. Her work has been translated into twenty-three languages. She holds a PhD in Slavonic studies from the University of Cambridge.

12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Registration, Exhibit Hall E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

W124.

Conference Registration

Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3. Please consult the bookfair map in the AWP mobile app for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

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AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

W125.

AWP Bookfair Setup

The exhibit hall at the Kansas City Convention Center will be open for bookfair setup. For safety and security reasons, only those holding a Bookfair Setup Access (BSA) registration, or those accompanied by an individual wearing a BSA registration, will be permitted inside the bookfair during setup hours. Bookfair exhibitors are welcome to pick up their registration materials in AWP’s registration area in Exhibit Hall E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3.

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2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Room 2214, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

W126.

Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography

Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a fifth year at AWP, author photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on-site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high resolution for $125. (Conference discount: in Adrianne's Boston studio, hour-long portrait sessions with one image included are priced at $850.) Additional images: $75/ea. Fine processing (spot adjustments beyond usual file preparation): $175/file. Rush processing: $100/file. Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required: https://am-photography.ticketleap.com/awp24/dates

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3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Registration, Exhibit Hall E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

W127.

Accessibility Tour

Join AWP conference staff for a tour of the Kansas City Convention Center. This tour will cover main event areas of the Kansas City Convention Center and will be an opportunity to ask questions about conference accessibility. This tour is great for someone who would like to get a sense for the distances between meeting rooms and to plan easiest routes. If you are unable to make it to this 3:00 p.m. tour, please email conference@awpwriter.org to arrange for a different time.

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5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Room 2215B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

W128.

CLMP Membership Meeting

This event is for all independent literary magazine and small press publishers: seasoned professionals, those just starting out, and all in between. Learn what we're planning for the year and share your thoughts on how we can best ensure that our community thrives. Even if you're not yet a member of CLMP, but would like to find out more, please feel welcome to join us.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Kansas City Public Library, 14 W 10th St, Kansas City, MO 64105

W129.

AWP Literary Awards & Poetry as Reciprocity: Indigenous Nations Poets Celebrate Language Back

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Join AWP in celebrating the contributions of those honored through its various award programs: the Intro Journals Project, the National Program Directors’ Prize, the Small Press Publisher Award, and the George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature.


Following the presentation of awards, join Indigenous Nations Poets Heid E. Erdrich (Ojibwe), Jake Skeets (Diné), and Kimberly Blaeser (Anishinaabe), along with moderator Elise Paschen (Osage), for a conversation and reading in which participants share how their languages inform a poetics of reciprocity both on the page and in their roles as teachers, mentors, leaders, and activists.


AWP is partnering with the Kansas City Public Library for this special event. RSVP to the event using this link: https://kclibrary.org/events/poetry-reciprocity-indigenous-nations-poets-celebrate-language-back

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Kimberly Blaeser, founding director of Indigenous Nations Poets and former Wisconsin Poet Laureate, holds the Mackey Chair in Creative Writing at Beloit College. Anishinaabe from White Earth Nation and professor emerita at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, she also teaches at the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her most recent book is Ancient Light.
Twitter Username: kmblaeser
Heid E. Erdrich is a poet, writer, editor, and winner of a National Poetry Series award and the 2022 Bobbitt Prize from the Library of Congress for her most recent book, Little Big Bully. She is an independent scholar and curator of Native American art. Erdrich is Ojibwe, enrolled at Turtle Mountain.
Twitter Username: HeidErdrich

Website: heiderdrich.com
Jake Skeets is the author of Eyes Bottle Dark with a Mouthful of Flowers, winner of a National Poetry Series award, the American Book Award, the Whiting Award, and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. He is from the Navajo Nation.
Twitter Username: JakeSkeets

Website: jakeskeets.com
Elise Paschen (Osage) is the author of four books of poetry, most recently The Nightlife. Her poems have appeared in A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry and Poetry, among others. She is the editor or coeditor of numerous anthologies, including Poetry Speaks and The Eloquent Poem.
Twitter Username: ElisePaschen
Thursday, February 8, 2024

7:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.

Room 2208, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T100.

Sober AWP

Daily 12-Step Meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

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8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Room 2214, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T101.

Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography

Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a fifth year at AWP, author photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on-site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high resolution for $125. (Conference discount: in Adrianne's Boston studio, hour-long portrait sessions with one image included are priced at $850.) Additional images: $75/ea. Fine processing (spot adjustments beyond usual file preparation): $175/file. Rush processing: $100/file. Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required: https://am-photography.ticketleap.com/awp24/dates

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8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

2200 Lobby, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T102.

Coat Check

Coat check is available in Lobby 2200 on Level 2 of the Kansas City Convention Center. It is $5.00 per item checked. ATMs can be found in Lobby 2200, next to Room 2207, and in the Conference Center, across the hall from Room 2501A.

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Registration, Exhibit Hall E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T103.

Conference Registration

Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3. Please consult the bookfair map in the AWP mobile app for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

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Room 2201 & 2202, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T104.

Dickinson Quiet Space

A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." -Emily Dickinson

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Room 2525A, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T105.

Low-light Space

A darkened, quiet, and more private space for attendees to gather their thoughts, reset, or take a break from the lighting of the convention center.

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Room 2213, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T106.

Nursing Lounge

The nursing lounge is located in Room 2213 on the Street Level of the Kansas City Convention Center, and is available for any nursing parent to use.

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9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T107.

AWP Bookfair

With more than 500 literary exhibitors, the AWP Bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the bookfair map in the AWP mobile app for location details.

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AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T108.

Bookfair Concessions, Bar, and Lounge

Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Kansas City Convention Center. Debit cards, credit cards, and tap-to-pay are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the AWP mobile app for location details.

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Booth 1531, AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T109.

AWP Membership Booth

Stop by the AWP Membership Booth to meet with AWP board members during bookfair hours at the conference! Join us for coffee every day from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and chat with senior publications editor James Tate Hill to learn more about the Writer’s Chronicle and the AWP Award Series. Also from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., you can meet with a member of the AWP membership team to discuss the many year-round benefits of AWP membership, such as the Writer to Writer Mentorship Program, the Intro Journals Project, and the AWP Prize for Undergrad Lit Mags.

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AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T110.

The Wick Poetry Center’s Traveling Stanzas Makerspace

In celebration of the Wick Poetry Center’s fortieth anniversary year, the Traveling Stanzas Makerspace offers conference attendees an opportunity to creatively engage with themes of health and healing, social and racial justice, nature and environment, and peace and conflict. This interactive exhibit invites participants to share their voice using a suite of digital expressive writing tools, such as Emerge (an erasure poetry app), Thread (community-generated poems), and the Listening Wall (thematically-driven touch-screen poetry displays). Visitors will be able to choose a theme, follow a prompt, then print and share their responses. More information can be found at http://travelingstanzas.com.

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9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Room 2203, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T111.

Yoga for Writers

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Join Manisha Sharma, a certified yoga practitioner, for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities. The hour-long practice will focus on stretches, asanas, physical postures, breathing, relaxation, and meditation. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

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Manisha Sharma teaches at Iowa State University. Her poetry and fiction has been lauded by Lit Hub, Commonwealth Short Story contest, Amethyst Review, Cream City, Iron Horse, Arts & Letters, ASF, and more. She is also an internationally-certified yoga teacher.


Twitter Username: _sharmamanisha

Website: www.manisha-sharma.com

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

Room 2101, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T112.

A Magic of Pauses: Poetry Editors on Collaborative Writing and Editing Practices

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Poet and editor Marianne Moore declared poetry a magic of pauses. Five poetry editors share how their varied editorial roles relate to their practices of poetry and cultural work, where their writing experience contributes to editing poems, and what conceptions of community have been born from working on journals and at presses, from established series to emerging spaces. The various pauses and magics that editing brings to writing is considered in terms of labor, time, and collectivism.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Srikanth Reddy's most recent book of poetry is Underworld Lit. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA, Creative Capital, and the Guggenheim Foundation, he is currently a professor of English at the University of Chicago.

Anthony Cody is the author of Borderland Apocrypha (Omnidawn, 2020) and The Rendering (Omnidawn, 2023). He has won a Whiting Award and American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award. He is copublisher of Noemi Press and teaches at Randolph College's Low Residency MFA.


Twitter Username: anthony_cody

Website: www.anthonycody.com

Cindy Juyoung Ok's debut collection Ward Toward won the 2023 Yale Younger Poets Prize. A Kenyon Review Fellow, poetry editor at Guernica, and host of the Poetry Magazine Podcast, she teaches creative writing at Kenyon College.

Sarah Ghazal Ali is a Pakistani poet and editor. A Stadler Fellow and winner of the Sewanee Review Poetry Prize, her forthcoming debut collection Theophanies was the Editors' Choice for the 2022 Alice James Award. She is the poetry editor for West Branch and lives in the Bay Area, California.


Twitter Username: caesarah_

Bernardo Wade, a writer from New Orleans is an MFA Candidate at IU-Bloomington. He currently serves as the EIC of Indiana Review, and has received support from Tin House, Community of Writers, Frost Place, and the Watering Hole. He moonlights as an equity and justice advocate.


Twitter Username: bernardo_wade

Room 2102A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T113.

Queering Kansas: LGBTQ+ Writers in the Heartland

(, , , , Allison Blevins)

Five Kansas LGBTQ writers of memoir and poetry discuss how Kansas influences their writing in both representation and resistance. How do LGBTQ+ poets and writers draw on the landscape of Kansas, from the Tallgrass Prairie to the Flint Hills? How is memoir and poetry shaped by writing as survival? How has prose and poetry played a role in coming out? How does community play a role in subject matter and support in LGBTQ+ writing? This panel will be a lively conversation about Kansas queer writing.

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Laura Lee Washburn, director of creative writing at PittState Kansas, author of The Book of Stolen Images, This Good Warm Place, Watching the Contortionists, is EIC of The Coop: Poetry Co-Op. Harbor Review's Washburn Prize is named in honor of her dedication to her students throughout their writing careers.

Jericho Hockett is a psychologist-poet at Washburn University (KS). She interdisciplinarily explores strange beliefs, trauma, and embodied social group membership. Her chapbook Rituals for Dissolution (Port Yonder Press) and full-length poetry book In the Bodies (Unsolicited Press) are forthcoming.

Fable J. Briggs (they/he/she) is a poet and activist from Kansas, writing often about mental illness, neurodiversity, queer and trans experiences, grief, and trauma survival. They released his first book of poems In Orbit: and Other Poems in 2021.

Dennis Etzel, Jr. (he/they) is a neuroqueer writer who lives in Topeka, Kansas and teaches at Washburn University. His poetry books include The Sum of Two Mothers, My Secret Wars of 1984, and This Removed Utopia. They have won awards for diversity and inclusion, and lead Kansas writing workshops.


Twitter Username: poemslyrical

Room 2102B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T114.

Stop Being So Dramatic!

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There are some stories so unbelievable, so horrible, or merely awful, but they must be told, for survival. How do we write about the overwhelming without overwhelming the reader? We are five memoirists and poets who write about things others would probably rather not hear about, but we've mastered drama (and dramatic technique), the understatement, humor, the fable, the archetype, third-degree emotion. We will share these techniques that help us develop an audience that asks to hear more.

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Marcela Sulak's fifth collection, The Fault, is a forthcoming novella-in-verse; she's coedited Family Resemblance, a hybrid anthology and was a National Jewish Book Award finalist, an NEA fellow, and a PEN Translation Award nominee. She edits The Ilanot Review and directs a creative writing program.

Jeannine's memoir, The Part That Burns, was a Kirkus Best 100 Indie Book, received starred reviews from PW and Kirkus, and was a finalist for the Next Generation Indie Book Award. She teaches writing at the University of Minnesota, the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop, Catapult, and Elephant Rock.


Twitter Username: _elephantrock

Website: jeannineouellette.com

Esteban Rodríguez, author of six poetry collections, most recently Ordinary Bodies (word west press 2022), and the essay collection Before the Earth Devours Us (Split/Lip Press 2021). He currently lives in south Texas.


Twitter Username: estebanjrod11

Website: https://www.estebanrodriguezpoetry.com/

Sabrina Orah Mark is the author of Wild Milk, a collection of fiction, as well as two collections of poetry, The Babies and Tsim Tsum. Happily, which began as a monthly column on fairytales and motherhood in the Paris Review, is now out from Random House.

Debora Kuan is the author of three poetry collections: XING, Lunch Portraits, and Women on the Moon. Her work has appeared in Poetry, Kenyon Review, New Republic, Iowa Review, and elsewhere. She has received residences at Yaddo, Macdowell, and the Santa Fe Art Institute.

Room 2103A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T115.

Re-Membering Past and Present: The Practice of Documentary Poetry

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Documentary, or “research-based,” poetry provides writers with opportunities to present contemporary or historical complexities through wedded structure and content. The panelists include leading theorists and practitioners who will reflect on seminal texts within documentary poetry and examine the subgenre’s benefits, including how chosen forms can further a text’s message, demonstrate an artistic version of a truth commission, decenter hegemonic or colonial narratives, and chronicle the now.

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Tara Ballard is the author of House of the Night Watch. A PhD student in English at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, Tara is an assistant poetry editor for Prairie Schooner and affiliate editor for Alaska Quarterly Review.

Philip Metres is the author and translator of a number of books, including Shrapnel Maps, The Sound of Listening, Sand Opera, Pictures at an Exhibition, and To See the Earth. His work has garnered Guggenheim and Lannan fellowships, two NEAs, three Arab American book awards, and the Hunt Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

Joseph Harrington is the author of Of Some Sky; Goodnight Whoever’s Listening; Things Come On (an amneoir); and the critical work Poetry and the Public. For several years he has written a real-time online verse-chronicle of the climate crisis, The Poem of Our Climate.

Michael Leong's most recent books are Words on Edge (Black Square Editions, 2018) and Contested Records: The Turn to Documents in Contemporary North American Poetry (University of Iowa Press, 2020). He is Robert P Hubbard Assistant Professor of Poetry at Kenyon College.

Paisley Rekdal is the author, most recently, of West: A Translation, Appropriate: A Provocation, and Nightingale. A Guggenheim fellow and Utah's former Poet Laureate, she teaches at the University of Utah, where she edits the web archive Mapping Literary Utah and directs the American West Center.


Twitter Username: paisleyrekdal

Room 2103B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T116.

Social Justice on the Page: How Writing and Activism Feed Each Other

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As Kansas City and other locales organize fiercely against incessant attacks, this panel of regionally diverse, mostly LGBTQI/BIPOC authors share how activism and lived experiences inform their writing on topics such as incarceration, medical racism, intersex identity, mental health, immigration, queerness, and intergenerational trauma. We explore the craft of writing stories that contribute to deep, durable narrative change, restructuring the way people feel, think, and respond to the world.

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Jen Soriano (she/they) is a Filipinx writer who has received Artist Trust, Jack Jones, Hugo House, and Vermont Studio Center fellowships. Her debut essay collection Nervous, named one of the best nonfiction debuts of 2023 by Poets & Writers, is now available from Amistad/HarperCollins.


Twitter Username: lionswrite

Website: jensoriano.net

Tijanna O. Eaton is the author of the jail crime memoir BOLT Cutters and has been published in Honey LiteraryNoyo Review, and Panorama Journal.  She is board chair of Five Keys Schools and Programs and is the recipient of the Unicorn Authors Club inaugural Alumni Award.

Hans Lindahl is a writer/activist bringing intersex community perspectives to medical education. As the former communications director of interACT, Hans worked to pass a bill against infant genital surgeries. Hans's debut YA novel tackles intersex abuse and the variety of forms queer love can take.


Twitter Username: hihellohans

Karina Muñiz-Pagán is a queer Xicana memoir and fiction writer. She cofounded the writers' collective, Las Malcriadas, to center Latina immigrant storytelling. She is a community-based creative writing coach and teacher, and the strategic partnerships director for the Unicorn Authors Club.


Twitter Username: KarinaM_P

Website: https://karinamp.contently.com/

Raychelle Heath is the director of curriculum and coaching for the Unicorn Authors Club. She is also a poet and storyteller working to tell the multifaceted stories of black women. Her podcast Black Women in Wellness spotlights black wellness women and discusses health and wellness disparities.

Room 2103C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T117.

DIY Your Lit Mag: How to Build a Literary Magazine From the Ground Up

(, , , Tommy Dean)

You have an idea for a lit mag…great! Now what? Four founding editors share how they launched a literary magazine outside of academia. How do you fund it? How do you staff it? How do you sustain it over time? The editors of DIAGRAM, Honey Literary, In Short, and Lucky Jefferson will provide practical tips and advice for those looking to do-it-themselves.

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An emerging Black writer, and art collector, NaBeela Washington holds a Master's in creative writing and English from Southern New Hampshire University and Bachelor's in visual advertising from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is the founder of Lucky Jefferson.


Twitter Username: _simplybee

Steph Liberatore is the founding editor of In Short, a new journal of flash nonfiction (fall 2023), and a professor at George Mason University. Her essays have appeared in River Teeth, Sweet: A Literary Confection, Cream City Review, Inside Higher Ed, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: stephliberatore

Dorothy Chan is the author of five poetry books, including Return of the Chinese Femme. They are an associate professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the cofounder and editor in chief of Honey Literary Inc., a 501(c)(3) organization.


Twitter Username: dorothykchan

Room 2104A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T118.

Fictionalizing Marginalized Histories: India, Jamaica, Japan, USA

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Four fiction writers of color discuss how they researched and wrote multivoiced, multigenerational books drawing from both archival records and family lore, as well as the politics surrounding it. How do the novel and short story form lend themselves to the retelling of marginalized histories? Where and why do these writers blur the line between “truth” and fiction? How do they grapple with representing presumed stereotypes (e.g., “bad mothers,” slavery, and Black trauma)?

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Asako Serizawa is the author of Inheritors, which won the PEN/Open Book Award and The Story Prize Spotlight Award. She has received two O. Henry Prizes, a Pushcart Prize, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, and fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, NEA, and MacDowell.


Twitter Username: a_serizawa

Website: www.asakoserizawa.com

Kim Coleman Foote is the author of Coleman Hill, a novel inspired by her family's Great Migration experience. She has received writing fellowships from the NEA, Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Center for Fiction, and NYFA, and she holds an MFA in creative writing from Chicago State University.


Twitter Username: KimColemanFoote

Website: www.kimfoote.com

Maisy Card is the author of the novel These Ghosts are Family, which won an American Book Award, the 2021 OCM Bocas Prize in fiction, and was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Novel, The Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, and the LA Times Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction.


Twitter Username: dracm

Shilpi Suneja was born in India. She is the author of the novel House of Caravans. Her writing has been supported by a National Endowment for the Arts literature fellowship, a Massachusetts Cultural Council fellowship, and a Grub Street Novel Incubator scholarship.


Twitter Username: shilpits

Room 2104B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T119.

Sound & Color: Poets and Visual Artists in Exquisite Exchange

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Over the course of ten days, five pairs of poets and visual artists from varied backgrounds exchanged work in the style of a cross-disciplinary exquisite corpse. The resulting collaborations are premiered in this panel, with reflections on the process by poets (in person) and artists (by statement or video) exploring the potential of ekphrastic exchange to nurture relationships, urge work in new directions, and expand our understanding of sound, color, and other tools of our respective crafts.

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Emily Van Kley is the author of The Cold and the Rust and Arrhythmia. Her work has been awarded the Iowa Review Award, Florida Review Editor's Prize, the Loraine Williams Prize for Poetry, and the Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize.

Maya Jewell Zeller is the author, most recently, of out takes/ glove box, chosen by Eduardo Corral as winner of the New American Poetry Prize, and Alchemy for Cells & Other Beasts (an interdisciplinary collaboration); she is associate professor at Central Washington University and affiliate faculty for Western Colorado University.


Twitter Username: MayaJZeller

Website: mayajewellzeller.com

Claudia Castro Luna is an Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow (2019), Washington State Poet Laureate (2018–2021), and Seattle's first Civic Poet (2015–2017) She is the author of Cipota Under the Moon, Killing Marías, One River, A Thousand Voices, and the chapbook This City.


Twitter Username: ClaudiaC_L

Sun Yung Shin is the author of four poetry collections including The Wet Hex; editor of three anthologies: What We Hunger For: Refugee & Immigrant Stories about Food & Family; A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota; and Outsiders Within: Writing on Transracial Adoption, and author of two picture books.


Twitter Username: sunyungshin

Website: www.sunyungshin.com

Vi Khi Nao is the author of Swimming With Dead Stars, A Bell Curve Is A Pregnant Straight Line, and the play Waiting for God. She was the winner of 2014 Nightboat Poetry Prize and the 2016 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Contest for A Brief Alphabet of Torture, a collection of short stories.


Twitter Username: vikhinao

Room 2105, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T120.

Creating Literary Community for All: Literary Centers and Reaching the Underserved

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Literary centers create and nurture vibrant and diverse literary communities across the United States, bringing together both writers and readers inside and outside academia. In this interactive panel, directors from established and emerging literary centers in urban and rural areas will explore the programs, readings, classes, workshops, events, outreach, and networking which help them to enrich both established writers and those without traditional access to literary arts programming and education.

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Shawn Girvan received his MFA in creative writing from Goddard College. His work has appeared in The Pitkin Review, Wraparound South, and West Texas Literary Review. Shawn currently teaches and works at the Muse Writers Center in Norfolk, Virginia and is finishing his first memoir.

Dariel Suarez is the Cuban-born author of the novel The Playwright's House and the story collection A Kind of Solitude, winner of the International Latino Book Award. He is education director at GrubStreet and resides in the Boston area.


Twitter Username: https://twitter.com/Darie

Karen Schubert, founding director of Lit Youngstown in 2015, is a NEOMFA graduate and author of The Compost Reader and five poetry chapbooks. She has taught in numerous academic and community settings. Her awards include residencies at Headlands Center for the Arts and Vermont Studio Center.


Twitter Username: karen_jedemeure

Philip Memmer is the author of six books of poems, most recently Cairns. He founded and directs the YMCA's Downtown Writers Center in Syracuse, New York, and is publisher at Tiger Bark Press. He also teaches creative writing part-time at Hamilton College.

Heather Newton's award-winning books include The Puppeteer’s Daughters, McMullen Circle, and Under the Mercy Trees. She is cofounder and program manager for the Flatiron Writers Room in Asheville, North Carolina, and teaches creative writing for Charlotte Lit and UNC Asheville's Great Smokies Writing Program.

Room 2208, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T121.

The Epigenetics of Joy: Writing Judaism Beyond Trauma

(, , , , Sean Singer)

Jewish literary events often focus on the Holocaust, generational trauma, or antisemitism—vital topics of discussion. Yet how much is lost if we reduce Jewish writing to writing from trauma. What about the joy, wisdom, traditions, and ubiquitous humor that can be found in Judaism and Jewish culture? With a combination of readings and conversation, our panelists, who embody a range of engagement and representation, will speak to the many visions possible when writing through a Jewish lens.

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Jessica Jacobs is the author of four books, including unalone, poems in conversation with the Book of Genesis (Four Way Books, March 2024). She is the founder and executive director of Yetzirah: A Hearth for Jewish Poetry, a nonprofit literary organization that supports Jewish poets & Jewish poetry.


Twitter Username: jessicalgjacobs

Erika Meitner is the author of six books of poems, including Useful Junk (BOA Editions in 2022), and Holy Moly Carry Me, which won the 2018 National Jewish Book award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award. She is an English professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Twitter Username: rikam99

Website: erikameitner.com

Yehoshua November is the author of two books of poetry, God's Optimism (an L.A. Times Book Prize finalist) and Two Worlds Exist (a National Jewish Book Award and Paterson Poetry Prize finalist). His work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Sun, VQR, and on NPR and Poetry Unbound.

Chanda Feldman is the author of Approaching the Fields: poems. She is a Cave Canem Fellow, and has received an NEA Fellowship for Poetry and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. She holds an MFA from Cornell University. Chanda teaches creative writing at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: chanda_feldman

Website: www.chandafeldman.com

Room 2209, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T122.

Navigating Stormy Waters: Telling Your Tales When They're Hard Stories to Tell

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How do you write your tale with compassion and love when it is a hard story to tell? These five writers will read from their works of memoir and autobiographical fiction touching on their own stories and their family stories of addiction, mental illness, trauma, neglect, and chaos. After, they will talk about how they were able to navigate the choppy waters of truth telling in their books, and how they use their voices for change and to highlight their own stories of redemption and forgiveness.

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Juanita E. Mantz (JEM) is a writer & lawyer with two books, Portrait of a Deputy Public Defender: or, how I became a punk rock lawyer (Bamboo Dart Press, 2021) andTales of an Inland Empire Girl (Los Nietos Press, 2022). She produces the Life of JEM podcast where she interviews writers on writing.


Twitter Username: lifeofjem

Laurie Markvart is a professional singer, musician, published author, songwriter, blogger, and poet. She thrives through life with generalized anxiety disorder and is a social media advocate for positive mental health awareness. She is also a recent breast cancer survivor. She lives in Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: lauriemarkvart

Toni Ann Johnson won the 2021 Flannery O'Connor Award for her linked story collection Light Skin Gone to Waste. She is a 2015 NAACP Image Award nominee for her debut novel Remedy For a Broken Angel and a two-time winner of the Humanitas Prize for her screenplays Ruby Bridges and Crown Heights.


Twitter Username: toniannjohnson

Nikia Chaney is a multigenre author of nonfiction, science fiction, and poetry. Her memoir Ladybug is available from Inlandia Institute (2022). Her forthcoming poetry book To Stir & is forthcoming from Word Works press.


Twitter Username: nikiachaney

Hannah Sward is the bestselling author of Strip: A Memoir which has received rave reviews from authors such as Melissa Broder and Nobel Prize winner J.M. Coetzee. She has appeared on NBC in honor of National Recovery Month, C-SPAN BookTV and many others discussing trauma, recovery, and healing.

Room 2215A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T123.

Sin Fronteras: Navigating, Representing, and Publishing Latine Authors

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As the United States continues to diversify, state legislatures advance bills that target people of color and the LGBTQ+ community. Publishing is one of the only industries that gives a truer representation of the richly complex Latine populations in the U.S. and their contribution to culture, history, and literary landscape. This panel of independent publishers from the U.S.-Mexico border discusses the importance of publishing Latine, including LGBTQ+ Latine authors in Texas and the U.S..

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Viktoria Valenzuela is a Macondista and Zoeglossia Fellow. Her writings keep keen focus on Chican@ m(other)ing as disruption and political action.


Twitter Username: viktoriavalenz

Cloud Delfina Cardona is a poet and artist from San Antonio, Texas. They are the cofounder of Infrarrealista Review, a nonprofit organization that promotes and publishes Texan writers. She is the author of What Remains, winner of the 2020 Host Publications Prize.


Twitter Username: cloudelfina

Carlos Fidel Espinoza is a writer and musician, thriving on the vibrant US-Mexico border. His poetry collection How to Lie to a Customs Agent won the Southwest Book Award, and his novel The Sacred History of Braulio Cantero was recently published by FlowerSong Press.

Maria Maloney is the author of two books of poetry, The Lost Letters of Mileva and Cracked Spaces. She is the founder and publisher of Mouthfeel Press and the outreach coordinator for the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Latino Día de los Muertos / Day of the Dead annual festival.


Twitter Username: maloney_ninfa

Edward Vidaurre is an award-winning poet and author of nine collections of poetry. He is the 2018–19 City of McAllen, Texas Poet Laureate, a 2022 inductee to the Texas Institute of Letters, and publisher of FlowerSong Press.

Room 2215B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T124.

The Many Roles of the Black Writer: An Appreciation of Calvin C. Hernton

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Calvin C. Hernton (1932-2001) is renowned as an anti-racist sociologist, literary critic, champion of Black women, and a founder of Umbra, which was a model for the 1960s Black Arts Movement. He is less well-known as a poet but recent attention has generated much acclaim. Based on new appraisals of his stature as a major poet, this panel will reveal him as an overlooked but very important figure who insisted on combining the roles of critic, teacher, poet, race theorist, and social commentator.

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Lauri Scheyer is Xiaoxiang Distinguished Professor, creative writing director, and poetry center director at Hunan Normal University (China). She is also the founding director of the center for contemporary poetry and poetics and Professor Emeritus of English and creative writing at Cal State LA.


Twitter Username: laurischeyer

Tyrone Williams is the author of seven books of poetry: washpark (with Patrick Clifford), As iZ, Howell, Adventures of Pi, The Hero Project of the Century, On Spec, and c.c. He teaches literature and literary theory at Xavier University in Cincinnati Ohio.


Twitter Username: twilightrenegad

Website: http://home.earthlink.net/~suspend/

David Grundy is the author of A Black Arts Poetry Machine: Amiri Baraka and the Umbra Poets and Never by Itself Alone: Queer Poetry in Boston and San Francisco, 1943–Present, coeditor with Lauri Scheyer of Selected Poems of Calvin C. Hernton, and currently a Humboldt Research Fellow at Freie Universität Berlin.

Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper, Professor Emerita from Spelman College, is an internationally recognized Langston Hughes scholar. She has published one monograph on Hughes's Simple stories and has edited four volumes of short fiction by Hughes.


Twitter Username: JustineXSemple

Kathy Lou Schultz is a poet-scholar. Her scholarship includes a collection of essays, Introduction to Claudia Rankine, and The Afro-Modernist Epic and Literary History: Tolson, Hughes, Baraka. She is the author of four collections of poetry including Some Vague Wife and Biting Midge: Works in Prose.


Twitter Username: doctor_poetry

Room 2215C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T125.

CANCELED: Internationalism and Identity: A Need for Magazines to Transcend Borders

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Unfortunately, this event has been canceled by the event organizer.

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Abeer Y. Hoque is a Nigerian-born, Bangladeshi-American writer and photographer. Her books include a monograph of travel photographs and poems (The Long Way Home, 2013), a book of linked stories, poems, and photographs (The Lovers and the Leavers, 2015), and a memoir (Olive Witch, 2017).


Twitter Username: olivewitch

Hananah Zaheer is the author of Lovebirds (Bull City Press, 2021). She serves as fiction editor for Los Angeles Review, a fiction editor for South Asian Avant Garde: a dissident literary anthology, and is the founder of Dubai Literary Salon.


Twitter Username: hananahzaheer

Aditya Desai's stories, essays, and poems have appeared in Taco Bell Quarterly, Tropics of Meta, B O D Y, The Rumpus, The Millions, The Margins, and others. He received his MFA in fiction from the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the literature programs officer for Maryland Humanities.


Twitter Username: atwittya

Kamil Ahsan is currently a doctoral student in History at Yale University, with a prior doctorate in biology from the University of Chicago. Originally from Lahore, Pakistan, he is also a freelance journalist, critic, and the editor of South Asian Avant-Garde (SAAG). He lives in New Haven, Connecticut.


Twitter Username: kamuleosaurus

Room 2502A, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T126.

A New Canon: Five Writers Remaking the American West

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The myth of the American West—a place to be tamed, dominated by narratives centering white men—is one of our most stubborn national fantasies. But five novelists are correcting the record. Their West is peopled with Black, Mexican, Asian, Indigenous, and Queer characters whose untold stories and unheard voices create a rich and complicated landscape that reflects the real American frontier as it was and is. We'll discuss research, resisting tropes, and fitting new stories into the canon.

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Elizabeth Gonzalez James is the author of the novels Mona at Sea (SFWP, 2021) and The Bullet Swallower (Simon & Schuster, forthcoming 2023), and the chapbook Five Conversations About Peter Sellers (Texas Review Press, forthcoming 2023). She is currently the interviews editor at The Rumpus.


Twitter Username: unefemmejames

Website: https://www.elizabethgonzalezjames.com/

Tom Lin is the author of The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu, which won the 2022 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction and was a finalist for the New York Public Library's Young Lions Award, among others. He is a doctoral candidate in English literature at the University of California, Davis.


Twitter Username: tom_lin__

Lauren Francis-Sharma is the author of Book of the Little Axe, a Hurston Wright Award finalist, and 'Til the Well Runs Dry. She is the assistant director of Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, a MacDowell fellow, and serves on the board of the PEN/Faulkner Foundation.


Twitter Username: laurenfsharma

Website: www.laurenfrancissharma.com

Robin McLean's debut collection Reptile House won the BOA Editions Fiction Prize and was noted as one of the best books of 2015 in the Paris Review. She splits her time between the high plains desert of central Nevada and western Massachusetts where she teaches writing at Clark University.

Claudia Cravens grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area. She has a BA in literature from Bard College and is a graduate of Catapult's Twelve-Month Novel Generator. Lucky Red is her first novel.


Twitter Username: claudia_cravens

Room 2502B, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T127.

The Language of Leaving: Puerto Rican Writers on/from the Diaspora

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Puerto Rico has long been a rich source of stories for those within and without its borders. This panel, composed of writers of Puerto Rican descent working in fiction, memoir, and other creative nonfiction, will focus on the challenges of writing about home, sometimes in another language, from the perspective of an expatriate, during a time of economic and political upheaval in their native country.

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Claudia Acevedo-Quiñones is a multigenre writer from Puerto Rico. Her work, which focuses on etymology, dreams, and diaspora, has appeared in the Brooklyn Rail, wildness, Ambit Magazine, and other publications. Her first book, The Hurricane Book, was published by Rose Metal Press in October 2023.

Amina Lolita Gautier is the author of four short story collections: At-Risk, Now We Will Be Happy, The Loss of All Lost Things, and The Best That You Can Do. For her body of work she has received the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in the Short Story.


Twitter Username: DrAminaGautier

Website: https://aminagautier.wordpress.com/

Sergio Gutiérrez Negrón (Caguas, Puerto Rico) has published the novels Los días hábiles, Palacio, and Dicen que los dormidos; and the collection of stories Preciosos perdedores. In 2017, he was selected by the Hay Festival as part of Bogotá39, a list of thirty-nine promising writers from the continent under the age of thirty-nine.


Twitter Username: sergioce

Jerilynn Aquino is a Puerto Rican writer from New Jersey. Her work appears in Salt Hill, Booth, The Journal, Gulf Coast, and others. In 2023, she was awarded a residency from Hedgebrook, and in 2022, received an AWP Intro Journals award for her essay "El Velorio: An Elegy."


Twitter Username: jerilynnaquino

Room 2503AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T128.

In Praise of Legacy: Writers of Color and the Challenge of the Canon

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The word “canon” in literary studies was intended to refer to humanity’s greatest writings—those which all "educated" people should know. Thanks to the work of critics and scholars of color, however, we are now able to recognize the exclusions, the silences, and the gaps that exist in the traditional concept of the canon. The four poets/professors on this panel will read poems and discuss how to explore, expand, and explode the literary canon in one's work and in the classroom.

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Enzo Silon Surin is a Haitian-born, award-winning poet, educator, publisher, librettist, and social advocate. He is the author of four collections of poetry, including his most recent book, American Scapegoat, and the twenty-first annual Massachusetts Book Award winner, When My Body Was A Clinched Fist.


Twitter Username: enzothepoet

Website: www.enzosurinink.org

Nathan McClain is the author of Previously Owned (2022) and Scale (2017), both from Four Way Books. He is a graduate from the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson and a Cave Canem fellow. He currently teaches at Hampshire College and serves as poetry editor for the Massachusetts Review.


Twitter Username: nathanhmcclain

Kenzie Allen is a Haudenosaunee poet and multimodal artist. She is the author of Cloud Missives (Tin House, 2024). The recipient of a 92Y Discovery Prize and a James Welch Prize for Indigenous Poets, she teaches at York University in Toronto, and she is a descendant of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin.


Twitter Username: cerena

Website: http://kenzieallen.co

Michael Mercurio lives and writes in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts. He serves as the director of community engagement for the nonprofit Faraday Publishing Company, working to center the voices and perspectives of the global majority through panels, readings, and workshops.

Rita Banerjee is an assistant professor of creative writing and director of the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. She is the author of Echo in Four Beats, CREDO, and A Night with Kali. She received a VAC 2022 Creation Grant, and her work appears in Poets & Writers, VPR, The Rumpus, VIDA, and LARB.


Twitter Username: Rita_Banerjee

Website: http://ritabanerjee.com

Room 2504AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T129.

Speaking Mosaics: Hybrid Narratives & the Prism of Identity

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Accustomed to wielding multiple perspectives, many BIPOC, queer, and neurodivergent writers are drawn to fragmented or hybrid forms: multimodal cross-genre mosaics of personal experience, and cultural, social, political, or natural history. Our panelists work across poetry, performance, nonfiction, and folklore, and will explore the craft and challenges of fragmented forms, offering inspiration and motivation to embrace hybridity as a way to claim space for historically marginalized communities.

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Marissa Landrigan is the author of The Vegetarian's Guide to Eating Meat, and her essays have appeared in the Atlantic, Creative Nonfiction, Guernica, Orion, the Rumpus, and elsewhere. She is an associate professor of writing at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown.


Twitter Username: mklandrigan

Website: marissalandrigan.com

Rajiv Mohabir is the author of three collections of poetry including Cultish (Four Way Books, Finalist for the NBCC), a memoir, Antiman (finalist for the PEN Open Book Award), and a collection of translations, I Even Regret Night (Kaya Press, winner of the HMLTA from the Academy of American Poets).


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Monica Prince is an assistant professor of activist and performance writing at Susquehanna University and the author of four poetry collections. Her creative focus is choreopoems, performance poetry, and social justice.


Twitter Username: poetic_moni

Website: www.monicaprince.com

Adriana E. Ramírez is a Mexican-Colombian writer, essayist, critic, and poet based in Pittsburgh. She won the inaugural PEN/Fusion Emerging Writers Prize (2015) for her novella-length work of nonfiction, Dead Boys (Little A, 2016). Her full-length work of nonfiction, The Violence, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: zadri

Website: www.aeramirez.com

Caitlyn Hunter was the inaugural emerging Black artist-in-residence at Chatham University (2021–22). She is a doctoral candidate at Duquesne University where she researches African American literature and Black food studies. She currently teaches and resides in Southern Maryland.


Twitter Username: Caitdagr8hunter

Room 2505AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T130.

Autobiographical Fiction: Writing about Trauma, Memory, Identity, and Survival

(, , , , Maria Kuznetsova)

Five prize-winning authors will lead a discussion on crafting autobiographical novels/stories versus memoirs/personal essays. They will talk about the differences and similarities between fiction and nonfiction, what determines a writer’s initial narrative choice, and the challenges writers encounter while writing from their own experiences about cultural heritage, trauma, disability, violence, and sexual abuse.

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K. Gorcheva-Newberry won a Prairie Schooner Prize for her first story collection, What Isn't Remembered, long-listed for the PEN/Bingham Prize and short-listed for the Saroyan International Prize. Her debut novel, The Orchard, was picked by New York Post among the best books of 2022, a finalist for the Chautauqua Prize.


Twitter Username: kgnewberry

Jeffrey Dale Lofton is the author of Red Clay Suzie, awarded the Seven Hills Literary Prize for Fiction and longlisted for the Center for Fiction 2023 First Novel Prize. He is a senior advisor at the Library of Congress and cohosts a podcast, Inside Voices, that showcases all things literary.


Twitter Username: JeffreyDLofton

Website: JeffreyDLofton.com

Chris Dennis is the author of Here Is What You Do. His work has appeared in the Paris Review, Playgirl, McSweeney's, Granta, LitHub, Guernica, and Best American Essays. He is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship, the Krause Essay Prize, and a New York Times Sidney Award for long-form journalism.


Twitter Username: ChrisDnns

Sasha Vasilyuk is a journalist and author of the debut novel Your Presence is Mandatory, which will be out in the U.S., Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Finland, and Brazil in April 2024. Her writing has been published in the New York Times, TIME, Harper's Bazaar, Los Angeles Times, Narrative, and USA Today.


Twitter Username: SashaVasilyuk

Website: www.sashavasilyuk.com

Room 3501AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T131.

Experiential Learning, Multimodality, and the Publishing Classroom, Oh My!

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Given the demands of the current job market, the importance of experiential learning cannot be overstated. Creative writing instructors are tackling this challenge by bringing publishing and its many multimodal facets into the classroom. From founding, to production, to print, our panel will discuss best practices in organizing, editing, and promoting published work. We will address the need for print and digital literary journals as well as other publishing venues on campus and beyond.

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Saul Lemerond is an assistant professor of English at Hanover College. He received his PhD in English with an emphasis in creative writing—fiction. He is dyslexic. He has a book, Digital Voices: Podcasting in the Creative Writing Classroom. Also, his short stories have appeared in JMWW and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: SaulLemerond

Kimberly Ann Southwick is the editor-in-chief and founder of Gigantic Sequins, a literary arts journal. She is an assistant professor at Jacksonville State University. Her full-length collection Orchid Alpha debuted from Trembling Pillow Press in April 2023.


Twitter Username: kimannjosouth

Website: kimberlyannsouthwick.com

Jason McCall holds an MFA from the University of Miami. His recent poetry collections include What Shot Did You Ever Take, A Man Ain't Nothin', and Two-Face God. He teaches at the University of North Alabama.


Twitter Username: JasonMcCall4

Katie Budris is a senior lecturer in writing arts at Rowan University, where she teaches creative writing and serves as coordinator of the MA in Writing program. She is the editor in chief of Glassworks and is the author of two chapbooks of poetry: Mid-Bloom and Prague in Synthetics.


Twitter Username: ktb8482

Website: katiebudris.com

Room 3501CD, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T132.

Pathways to Publishing for Indie Authors of Color

(, , , Celestine Woo, Jee Leong Koh)

We’re a group of authors of color at various career stages who've taken winding roads to publication. We will share insights about the various paths each of us took to get our works out: self-publishing, hybrid publishing, or working with small presses. Topics will include finding editors and presses who understand your work, deciding whether you need an agent, marketing your work, avoiding our publishing missteps, and dealing with people considering your work "too niche" for their audiences.

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Amy M. Le is a Vietnam War survivor, Congenital Heart Defect (CHD) warrior, award-winning author, and founder of Quill Hawk Publishing, a woman-owned, Asian American hybrid publishing company that helps writers indie publish their books while amplifying diverse voices through storytelling.


Twitter Username: amy_m_le

Website: www.quillhawkpublishing.com

Kiran Bhat is an Indian American author, traveler, and polyglot. He is known as the author of we of the forsaken world... and has had his writing published in various journals such as the Caravan, Outlook India, the Kenyon Review, Prairie Schooner, SOFTBLOW, etc. He currently lives in Mumbai.


Twitter Username: WeltgeistKiran

Mugabi Byenkya is an award-winning writer of prose, poetry, comics, essays, drama, and songs. Mugabi’s writing is used to teach high school English in Kampala and Toronto schools. In 2018, Mugabi was named one of fifty-six writers who has contributed to their native Uganda’s literary heritage by Writivism.


Twitter Username: mugabsb

Room 3501 GH, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T133.

Beyond the Debut: Publisher One-Night Stands vs. Long Term Relationships

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After the debut book, what happens next? Where did everybody go? While some authors forge long-term relationships with agents and editors, others must start fresh with each book. This business-oriented panel offers insights on how to build a career book by book, whether at indie presses or commercial publishers. Panelists chart paths to publication, discuss relationships (or lack thereof) with agents and editors, and offer advice on continuing to publish books as an established author.

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Kim Liao's writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, The Rumpus, River Teeth, Fourth River, and others. This includes her viral Lit Hub essay about collecting one hundred rejections a year, which led to the #100rejections challenge. She teaches writing at John Jay College in New York City.


Twitter Username: the_kimlet

Kirstin Chen is a New York Times best-selling author of three novels. Her latest, Counterfeit, is a Reese’s Book Club pick, a Roxane Gay book club pick, and a New York Times Editors’ Choice. Her previous two novels are Bury What We Cannot Take and Soy Sauce for Beginners.


Twitter Username: kirstin_chen

Leland Cheuk is the author of three books of fiction, most recently No Good Very Bad Asian. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, NPR, the San Francisco ChronicleSalon, and elsewhere. He runs the indie press 7.13 Books.


Twitter Username: lcheuk

Amy Hassinger is the author of three novels: Nina: Adolescence, The Priest's Madonna, and After the Dam. Her nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times, Creative Nonfiction, and Sierra magazine, among other venues. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Illinois.

Rachel Stolzman Gullo is the author of two novels, The Sign for Drowning and Practice Dying. Her forthcoming novel Confuse the Wind will come out in June 2024 with Vine Leaves Press. Her debut novel is being republished by 7.13 Books. She earned her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College.

Room 3501 EF, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T134.

Wait...I Can Use "Cunt" in a Poem?

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“Twat,” “cock,” and “motherfucker” too. You can say anything in a poem—use any word, broach any topic, and be obscene as you please, but what are you trying to blow up with your F-bombs? Such language functions as the repudiation of a lingual and cultural hegemony, so the question is whether the poem earns the use of such language. In this panel, poets known for their engagement with the taboo will read their work and discuss their use of the profane as a means of subversion.

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Sonia Greenfield is the author of five books of poetry: All Possible Histories (RIYT 2022), Helen of Troy is High AF (Harbor Editions 2022), Letdown (White Pine), American Parable (Autumn House), and Boy with a Halo at the Farmer's Market (Codhill). She teaches at Normandale College in Minneapolis.


Twitter Username: SoniaGreenfield

Website: soniagreenfield.com

sam sax is a queer, jewish, writer & educator. Author of Madness (National Poetry Series), ‘Bury It’ (James Laughlin Award), and Pig (Scribner, 2023). They've received fellowships from Yaddo, Macdowell, and the National Endowment for the Arts. They're currently a lecturer at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: samsax1

Website: www.samsax.com

Dustin Brookshire is the author of three chapbooks. His most recent, Never Picked First For Playtime is a tribute to Denise Duhamel’s Kinky. He is the coeditor of Let Me Say This: A Dolly Parton Poetry Anthology.


Twitter Username: Dbrookshire

Angelique Zobitz is the author of the chapbooks Burn Down Your House and Love Letters to the Revolution. Her first book, Seraphim, is forthcoming from CavanKerry Press, April 2024. She is poetry editor at The Night Heron Barks and Ran Off with the Star Bassoon and contributing editor at Cave Wall.


Twitter Username: angeliquezobitz

Jonah Mixon-Webster is a poet and conceptual sound artist from Flint, Michigan. His debut poetry collection, Stereo(TYPE), received the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award and the Windham Campbell Prize for Poetry. His works are featured in Harper’s, Yale Review, the New Republic, Callaloo, and BAX 2018.


Twitter Username: jmixweb

9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

Grand Ballroom D, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T135.

AWP Program Directors’ Plenary Assembly

This meeting is for all directors of AWP member programs. Please join us for a light breakfast and an informal working session with your regional representatives. AWP Board Chair January Gill O'Neil will give a welcome and briefing before the breakout discussions begin.

Please note: program directors who are unable to attend may send a department representative in their place.

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10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

Room 2101, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T136.

First Time’s the Charm: Debut Novelists on How to Debut

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Debuting is a fraught process and the experience and advice varies seemingly year to year in a rapidly changing literary landscape. This panel of novelists from various genres shares tips, tricks, and hard-won lessons from the months before and after their debuts—on everything from publicity and marketing to questions we wish we’d asked. Whether attendees are debuting their own novels next year or still dreaming the book into being, they’ll find fresh, urgent discussion about the processes here.

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Jeremy Broyles is a writer, professor, and voracious consumer of stories. As a first-gen college student, he was a three-time All-American in track and often incorporates sports/games in his fiction. His debut novel Flat Water releases in fall of 2023. He teaches creative writing in Mesa, Arizona.


Twitter Username: _jeremybroyles

Website: jeremybroylesauthor.com

Holly M. Wendt is associate professor of English and director of creative writing at Lebanon Valley College.Their debut novel, Heading North, is forthcoming from Braddock Avenue Books and their prose has appeared in Shenandoah, Passages North, Four Way Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: hmwendt

Website: https://www.hollymwendt.com/

Kate Reed Petty's first novel, True Story, was a New York Times Editor's Choice and a finalist for the Shirley Jackson Award. She lives in Baltimore.


Twitter Username: pettykate

Sarah Cypher is a queer Lebanese American writer, and her debut novel The Skin and Its Girl (Ballantine) uses direct-address first person. Sarah holds an MFA from Warren Wilson College, where she was a Rona Jaffe Creative Writing Fellow in Fiction. She lives in Washington, DC with her wife.


Twitter Username: threepenny

Website: www.sarahcypher.com

Sarah Seltzer is the executive editor at Lilith Magazine, a forty-five year old journal of Jewish feminist journalism, fiction, poetry and art. She is a journalist, critic, and novelist: her debut novel, The Singer Sisters (Flatiron), the story of two generations of female folk singers, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: sarahmseltzer

Website: sarahmseltzer.com

Room 2102A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T137.

Reimagining Place: New Voices from the Midwest

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As “fly-over country,” the Midwest is imagined as corn fields and snow drifts, not the nexus of vibrant, innovative poetry. This diverse group of BIPOC poets from Chicago, Lincoln, Minneapolis, and Onigamiising will interrogate Midwestern stereotypes by breaking boundaries of language, image, and form. As Indigenous, Queer, immigrant, Black, nonbinary, and multinational writers, they will reimagine the concepts of place, space, and the intersectional landscapes that reside in us all.

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Kathryn Kysar is the author of two books of poetry, Dark Lake and Pretend the World, and she edited Riding Shotgun: Women Write About Their Mothers. A previous AWP board member, Kysar is the director of the creative writing program at Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Minneapolis.


Twitter Username: darklake

Website: https://www.pw.org/directory/writers/kathryn_kysar

April Gibson is a Black poet, writer, and professor whose work appears in The Kenyon Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Prairie Schooner, and elsewhere. Her forthcoming book of poetry will be published by Amistad Press/Harper Collins in 2024. April teaches English at Malcolm X College in Chicago.


Twitter Username: AprilGibsonPoet

Website: argpoetry.com

Ashley E. Wynter lives in Minneapolis where she participated in a regional Cave Canem workshop. She won first place in the fifty-third New Millennium Award for Poetry and her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in West Trade Review and Water~Stone Review. Wynter is editor at Copper Canyon Press.


Twitter Username: ashwritesprose

Halee Kirkwood is a poet and descendant of the Fond Du Lac Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe. They are a 2023–25 Jerome Hill Artist Fellow, an inaugural In-Na-Po fellow, and were a 2019–20 Loft Mentor Series Fellow. Their work has been published in Poetry Magazine, Ecotone, Poem-A-Day, and others.

Chinua Ezenwa-Ohaeto lives in Lincoln, Nebraska where he is pursuing his PhD in English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a focus on creative writing (poetry). His works have appeared in Isele Magazine, AFREADA, Poet Lore, Massachusetts Review, Frontier Poetry, Palette Poetry, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: Chinuaezenwa

Room 2102B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T138.

Navigating Age-Based Audiences: Adult to Picture Book & Everything In Between

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Publishing writers working in kid lit talk truthfully about figuring out which age-based market their story fits into. Some intentionally wrote for one even if their story bent typical rules, others subbed stories in YA and A, some wrote the story and then figured it out. All have learned from their experiences and grown as writers. Panelists will have a lively conversation about what age-based markets mean, and how, over the course of a writing career, to move between them.

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Shana Youngdahl teaches in the mostly asynchronous MFA program at Lindenwood University. She is the author of the novels As Many Nows As I Can Get and A CATALOG OF BURNT OBJECTS (forthcoming) as well as two poetry collections, most recently A Cage To Welcome.


Twitter Username: shanayoungdahl

Website: www.shanayoungdahl.com

Jennifer Moffett writes fiction and poetry for adults and is the author of the YA novel Those Who Prey and a forthcoming YA thriller with Atheneum/Simon & Schuster. She teaches creative writing and screenwriting at Southern New Hampshire University.

Patricia Park is the author of the adult novel, Re Jane and the YA novels Imposter Syndrome & Other Confessions of Alejandra Kim and the forthcoming What's Eating Jackie Oh? (2024). She is an associate professor of creative writing at American University.


Twitter Username: patriciapark718

Website: www.patriciapark.com

A two-time National Book Award finalist, Laura Ruby writes poetry and fiction for adults, teens, and children, including the novels Bone Gap and Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All. She is on the faculty of Hamline University's MFAC program and Queens University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: thatlauraruby

Website: www.lauraruby.com

Linda Urban's award-winning picture books, chapter books, and novels for middle grade and YA readers include Mouse Was Mad, A Crooked Kind of Perfect, and Talk Santa to Me. She is currently cochair of the Vermont College of Fine Arts Writing for Children and Young Adults program.

Room 2103A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T139.

Where the Living Sit Talking About the Dead

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The pandemic was a collective experience of profound loss. Death is ubiquitous, yet the topic is avoided on the page and in life. What do we fear? Five acclaimed authors who think alongside the topic in genre-transcending ways that manifest as poem-films, martyrs, spirit lands, encyclopedias, and aliens, discuss why rendering death is crucial; its surprising humors, responsibilities, and joys. Their combined perspective includes social workers, poets, literacy researchers, and a death doula.

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Dr. Brandon Hobson is the author of five books. His novel Where the Dead Sit Talking was a finalist for the National Book Award. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and UCROSS. Hobson is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and teaches at New Mexico State and IAIA.

Diana Khoi Nguyen is a poet, multimedia artist, and author of Ghost Of (Omnidawn 2018), as well as a recipient of a 2021 NEA fellowship. A Kundiman fellow, she is core faculty in the Randolph College low-residency MFA and an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh.

Marie-Helene Bertino's new novel Beautyland is available now! She is the author of Parakeet, Safe as Houses, and 2 A.M. at the Cat's Pajamas. Honors include the O. Henry Award, Pushcart Prize, and the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Fellowship in Ireland. She teaches at Yale University.


Twitter Username: mhbertino

Website: www.mariehelenebertino.com

Kristin Keane is the author of An Encyclopedia of Bending Time and Luminaries. Her writing has appeared in/at the Washington Post, Ploughshares, New England Review, Creative Nonfiction, The Handbook of Educational Thinkers, and elsewhere. She earned a PhD from Stanford University.


Twitter Username: kitenearsink

Room 2103B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T140.

Artificial Intelligence & Real Creativity: AI in the CW Classroom

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This panel will explore the possibilities of working with AI technology in creative writing classes, rather than fighting against its growth in popularity, by teaching students how to use AI as a tool for inspiration instead of a replacement for original human thought. Writers at the level of post-doc, assistant, and full professor, teaching across all genres at both liberal arts and STEM-focused institutions, will discuss research-based and practical approaches to using AI in their CW classes.

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Rebecca Pelky is an assistant professor at Clarkson University and a member of the Brothertown Indian Nation. Her awards include a 2023 creative writing fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Perugia Press Prize for her second collection of poetry, Through a Red Place (2021).


Twitter Username: RebeccaPelky

Allison Adair is author of The Clearing, winner of the Max Ritvo Poetry Prize. Her work appears in Best American Poetry, Best New Poets, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, Kenyon Review, and Threepenny. She has received a Pushcart Prize, the Orlando Prize, and the Florida Review Editors' Award.


Twitter Username: fascicles

Jordi Alonso holds an MA in classical studies from Columbia University and a PhD in Victorian literature and creative writing from the University of Missouri. He is working on a project involving the early-modern Jesuit Latin poet Ubertino Carrara.


Twitter Username: nymphscholar

Kate McIntyre is the author of the story collection Mad Prairie, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award. Two stories from the collection received Special Mention for the Pushcart Prize. She is an assistant professor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where she edits the journal hex literary.


Twitter Username: _katemcintyre

Christopher Salerno is a professor of English at William Paterson University and associate editor at Tupelo Quarterly. He is the author of five full-length poetry collections, including The Man Grave, Sun & Urn, Minimum Heroic, Whirligig, and ATM. He is a New Jersey Council for the Arts Fellow.

Room 2103C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T141.

It’s Alive… It’s Alive! Using Horror Film Aesthetics in Poetry

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Long viewed as an outside genre, horror only rarely skirts so-called mainstream “artistic legitimacy,” as seen recently in the award-winning films of Jordan Peele and Ari Aster. How can poets use horror films to push, even transgress, the boundaries of verse, and explore intersections of body, identity, and sociocultural history? Five poets will share how horror films have shaped their work, from processing the body to translating trauma. Who will survive and what will be left of them?

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Glenn Shaheen is the author of four books, most recently the fiction collection Carnivalia. He teaches at Prairie View A&M University and is the executive director of the Radius of Arab American Writers.


Twitter Username: glennshaheen

Sara Eliza Johnson is the recipient of an NEA fellowship in poetry, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, among other honors. Her first book, Bone Map, won the 2013 National Poetry Series. Her second book, Vapor, will be published in 2022.


Twitter Username: saraelizaj

Website: saraelizajohnson.com

Christopher Munde is the author of the poetry collection Slippage, and his poems have also appeared in Blackbird, The Literary Review, Massachusetts Review, Third Coast, West Branch, and elsewhere. A graduate of the University of Houston’s MFA program, he currently teaches in western New York.

Christian J. Collier is a Black Southern writer, arts organizer, and teaching artist who resides in Chattanooga, Tennessee. He is the author of Greater Ghost (Four Way Books, 2024), and the chapbook The Gleaming of the Blade, the 2021 Editors’ Selection from Bull City Press.


Twitter Username: ichristian3030

Melanie Jordan is a Tennessee writer and editor currently in Newnan, Georgia. Hallelujah for the Ghosties is her first book. She holds degrees from University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Southern Illinois University, and the University of Houston. She teaches creative writing and tech writing.

Room 2104A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T142.

Finding Your Own Rhythm: Writing Practices For Neurodiverse/Disabled Writers

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It's not always possible for neurodivergent writers or those with physical or mental disabilities to follow popular writing advice. This group of authors shares strategies and workarounds that have helped them research, complete, revise, and submit writing projects. They will also address ways to maintain professional relationships when attending events or communicating with others is challenging—and urge the publishing and literary worlds to equitably include the disabled and neurodiverse.

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Lori Lynne Armstrong writes poetry and prose about mental health, addiction, and living with disabilities. She is influenced by her background as scientist, counselor, and patient, having earned bachelor's and master's degrees in molecular biology as well as a master's in counseling psychology.


Twitter Username: LLArmstrong

Website: www.lorilynnearmstrong.com

Vayl Larkin is a trans, wheelchair-modded writer and performer living in Pittsburgh. They've published work from poetry to theater, and they are a frequent feature at accessible literary events. Their focus on access and inclusion includes a position on an advisory board for Allegheny Health Network.

Mira Hadlow is a deaf Canadian author, thought leader, and advocate for personal power. Since the publication of her first book, she has amassed a cult following on social media, and drawing on her experience with domestic violence, Mira uses her platform to empower survivors.


Twitter Username: Mirahadlow

Website: Https://www.mirahadlow.com

Using her poetry collection, Stop Hurting and Dance, and her performance art workshop, “From a Victim to a Thriving Survivor: Learning How to Revive the Soul,” award-winning poet, author, and journalist Aqueila M. Lewis-Ross honors what it means to live with resilience, love, and prosperity.


Twitter Username: aqueilamlewisross

Anita Cameron has addressed disability rights for outlets including Yahoo! Voices, The Mobility Resource, and Huffington Post. She’s included in Zinn's Voices of a People's History of the United States, cited in a 2019 National Council on Disability report, and has an upcoming disability-themed kids’ book.

Room 2105, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T144.

All About Audiobooks: Top Ten Questions Finally Answered!

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Attention novice and seasoned writers alike! Discover the answers to the top ten questions about audiobooks. In this workshop we will cover everything from: writing with audio in mind, how to find/hire a narrator (or narrate yourself), pros/cons of various publishing and distribution options, addressing AI in the audiobook industry, understanding the importance of casting diverse narrators, learn current sales data, and gain new marketing tips and resources. The workshop will conclude with a Q&A.

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Andy is an award-winning, SAG-AFTRA audiobook narrator of both fiction and nonfiction books, narrating for traditional and indie publishers. Andy has presented at thirty plus conferences and is a former graduate-level adjunct professor. Andy also writes YA and children's books and serves on DEI committees.


Twitter Username: otherandygarcia

André Santana is an award-winning and Audie-finalist narrator of dozens of titles from contemporary YA to adult science fiction. He's worked with major audiobook publishers including Penguin Random House Audio and Dreamscape Media, and serves as a mentor through the Audio Publishers Association.


Twitter Username: andreonthemic

Sarah Nessel is an audiobook narrator whose career has also included three decades of copyediting for newspapers, magazines, and independent fiction authors, and a stint as a newspaper columnist. She earned a BA from Drury University and an MS in journalism from the University of Kansas.

Room 2207, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T145.

How Food Invokes Poetry

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Poetry is witness and what better location to witness than at the kitchen table. It is an invocation of all five senses. The synesthetic aura leads to readiness
for nourishment and a spiritual setting enables gratitude. Ingredients, recipes, and rituals of honoring are a celebration and a meditation. Mealtimes hold us, as well as history. Every morsel is an activation process; nothing is as evocative as food. Stories have been buried within our pots and pans. Flavors of beginnings and endings.

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Kashiana Singh calls herself a work practitioner and embodies the essence of her TEDx talk, "Work as Worship," into her everyday. She has served as a managing editor for Poets Reading the News. Her newest full-length collection, Woman by the Door, was released in 2022 with Apprentice House Press.


Twitter Username: Kashianasingh

Amy Baskin's first collection NIGHT HAG (Unsolicited Press, 2023) explores Lilith, the mythic "first woman." She helps run the Visiting Writers Series and Fir Acres Writing Workshop at Lewis & Clark College. Timberline Review nominated Amy's poem "Self-Portrait as Comfort Food" for the Pushcart.


Twitter Username: AmyBaskin

Jen Karetnick is the author of eleven poetry collections, including Inheritance with a High Error Rate, winner of the 2022 Cider Press Review Book Award (January 2024). She is also the cofounder and managing editor of SWWIM Every Day. She works as a food writer, dining critic, and cookbook author.


Twitter Username: Kavetchnik

Website: https://jkaretnick.com/

Zeina Azzam, a Palestinian American, is the poet laureate of Alexandria, Virginia, for 2022–25. Her poems about food, identity, and culture appear in her two books of poetry Some Things Never Leave You (Tiger Bark Press, 2023) and Bayna Bayna, In-Between (The Poetry Box, 2021). www.zeinaazzam.com


Twitter Username: zeina3azzam

Tresha Faye Haefner is the founder of The Poetry Salon, an organization that provides both beginning and advanced writing classes to those who want to deepen their understanding of the craft. She holds an MA in humanistic psychology/creativity studies and is author of Take This Longing.


Twitter Username: Tresha

Room 2208, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T146.

Split/Lip Press Tenth Anniversary Reading

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Split/Lip Press is celebrating its tenth anniversary in 2024! For this reading, five authors from our catalog will read from their books. Split/Lip Press is proud to publish innovative, boundary-breaking prose; we've helped launch the careers of some of the most exciting prose writers of the last decade.

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Mila Jaroniec is the author of Plastic Vodka Bottle Sleepover and the editor of Black Lipstick. She teaches at Writing Co-Lab and GrubStreet.

Anurag Andra is a writer based in Arlington, Virginia. He is the author of Submarine (Split/Lip Press, 2022). His short fiction has been featured in Ninth Letter, Necessary Fiction, Atticus Review, and elsewhere. His work explores themes of family, identity, coming-of-age, mental health, and loss.


Twitter Username: AnuragAndra

Website: https://anuragandra.com/

Devon Capizzi is a writer from Pennsylvania. Their debut collection of stories My Share of the Body was published by Split/Lip Press (December 2021). Their work has been supported by the Bread Loaf Writer's Conference, the Tin House Workshop, and a fellowship from Emerson College.


Twitter Username: devoncapizzi

Jillian Danback-McGhan is an author, Navy veteran, former child actor, and the winner of the 2020 Col. Darron L. Wright Memorial Writing Awards. Midwatch, her debut collection of short fiction, will be published in spring 2024. She lives in Annapolis, Maryland with her family.


Twitter Username: JDanbackMcGhan

Jared Yates Sexton is a writer whose work has appeared in the New York Times, New Republic, and elsewhere. His most recent book is The Midnight Kingdom: A History of Power, Paranoia, and the Coming Crisis from Dutton / Penguin Random House.


Twitter Username: jysexton

Website: http://www.jysexton.com

Room 2209, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T147.

Queer Latinx Men and Vulnerability

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Latinx men who write on identity, culture, or those who grew up with limitations as to how they could express themselves, know how ones own culture plays a huge part in showing vulnerability, thus, creating perpetual feelings of shame affecting identity. As queer Latinx, we write because vulnerability is often seen as weakness; however, it’s necessary to address how it affects writing both from the writer’s and reader’s perspective.

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Saúl Hernández is a queer writer from San Antonio, Texas who was raised by undocumented parents. He's the winner of the Two Sylvias Press Chapbook Prize 2021 chosen by Victoria Chang. His poems have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and Best of The Net.


Twitter Username: el_saulhdez

Aldo Amparán is the author of Brother Sleep (Alice James Books, 2022), winner of the 2020 Alice James Award and a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Gay Poetry. A 2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, their work appears in the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day, Ploughshares, and POETRY.


Twitter Username: skygoneout

jj peña (pronouns he/they) is a queer, burrito-blooded writer. jj's a 2023 92Y Discovery Poetry Prize winner, a 2022 Woody & Gayle Hunt Fellow, & a 2021 Periplus fellow. jj's won serval flash contests and has been anthologized in Best Microfictions (2020) & Best Small Fictions (2023).

Gustavo Hernandez is a Queer Mexican immigrant poet. His poems have been published in several literary journals in the United States and abroad. His first full-length poetry collection Flower Grand First is forthcoming.

Room 2211, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T148.

Nepali Anglophone Writing: Five Writers from the Nepali Diaspora

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The event will feature five Nepali immigrant anglophone writers writing in the United States and Canada: Rohan Chhetri, Khem Aryal, Samyak Shertok, Pushpa Raj Acharya, Saraswati Lamichhane. Spanning genres from poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, they will discuss the challenges of writing Nepali diasporic lives in North America drawing roots from Nepal and India, and their role as translators and anthology editors in building a robust and complex representation of Nepali literature in English and in translation.

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Khem K. Aryal is the author of a short story collection The In-Betweeners (Braddock Ave Books, 2023) and editor of an anthology South to South (Texas Review Press, 2023). He teaches creative writing at Arkansas State University, where he also serves as creative materials editor of Arkansas Review.


Twitter Username: khemaryal

Website: www.khemaryal.com

Rohan Chhetri is the author of Lost, Hurt, or in Transit Beautiful (Tupelo Press/HarperCollins). A recipient of a 2021 PEN/Heim Grant for translation, his poems have appeared in the Paris Review, AGNI, Academy of American Poets' Poem-a-Day, and Revue Europe, among others.


Twitter Username: rohancht

Pushparaj Acharya has published poetry collections in Nepali and English: Chāyākāla (FinePrint, 2006) and Dream Catcher (Vajra, 2012). Acharya collaborated with an artist and other poets in Somnio: The Way We See It (TiPSY Press, 2015). He has written screenplays and documentary scripts.

Samyak Shertok's poems appear in Blackbird, Cincinnati Review, Colorado Review, Gettysburg Review, Shenandoah, Waxwing, and elsewhere. He has received fellowships from Aspen Words, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.

Saraswoti Lamichhane is a coauthor of Six String: A Joint Anthology of Poems and her work appears in various anthologies and journals. She has lived in Nepal, Toronto, and now lives and writes in Alberta, Canada.

Room 2215A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T149.

won’t you celebrate with me: BIPOC Women on Crafting the Personal Narrative

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How do we tell the stories of our lives? Five contributors from the award-winning anthology Nonwhite and Woman: 131 Micro Essays on Being in the World, will discuss how personal narratives offer powerful testimonies as women of color owning their place in the world. The conversation will include discussions of identity, memory, otherness, ancestral heritage, place, and writing craft. Discussion and Q&A in the end.

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Darien Hsu Gee is the author of five novels published in eleven countries. Her collection of micro essays won a bronze IPPY award, and her craft book on writing memoir won the Hawaiʻi Book Publishers award. Darien is a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellow.

CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems (Floodgate 2020) and coeditor of Native Voices (Tupelo 2019). CMarie is director of Elk River Writers Workshop and faculty in the graduate program in creative writing at Western Colorado University.

Anastacia-Reneé (She/They) is a writer, educator, interdisciplinary artist, TEDx Speaker and podcaster. Reneé is the author of (v.) (Black Ocean) and Forget It (Black Radish). Side Notes from the Archivist forthcoming from Amistad (an imprint of HarperCollins) March 2023.

Preeti Parikh is an Indian American poet and essayist based in Ohio. A Kundiman Fellow, Preeti is the recipient of a 2023 Sustainable Arts Foundation grant award and has received support for her work from Millay Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the AWP Writer to Writer program.


Twitter Username: poetpreeti

Karina L. Agbisit is a Latina writer and editor. Her writing has been published by Woodhall Press, Cleis Press, Haunted Waters Press, Ruminate Magazine, and Oregon Humanities. She holds an MFA in creative writing and MA in book publishing from Portland State University. She is working on a memoir.

Room 2215B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T150.

Writers in the Schools Alliance Annual Meeting

Join other teaching writers and writer-in-the-school programs to discuss the rewards and challenges of the field at this moment. Goals for this meeting are to forge stronger connections within the network of WITSA organizations and practitioners and to set the coalition’s agenda for the year ahead. Time permitting, WITS community members will be invited to share their students’ writing. This meeting is open to anyone interested in the work of writer-in-the-school teaching artists, programs, and organizations.

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Room 2215C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T151.

Storytelling through Hermit Crab Flash: Exploring Borrowed Forms

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How can the ordinary forms we use in daily life—receipts, shopping lists, crossword puzzles—be inhabited to create compelling stories? Our panel will focus on how borrowed forms, called hermit crabs as they borrow the “shell” of a familiar text, can open up playful experimentation in our work and surprise by their hidden depth. We will look at stellar examples of both fiction and nonfiction and show how and why they work. We will also share techniques, ideas for forms to borrow, and prompts.

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Kathy Fish is featured in the newest edition of the Norton Reader. Her fiction has appeared in Washington Square Review, Electric Literature, and is forthcoming in Ploughshares. She's the recipient of a Ragdale Foundation Fellowship, the Copper Nickel Editors' Prize, and has authored five collections.


Twitter Username: kathyfish

Website: http://kathy-fish.com/

L. Novak is a writer and PhD candidate who teaches composition at ASU with work in The Rumpus, Atticus Review, Puerto del Sol, Chattahoochee Review, BOMB, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, and others. A winner of the Swarthout award, she has won grants from the Academy of American Poets and her chapbook Echolalia is available.


Twitter Username: anxiety_turnt

Avitus B. Carle (she/her) lives and writes outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Formerly known as K.B. Carle, her flash has been published in a variety of places including Five South, JMWW, The Rumpus, Jellyfish Review, The Offing, and elsewhere. She can be found on Twitter @avitusbcarle.


Twitter Username: avitusbcarle

Website: avitusbcarle.com

Ruth Joffre is the author of the story collection Night Beast. She is a graduate of Cornell University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop and now teaches at Hugo House in Seattle.


Twitter Username: Ruth_Joffre

Room 2502A, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T152.

Decolonizing American Literature: The Goals, Challenges, and Strategies of Writers

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Four writers will discuss decolonizing American literature through the examples of literary works in the colonial languages of English and French from Black, brown, and Asian writers across the world, as well as literature in Indian languages, including Urdu and Bengali. Panelists will discuss the goals of decolonial anglophone literature and consider the challenges and strategies of writers confronting imperial patterns in American Literature.

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Gemini Wahhaj is the author of the novel The Children of This Madness (7.13 Books, fall 2023) and the short story collection Katy Family (Jackleg Press, spring 2025). Her fiction is in or forthcoming in Granta, Third Coast, Chicago Quarterly Review, and other magazines. PhD, fiction, U Houston.


Twitter Username: wahhajgemini

Sehba Sarwar is a novelist (Black Wings, Veliz Books 2019) whose writings tackle gender and displacement issues. Her short stories have been anthologized by Feminist Press, Akashic Books, and Harper Collins India, and her essays have appeared in the New York Times, Callaloo, LA Times, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: sehbasarwar

Oindrila Mukherjee is the author of the novel The Dream Builders. She is an associate professor of writing at Grand Valley State University. The recipient of fellowships from Emory University and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, she is a contributing editor for the literary magazine Aster(Ix).


Twitter Username: oinkness

Namrata Poddar is the author of the award-winning debut novel Border Less, an essayist, interviews editor for Kweli, and faculty of writing & literature at UCLA. Her work has appeared in Longreads, Literary Hub, Kenyon Review, Poets & Writers, L.A. Times, The Best Asian Short Stories, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: poddar_namrata

Website: www.namratapoddar.com

Room 2502B, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T153.

Only This: Running a Themed Journal in an Era of Distraction and Specialization

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Jacqueline Woodson says, “The more specific we are, the more universal something can become.” Does this apply to a themed magazine? Starting and running a lit mag is hard. Why make it harder by restricting its theme to something deeply specific? In this intellectually lively session, the editors of Slag Glass City, After the Art, Consequence, and Past Ten will discuss the pleasures and challenges of running themed lit mags. Come for inspiration and practical advice!

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Parisa Saranj is a writer, translator, and editor at Consequence Forum. Her writings on contemporary Iranian politics and translations from Persian have been published in several publications, including Ms. Magazine, Your Impossible Voice, Two Lines, and Defunct Magazine.


Twitter Username: PSaranj

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. She is the author of the collection Be with Me Always and the editor of the lyric essay anthology A Harp in the Stars. She is the founding editor of the literary magazine After the Art and teaches in the MFA programs at Goucher and West Virginia Wesleyan.


Twitter Username: randonnoble

Website: www.randonbillingsnoble.com

Matthew Krajniak earned his PhD from the University of Houston. He was hired as the executive Editor of Consequence Forum in 2020, and has helped grow the staff from six to fifty people, the readership to nearly 5K unique online visitors a month, and the programming to include workshops and panels.


Twitter Username: ConsequenceF

Timothy J. Hillegonds is the author of the memoir The Distance Between (Nebraska, 2019). He has published work in The Guardian, The Daily Beast, Salon, Brevity, and other publications. He serves as a contributing editor for Slag Glass City, a digital journal of the urban essay arts.

Room 2503AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T154.

Fragmented Inheritances: Lyric Essay and Intergenerational Trauma

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Lauded essayists discuss experiments with form, including fragmentary approaches to narrative, and how they leave space for both readers and writers to approach subject matter about difficult legacies. How does the use of fragments allow ways into incomplete or contested family and cultural narratives around war trauma; religious persecution; racial, sexual, and gender identity; and violence? How might fragmented narrative further the possibilities for sharing and transmuting difficult legacies?

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Joanna Penn Cooper is the author of The Itinerant Girl's Guide to Self-Hypnosis and What Is a Domicile. Her current project is When We Were Fearsome, lyrical prose about motherhood, origins, and power. Joanna holds a PhD from Temple University and teaches at musewriting.com.


Twitter Username: jp_cooper

Website: joannapenncooper.net

Kiki Petrosino is professor of poetry at the University of Virginia. She is the author of four books of poetry, including White Blood: A Lyric of Virginia and Witch Wife. She is a National Endowment for the Arts Fellow in Literature.

James Allen Hall is the author of two books of poems, Romantic Comedy (Four Way Books, 2023) and Now You’re the Enemy (2008). They also authored a book of lyric essays, I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well. They teach at Washington College and direct the Rose O'Neill Literary House.


Twitter Username: jamesallenhall

Website: notbeauty.blogspot.com

Rajiv Mohabir is the author of three collections of poetry including Cultish (Four Way Books, Finalist for the NBCC), a memoir, Antiman (finalist for the PEN Open Book Award), and a collection of translations, I Even Regret Night (Kaya Press, winner of the HMLTA from the Academy of American Poets).


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Room 2504AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T155.

Communing with James Baldwin: A Centennial Celebration

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One hundred years after his birth, Baldwin's legacy, influence, and relevance cannot be overstated. Panelists writing in several genres share work guided by the critic, activist, novelist, playwright, and poet, and discuss how we as writers and a society can make our way into communion with him.

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Wesley Rothman, author of Subwoofer, has published work in Bennington Review, Boston Review, Gulf Coast, Kenyon Review, New England Review, and Prairie Schooner. Recipient of fellowships from the Sewanee Writers' Conference and the Vermont Studio Center, he teaches at Howard University.

Ed Pavlić is author of thirteen books written across and between genres: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, scholarship. His most recent works are Call It in the Air (2022), Outward: Adrienne Rich's Expanding Solitudes (2021), and Let It Be Broke (2020). He lives in Athens, Georgia.


Twitter Username: edpavlic

Website: https://www.english.uga.edu/directory/572/detail

Airea D. Matthews’s first collection of poems, Simulacra, received the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Award. She is a recipient of a 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and an assistant professor of creative writing at Bryn Mawr College.


Twitter Username: @aireadee

Khadijah Queen is the author of six books of poetry and hybrid prose, including Anodyne, Conduit, and I'm So Fine: A List of Famous Men & What I Had On. Her verse play Non-Sequitur won the Leslie Scalapino Award for Innovative Women Performance Writers. She teaches creative writing at Virginia Tech.


Twitter Username: Authorkq

Website: http://khadijahqueen.com

Kiese Laymon is a Black southern writer from Jackson, Mississippi.

Room 2505AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T156.

Small & Mighty: Everything You Want to Know About Working with Indie Presses

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Independent publishers publish some of the most dynamic and exciting books in the literary landscape, often launching debut writers’ first books or chapbooks. This panel, featuring publishing veterans from prominent independent presses, will demystify the process of submitting to and publishing work with an indie press. Panelists will share the benefits and challenges of working with an indie press, as well as tips for how to put your best foot forward when submitting your work to indie presses.

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Margot Atwell (she/her) is a writer, editor, publisher, and community funding expert. She is the executive director and publisher at Feminist Press. She's the author of Derby Life, coauthor of The Insider's Guide to Book Publishing Success, and writes the On the Books newsletter about money and arts.


Twitter Username: MargotAtwell

Ryo Yamaguchi is the publicist at Copper Canyon Press. He is the author of The Refusal of Suitors (Noemi Press), and has been a book critic for Harriet Books at the Poetry Foundation and Michigan Quarterly Review, among others. His poems have appeared widely, including The Best American Poetry 2020.


Twitter Username: ryo964

Kate Arden McMullen is the managing editor of Hub City Press, a nonprofit independent publisher of extraordinary writers from the American South. She is on the lookout for voice-driven literary works from the margins of Southern experience. Kate received her MFA in fiction from UNC-Wilmington.


Twitter Username: KateAMcMullen

Cat Fitzpatrick is the editrix at LittlePuss Press, and the director of women's and gender studies at Rutgers University Newark. Her novel in rhyme, The Call-Out (Seven Stories) won the 2023 Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Fiction.


Twitter Username: Intermittentcat

Room 3501AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T157.

Lit Mags Explore Challenges & Methods of Expanding Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

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Literary magazines have historically been criticized for being dominated by white, cisgender, heterosexual voices, and too focused on the experiences of a privileged few. Editors from Solstice, Pangyrus, and AGNI will explore diversity, equity, and inclusion in literary magazines; specific challenges and opportunities, and how editors, writers, and readers can create a more inclusive and truly representative literary landscape.

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Lorena is a Latina immigrant writer, storyteller, and editor-in-chief at Solstice Literary Magazine. Her work appears in KHÔRA, Tasteful Rude, Cognoscenti, Pathfinders Collective, and on WORLDChannel/PBS’s TV program Stories From the Stage. She’s a 2023 PEN America Emerging Writer Fellowship finalist.


Twitter Username: LorenaLeonard

Robbie Gamble is the poetry editor of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. He has been a recipient of a Peter Taylor Fellowship for the Kenyon Writers Workshop, and the Carve Poetry Prize. He worked for many years as a nurse practitioner caring for homeless people in Boston.

Anri Wheeler is an alumna of Tin House, VONA, and GrubStreet’s Memoir Incubator, and is reviews editor for Pangyrus. She teaches at GrubStreet and facilitates DEI workshops as cofounder of Beyond Binaries Consulting. Her writing has appeared in Lit Hub, Boston Globe, Hippocampus, and others.


Twitter Username: anrielizabeth

Website: anriwheeler.com

Shuchi Saraswat's prose has appeared or is forthcoming in Ploughshares, AGNI, Ecotone, Tin House, and elsewhere. She founded and directed the Transnational Literature Series at Brookline Booksmith until 2021. She's now senior editor at AGNI.

Artress Bethany White is associate professor of English at East Stroudsburg University. She is the author of the Trio Award-winning poetry collection My Afmerica: Poems. Her book Survivor's Guilt: Essays on Race and American Identity received a 2022 Next Generation Indie Book Award.


Twitter Username: Artresswhite

Website: artressbethanywhite.com

Room 3501CD, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T158.

Ripped (Gently) from the Headlines: The Ethics of Writing Fiction Based on Fact

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All writers borrow from life: people we’ve known, things we’ve witnessed, and historical events inevitably find their way into the work. But when novelists explicitly set out to retell true stories, they face serious ethical and artistic challenges. What does it mean to "shape" reality? What do we owe the people whose lives are our source material? Is our responsibility to historical accuracy or to the meaning we find there? Five authors discuss the fraught process of turning fact into fiction.

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Andrew Altschul is the author of the novels The Gringa, Deus Ex Machina, and Lady Lazarus, as well as short fiction that has appeared in Best American Nonrequired Reading, Best New American Voices, O. Henry Prize Stories, and elsewhere. He lives in Fort Collins, Colorado and teaches at Colorado State University.

Ellen Meeropol is the author of the novels The Lost Women of Azalea Court, Her Sister's Tattoo, Kinship of Clover, On Hurricane Island, and House Arrest, and guest editor of the anthology Dreams for a Broken World. Recent essay publications include Lilith, Writer Magazine, and Lit Hub.

Ava Homa is the award-winning author of the novel Daughters of Smoke and Fire, which was selected for Roxane Gay's book club and won the 2020 Silver Nautilus Award. Ava holds a Master's degree in creative writing from the University of Windsor in Canada. Her words have appeared in BBC and the Guardian.


Twitter Username: AvaHoma

Website: http://www.avahoma.com/

Charmaine Craig is the author of the novels My Nemesis and Miss Burma, longlisted for the National Book Award and the Women’s Prize for Fiction. Her writing has been published in the New York Times Magazine, Narrative magazine, Afar, and Dissent. She teaches at UC Riverside.

Justin Torres is the author of the novels Blackouts and We the Animals. He has published short fiction in the New Yorker, Harper's, Tin House, and other publications. He lives in Los Angeles, where he is associate professor of English at UCLA.

Room 3501 GH, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T159.

Legal and Ethical Issues in Memoir, Hosted by the Authors Guild

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Writing about real people comes with an obligation to consider the impact on those involved. Memoirists must write the authentic story that they need to tell, and yet doing so can be difficult when facing the risk of a lawsuit or a damaged relationship with a loved one. How can a writer maintain artistic integrity and truthfulness while minimizing the risk of hurting or angering the people who appear on the page? In this panel, authors and attorneys discuss the legal and ethical implications of memoirs to help you feel confident about writing your truth.

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Umair Kazi is the director of policy and advocacy at the Authors Guild. He studied law at the University of Iowa, and creative writing at Columbia University.

Hannah Pittard is the author of five books, including the memoir We Are Too Many (Henry Holt) and the novels The Fates Will Find Their Way (Ecco) and Listen to Me (Houghton Mifflin). She is a professor of English at the University of Kentucky.


Twitter Username: hannahpittard

Website: hannahpittard.com

Maya Shanbhag Lang is the author of What We Carry (Penguin Random House) and The Sixteenth of June (Simon & Schuster). Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Times of India. She holds a PhD in comparative literature and lives in New York.


Twitter Username: mayaslang

Website: www.mayalang.com

Nancy E. Wolff is a partner of the law firm of Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard. A frequent speaker on copyright, she is president of the Copyright Society of the USA, chair of the ABA IP Section Committee and ranked by Super Lawyers as one of the top fifty female lawyers in New York City.

Room 3501 EF, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T160.

Shaking Up the Memoir from Middle America

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Four diverse memoirists come together for a discussion of the joys and perils of writing timely memoirs from the middle of the country, exploring issues related to voice, persona, research, and tension in developing a well-constructed memoir.

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Taylor Brorby is the author of Crude: Poems, Coming Alive: Action and Civil Disobedience, and the forthcoming Boys and Oil. His work has been supported by fellowships and residencies from the NBCC, the MacDowell Colony, and Mesa Refuge. He is a contributing editor at North American Review.

Camille T. Dungy's books include Soil: The Story of a Black Mother's Garden, four books of poetry, most recently, Trophic Cascade, and the essays Guidebook to Relative Strangers. She edited Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry, and coedited two other anthologies.

Toni Jensen is the author of the memoir Carry, a Dayton Literary Peace Prize finalist, and the story collection From the Hilltop. An NEA fellowship recipient in nonfiction, she teaches at the University of Arkansas and in the low-residency MFA at the Institute of American Indian Arts. She is Métis.


Twitter Username: ToniJens

Gabe Montesanti is the author of the roller derby memoir, Brace For Impact (2022). Her work has been published in HuffPost, Lit Hub, Creative Nonfiction Magazine, Electric Literature, and Brevity. Gabe is currently at work on an illustrated memoir about performing drag.


Twitter Username: gabemontesanti

Bookfair Stage, AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T161.

Bookshop.org For All

(Ellington McKenzie)

Did you know publishers and authors can use Bookshop.org? In this session we’ll show you how to create an account, generate revenue streams, and build your brand using Bookshop.org. By providing guidance on how to monetize your online presence, leverage your fanbase, and how you can work with your local indie or many or all indies to support their stores, you’ll leave this session ready support the publishing ecosystem while making some money.

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12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

Room 2101, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T162.

Beyond Books: Alternative Careers in Writing

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Many aspire to “the writer’s life”—publishing books, realizing literary fame—an often inaccessible, even exclusionary, ideal. But there is another way: a life in writing. What paths exist for those not seeking agents or haunting literary magazines but whose writing ambitions and accomplishments are just as relevant? A panel of Kansas City writers—an undergraduate, assessment writer, educator/storyteller, and print/radio journalists—discuss their unique experiences embodying a life in writing.

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Brooke Palmer is a career language arts assessment writer, currently for GED, and freelance writer/journalist. She has written weekly music, nightlife, and culture columns for the Kansas City Star and San Antonio Current, and experiments in podcasts and memoirs.

Carmen Cantu is an undergraduate student at the Kansas City Art Institute. She was awarded a scholarship for the major/minor program with her major focus in the creative writing department. Carmen competed in a slam poetry group at her high school, further solidifying her pursuit in writing and poetry.

John "Br. John" Anderson—author, storyteller, motivational minister, five-time Best of KC Fringe Fest winner—entertains audiences with his brand of interactive storytelling. Former early childhood educator, Br. John has written, produced, and recorded albums of historical storytelling in prose and music.

Barbara Shelly is a journalist, writer, and editor based in Kansas City. She has worked for newspapers in three cities and now contributes to multiple publications as a freelance journalist. Barbara also works as a contract editor for independent and public media sites.


Twitter Username: bshelly

Lewis W. Diuguid is the political action chair for the National Association for Multicultural Education. He was a journalist for more than thirty-nine years for the Kansas City Star. He is the author of A Teacher’s Cry, Discovering the Real AmericaOur Fathers: Making Black Men; and Exploring Cuba.


Twitter Username: DiuguidLewis

Room 2102A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T163.

Resuscitation: Writing About Trauma

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How can fiction express trauma, both lived and witnessed? From “telling it slant” to employing metaphor and rhythm, to imbuing the very landscape with disturbance, fiction permits us to animate trauma in amazing ways. Drawing upon our collective experience as writers, editors, emergency room physicians, and members of the Latinx diaspora, we will describe our own approaches and that of other authors to writing about trauma.

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Rachel Kowalsky, MD is a first-generation Guatemalan American, a pediatric emergency physician, and two-time Pushcart nominee. Her short stories are in the Missouri Review, Atticus Review, Orca, Best of jmww, Intima, and elsewhere. She teaches health humanities at Weill Cornell Medical College.


Twitter Username: rachel_kowalsky

Beth Hahn (she/her) is the author of the novel The Singing Bone (Regan Arts, 2016) and The City Beneath Her (Regal House, 2025). Her writing has been published in the Chestnut Review, DMQ Review, Ran Off with the Star Bassoon, The Common, and CRAFT, among others. She is the editor of -ette review.

David Byron Queen has an MFA from the University of Montana, where he was a Truman Capote Fellow. His work has appeared in VICE, Paste, Split Lip Magazine, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Hobart, McSweeney's, and elsewhere. He lives in New York and runs the publishing company word west.


Twitter Username: byron_queen

Jay Baruch, MD, is a writer, ER doctor, educator, and professor of emergency medicine at Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He's the author of two books of short fiction. His latest book of nonfiction essays is Tornado of Life: A Doctors Journey Through Constraints and Creativity in the ER.


Twitter Username: JBaruchMD

Room 2102B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T164.

Raising More Than One Voice: Polyvocal and Multivocal Poetics

(, , , , Justin Rovillos Monson)

What happens when the speaker becomes a collective? Or when the self fractures into multiplicity? Polyvocal and multivocal poetics demand that we explore not a first telling nor a retelling, but a faceted nonlinear narrative. Join panelists as they explore how expanding the speaker confronts the limitations of the self and the canon in search of solidarity and belonging.

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Asa Drake is a Filipina American poet and essayist in Central Florida. She has received support from the 92Y Discovery Poetry Contest, Tin House, and Idyllwild Arts. Her chapbook One Way to Listen was selected by Taneum Bambrick as the winner of Gold Line Press’s 2021 Poetry Chapbook Contest.


Twitter Username: AsaLDrake

Website: https://www.asaldrake.com/

Jimin Seo is the author of Ossia, a winner of The Changes Book Prize. He earned his MFA from Columbia University School of the Arts. His most recent project, Poems of Consumption, is a collaboration with artist Hamed Sinno premiering at the Barbican Centre in London.


Twitter Username: jimseoni

Emily Lee Luan is the author of 回 / Return, a winner of the Nightboat Poetry Prize, and the PSA chapbook I Watch the Boughs. The recipient of a Pushcart Prize, her work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2021, American Poetry Review, Lit Hub, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA from Rutgers–Newark. 

Saretta Morgan is author of the poetry collection Alt-Nature and the chapbooks Feeling Upon Arrival and room for a counter interior. Her work engages ecologies and forms of connectivity that manifest in the shadows of militarism, incarceration, and ecological trauma.

Room 2103A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T165.

Getting Non-Writers to Write: Teaching Outside of the English Department

(, , , , Iris Jamahl Dunkle)

"I'm not good at writing," "I don't know what to write," and "My English isn't good enough"—working with creative writers outside English departments requires shifts in expectations, approaches, and consciousness. This panel gathers those working in a variety of nontraditional settings: libraries, prisons, hospitals, and teacher certification programs. Each panelist addresses challenges they've encountered and strategies for success to teach with courage, creativity, and care.

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Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor, author of Imperfect Tense (poems), four education books, and numerous articles and essays, was awarded 2015–2023 NEA Big Read grants, a Fulbright (2014), and artist residency (2017) in Mexico. She is a professor of language and literacy education at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: cahnmann

Website: www.melisacahnmanntaylor.com

Deb Olin Unferth is the author of six books, most recently the novel Barn 8. A Guggenheim fellow and finalist for the National Book Critics Award, she has published in the Paris Review, Granta, Harpers, and elsewhere. A professor at UT Austin, she also directs a prison creative writing program.

Elline Lipkin's book The Errant Thread was chosen by Eavan Boland for the Kore Press Book Award. Also the author of Girls' Studies (Seal Press), Lipkin is a research scholar with UCLA's Center for the Study of Women and teaches for Writing Workshops Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: Elline_Lipkin

Website: www.EllineLipkin.com

Mihaela Moscaliuc is the author of Cemetery Ink, Immigrant Model, and Father Dirt, translator of Liliana Ursu's Clay and Star and Carmelia Leonte’s The Hiss of the Viper, and coeditor of Border Lines: Poems of Migration. She is associate professor of English at Monmouth University (NJ).

Room 2103B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T166.

TikTok Isn’t Just For Dancing: An Undergraduate Perspective on #BookTok

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As seen by the "BookTok" tables in Barnes & Noble, the effect that TikTok has on the literary landscape is undeniable. Using their experience growing up online, these undergraduate students explain why you should care about the platform currently rewriting the industry, and how to use it to market your work. From the generation largely responsible for TikTok’s reach, the panelists will tackle the beginnings of BookTok and its effects on the future of the publishing industry.

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Emily Hizny is a senior creative writing and publishing & editing double major at Susquehanna University. She is the managing editor of SU's literary magazine The Sanctuary, the president of SU Slam Poetry Club, and the director of SU's FUSE chapter (Forum for Undergraduate Student Editors).


Twitter Username: OctoEmily

Ellie Pasquale is an undergraduate at Susquehanna University, where she serves as the managing editor of RiverCraft literary magazine and the conference coordinator for FUSE. She formerly managed the TikTok account of a best-selling author and currently works as a library research assistant.


Twitter Username: words_of_whimsy

Amber Watkin is an undergraduate student at Susquehanna University studying creative writing, publishing & editing, and art. She is the editor-in-chief of Susquehanna’s The Squirrel. She is also the PR chair for SU’s chapter of FUSE and is responsible for running the organization’s social media.


Twitter Username: julysmourning

Sarah Ledet is an undergraduate student at Susquehanna University studying creative writing and publishing and editing. They are the junior managing editor of The Sanctuary Magazine and the junior director of FUSE (Forum for Undergraduate Student Editors).


Twitter Username: sledet02

Room 2103C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T167.

Writing Miscarriage, Child Loss, and Complicated Childbirth in the Post-Roe Era

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What new urgency does the fall of Roe v. Wade create for writers who experience miscarriage, child loss, and childbirth? How does the use of form and persona complicate and elucidate these topics? What can be gained by exploring racist and sexist institutions of reproductive care through poetry? How can poetry order the chaos of this kind of grief into art? Five poets will discuss their process of writing reproductive elegies, from individual poems to chapbooks and full-length collections.

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Kate Gaskin is the author of the poetry collection Forever War (YesYes Books). Recently her poems have appeared in Ploughshares, TriQuarterly, and New Letters, among others. She edits poetry for The Adroit Journal and is a PhD student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.


Twitter Username: katebgaskin

Joanna Solfrian’s first book, Visible Heavens, was chosen by Naomi Shihab Nye for the 2009 Wick Poetry Prize. She is also the author of The Mud Room, The Second Perfect Number, and the upcoming Temporary Beast. An educator in NYC, Solfrian is also a MacDowell fellow and six-time Pushcart nominee.

Leila Chatti is the author of Deluge (Copper Canyon Press, 2020) and multiple chapbooks. She teaches in the MFA program at Pacific University and is a provost fellow at the University of Cincinnati.


Twitter Username: laypay

Niina Pollari is a poet and the author of the books Path of Totality (listed by the New York Times as one of the best poetry collections of 2022) and Dead Horse. She is also the translator, from the Finnish, of Tytti Heikkinen's collection The Warmth of the Taxidermied Animal.


Twitter Username: heartbarf

Kwoya Fagin Maples is the author of Mend (University Press of Kentucky, 2018). A collection of historical persona poetry, Mend tells the story of the birth of obstetrics and gynecology in America and the role enslaved black women played in that process.


Twitter Username: kwoya_f_maples

Room 2104A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T168.

African Diaspora Caucus

Uniting attendees from across disciplines, the African Diaspora Caucus will provide a forum for discussions of careers, best practices for teaching creative writing, and obtaining the MFA or PhD. We will work with AWP's affinity caucuses to develop national diversity benchmarks for creative writing programs, and will collaborate with board and staff to ensure that AWP programs meet the needs of diaspora writers. This caucus will be an inclusive space that reflects the pluralities in our community.

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Room 2104B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T169.

Low-Stakes Creative Writing in a High-Stakes School: Upper Story

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Explore one Kansas City, Missouri independent high school’s dedicated week of creative writing where in all English classes, across all grade levels, students engage in professional and peer-led workshops, craft talks and readings, and have time and space to write—without a grade attached. Low-stakes creative writing experiences, especially in post-COVID years, are a way to develop social-emotional bonds, imagination, and writing skills. Learn about how to design and implement a program like this at any level.

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Piper Abernathy is the English Department Chair at Pembroke Hill, a KCMO independent school. Abernathy has an MEd in literacy studies and an MFA in poetry from UMKC. Her poems have been published in Mid-American Review, Pleiades, and elsewhere. She has presented for the International Reading Association.

Ben Christian is in his twenty-fourth year of teaching secondary English at Pembroke Hill. In that time, he has witnessed many educational trends, fads, and buzzwords. The constant, however, is students' need to find theirselves in writing. Christian's project is to create a consistent place for that to happen.

Nathan Gehoski holds a PhD in English from the University of Georgia, an MA in creative writing from Eastern Michigan University, and a BS in microbiology from the University of Michigan. An eclectic writer and educator, he pursues an experimental approach to trauma and its affect.

Luisa Muradyan is originally from Odesa, Ukraine and holds a PhD in poetry from the University of Houston. She won the 2017 Prairie Schooner Book Prize and is the author of American Radiance. She is a member of the Cheburashka Collective and additional work can be found at Best American Poetry.

Jim Young has an MA in Greek and Classicals from the University of Kansas and currently teaches ninth and twelfth grade English at Pembroke Hill, an independent school in Kansas City, Missouri. His teaching interests include comics, graphic literature, and literature by and about neurodivergent authors.

Room 2105, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T170.

Toward a Poetics of Tenderness: Hegemonic Masculinity & the Poetic Imagination

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The culturally-dominant conceptualization of masculinity is characterized by intermale dominance, relentless competition, emotional inexpressivity, and attendant violences (interpersonal, ecological). This damaging, hegemonic masculinity impacts every aspect of daily life, from the personal to the geopolitical. This panel confronts masculinity narratives, explores craft strategies to subvert destructive notions of “manhood,” and considers what it means to embody a poetics of tenderness.

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Hayan Charara is the author of four poetry books, including These Trees, Those Leaves, This Flower, That Fruit. He edited Inclined to Speak, an anthology of contemporary Arab American poetry, and edited the Etel Adnan Poetry Prize with Fady Joudah. He teaches at the University of Houston.

Matthew Olzmann is the author of three collections of poems including Constellation Route, Mezzanines, and Contradictions in the Design. He teaches at Dartmouth College and in the MFA program for writers at Warren Wilson College.

Taylor Johnson is from Washington, DC. He is the author of Inheritance (Alice James Books, 2020), winner of the 2021 Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America. Taylor was the inaugural 2022 poet-in-residence at the Guggenheim Museum. He is the poet laureate of Takoma Park, Maryland.

Ross Gay is the author of the poetry collections Against WhichBringing the Shovel Down, and Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude; and the essay collection The Book of Delights. He teaches at Indiana University.

Issam Zineh is a Palestinian-American poet and clinician-scientist. He is author of Unceded Land (Trio House Press, 2022), Editors’ Selection and finalist for the Trio Award, and Medal Provocateur. His writing appears in AGNI, Guernica, Gulf Coast, and elsewhere. He lives on Paskestikweya land.


Twitter Username: izineh

Room 2207, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T171.

Indian Writers Challenge State Violence

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In the popular depictions of India circulating in the United States, we rarely see the stories that the nation’s jingoistic governments have shoved under the carpet, stories of massive human rights violations committed by the Indian state in the country’s margins: military violence and Hindu fundamentalist oppression—nearly absent in the vast array of widely read work about India available in English in the U.S. The panelists will discuss how they represent this in their work and the challenges associated.

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Aruni Kashyap writes in Assamese and English. He is the author of two books of fiction, including His Father’s Disease (Gaudy Boy Books NY), and a poetry collection. Winner of fellowships from NEA and the Charles Wallace Trust, he is the director of the CWP at the University of Georgia, Athens.


Twitter Username: arunikashyap

Website: http://www.arunikashyap.com/

Suchitra Vijayan is a New York-based author of the critically acclaimed Midnight's Borders: A People's History of Modern India (2021) and How Long Can the Moon Be Caged? Voices of Indian Political Prisoners (2023). She is a lawyer, researcher, and teaches at NYU Gallatin and Columbia University.


Twitter Username: suchitrav

Shastri Akella's debut novel is The Sea Elephants (Flatiron (US-Canada), Penguin (India)). His writing has appeared in Guernica, Fairy Tale Review, Masters Review, The Rumpus, World Literature Today, CRAFT, etc. He is an assistant professor of creative writing at Michigan State University.

Torsa Ghosal is the author of an experimental novella, Open Couplets, and a book of literary criticism, Out of Mind. Her work has appeared in Berkeley Fiction ReviewCatapultLit HubLos Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere. She is a professor of English at California State University and is at work on a novel.


Twitter Username: TorsaG

Room 2208, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T172.

This is Nebraska: Appraising the State We're In

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Writers across generations and genres read their work and discuss what it means to be an author from the Great Plains at this moment. Inspired by the public radio series This is Nebraska: Books That Tell Our Story, this panel will delve into what it's like to write, live, and persist in a place that's considered culturally homogenous “flyover” country but whose diverse population is often polarized and marginalized. How do we engage the region's traditions? How do we push back against them?

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Theodore Wheeler is the author of four books, most recently The War Begins in Paris (Little, Brown & Co., 2023). He has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Nebraska Arts Council, and Akademie Schloss Solitude in Germany, and teaches creative writing at Creighton University.


Twitter Username: theodorewheeler

Website: theodore-wheeler.com

Chris Harding Thornton is a seventh-generation Nebraskan and holds an MFA from the University of Washington and a PhD from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her first novel, Pickard County Atlas, was a PBS Masterpiece Best Mystery. It was also featured in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and the New Yorker. Her second novel, Little Underworld, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: chrishardingth1

Website: www.chrishardingthornton.com

James Han Mattson is the author of two novels, The Lost Prayers of Ricky Graves and Reprieve. His third novel, The Grand Impostors, is forthcoming. He currently lives in Austin, Texas.


Twitter Username: jhmattson

Moisés R. Delgado is a Latinx writer from the Midwest. He holds an MFA from the University of Arizona. His prose appears in Gulf Coast, SmokeLong Quarterly, Passages North, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere. Moisés is currently working on a memoir/game about home, anxiety, self-acceptance, and chance.


Twitter Username: MoisesTheHuman

Julie Iromuanya is the author of Mr. and Mrs. Doctor, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction, the Etisalat Prize for Literature, and the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize for Debut Fiction. She teaches at the University of Chicago.


Twitter Username: Julie_Iro

Website: http://julieiromuanya.com

Room 2209, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T173.

Queer As In: A Reading of Debut Trans and Nonbinary Poets

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Experience the transformative power of four trans and nonbinary poets in a poignant reading of debut poetry collections. Amid rising anti-trans legislation and violence, these writers navigate the complexities of identity, resilience, and self-discovery. With vulnerability and strength, their diverse voices challenge societal norms and inspire change. Join us to celebrate and amplify marginalized perspectives, fostering empathy and understanding in a time when existence itself is a radical act.

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Sebastian Merrill is the author of GHOST :: SEEDS, the winner of the 2022 Levis Prize for Poetry from Friends of Writers, a member of the inaugural Get the Word Out poetry cohort from Poets & Writers, a Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Staff Scholar, and a Warren Wilson MFA Alumni Residency Fellow.

Jennifer Conlon is from North Carolina and teaches at Arizona State University. Their poems have been published by Bayou Magazine, Juked, Bennington Review, DIALOGIST, Threadcount, and elsewhere. They won the 2022 Autumn House Poetry Prize, selected by Carl Phillips. Taking to Water is their first book.

Tennison S. Black is the author of Survival Strategies (UGA Press, 2023), selected as a winner of the National Poetry Series. They are the managing editor at Sundress Publications and also at Best of the Net.


Twitter Username: Tennison_Black

Website: tennisonblack.com

jason b. crawford (They/Them) was born in Washington DC and raised in Lansing, Michigan. Their full-length debut Year of the Unicorn Kidz is out from Sundress Publications. They are currently an MFA Candidate at New School in Poetry.


Twitter Username: jasonbcrawford

Room 2210, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T174.

Slackers, Stoners, and Screw-Ups: APIA Writers on the Margins of the Margins

(, , , )

Most first- or second-gen APIA stories are tales of perseverance. The American Dream fulfilled. But what about everyone else: the slackers, stoners, and screw-ups? This panel is five creators, working in a variety of prose genres, who will discuss the personal and artistic choices that led them to writing about APIA people in the margins. The discussion will delve into conversations around the consideration of audience, upending of the model minority myth, and writing complicated characters.

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Mark Galarrita is a graduate of the 2017 Clarion West Writers Workshop and the University of Alabama MFA program. His writing can be found in McSweeney’s, Electric Literature, Nightmare magazine, Split Lip, and elsewhere. Currently, he works at Scribner.


Twitter Username: Markgalarrita

Gene Kwak is the author of Go Home, Ricky!, which received a starred review in Publisher's Weekly and was a Rumpus book club selection. He is also the winner of the 2022 Poets & Writers Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Award. He is an assistant professor at Oklahoma State University.


Twitter Username: genekwak3

Jean Kyoung Frazier is a writer living in Los Angeles. Pizza Girl is her debut novel. She also writes for television shows such as A24's Beef.

Jenn Alandy Trahan is a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, where she teaches fiction, creative nonfiction, creative expression, and contemporary American short stories. Her work (featuring APIA slackers and screw-ups) has been published in Harper's, One Story, and Best American Short Stories.

Room 2211, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T175.

Centering the Margin: Editors on Editing Anthologies

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In this session, editors of five recently published, or publishing in 2023, anthologies will highlight the contributions of their anthologies and share ins and outs of editing an anthology and getting it published. The anthologies—South to South, Mid/South Sonnets, Already Gone: 40 Stories of Running Away, What Things Cost: An Anthology for the People, and Transmasculine Poetics: Filling the Gap in Literature & the Silences Around Us—cover a wide range of issues and all major literary genres.

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Khem K. Aryal is the author of a short story collection The In-Betweeners (Braddock Ave Books, 2023) and editor of an anthology South to South (Texas Review Press, 2023). He teaches creative writing at Arkansas State University, where he also serves as creative materials editor of Arkansas Review.


Twitter Username: khemaryal

Website: www.khemaryal.com

Casie Dodd lives in Arkansas with her husband and two children. Her work has appeared in Oxford American, Image, Front Porch Republic, Arkansas Review, and other journals. Based in Fort Smith, she is the founder and publisher of Belle Point Press.


Twitter Username: CasieDodd

Hannah Grieco is the editor of two anthologies, Already Gone (Alan Squire Publishing, 2023) and And If That Mockingbird Don't Sing (Alternating Current, 2022). Her writing can be found in the Fairy Tale Review, The Rumpus, Brevity, Poet Lore, and more. She teaches at American University.


Twitter Username: writesloud

Emily Jalloul is a Lebanese-American poet from South Florida. She earned a PhD in English and creative writing from the University of Tennessee. Her previous work has been published or is forthcoming in Oxford American, What Things Cost: an anthology for the people, and Arkansas International.


Twitter Username: ejjalloul

Remi Recchia, PhD, is a trans writer and editor from Kalamazoo, Michigan. Works include Quicksand/Stargazing; Sober; From Gold, Ghosts: Alchemy Erasures; and Transmasculine Poetics: Filling the Gap in Literature & the Silences Around Us. He holds an MFA in poetry from Bowling Green State University.


Twitter Username: steambbcrywolf

Room 2215A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T176.

The Loneliness of the Slow Essayist: On Writing Books That Take Forever

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Does it feel like your nonfiction book is taking too long to write? From the tenure committee to social media, from well-meaning friends to your own worst imagination—pressures to hurry up and write can easily overwhelm. What if you take so long your cultural criticism or memoir is no longer relevant? What if the fire burns out after years of research? Join five writers in the same boat as we create a space to explore and tackle some of the real versus imagined risks of the long-simmering book project.

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Chelsea Biondolillo is the author of The Skinned Bird: Essays and two prose chapbooks, #Lovesong and Ologies. Her work has appeared in Best American Science & Nature Essays, Orion, Brevity, Diagram, River Teeth, Passages North, and others. She is a former Colgate O'Connor and Oregon Literary Fellow.


Twitter Username: c_biondolillo

Website: http://roamingcowgirl.com

Silas Hansen teaches creative writing at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, and is the nonfiction editor for Waxwing. His essays have appeared in Slate, Colorado Review, The Normal School, Hayden's Ferry Review, Redivider, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: silas_hansen

Website: www.silashansen.net

Lisa Nikolidakis's fiction and nonfiction has appeared in Best American Essays 2016, Los Angeles Review, Brevity, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Passages North, The Greensboro Review, and elsewhere. She is an assistant professor at the University of Evansville.


Twitter Username: lisanikol

Helena Rho, a former assistant professor of pediatrics, earned her MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Pittsburgh. Her memoir, American Seoul, was an Amazon Book Editors' Best Books of May 2022 and included in BuzzFeed's "16 Memoirs by AAPI Authors to Add to Your Reading List."


Twitter Username: helena_rho

Rajpreet Heir is an assistant professor of creative nonfiction at Ithaca College. She has published nonfiction in both commercial and literary venues including The Atlantic, the Washington Post, the New York TimesTeen VogueBrevity, and others. She writes about being Indian in Indiana.


Twitter Username: rajtweet_edu

Room 2215B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T177.

From the French but not from France: A Bilingual Reading of Francophone Poems, Sponsored by ALTA

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Many of the poets who claim the French language and handle it in expansive ways come from non-French cultural backgrounds. Five translators of francophone poetry will read and discuss their translations of poets from Syria, Haiti, Algeria, Palestine, and Côte d’Ivoire who use French (and, through translation, English) and inflect it with a wider diversity of non-French cultural, exilic, and decolonial concerns, among others.

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Conor Bracken's poetry books include Henry Kissinger, Mon Amour and The Enemy of My Enemy Is Me. He is also the translator of Scorpionic Sun by Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine, and No Way in the Skin Without This Bloody Embrace, by Jean D'Amérique, a finalist for the 2023 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation.

Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored thirteen titles (nine translations) and won the 2022 Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize. A BTBA and CLMP finalist, she received two NEA translation grants and was decorated with the French Academic Palms. An Infusion of Violets was named "New & Noteworthy" by the New York Times.

Hélène Cardona has authored three bilingual collections and five translations. A Goethe-Institut and Andalucía International University Fellow, she is the recipient of an Albertine and FACE Foundation Grant for The Abduction by Maram Al-Masri and a Hemingway Grant for Beyond Elsewhere by Gabriel Arnou-Laujeac. 


Twitter Username: helenecardona

Website: http://helenecardona.com

Todd Fredson is the author of the poetry collections Century Worm and The Crucifix-Blocks, and the translator of Tanella Boni's The future has an appointment with the dawn, as well as Josué Guébo’s My country, tonight and Think of Lampedusa. He is a 2018 NEA Translation Fellow.

Kareem James Abu-Zeid, PhD, is an award-winning translator of poets and novelists from across the Arab world and the recipient of the 2022 Sarah Maguire Prize for poetry in translation. He is the author of the book The Poetics of Adonis and Yves Bonnefoy: Poetry as Spiritual Practice.

Room 2215C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T178.

Writing Under the Influence: Accessing the Unknown through Divination

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Divination and writing are both processes that draw from archives of knowledge, but divination opens us up to sources often difficult to access: ancestral, somatic, elemental, natural, spiritual, unconscious, silenced. By accessing these sources to inform and guide writing, our writing, in turn, generates meaning and connections that alter the archives in structure, content, and accessibility. We will explore how divination creates new paths to hidden ways of knowing and writing.

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Michele Battiste is author of three poetry collections, most recently Waiting for the Wreck to Burn, which won the Louise Bogan Award from Trio House Press. She has taught workshops for Gotham Writers Workshops, Teen Ink, and Wichita State University. She currently raises funds to protect nature.


Twitter Username: michelebattiste

Website: http://www.michelebattiste.com

Kristen E. Nelson is the author of In the Away Time (2024) and the length of this gap; and two chapbooks: sometimes I gets lost and is grateful for noises in the dark and Write, Dad. She is the cofounder of Four Queens with Selah Saterstrom and a literature PhD student at UCSC.

Hoa Nguyen is an educator and author of several books, including Red Juice: Poems 1998–2008, the Griffin Prize-nominated Violet Energy Ingots, and A Thousand Times You Lose Your Treasure, winner of the Canada Book Award and finalist for a 2021 National Book Award and the General Governor’s Award.


Twitter Username: peacehearty

Website: http://www.hoa-nguyen.com/

Megan Kaminski is a poet and essayist—and the author of three books of poetry, most recently Gentlewomen, and Prairie Divination, a collection of essays and oracle deck (with artist L. Ann Wheeler). She is professor of creative writing and environmental studies at the University of Kansas.


Twitter Username: megan_kaminski

Website: http://www.megankaminski.com/

Teresa Carmody's books include The Reconception of Marie, Maison Femme: a fiction, and A Healthy Interest in the Lives of Others, forthcoming in 2024. Her essays have appeared in Michigan Quarterly, Waterstone Review, LitHub, and more. She teaches at University of Nebraska Omaha.

Room 2502A, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T179.

Memoirs-in-Essays

(, , , , Tyrese Coleman)

The rise of memoirs-in-essays is upon us, but what purpose does the form serve? What even is a memoir-in-essays? These four CNF writers discuss why they chose to inhabit the space between memoir and essays and the possibilities inherent in the subgenre. In this moderated Q&A, panelists will discuss the contours of the form, the freedom of liminality, and the challenges of writing the in-between.

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Margo Steines holds an MFA in CNF from the University of Arizona. Her work was named Notable in Best American Essays and has appeared in The Sun, Brevity, Off Assignment, "Modern Love," the anthology Letter to a Stranger, and elsewhere. She is the author of the memoir-in-essays Brutalities.


Twitter Username: margosteines

Maddie Norris is the author of The Wet Wound: An Elegy in Essays. She earned her MFA at the University of Arizona and before that was the Thomas Wolfe scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her work can be found in Guernica, Fourth Genre, and Territory, among others.


Twitter Username: madnor94

Natalie Lima is a Cuban-Puerto Rican writer, with work published in Longreads, Guernica, Brevity, the Offing, Catapult, Sex & the Single Woman (Harper Perennial, 2022), Body Language (Catapult, 2022), and elsewhere. She recently joined the faculty at Butler MFA as assistant professor of English.


Twitter Username: natalielima09

Krys Malcolm Belc is the author of the memoir The Natural Mother of the Child: A Memoir of Nonbinary Parenthood (Counterpoint) and the flash nonfiction chapbook In Transit (The Cupboard Pamphlet). He is the Edelstein-Keller Writer in Residence Fellow at the University of Minnesota.


Twitter Username: krysmalcolmbelc

Room 2502B, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T180.

The Unsung Masters Reading

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Each year, the Unsung Masters Series publishes a book devoted to the life and work of a great but little known author. Volumes include large selections of the author's work printed alongside interviews, articles, drafts, photographs, and ephemera. This reading brings together the editors of four recent volumes who will read from the work of poets Shreela Ray, Tom Postell, Bert Meyers, and Laura Hershey. This event should lead to great discoveries for those who attend.

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Kevin Prufer's ninth book of poetry is The Fears (Copper Canyon, 2023). His first novel, Sleepaway, will be published by Acre Books in 2024. He is professor of English in the creative writing program at the University of Houston and also teaches in the Lesley University low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: Prufer_Kevin

Website: www.kevinprufer.com

Niki Herd is the author of the chapbook don't you weep, and two poetry collections: The Language of Shedding Skin and The Stuff of Hollywood, which is forthcoming. Herd coedited Laura Hershey: On the Life & Work of an American Master. She lives in St. Louis and teaches at Washington University.

Michael C. Peterson serves as curator of the Elliston Poetry Room and archive at the University of Cincinnati. He's a poet, the recipient of fellowships from Yaddo, MacDowell, and Vermont Studio Center, and is an editor of Tom Postell: On the Life and Work of an Unsung Master (Pleiades, 2024).


Twitter Username: ellistonpoetryroom

Kazim Ali's most recent books are Sukun: New and Selected Poems (Wesleyan) and the novel Indian Winter (Coach House). He is a professor of literary arts and chair of the Department of Literature at the University of California, San Diego. He is the founding editor of Nightboat Books.


Twitter Username: kazimalipoet

Website: www.kazimali.com

Dana Levin's fifth book is Now Do You Know Where You Are, a 2022 NYT Notable Book. She is coeditor of a book on poet Bert Meyers for the Unsung Masters Series (Pleiades 2023). A Whiting and Guggenheim Fellow, Levin serves as Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at Maryville University in Saint Louis.

Room 2503AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T181.

How True Must Fiction Be?—The Role of Research in Fiction Writing

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When does our imagination require fact checking? Curated facts vivify our made-up worlds, deepen authenticity, and ward off appropriation, while inaccuracy undermines our credibility. This diverse panel of fiction writers will detail their research methods and madnesses, addressing questions like, how can you tell when you’re writing into territory you need to learn more about? When do facts weigh down rather than elevate a story? How can we avoid—or learn from—rabbit holes?

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Teresa's award-winning wok is published widely in US and international literary journals and anthologies. Her collection Hold Off The Night, a finalist for two book prizes, was published June 2023. Recent awards include the 2023 Gemini Story Award and the NMW story award in 2022. She is the founder of Lakeshore Writers Workshop.


Twitter Username: TBurnsGunther

Website: https://www.teresaburnsgunther.com

Charmaine Wilkerson is the author of Black Cake, a multigenerational novel with elements of historical fiction. A former journalist, she is a graduate of Barnard College and Stanford University, and has written at Bread Loaf in Sicily, the Vermont Studio Center, and Hedgebrook.

Jody Hobbs Hesler’s debut story collection What Makes You Think You're Supposed to Feel Better is forthcoming from Cornerstone Press, October 2023. A novel is forthcoming from Flexible Press November 2024. Her work also appears in Arts & LettersCRAFTAtticus ReviewNecessary Fiction, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jhhesler

Viet Dinh teaches at the University of Delaware. He has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as two O. Henry Prizes and the Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction. His debut novel After Disasters, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Prize, was released in 2016.


Twitter Username: vietpdinh

Susan Baller-Shepard is a poet, author, and ordained Presbyterian minister. Her essays, poetry, photography, and sermons have appeared in newspapers and various literary publications. She is the author of the poetry collection Doe, as well as a recently completed historical fiction novel and new poetry collection.


Twitter Username: yoursbc

Room 2504AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T182.

Neurodiverse Sounds like Universe: Crafting Worlds Embracing Neurodiversity

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Combating stigmas and shame culture surrounding mental health, writers share poetry, nonfiction, and cross-genre work that embraces autism spectrum disorder, Anxiety, ADHD, OCD, Bipolar, and depression. These writers refuse to hide from or mask within an ableist society and through content and form, call attention to the creative powers of neurodiversity. They will share their work and discuss how their craft choices transform neurotypical language into a neurodiverse universe.

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Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach, PhD, writes poetry and nonfiction. She is the author of The Many Names for Mother (Wick Poetry Prize, KSU Press, 2019), Don't Touch the Bones (Lost Horse Press, 2020), and 40 WEEKS (YesYes Books, 2023). She is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at Denison University.


Twitter Username: jkdpoetry

Oliver de la Paz is the author of six books of poetry and the poet laureate of Worcester, Massachusetts. His most recent book The Diaspora Sonnets was published in 2023 with Liveright Press. He is a founding member of Kundiman and teaches at the College of the Holy Cross and in theLow Res MFA Program at PLU.


Twitter Username: @Oliver_delaPaz

Website: http://www.oliverdelapaz.com

Eugenia Leigh is a Korean American author of two books of poetry. Poems from her new collection, Bianca, were awarded Poetry's Bess Hokin Prize and have appeared in The Atlantic, The Nation, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. A Kundiman fellow, Eugenia serves as a poetry editor at Adroit Journal.


Twitter Username: EugeniaLeigh

Website: http://www.eugenialeigh.com

Diannely Antigua is a Dominican American poet and educator, born and raised in Massachusetts. Her debut collection Ugly Music was the winner of the Pamet River Prize and a 2020 Whiting Award. Her second collection Good Monster is forthcoming from Copper Canyon. She received her MFA from NYU.


Twitter Username: nellfell13

Allison Blevins, a queer disabled writer, is the author of Cataloguing Pain, Handbook for the Newly Disabled, Slowly/Suddenly, and five chapbooks. Her next collection is forthcoming from Persea Books. She is the director of Small Harbor Publishing and the executive editor at the museum of americana.

Room 2505AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T183.

What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About (or To) Agents

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You’ve finalized your manuscript and perfected your query letter, but now what? How do you know the etiquette or strategy to approach finding the right agent? And what comes after you’ve found the dream fit? Five seasoned literary agents offer insight about what they’re looking for, how they work with authors, and why you should never ever pitch them in the bathroom. The conversation will approach the agent/author relationship with transparency, candor, and care.


This event will take place in person in the Kansas City Convention Center. In addition to the in-person event at the conference, a prerecorded version of this event will be available to view on-demand.

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Sarah Bowlin joined Aevitas Creative Management as an agent in early 2017 after about a decade as an editor of bold new voices in literary fiction and nonfiction at Riverhead Books and most recently at Henry Holt & Co.


Twitter Username: svbowlin

Annie Hwang is a literary agent at Ayesha Pande Literary where she represents literary fiction with teeth and select nonfiction. Her authors include John Paul Brammer, Franny Choi, Lilly Dancyger, Carson Faust, Faylita Hicks, Sequoia Nagamatsu, Cleo Qian, and Alison C. Rollins.


Twitter Username: AnnieAHwang

Lucy Carson has been with The Friedrich Agency since 2008, where she works with Pulitzer Prize-winning and New York Times bestselling authors including Elizabeth Strout, Ruth Ozeki, Leila Mottley, and Karen Joy Fowler. Lucy also manages the book-to-film rights for the entire Friedrich Agency roster.


Twitter Username: LucyACarson

Mariah Stovall is an agent at Trellis Literary Management, where she represents adult fiction and nonfiction. She previously worked at Howland Literary, Writers House, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and Gallery Books. She's also the author of the novel I Love You So Much It's Killing Us Both.


Twitter Username: retiredpunk

Mina Hamedi represents adult literary fiction and nonfiction. She is interested in stories from around the world, particularly her native Turkey and Iran. She is an associate agent at Janklow & Nesbit where she works with cofounder Lynn Nesbit. She lives in New York City with her Turkish street cats, Saffron and Lemon.


Twitter Username: mina_hamedi

Grand Ballroom A, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T184.

NBF Presents: Crafting Coming-of-Age

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Join 2019 National Book Award winner Susan Choi (Trust Exercise) and 2022 National Book Award finalist Sarah Thankam Mathews (All This Could Be Different) for a conversation on the impact of contemporary bildungsroman and what it means to grow up in adult fiction. Choi and Mathews read from their novels and discuss how and why coming-of-age stories capture writers and readers alike. Moderated by Ruth Dickey, Executive Director of the National Book Foundation. Presented in partnership with the National Book Foundation.


This event will take place in person in the Kansas City Convention Center and will be livestreamed for virtual audiences. All livestreamed events include open captions and ASL interpretation.

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Susan Choi is the author of five novels, including Trust Exercise, which received the 2019 National Book Award for fiction. She has also been recipient of the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, a Lambda Literary award, the 2021 Sunday Times Audible Short Story Award, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation. She serves as a trustee of PEN America and teaches in The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University.

Sarah Thankam Mathews is the author of All This Could Be Different, which was shortlisted for the 2022 National Book Award in Fiction. It was also a New York Times Editor's Choice and named a Best Book of the Year by NPR, Vogue, Vulture, Los Angeles Times, TIME, Slate, and Buzzfeed. Mathews grew up between Oman and India, immigrating to the United States at seventeen.


Twitter Username: smathewss

Ruth Dickey has spent over twenty-five years working at the intersection of community building, writing, and art, now as executive director of the National Book Foundation. Ruth previously had the pleasure of leading organizations in Washington, D.C.; New Orleans, Los Angeles; Cincinnati, Ohio; and, most recently, in Seattle, Washington as executive director of Seattle Arts & Lectures. An ardent fan of dogs and coffee, she served as a fiction judge for the 2019 National Book Awards and holds an MFA in poetry from UNC-Greensboro, a BS in Foreign Service, and an MA in Latin American Studies from Georgetown University.

Room 3501AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T185.

Writing in Written-Off States: Literary Nonprofits on Advocacy & Outreach

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In our charged political climate, representatives from literary nonprofits located in so-called “red states” will discuss their pitfalls and their triumphs in literary programming. This panel will discuss the importance of nonprofit literary arts organizations in states with often-hostile political climates, what problems (from funding to program security) they face, and their current initiatives and future goals to foster a more inclusive community and uplift marginalized voices.

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Ed Southern is the executive director of the North Carolina Writers' Network and the author of Fight Songs: A Story of Love and Sports in a Complicated South. His stories and essays have appeared in The Bitter Southerner, the North Carolina Literary Review, Asheville Poetry Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: EdSouthern

Meg Reid is the publisher of Hub City Press and executive director of the Hub City Writers Project, a literary nonprofit that cultivates readers and nurtures writers throughout the South to foster an inclusive literary arts culture.


Twitter Username: megireid

Ashley M. Jones is the poet laureate of Alabama and the author of three award-winning poetry collections, most recently Reparations Now! (Hub City Press, 2021).


Twitter Username: ashberry813

Website: ashleymichellejones.wordpress.com

Room 3501CD, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T186.

Voices of Resilience: Celebrating the Strength & Resilience of BIPOC Communities

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This panel of five BIPOC poets will share work that celebrates the hard-won strength that comes with facing adversity, then engage in a dialogue about the ways their poems and their platforms have become tools for confronting and navigating challenges such as systemic oppression, marginalization, and cultural erasure. This panel seeks to honor and uplift stories of resilience while showcasing the transformative power of poetry as a means of self expression, healing, and social change.

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Ricardo Ruiz is a multidimensional writer of poetry and prose. His work draws from his experience as a first-generation Mexican-American and his military service. He is passionate about elevating marginalized voices from rural communities and takes pride in being a conduit for cultural connection.


Twitter Username: PoetRuiz

José Olivarez is from Calumet City, Illinois. He has published two books of poems: Promises of Gold and Citizen Illegal.

Paul Hlava Ceballos is the author of banana [ ], a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and winner of the Donald Hall Prize for Poetry. His collaborative chaplet banana/we pilot the blood is with Quenton Baker and Christina Sharpe. He lives in Seattle and practices echocardiography.


Twitter Username: paulhlava

Website: www.paulhlava.com

Salaam Green is an award-winning Certified Listener Poet and Alabama’s Poet Laureate of Innovation & Creativity. Salaam’s poetry collection, to be published in 2024 (Pulley Press), will be on the descendants of the Wallace House in rural south. She is the 2018 Allied Media Black Women's Writing Recipient.


Twitter Username: Salaam1

Room 3501 GH, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T187.

Writing Life As A Long Game: From Emerging to the Established Writer

(, , Vincent Toro)

“Stay focused and stay in love with what it is that you are doing.” — Dianne Reeves, NEA Jazz Master. Writing is a lifelong journey. Often a writer’s success is measured by publication, accolades, and sales. But with all the ups and downs of the writing life—emotional, financial, physical, etc.—what motivates writers to continue sitting in the chair to do the work? And what sorts of habits are needed to create meaningful art for the long haul?

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David Mura. Memoirs: Turning Japanese; Where the Body Meets Memory, novel, four poetry books including The Last Incantations. Essay collections: A Stranger's Journey: Race, Identity & Narrative Craft in Writing; The Stories Whiteness Tells Itself: Racial Myths & Our American Narratives. Teaches at VONA.


Twitter Username: MuraDavid

Website: davidmura.com

Jubi Arriola-Headley (he/him) is a Blacqueer poet and the author of original kink (Sibling Rivalry Press), winner of the 2021 Housatonic Book Award; his second collection, Bound, will be published by Persea Books in 2024. Find Jubi at www.justjubi.com.

Room 3501 EF, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T188.

In the Tempered Dark: Contemporary Poets Transcending Elegy

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The forthcoming anthology In the Tempered Dark conveys the wide range of grief deemed urgent by contemporary poets from diverse backgrounds, at all career stages, exploring loss, trauma, addiction, marginalized bodies, the climate crisis, inter alia, through various styles and forms. As grief needs, from villanelle to epistle to golden shovel to erasure, these contributors’ poems show visceral links between unique bodies of/in grief and the shapes poems take on the page, transcending elegy.

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Lisa Fay Coutley is the author of HOST, tether, Errata, In the Carnival of Breathing, and Small Girl. She is editor of the anthology In the Tempered Dark. She's received an NEA fellowship and is an associate professor of poetry and CNF in the Writer's Workshop at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.


Twitter Username: LFCoutley

Prageeta Sharma's recent book is Grief Sequence (Wave Books). She is the founder of the conference Thinking Its Presence; a finalist of the 2020 Four Quartets Prize; and a recipient of the 2010 Howard Foundation Award. Sharma is the Henry G. Lee '37 professor of English at Pomona College.


Twitter Username: prapra

torrin a. greathouse is a transgender cripple-punk and essayist. She is the author of Wound from the Mouth of a Wound, winner of the 2022 Kate Tufts Discovery Award, as well as the forthcoming DEED. She teaches at Rainier Writing Workshop, the low-residency MFA at Pacific Lutheran University


Twitter Username: tagreathouse

Muriel Leung is the author of How to Fall in Love in a Time of Unnamable Disaster, forthcoming from W.W. Norton & Company, and three poetry books. She received her PhD in creative writing and literature from University of Southern California and is faculty at California Institute of the Arts.


Twitter Username: murmurshewrote

Website: http://www.murielleung.weebly.com

Chloe Honum is the author of the poetry collections The Lantern Room, Then Winter, and The Tulip-Flame, a finalist for the PEN Center USA Literary Award. Raised in Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand, she is an associate professor of creative writing at Baylor University.

Bookfair Stage, AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T189.

Naugatuck River Review and Wordpeace Reading!

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Naugatuck River Review, a print journal of narrative poetry and Wordpeace.co, an online multi-genre journal dedicated to social justice issues present a reading of NRR's fifteenth annual contest winners and featured Wordpeace contributors from our issues celebrating bodily autonomy and LGBTQ+ writers and issues.

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Lori Desrosiers's poetry books include typing with e.e. cummings and Keeping Planes in the Air. They teach poetry in the Lesley University MFA program. They are the editor of two journals, Naugatuck River Review and Wordpeace.


Twitter Username: lorides

Website: http://loridesrosierspoetry.com

Subhaga Crystal Bacon is a Queer poet living in rural north central Washington on unceded Methow land. She is the author of four collections of poetry, Transitory from BOA Editions, 2023; Surrender of Water in Hidden Places, 2022; Blue Hunger, 2020; Elegy with a Glass of Whiskey, BOA Editions, 2004.

Sarah Browning teaches workshops with Writers in Progress. She is cofounder and for ten years was executive director of Split This Rock. Author of Killing Summer and Whiskey in the Garden of Eden, she received an MFA in poetry and creative nonfiction from Rutgers University Camden.

David W. Janey is a Boston-based, African-American poet and essayist. He writes about racial justice, social change, personal memory/growth, and lessons learned from nature. David is a university administrator by day and his writing has appeared in Solstice Magazine, Wordpeace, and WBUR's Cognoscenti.

Robin Michel has worked in nonprofits and education for most of her career, including as a grant writer, teacher, pre-K–12 administrator, and a community organizer at the grassroots level. Her poetry and prose have appeared in many print and online journals. She lives in Northern California.


Twitter Username: RLMichelwriter

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Room 2101, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T190.

The Page Blinks Back :: Image, Text & Screen

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As literary publishing adapts to the rise of literary comics, visual essays, and intermedia fictions championed by indie presses and online magazines, editors are selecting for more writing that moves visually. But what makes a multimedia text? And what makes a good one? Which strategies make visual elements inextricable from rather than extraneous to text? On this panel, five writers discuss a wide range image-text forms, and demonstrate how they are thriving on pages and screens.

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Sarah Minor is the author of Slim Confessions: The Universe as a Spider or Spit (Noemi 2021), Bright Archive (Rescue 2020), and The Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated, a digital chapbook from Essay Press. She teaches in the University of Iowa's nonfiction writing program.


Twitter Username: sarahceniaminor

Diana Khoi Nguyen is a poet, multimedia artist, and author of Ghost Of (Omnidawn 2018), as well as a recipient of a 2021 NEA fellowship. A Kundiman fellow, she is core faculty in the Randolph College low-residency MFA and an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh.

Sarah Rose Nordgren is an American writer, teacher, and activist. She is author of two poetry collections, a hybrid-genre chapbook, and the nonfiction book, The Bird Hat Wearer’s Journal. She holds a PhD in poetry from University of Cincinnati and serves as director of the School for Living Futures.

Douglas Kearney has published eight books of poetry, essays, and libretti. He teaches creative writing at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His honors include a Griffin Poetry Prize, a Campbell Opera Librettist prize, and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Cy Twombly Award.

Tisa Bryant is the author of Unexplained Presence, cocreator of The Black Book visual mixtape series, cofounder of The Encyclopedia Project as well as new forthcoming works. Focused on radical Black women's writing, she teaches in the MFA Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: misstisab

Room 2102A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T191.

A Writer in Art School: Fostering Meaningful Interdisciplinary Experiences

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This panel will examine methodologies that foster exploration in interdisciplinarity, outlining projects and practices undertaken in the first four years of OCADU’s creative writing BFA program, including in-class experiences and exercises, public projects, curricular intersections, and student-led iniitiatives and publications, all of which encourage writing that seeks new spaces for text and engage with the precepts, materials, and processes of art and design practices.

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Catherine Black is an associate professor and chair of the BFA creative writing program at OCAD University in Toronto. Catherine has published three books with Guernica Editions, and her work has been nominated for the ReLit Award and the Pat Lowther Memorial Award.


Twitter Username: writercatblack

Professor Lillian Allen is an acclaimed foremother of Canadian Poetry and poet laureate of Toronto. She is a renowned international exponent of dub poetry with politically charged, community-engaged poetics. She initiated and led the development of the BFA in Creative Writing Program at OCAD University.


Twitter Username: lillianallendubpoet

Ian Keteku is an internationally-acclaimed writer/performer and the 2010 World Poetry Slam champion. He uses his voice to inspire messages of action and critical thought. Ian’s work is strongly influenced by journeys throughout Africa. He teaches creative writing at OCAD University.


Twitter Username: ianketeku

Jada White is an interdisciplinary student in her third year of the OCAD creative writing BFA. She uses creative writing, photography, illustration, mixed media, and printmaking to explore her interest in what draws strangers to one another, despite all the reasons we could stay apart.

Room 2102B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T192.

Dazzling Multiplicity of the Actual: Nonfiction Hybridity & Intersectional Form

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Conventional approaches to nonfiction emphasize single stories, linear revelations, and verifiable facts, but pressure to conform to familiar narrative modalities can silence those who write from marginalized and non-normative perspectives. In this panel, five writers of hybrid and intersectional nonfiction discuss how their work disrupts norms, shatters singular narratives, and complicates facts—embracing instead the power of blended genres, multiple identities, and prismatic points of view.

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Jen Soriano (she/they) is a Filipinx writer who has received Artist Trust, Jack Jones, Hugo House, and Vermont Studio Center fellowships. Her debut essay collection Nervous, named one of the best nonfiction debuts of 2023 by Poets & Writers, is now available from Amistad/HarperCollins.


Twitter Username: lionswrite

Website: jensoriano.net

Julie Marie Wade's most recent collections are Otherwise: Essays (Autumn House 2023), Fugue: An Aural History (Diagram/ New Michigan Press, 2023), and Skirted: Poems (The Word Works, 2021). She is a professor of English and creative writing at Florida International University in Miami.


Twitter Username: manyplums

Website: www.juliemariewade.com

Constance Collier-Mercado is an experimental writer and artist whose work explores dialectical, multilingual, and equivocal spaces. A MacDowell, Hambidge Center, and Jack Jones Fellow based in Atlanta, she is influenced by the Black Arts Movement, cycles of repetition and revision, and the Afrosurreal.


Twitter Username: WriterChicLady

Website: www.ConstanceSherese.com

Barrie Jean Borich is the author of the lyric memoir Apocalypse, Darling. Her hybrid essay Body Geographic won a Lambda Literary Award, and her memoir My Lesbian Husband won a Stonewall Book Award. A professor at DePaul in Chicago, Borich edits Slag Glass City, a journal of the urban essay arts.


Twitter Username: BOOKofBJB

Website: barriejeanborich.com

Marco Wilkinson is an assistant professor of literary arts and cultural studies in the literature department at UC San Diego. His focus is on creative nonfiction and eco-writing. He is the author of Madder: A Memoir in Weeds and his work has appeared in Ecotone, Kenyon Review, DIAGRAM, and elsewhere.

Room 2103A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T193.

Embodied Prosody, Embodied Sentences: Coping Mechanisms

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torrin a. greathouse asks, “What tools can prosody provide us with for cultivating an embodied poetics of disability?" Jenny Johnson suggests “Prosody can be a space for wrestling with and wrestling off old scripts, and also for generating the new ones that we need.” Oliver de la Paz argues that prose poems offer a specific vantage point for the “political” gesture of sentence making, while Brian Teare suggests that a collage-based prose practice can wire our sentences to our nervous systems.

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Brian Teare is the author of seven critically acclaimed books of poetry, most recently The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven and Poem Bitten by a Man. An associate professor at the University of Virginia, he lives in Charlottesville, where he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

Jenny Johnson is the author of In Full Velvet. She received a 2016–17 Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University and a 2015 Whiting Writer's Award in Poetry. She teaches at West Virginia University and in the Rainier Writing Workshop's MFA program.

torrin a. greathouse is a transgender cripple-punk and essayist. She is the author of Wound from the Mouth of a Wound, winner of the 2022 Kate Tufts Discovery Award, as well as the forthcoming DEED. She teaches at Rainier Writing Workshop, the low-residency MFA at Pacific Lutheran University


Twitter Username: tagreathouse

Oliver de la Paz is the author of six books of poetry and the poet laureate of Worcester, Massachusetts. His most recent book The Diaspora Sonnets was published in 2023 with Liveright Press. He is a founding member of Kundiman and teaches at the College of the Holy Cross and in theLow Res MFA Program at PLU.


Twitter Username: @Oliver_delaPaz

Website: http://www.oliverdelapaz.com

Room 2103B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T194.

Finding & Creating Community as a Writer, Sponsored by WITS Alliance

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Writing and being a teaching artist can both be solitary professions, as much of the work of creating, planning, and leading classrooms is often done alone. How can writers find their people and build a writing community that will motivate and support their writing practices? In this panel, teaching writers will share their strategies for finding or creating writing communities, including generative writing communities such as writing groups and beta readers, mentorships and fellowships, fundraising, and career support.

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Jason Koo is a Korean American poet and the author most recently of More Than Mere Light and coeditor of the Brooklyn Poets Anthology. He is the founder and executive director of Brooklyn Poets and an associate teaching professor of English at Quinnipiac University.


Twitter Username: jasonykoo

Website: http://jasonykoo.com

Nicole Callihan's books include This Strange Garment and SLIP (forthcoming). She is also the founder of the Braving the Body project which includes workshops, ekphrastic experiences, and an anthology. A teaching artist in hospitals and schools, she taught expository writing at NYU for two decades.


Twitter Username: thebluepitcher

Brenda Cárdenas, former Milwaukee poet laureate, has authored Trace: Poems, Boomerang: Poems, and From the Tongues of Brick and Stone. She coauthored two chapbooks and coedited Resist Much/Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance and Between the Heart and the Land: Latina Poets in the Midwest.


Twitter Username: CardenasBrendaE

Javan Howard is a poet and writer from Bronx, New York. He truly believes that the lived experience is the ultimate teaching tool and uses poetry as a social forum to foster discourse about love, culture, and identity. He is the TAP codirector for curriculum mentorship & facilitation.


Twitter Username: Righteoustpoet

Website: www.javanjhoward.com

Room 2103C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T195.

What I Wish I Would Have Known: Considerations for First Books and Far Beyond

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How do you find the right publisher—and what happens next? Five writers who’ve published in different models, genres, and eras will discuss in frank terms what they wish they would have known on the publishing journey. Topics include relationships with publishers, how the money works, and will encompass how to manage expectations against realistic outlooks. With an overall goal of transparency, this panel will help writers at every stage ask questions that will best serve their projects.

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Wendy J. Fox is the author of four books, including the novel If the Ice Had Held and the linked short story collection What If We Were Somewhere Else. She has written for Electric Literature, Buzzfeed, Self, Business Insider, Ms., and others. Her fiction has appeared in many literary magazines.


Twitter Username: wendyjeanfox

Website: www.wendyjfox.com

Gregory Spatz has published three novels and three fiction collections, most recently Inukshuk, Half as Happy, and What Could Be Saved. Recipient of a 2012 NEA Literature Fellowship and a Washington State Book Award, he teaches in and directs the MFA program at Eastern Washington University.


Twitter Username: gregoryspatz

Website: www.gregoryspatz.com

Leland Cheuk is the author of three books of fiction, most recently No Good Very Bad Asian. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, NPR, the San Francisco Chronicle, Salon, and elsewhere. He runs the indie press 7.13 Books.


Twitter Username: lcheuk

Aisha Sharif is the author of To Keep from Undressing, a collection of poems addressing her life as an African American Muslim woman. Aisha's poetry has been nominated for Pushcart Prizes and published in Crab Orchard Review and Rattle. She holds an MFA in poetry and is a Cave Canem fellow.


Twitter Username: sharifpoet

Morgan Christie is the author of Boolean Logic, the Howling Bird Press Nonfiction Prize winner; These Bodies (Tolsun Books, 2020), a Hurston Wright Legacy Award nominee; and four poetry chapbooks. She was awarded the 2022 Arc Poem of the Year prize and Digging Press's Chapbook Series Prize.

Room 2104A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T196.

Women Reclaim the Page: Generative Writing to Beat Burnout

(, , , , Sakinah Hofler)

In creative writing, the focus is product over process. Producing pages for publication is necessary, but when that goal takes over, what is lost? For women especially, writing solely to publish can lead to burnout. Generative writing might be an answer. These panelists, women who work in both academic and community spaces, champion writing for writing’s sake. Their interactive panel will reclaim writing as a process of discovery and invite attendees to try a few favorite generative prompts.

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Emma Hudelson is a nonfiction writer living in Indiana. Her book Sky Watch will be out in 2024 with the University Press of Kentucky. Her work appears in the Cincinnati Review, The Chattahoochee Review, The Rumpus, and elsewhere. She writes about humans, animals, and finding wellness.


Twitter Username: efhudelson

Website: www.emmahudelson.com

Yalie Saweda Kamara, PhD, is a Sierra Leonean-American writer from Oakland, California. She is the 2022–23 Cincinnati and Mercantile Library Poet Laureate (two-year term). She is the author of Besaydoo (Milkweed Editions, 2024). She is an assistant professor of English at Xavier University.


Twitter Username: Yaliesaweda

Melissa Fraterrigo is the author of the novel Glory Days (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), as well as the short story collection The Longest Pregnancy (Livingston Press, 2006). She is the founder of the Lafayette Writers' Studio in Lafayette, Indiana and teaches creative writing at Purdue University.


Twitter Username: lafayettewrite

Website: www.melissafraterrigo.com

Lisa Low is the author of Crown for the Girl Inside (YesYes Books, 2023), winner of the 2020 Vinyl 45 Chapbook Contest. Her poems appear in Copper Nickel, Massachusetts Review, Poetry, Southern Review, and elsewhere, and her nonfiction won the 2020 Gulf Coast Nonfiction Prize.

Room 2104B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T197.

Fostering Digital Literacies through Creative Composition

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This panel will discuss how to foster digital literacies within creative writing projects. The goal of this panel will be to explore the following questions: in what ways can digital projects enhance creative writing students' rhetorical awareness of the unique author-audience interactions facilitated by online/multimodal platforms? How can this rhetorical awareness invite students to locate connections between their creative composing strategies and professional aims?

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Tara Propper has earned her MFA and PhD in English. She is currently an assistant professor of English and serves as the director of graduate studies in the department of literature and languages at the University of Texas at Tyler.


Twitter Username: tara198400

Matthew Kelly is an associate professor of English at the University of Texas at Tyler, whose research focuses on digital literacies, the use of new media technologies in the writing classroom, and the role of pedagogy in video games and gaming communities.

Michelle Whittaker is a Caribbean-American poet and author of Surge, awarded a Next Generation Indie Book Award for Poetry. She received a Pushcart Special Mention and NYFA Fellowship in Poetry. She has also served as poetry editor for the Southampton Review and teaches at Stony Brook University.

Room 2105, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T198.

Biography: The Radical Work of Writing Lives

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“I’ve entered LA to anti-erase, which is the work of resistance,” writes Courtney Faye Taylor in Concentrate. This panel of poets and nonfiction writers considers biography as an act of anti-erasure, recovering lives that systems of power seek to efface. Panelists discuss biography’s ethics, challenges, and possibilities, including redefining “archives,” reconciling evidence, interpreting gaps, and reimagining genre conventions to do justice to a subject’s lived experience.

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Morgan Graham is an English PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota, where she studies autobiography. Her work has been supported by the Women’s History Institute at Historic Hudson Valley. She is managing editor at Pleiades and has published work in Chicago Review of Books and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: morgraha

Iris Jamahl Dunkle was the poet laureate of Sonoma County, California. Her books include West : Fire : Archive (The Center for Literary Publishing 2021) and her biography Charmian Kittredge London: Trailblazer, Author, Adventurer (UOP, 2020). She teaches at Napa Valley College and the Napa Valley Writers' Conference.


Twitter Username: irjohnso

Website: www.irisjamahldunkle.com

Janice N. Harrington’s latest books of poetry are Primitive: The Art and Life of Horace H. Pippin, and for children, Hurry, Kate, or You'll Be Late!. She teaches creative writing at the University of Illinois.

Eloisa Amezcua is from Arizona. Her debut collection From the Inside Quietly is the inaugural winner of the Shelterbelt Poetry Prize, selected by Ada Limón. A MacDowell Fellow, her second collection of poems Fighting Is Like a Wife was published by Coffee House Press (April, 2022).


Twitter Username: Eloisa_Amezcua

Courtney Faye Taylor is the author of Concentrate (Graywolf Press, 2022), selected by Rachel Eliza Griffiths as the winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Concentrate was named a finalist for the NAACP Image Awards, the Lambda Literary Awards, and the Society of Midland Authors Award.


Twitter Username: thecourtcase

Website: courtneyfayetaylor.com

Room 2207, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T199.

Space, Lines, and Mattering: the Journey of Discovery Through Spoken Word

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As the intersection of literary form and performance art, spoken word engages underserved and marginalized communities through accessible language and culturally relevant subject matter. It is this accessibility that is affirming to both poets and audiences. Our discussion will explore the possibilities in coordinating and developing programs while considering effective collaborations and best practices and dream of what more we can accomplish in our communities.

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Eddie Vega is a poet, spoken word artist, and career educator. He writes about food, Tejano culture, social justice, and the intersections thereof. He is the author of a full-length book of poetry, Chicharra Chorus. He can be found on social media—@eltacolico (Twitter and Instagram).


Twitter Username: eltacolico

Website: tacopoet.com

Adam Henze is a poet and educator living in Indianapolis. He earned a PhD in literacy, culture, and language education and a Master of Arts in teaching. Adam is the director of literacy programming at Flanner House and runs a prison literacy program. He was the Official Poet of the Indianapolis 500.


Twitter Username: henzbo

Dasan is an artist, educator, and cultural organizer. He has performed across the country, hosted or coordinated many cultural arts events, and has helped to establish and grow cultural and performing arts organizations. He is a scholar committed to examining Black popular culture and creativity.


Twitter Username: dasanahanu

Website: http://dasanahanu.com/

Boris "Bluz" Rogers: Emmy Award-winning poet, Slam Master/Coach of the three-time National Poetry slam Champs, Slam Charlotte. Bluz is also the 2023 Southern Fried Poetry Festival Haiku Champ and has written award-winning poetry for the Carolina Panthers, NBA, NASCAR, NAACP, AMAZON, CBS, and more.


Twitter Username: mrbluz

Andrea "Vocab" Sanderson has been a poet, rapper, and singer for over twenty years. Andrea serves as a writer in community for Gemini Ink. Her book entitled She Lives In Music, was published on Valentine's Day 2020 by Flower Song Press. She is the first black Poet Laureate of San Antonio, Texas, 2020–23.

Room 2208, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T200.

Celebrating Four Decades of the Affrilachian Poets: A Multigenre Reading

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Since 1991, the Affrilachian Poets—a multicultural group of writers who consider Appalachia home—have defied the stereotype of the region as rural and racially/religiously homogenous. Join members of this diverse collective for a multigenre reading of new and selected work that connects intersectional identities to family roots, culture, and deep connections to the land.

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Amy M. Alvarez is the author of Makeshift Altar and coeditor of Essential Voices: A COVID-19 Anthology. A neurodivergent Jamaican and Puerto Rican Affrilachian poet, she has published in PloughsharesThe Acentos Review, and Obsidian. Alvarez currently teaches at West Virginia University.


Twitter Username: Amy__Writes

Website: https://amymalvarez.com

Kelly Norman Ellis is an associate professor of English at Chicago State University and poetry editor at Third World Press. She is a poet who is Cave Canem fellow and a founding member of the Affrilachian Poets. She has written two poetry collections, Offerings of Desire and Tougaloo Blues.


Twitter Username: conjwoman

Ricardo Nazario y Colón is a member of a new generation of Kentucky writers destined to forge a New Kentucky Home. He is a cofounder of the Affrilachian Poets and author of the books Of Jíbaros and Hillbillies and The Recital. His work has been anthologize and appeared in various publications.

Crystal Wilkinson, Kentucky’s Poet Laureate, is the award-winning author of Perfect Black: Poems, The Birds of Opulence (2016 Ernest J. Gaines Prize,) Water Street, and Blackberries, Blackberries. She is the recipient of a 2021 O. Henry Prize and a 2020 USA Artists Fellowship.


Twitter Username: crystalwilki

Marta Miranda-Straub is an Afro-Caribean Queer woman, poet, and storyteller who was inducted into the Afrilician Poets in 2009 by Frank X Walker. Her bilingual memoir, Cradled by Skeletons, was published in winter 2019 and her children's book, Lullaby for Maddie, was published in November 2022.

Room 2209, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T201.

Norman Dubie: A Critical Legacy

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From 1975 until his death in 2023, Norman Dubie—who helped establish the MFA program at Arizona State University in 1985—served as a tireless, dedicated, and influential mentor to writers living and studying in central Arizona and the American southwest. Comprised of former students, colleagues, and critics, this panel examines Dubie’s legacy as both a poet and teacher, paying special attention to his inclusive pedagogy, devotion to students, and the genius of his poetic vision.

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Cynthia Hogue has published ten poetry collections, most recently Instead, It Is Dark and In June the Labyrinth. Her cotranslation of Nicole Brossard's Lointaines is published as Distantly (Omnidawn). Hogue was the inaugural Marshall Chair in Poetry at Arizona State University. She lives in Tucson.


Twitter Username: cynthis66_hogue

Website: www.cynthiahogue.com

Dorothy Chan is the author of five poetry books, including Return of the Chinese Femme. They are an associate professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the cofounder and editor in chief of Honey Literary Inc., a 501(c)(3) organization.


Twitter Username: dorothykchan

Dexter L. Booth is the author of Abracadabra, Sunshine ,and Scratching the Ghost. His poems have been included in numerous anthologies including The Future of Black: Afrofuturism, Black Comics, and Superhero Poetry. Booth holds a PhD in poetry from the University of Southern California.


Twitter Username: DexterL.Booth

Website: www.dexterlbooth.com

Elizabyth A. Hiscox is a founding editor with Tram Editions, a poetry and hybrid chapbook press. Hiscox is the author of the collection Reassurance in Negative Space, and holds an MFA from Arizona State and Doctorate from Western Michigan. Currently she instructs with the Writers' Studio at ASU.

Hugh Martin, a veteran of the Iraq War, is the author of In Country (BOA Editions, 2018) and The Stick Soldiers (BOA Editions, 2013). He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a Yaddo residency, an NEA Fellowship, and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship. He currently teaches at the U.S. Air Force Academy.


Twitter Username: HughJMartin

Website: www.hugh-martin.com

Room 2210, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T202.

Translation as Advocacy With/in Poetry's Multilingual World

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As a privileged global language, English provides a powerful tool for centering diverse voices who speak in new ways into English-language cultures. This panel brings together translators who understand their work in part as advocacy for poets writing in languages other than English. Our panelists translate from French, Sinhala, Spanish, Ukrainian and Russian, and from cultures across the globe: from the African diaspora in the Americas to South Asia to the post-Soviet sphere and its diasporas.

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Martha Kelly is an associate professor of Russian at the University of Missouri. She is author of Unorthodox Beauty: Russian Modernism & Its New Religious Aesthetic and coeditor of the anthology Russian Silver Age Poetry. She researches and translates Russian-language poetry of Russia and beyond.

Rachel Galvin’s poetry collections include Uterotopia, Elevated Threat Level, and Pulleys & Locomotion. She translated Raymond Queneau’s Hitting the Streets (Scott Moncrieff Prize) and Alejandro Albarrán's Cowboy, and cotranslated Oliverio Girondo's Decals (National Translation Award Finalist).


Twitter Username: RachelJGalvin

Aaron Coleman is the author of the poetry collection Threat Come Close, and the chapbook St. Trigger. He is an NEA Creative Writing Fellow, Fulbright Scholar, Cave Canem Fellow, and ALTA Jansen Fellow. Aaron is a postdoctoral fellow in Critical Translation Studies at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: AaronC_Poetry

Website: https://complit.artsci.wustl.edu/people/aaron-coleman

Vitaly Chernetsky is a professor of Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Kansas. His translations from the Ukrainian include two novels and a poetry collection by Yuri Andrukhovych, a novel by Sophia Andrukhovych, and two children's books by Romana Romanyshyn and Andriy Lesiv.


Twitter Username: globalrhizome

Room 2211, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T203.

Bad Immigrant Daughters in Fiction and Nonfiction

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Oops—you married outside your race, didn’t get a high-status job, botched family traditions, moved far away, forgot your mother tongue, spilled family secrets, got divorced, can’t cook, didn’t have children. The list of sins is endless for immigrant daughters who walk a tightrope between assimilating enough to succeed while being judged by the values of their parents’ generation and homeland. These writers reject the model minority myth and portray the drama and humor of living across cultures.

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Grace Loh Prasad writes about belonging and diaspora. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Longreads, Catapult, KHÔRA, and elsewhere. Her memoir The Translator’s Daughter will be published in 2024 by Machete, an imprint of Mad Creek Books/The Ohio State University Press.


Twitter Username: GraceLP

Monica Macansantos is the author of the forthcoming essay collection, Returning to My Father’s Kitchen (Northwestern University Press, 2024) and the story collection, Love and Other Rituals (2022). Her work has appeared in Colorado Review, The Hopkins Review, Lit Hub, and Electric Lit, among others.


Twitter Username: missmacansantos

Website: www.monicamacansntos.com

Lisa Chiu is a writer whose work has appeared in McSweeney's Internet Tendency, People magazine, and anthologies including Cheers to Muses: Contemporary Works by Asian American Women and Who’s Your Mama?: The Unsung Voices of Women and Mothers. She is currently working on a memoir, HUNGRY GHOST.


Twitter Username: lisachiu

Lindsay Wong is the author of the critically-acclaimed, award-winning, and bestselling memoir, The Woo-Woo, a YA novel, My Summer of Love and Misfortune, and a recent short story collection, Tell Me Pleasant Things About Immortality. She teaches creative writing at The University of Winnipeg.


Twitter Username: LindsayMWong

Madhushree Ghosh is author of Khabaar: An Immigrant Journey of Food, Memory and Family (University of Iowa Press, 2022), a gold medalist IPPY. Her work was Pushcart-nominated and named a Best American Essay in Food Writing. Her essays and OpEds have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Longreads, and others.


Twitter Username: writemadhushree

Room 2215A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T204.

Snap, Crackle, Prose: Telling Our Stories in 300 Words or Less

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Defying the notion that brevity diminishes impact, this panel celebrates the art of concise writing. Writing micro is an opportunity to cut to the chase, to distill what is most essential into a few carefully considered words, to center a single experience or thought. Defined as 300 words or less, micro essays/narratives/memoirs linger long after you’ve read them. Panelists will discuss how they’ve used micro in their work, and the publication options for micro. Discussion and Q&A at the end.

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Kalehua Kim is a Native Hawaiian poet living in the Seattle area. Currently pursuing an MFA through the Rainier Writing Workshop, she is a 2023 winner of the James Welch Prize for Indigenous Poets. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, Denver Quarterly, and Ōiwi, A Native Hawaiian Journal.

Samantha Chagollan centers much of her work around her mixed Mexican and American heritage. Her bachelor’s degree in literature comes from Cal Poly Humboldt, and her creative nonfiction work has appeared in Alebrijes Review, Latin@ Literatures, Lavender Bones, and the anthology Non-White and Woman.


Twitter Username: samchagollan

Website: https://samanthachagollan.com/

Devi S. Laskar has worked as a newspaper reporter covering crime and politics in North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Illinois, and Hawaii. She holds an MFA from Columbia University and an MA in South Asian studies from UIUC, is a published poet, and her debut novel was published in 2019.


Twitter Username: devislaskar

Website: devislaskar.com

Shaina A. Nez is Táchii’nii born for Áshįįhi. She serves Diné College as a senior lecturer in creative writing and English. She is a doctoral scholar in justice studies with the School of Social Transformation and Social Inquiry at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: just(us)_writer

Darien Hsu Gee is the author of five novels published in eleven countries. Her collection of micro essays won a bronze IPPY award, and her craft book on writing memoir won the Hawai'i Book Publishers award. Darien is a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellow.

Room 2215B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T205.

Poetry Stacked: Building a Twenty-First Century Reading Series at the Library

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Tasked to enrich and engage the University of Cincinnati campus and community, UC Libraries and Elliston Poetry Room partnered to create Poetry Stacked, a multimodal reading series staged in the stacks of UC’s Langsam Library and curated with twenty-first century values. Poetry Stacked brings faculty, staff, student, and community poets together in-person and live streamed. Panelists will discuss the planning and staging process, sharing lessons and adjustments, feedback and the future.

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Twitter Username: UCLibraries

Michael C. Peterson serves as curator of the Elliston Poetry Room and archive at the University of Cincinnati. He's a poet, the recipient of fellowships from Yaddo, MacDowell, and Vermont Studio Center, and is an editor of Tom Postell: On the Life and Work of an Unsung Master (Pleiades, 2024).


Twitter Username: ellistonpoetryroom

Dior J. Stephens is a proud, Midwestern Pisces. He is the author of three chapbooks, and their debut full-length collection, Cruel/Cruel, is out now with Nightboat Books. Dior is pursuing a doctorate degree in philosophy at UCincinnati and serves as managing poetry editor for Foglifter Press.


Twitter Username: dolphinneptune

Ben Kline lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, and works for the University of Cincinnati Libraries. Author of Sagittarius A*, Dead Uncles, and the forthcoming It Was Never Supposed to Be, Ben is a storyteller and poet whose work has appeared in Copper Nickel, Florida Review, Poetry, and other publications.

Room 2215C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T206.

Poets Against Walls: An Anthology/Handbook for Writing Past the Checkpoints

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Poets Against Walls anthology/handbook features poetry and hybrid writings from the geopolitical spaces of the borderlands, along with a history of the collective’s social actions, discussions on craft, and writing prompts. In addition to reading short selections of their work and speaking on the value of writing directly about communities under attack, panelists will provide tips and strategies for writing what some may feel dissuaded from in workshop spaces: crafting work for social change.

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Cesar L. De Leon is the author of Speaking With Grackles by Soapbery Trees, winner of the John A. Robertson book award and the Best Book of Poetry award from the Philosophical Society of Texas. Cesar is a poet-organizer for Poets Against Walls, a Macondista, and an educator in South Texas.


Twitter Username: CesarPoet

Website: https://cesarldeleon.com/

Sehba Sarwar is a novelist (Black Wings, Veliz Books 2019) whose writings tackle gender and displacement issues. Her short stories have been anthologized by Feminist Press, Akashic Books, and Harper Collins India, and her essays have appeared in the New York Times, Callaloo, LA Times, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: sehbasarwar

Emmy Pérez, USA Fellow 2022, is the author of With the River on Our Face, Solstice, and a forthcoming volume of new & selected poetry. A past recipient of a Poets Laureate Fellowship & an NEA Fellowship, she cofounded Poets Against Walls and is a professor at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.


Twitter Username: emmyemmaperez

Website: www.emmyperez.com

Carolina Monsivais is the author of three collections of poetry: Somewhere Between Houston and El Paso, Elisa’s Hunger, and Descent. She holds an MFA from NMSU and a PhD from UTEP. Monsivais has worked many years with survivors of patriarchal violence and is a founding member of Poets Against Walls.


Twitter Username: carotlicue

Celina A. Gómez is a performance poet and educator who coaches performance poetry to high school students. She has her MFA in creative writing and graduate certificate in Mexican American Studies. She is the reigning ultimate poetry boxing champion and published in various anthologies and journals.

Room 2502A, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T207.

A More Perfect Union in Extreme Times: Kansas Poets Laureate

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Kansas has a tradition of serving as a bellwether, showing the country and the world where we are headed, especially in difficult times. Listen to five past Kansas poets laureate talk about how the experiment of United States democracy encompasses advocacy for and through poetry and involves diverse communities and actions, including how to grow the arts in extreme political environments. "When something's going to happen in this country, it happens first in Kansas," says writer William Allen White.

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Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg is the 2009–13 Kansas Poet Laureate, and founder of Transformative Language Arts at Goddard College. Author of twenty-four books, including a memoir on cancer and community, and other prose, she leads community writing workshops for people living with serious illness and teaches widely.


Twitter Username: CarynMirriamGoldberg

Website: www.CarynMirriamGoldberg.com

Kansas Poet Laureate Emeritus and Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow, Huascar Medina is a father and arts administrator. He’s an op-ed writer at Kansas Reflector, an editor for seveneightfive magazine, Southbroadway Press, and latinidad.us. Medina also sits on the National Council on the Arts.

Kevin Rabas leads the poetry and scriptwriting tracks at Emporia State. His short films have shown across Kansas, Missouri, and beyond, including Strawberry Hill Fight Club, a selection for the IFC KC film festival, KIFF, and No Coast Film Festival. Rabas served as Poet Laureate of Kansas, 2017–19.


Twitter Username: KevinRabas

Website: kevinjamesrabas.com

Denise Low, Kansas Poet Laureate 2007–09, authored Turtle’s Beating Heart: One Family’s Story of Lenape Survival (University of Nebraska Press) and Shadow Light (Red Mountain Press Award). House of Grace, House of Blood (University of Arizona Press) is forthcoming. She is past AWP board president and board member of Indigenous Nations Poets.


Twitter Username: kansaspoetry

Website: www.deniselow.net

Wyatt Townley is Poet Laureate of Kansas Emerita and the author of six books. Her work has been published in journals ranging from Newsweek to Paris Review, Yoga Journal to Scientific American. Commissioned poems hang in libraries including the Space Telescope Science Institute, home of the Hubble.

Room 2502B, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T208.

Reimagining Kansas: Anarchy, Islamic Hope, Family Dysfunction, and Godly Plains

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Join four authors who have written about Kansas in new and imaginative ways, fleshing out the Sunflower State in their own innovative literary strokes. This innovation comes in the form of alternate histories injecting Islamic folklore into the plains and the metanarrative of a could-be Lawrence bomber, the emotionally-nuanced story of an animal-loving family in repair, and the dark tale of a supernaturally-touched farming family in decline.

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Chloe Chun Seim's work has appeared in LitMag, Split Lip Magazine, Free State Review, and others. She earned her MFA from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Her novel, Churn, won the George Garrett Fiction Prize and is due out from Texas Review Press in November 2023. She lives in Lawrence, Kansas.


Twitter Username: chloe_chun

Website: chloechunseim.com

Farooq Ahmed is the author of the novel Kansastan. He primarily writes about Muslims and the Midwest. His work has been recognized by the South Asian Journalists Association, and he is a recipient of a Caldera Arts Center residency. He graduated from the Columbia University Creative Writing Program.


Twitter Username: farooqtheahmed

Website: https://www.kansastan.com/

Becky Mandelbaum is the author of the novel The Bright Side Sanctuary for Animals and the story collection Bad Kansas. She received the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction and a High Plains Book Award for First Book. Born and raised in Kansas, she now lives in Bellingham, Washington.


Twitter Username: b_mandelbaum

Website: www.beckymandelbaum.com

Daniel A. Hoyt's novel This Book Is Not For You won the inaugural Dzanc Books Prize for Fiction. His first story collection, Then We Saw the Flames, won the Juniper Prize for Fiction. Dan teaches at Kansas State University, where he is the founding editor of American Buffalo Books.


Twitter Username: dan_hoyt

Room 2503AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T209.

Revision as Trans* Praxis

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The panel affirms revision as transformative practice. Writing across gender and genre, we will examine literary and human transition—the revision of form, language, narrative, and understanding. The panel will discuss the promise of reflective practice, away from perfection and legibility toward integrity and liberation. Topics will include conception, discernment, integration, and audience. Framing revision as iterative rather than linear, we consider what's at stake in revision: truth.

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Crystal Odelle is a queer trans writer, chapbooks editor at Newfound, and author of the novel Goodnight. Their stories have appeared in Split Lip Magazine, Gulf Coast, bedfellows, beestung, and elsewhere. Crystal was a Tin House scholar, Lambda Literary fellow, and nominated for Best of the Net.


Twitter Username: crystal_ography

Website: https://crystalkeltner.com

Nico Amador’s poetry has been featured in Poetry Unbound, Bettering American Poetry, Poem-a-Day, PANK, Pleiades, The Cortland Review, Hypertext Review, The Visible Poetry Project, and elsewhere. His chapbook Flower Wars was selected as the winner of the Anzaldúa Poetry Prize.


Twitter Username: njamador1

K. Angel has been published by the Tin House Open Bar, PANK, and the New Flash Fiction Review. Their projects across genres are curious about consent, chosen community, and metamorphosis interruptus. They live in Austin and London, where they occasionally perform as the singing drag king TrucK.

Safa Khatib is a poet and translator living in St. Louis. Her work has appeared in The White Review, Words Without Borders, The Baffler, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. Her first book, Silhouette, is forthcoming with Bloomsbury.

Maurice Tracy is a transfemme writer and social worker in St. Louis, Missouri. They received their doctorate degree in American Studies in 2017 from Saint Louis University. Their work has been featured on Formal Invitation, The Tenth, and Huffington Post.


Twitter Username: Blaqueer

Room 2504AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T210.

Feeling Heard in a World that Wants to Silence Us: LGBTQIA+ Rep in Young Adult

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More anti-LGBTQIA+ bills are being introduced and passed at alarming rates, including book bans. In such a dark, dangerous climate, how can authors in that community feel motivated to keep writing stories? Five Young Adult authors bring a range of experiences to discuss the pull they feel to tell queer stories despite these challenges. We’ll talk about queer joy, relationships, and plots that drive us forward.

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Jenna Miller (she/her) writes young adult contemporary romance books about fat, queer, nerdy girls who deserve to be seen and have their voices heard. Her first novel, Out of Character, released February 2023 from Quill Tree Books (HarperCollins), and her second YA novel will release February 2024.


Twitter Username: jmillwrites

Edward Underhill (he/him) is the author of Always the Almost and This Day Changes Everything, both from Wednesday Books. A queer trans man, he grew up in the suburbs of Wisconsin, where he could not walk to anything, so he had to make up his own adventures. He now lives in California.

Trang Thanh Tran is the author of the New York Times and national indie bestselling novel, She Is a Haunting.


Twitter Username: nvtran

Room 2505AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T211.

Independent for Life: The Value and Benefits of Publishing with an Independent Press, Sponsored by CLMP

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The hundreds of independent presses in the United States each publish beautiful, important, and high-quality books. Working with an independent press can be the beginning of a partnership that nurtures your writing and makes space for creative risk-taking. Indie presses’ dedication for their work allows them to compete with much bigger publishers for recognition in the literary world. Come learn why writers choose to trust their work to these essential publishers at all stages of their careers.

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Montana Agte-Studier, the director of membership and NYSCA NYTAP at CLMP, is a writer, musician, sculptor, painter, photographer, aviatrix, and amateur arborist living in Washington Heights, New York City. Her work is published in/forthcoming from Epiphany, The Ocotillo Review, New South, and The New Guard.

Carmen Giménez is the author of Be Recorder (Graywolf Press, 2019), a finalist for the National Book Award. A 2019 Guggenheim fellow, she was publisher of Noemi Press for twenty years. She now serves as the publisher and director of Graywolf Press.

Adam Levy is the copublisher of Transit Books.

Grand Ballroom A, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 2

T212.

Another Last Call: A Reading and Conversation with Sarabande Anthology Poets on Writing & Addiction

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Death to the old cliché of the lush poet who destroys themselves and others in pursuit of their tortured genius. Here, four nationally-acclaimed poets from the Sarabande anthology, Another Last Call: Poems on Addiction & Deliverance, read their work and speak to writing and their experiences with (and near) addiction. This event celebrates the work of writers who have grappled, or are grappling with this disease, who do not glamorize addiction but instead live beside it, around it, through it.


This event will take place in person in the Kansas City Convention Center and will be livestreamed for virtual audiences. All livestreamed events include open captions and ASL interpretation.

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Kaveh Akbar is the author of the novel Martyr! (Knopf) and two books of poetry, Pilgrim Bell (Graywolf) and Calling a Wolf a Wolf (Alice James).


Twitter Username: kavehakbar

Website: kavehakbar.com

Paige Lewis is author of the poetry collection Space Struck (Sarabande Books, 2019) and co-editor of Last Call: Poems on Addiction and Recovery (Sarabande Books, 2023). Lewis co-created and curated the YouTube channel Ours Poetica with author John Green. Lewis’s poems have appeared in Poetry, American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. They teach at the University of Iowa and in the low-residency program at Randolph College.

Joy Priest is the author of Horsepower (Pitt Poetry Series, 2020), winner of the Donald Hall Prize for Poetry, and the editor of Once a City Said: A Louisville Poets Anthology (Sarabande, 2023). Her honors include a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Fine Arts Work Center fellowship, and the Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize from the American Poetry Review. She is an Assistant Professor of African American / African Diasporic Poetry in the MFA Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh and the Curator of Community Programs & Praxis at the Center for African American Poetry & Poetics.


Twitter Username: Dalai_Mama_

Room 3501AB, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T213.

It’s a Crime! Genre Fiction’s Bad Rap (Sheet) in Academia's Mean Streets

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Crime fiction has often struggled to be taken seriously in literature classes and creative writing workshops, even as the students themselves are avid fans of suspense, thrillers, true crime podcasts, and more. Professors who teach crime fiction as literature (class, race, and social justice as thematic cores) or use it as models for aspiring writers (plotting, pacing, getting readers to turn the page) explore the genre’s strengths for academia and offer tips on bringing it into the classroom.

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Richie Narvaez is the author of two novels and two short story collections. He teaches crime fiction writing at the Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan and received SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Adjunct Teaching in 2022.


Twitter Username: richie_narvaez

Website: www.richienarvaez.com

Edwin Hill teaches creative writing and literature at Emerson College. He also served as the vice president and editorial director of Bedford/St. Martin's. He is the critically-acclaimed author of five novels and numerus short stories.


Twitter Username: edwinhillauthor

Art Taylor is the Edgar Award-winning author of The Adventure of the Castle Thief and Other Expeditions and Indiscretions. His fiction has also won the Agatha, Anthony and Macavity Awards. He is an associate professor and assistant director of the creative writing program at George Mason University.


Twitter Username: ArtTaylorWriter

Website: www.arttaylorwriter.com

David Heska Wanbli Weiden is author of the novel Winter Counts (Ecco; S&S UK), winner of twelve awards and named a New York Times Editors' Choice, Indie Next Pick, and Book of the Month Club main selection. He is a MacDowell, Ucross, Ragdale, Sewanee, and Tin House fellow. davidweiden.com


Twitter Username: WanbliWeiden

Website: www.DavidWeiden.com

Room 3501CD, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T214.

What Is an Author—Off the Net?

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In 2000, three members of this panel presented "What Is an Author—on the Net?" at AWP. The landscape has changed, and the question is different too. Online publishing is more inclusive and accessible, with greater outreach than a print-dominant approach tied to top-tier creative writing programs, and most writers, especially poets, make use of both. How has this changed the aesthetic standards of the poetry world? How has it changed the way poets approach their writing and careers?

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Jennifer Kwon Dobbs is the author of Paper Pavilion, Interrogation Room, and the chapbooks Notes from a Missing Person and Necro Citizens (German, English). A cotranslator of Sami poetry, she is also senior poetry editor at AGNI and professor of English at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: jkwondobbs

Website: www.jkwondobbs.com

Lisa Lewis's books of poetry include The Unbeliever, Silent Treatment, Vivisect, Burned House with Swimming Pool, The Body Double, and Taxonomy of the Missing. She teaches in the creative writing program at Oklahoma State University and serves as editor of the Cimarron Review.


Twitter Username: aliswisel

Ralph Burns has published seven books, most recently But Not Yet, winner of the Blue Lynx Poetry Award; Ghost Notes, winner of the Field Poetry Prize; and Swamp Candles, winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize. Burns edited Crazyhorse periodically from 1985 to 2000. He lives in Fair Lawn, New Jersey.


Twitter Username: Ralph Burns@yorick005

Laura Minor won the 2020 John Ciardi Poetry Prize. Her critically acclaimed debut book of poems, Flowers as Mind Control, is on BkMk Press/University of Arkansas Press, 2021. She was also a finalist for the 2019 National Poetry Series and the winner of the 2019 ILA's Rita Dove Poetry Award.

Clemonce Heard's poetry collection Tragic City explores his relationship to Oklahoma and the Tulsa Race Massacre. Heard has been awarded time and space from the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, Sala Diaz, MacDowell, and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation.

Room 3501 GH, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T215.

Pathways to Success: Practical and Personal Tips for Getting Published

(, , , Lisa Williamson Rosenberg, Jenny Qi)

It’s every writer’s dream to see their words published, so why is it so hard to get honest, practical advice? Five ethnically diverse authors with diverse pathways to success share their tips for navigating the publishing world. How challenging is it to get an agent? Do you always need an agent? How do you get a book deal? Are there alternatives to the Big Five? What are the pros and cons of self-publishing? Are the pathways different for poetry, children’s books, YA, fiction, and nonfiction?

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Lydia Y. Kang is an author of the young adult science fiction novels Control and Cataylst, as well as poetry and creative nonfiction. She is a practicing internal medicine physician who helps other novelists with their medical accuracy.


Twitter Username: LydiaYKang

Website: http://lydiakang.com

Jean Alicia Elster is a 2017 Kresge Artist Fellow in Literary Arts and a former attorney. She is the multiple award-winning author of several books for youth and young adults including How It Happens, Who’s Jim Hines?, The Colored Car, and the Joe Joe in the City series.


Twitter Username: j_a_elster

A.H. Kim is a Korean-American immigrant, graduate of Harvard College and Berkeley Law School, and author of the novels A Good Family and Relative Strangers. Her nonfiction writings on cancer have appeared in Zocalo Public Square, Saturday Evening Post, and several anthologies.

Room 3501 EF, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T216.

Black Women Leading

(, , , , Lisa Willis)

Black women are authoring change as new and founding leaders of literary arts organizations throughout the country. Hear from the leaders of the Loft in Minneapolis, Hedgebrook in Freeland, Lambda Literary in New York, TruArtSpeaks in St. Paul, and CityLit Project in Baltimore about how their identities inform their values, perspectives, and approach to leadership within their organizations and communities.

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Arleta Little is a writer and culture worker. Her recent literary work has appeared in multiple journals and publications including We Are Meant to Rise; Calyx; Blues Vision; and Water-Stone Review. She currently serves as the executive & artistic director for the Loft Literary Center.


Twitter Username: littlearleta

Tish Jones is a poet, emcee, and hip hop theater artist from Saint Paul, Minnesota. Her work explores themes of Black love, liberation, politics, and Afro-Futurism. Jerome Hill Artist Fellow and an Arts Matters Artist2Artist Fellow, Tish also serves as the founder and executive director of TruArtSpeaks.


Twitter Username: thetishjones

Kimberly A.C. Wilson, twice a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in the explanatory journalism and breaking news categories, is the executive director at Hedgebrook. An avid reader, she is currently writing a work of speculative fiction.


Twitter Username: kacw

Carla Du Pree's work appears in the literary journals Callaloo, The Pierian Literary Journal, and others. She is CityLit Project's executive director and a recipient of fiction fellowships from Hedgebrook, Baldwin for the Arts, VCCA, Rhode Island Writers Colony for Writers of Color, and Deutsch Foundation.


Twitter Username: darkndifferent

Website: citylitproject.org

Bookfair Stage, AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Halls D & E, Kansas City Convention Center, Level 3

T217.

The Hen Party: Is Multigenerational Dialogue Unifying for Women?

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Contrary to popular belief, a hen party is not limited to a bachelorette party and can extend to any social gathering of women. Four generations of poets: in their twenties, thirties, fifties and sixties, celebrate how women’s thoughts on career, relationships and body image change with age through the writing, discussion, and reading of their poems all the while getting to the heart of the matter—why is cross-generational dialogue necessary for the empowerment of woman-identifying people? 

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Angie Trudell Vasquez is the current Poet Laureate of Madison, Wisconsin. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her third collection of poetry, In Light, Always Light, and her fourth collection of poetry, My People Redux, were both published by Finishing Line Press.

Aliki Barnstone is a poet, essayist, translator, critic, editor, and visual artist. Her most recent books are Dwelling and her translation of Liana Sakelliou's Portrait Before Dark. Among her awards are two Fulbright Fellowships in Greece and serving as poet laureate of Missouri from 2016–2019.


Twitter Username: AlikiBee

Website: www.alikibarnstone.com

Anum Sattar is a poet with a BA in English from College of Wooster in Ohio. Her work appears in American Journal of Poetry (Margie), Beltway Poetry QuarterlyDecadent Review, Uppagus, The Rush, Florida Review, Xavier Review, North Dakota Quarterly, Notre Dame Review, Lullwater Review, and others.

Jenny Molberg is the author of the poetry collections Marvels of the Invisible, Refusal, and The Court of No Record. An NEA fellow, she is associate professor at the University of Central Missouri, where she edits Pleiades: Literature in Context and directs Pleiades Press.


Twitter Username: jennymolberg

Liana Sakelliou is a poet, translator, critic, editor, professor at the University of Athens, Greece, and author of twenty-six books. She wrote monographs on Emerson, Dickinson, H.D., Levertov, Snyder. Her poems have been widely anthologized and translated into eleven languages. She is a member of Hellenic Authors' Society.

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

Room 2101, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T218.

Building Writing Collectives that Empower and Support Outside the Institution

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Artist collectives have long been places of professional knowledge sharing, resistance, and deep care, but in this era of COVID-19, inaccessibility, and increasing homophobia, collectives offer invaluable support for the writer. Whether virtual or in person, local community-originating or a national group unified by an ethnic, cultural, or Queer identity, collectives offer writers the ability to build a new society or way of relating. These five writers of color gather to share their experience.

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Aliah Lavonne Tigh is the author of Weren’t We Natural Swimmers, a 2022 Tram Editions chapbook. Their poems have appeared in the Academy of American Poets' Poem-A-Day, Mizna, Guernica, The Rupture, and others. Tigh lives in Houston, Texas.


Twitter Username: Alovetigh

Website: AliahLavonneTigh.com

Randall James Tyrone holds an MFA from the University of Wyoming. He is a poet and community organizer in Houston, Texas.


Twitter Username: RJamesTyrone

Glenn Shaheen is the author of four books, most recently the fiction collection Carnivalia. He teaches at Prairie View A&M University and is the executive director of the Radius of Arab American Writers.


Twitter Username: glennshaheen

Dr. Stalina Emmanuelle Villarreal is a poet, translator, and essayist whose book Watcha is forthcoming in 2024. She has published translations of poetry by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Minerva Reynosa, Maricela Guerrero, and Sergio Pérez Torres.


Twitter Username: profstalina

Website: https://www.stalinavillarreal.com/

Room 2102A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T219.

Hybridity and the Case of the Active Reader

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Contemporary writers turn to hybridity to grapple with social upheaval and political uncertainty at this critical time. This panel looks at how poets hybridize their work and teach their readership to dissolve genre borders, while asking for a curious and active response from their audience to the way poetry blurs, disrupts, and alters genres. Authors of recent poetry collections will gather to read work that negotiates hybridity as a creative space through linguistic innovation and inquiry.

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Clara Burghelea is a Romanian-born poet, editor, and translator. Winner of the Robert Muroff Prize in Poetry, she received her MFA in poetry from Adelphi University in 2018. Her second collection Praise the Unburied was published in 2021 with Chaffinch Press.


Twitter Username: ioanaclara

Felicia Zamora is the author of six poetry collections including I Always Carry My Bones (Iowa Poetry Prize). Her poems appear in Boston Review, Guernica, Orion, The Nation, and others. She is an associate professor of poetry at the University of Cincinnati and associate poetry editor for Colorado Review.

Lauren Brazeal Garza is a PhD. candidate in literature at UT Dallas. Her published poetry collections include Gutter, which chronicles her homelessness as a teenager. Her recent work includes an epistolary novel of poems and flash fiction that features fictional interviews with Texan ghosts.


Twitter Username: lbrazealgarza

Jennifer Militello is the author of the memoir in essays, Knock Wood, as well as five collections of poetry: The Pact; A Camouflage of Specimens and Garments; Body Thesaurus; Flinch of Song; and Anchor Chain, Open Sail. She teaches in the MFA program at New England College.


Twitter Username: JenifrMilitello

Website: www.jennifermilitello.com

Sam Moe (she/her) is a queer writer of multiple genres with three poetry books published or forthcoming. She received her PhD in creative writing from Illinois State University and her MFA in creative writing from Converse College. Sam currently teaches at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.


Twitter Username: SamAnneMoe

Room 2102B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T220.

Everyone is Multilingual: Inviting All Languages into the Writing Classroom, Sponsored by ALTA

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How can we decolonize the classroom through language? How can we resist the idea of English being the “universal language” when most academic conversations still happen in English? This panel will bring together several translators and writers who are also teachers at Queens College, CUNY, an institution at the forefront of multilingual writing education, to discuss translation as a pedagogical practice.

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Nora Carr is a lecturer in European languages and literatures at Queens College, CUNY. A translator from Spanish, her work has appeared in Asymptote, Latin American Literature Today, and Nashville Review. Her own creative nonfiction debuted in Lunch Ticket, summer 2023.

Rebecca Suzuki is a writer, translator, and educator. She is interested in multilingual writing and pedagogy and teaches writing at Queens College, CUNY where she also earned her MFA. Her book, When My Mother is Most Beautiful, was published by Hanging Loose Press in 2023.

Francesca Hyatt is a writer, translator, and professor of English at CUNY-Queens College. She has an MFA in creative nonfiction and her chapbook Forestwish won the Birdhouse Prize in 2022 (Ghostbird Press). She is an editor at Killing the Buddha magazine and founding coeditor of the literary journal Clotheslines.

L Torres is an NYC writer, artivist, and educator. L's writing and pedagogy zeroes in on gender/racial/(dis)ability/class/age/body size equitability and justice, while dismantling social conventions. A proud alum of the City University of NY (CUNY), she is honored to call herself a CUNY educator.

Jacqui Cornetta is an interdisciplinary artist working with text and sound. Their poetry, translations, essays, and music projects have appeared in publications like The Offing, Words Without Borders, Lost & Found, LARB, and on stages nationwide. She teaches writing at Queens College CUNY.

Room 2103A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T221.

The Book Was Better...or Was It?: Adapting Your Novel into a Screenplay or Play

(, , )

Demystify the journey of adapting your novel into a viable screenplay or play. As a novelist, you allow your readers an insight into characters' thoughts and inner monologues; yet, to be a successful screenwriter or playwright, you must master the craft of turning the internal into the visual. We will give you the structural, formatting, dialogue, and character tricks of the trade, and building blocks to successfully adapt your novel into a viable screenplay, teleplay or play.

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Colette Freedman is is a novelist, playwright, and screenwriter whose work has been published/ produced all over the world. Her film 7000 Miles starring Wendie Malick is currently on the festival circuit and she recently was the dramaturg at Carnegie Hall with Mozart Her Story, the new musical.


Twitter Username: colettefreedman

Guadalupe García McCall is the author of four award-winning YA novels. She is the recipient of the prestigious Pura Belpré Author Award, a Westchester Young Adult Fiction Award, and the Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Children’s Book Award. She is a full-time writer and lives in South Texas.


Twitter Username: ggmccall

Room 2103B, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T222.

Beyond the Signed Copy: Lessons from Writers who are also Booksellers

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Booksellers have a unique understanding of how books sell. Author publicity efforts often focus on social media, but what should authors do to support sales in brick and mortar stores? How can they inspire booksellers to stock, recommend, and promote their books? The answers have everything to do with cultivating relationships and being a good literary citizen. Writers who are, or were once booksellers, some publishing with indie presses and some with Big Five houses, will share their wisdom.

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Dan Wells is a bookseller and publisher, both at Biblioasis, an independent publishing house and bookshop in Windsor, Ontario. He is also the publisher and editor at CNQ: Canadian Notes & Queries, Canada's longest-running independent critical journal.

Josh Cook is a bookseller and coowner at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he has worked since 2004. He is also the author of the critically acclaimed postmodern detective novel An Exaggerated Murder. His fiction, criticism, and poetry have appeared in numerous literary publications.


Twitter Username: inorderofimport

Casey Plett is the author of A Dream of a Woman, Little Fish, and A Safe Girl to Love. She coedited Meanwhile, Elsewhere: Science Fiction and Fantasy From Transgender Writers and has written for the New York Times and McSweeney's Internet Tendency. She is the publisher at LittlePuss Press.


Twitter Username: caseyplett

Danny Caine is the author of the poetry collections Continental Breakfast and El Dorado Freddy's, plus the chapbook Uncle Harold's Maxwell House Haggadah. His poetry has appeared in Diagram, Hobart, Barrelhouse, Mid-American Review, and other places. He owns the Raven Book Store.


Twitter Username: mistercaine

Meg Reid is the publisher of Hub City Press and executive director of the Hub City Writers Project, a literary nonprofit that cultivates readers and nurtures writers throughout the South to foster an inclusive literary arts culture.


Twitter Username: megireid

Room 2103C, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T223.

Writing and the Day Job: How Writers Maintain a Living Outside of Academia

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There’s an old lie about the arts: if you can’t live off your passion, you teach. This adage was true for writers who also built a life as professors in academia, but with tenure-track jobs shrinking and stable writing jobs low, how can one maintain a healthy life, writing career, and plan for the future? In this panel, five published authors in various genres discuss their different career paths in law, tech, nonprofits, and other fields while also writing.

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Maurice Carlos Ruffin is the author of The American Daughters (forthcoming), The Ones Who Don’t Say They Love You: Stories, a New York Times Editor’s Choice, and We Cast a Shadow: A Novel, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and the PEN America Open Book Prize.


Twitter Username: mauriceruffin

Mina Hamedi represents adult literary fiction and nonfiction. She is interested in stories from around the world, particularly her native Turkey and Iran. She is an associate agent at Janklow & Nesbit where she works with cofounder Lynn Nesbit. She lives in New York City with her Turkish street cats, Saffron and Lemon.


Twitter Username: mina_hamedi

Josh Riedel is the author of Please Report Your Bug Here. He worked at tech startups for several years before earning his MFA from the University of Arizona. His short stories have appeared in One Story, Joyland, and Passages North, among others. He lives in San Francisco, California.


Twitter Username: joshriedel

Mark Galarrita is a graduate of the 2017 Clarion West Writers Workshop and the University of Alabama MFA program. His writing can be found in McSweeney’sElectric LiteratureNightmare magazine, Split Lip, and elsewhere. Currently, he works at Scribner.


Twitter Username: Markgalarrita

Room 2104A, Kansas City Convention Center, Street Level

T224.

Thinking Beyond the Page: Reaching and Creating Community

(, , , , Mikhail Iossel)

This panel features writers who create programming and events that expand our impact beyond the boundaries of the literary world. Participants will share their experiences with programs that reach new communities or develop community in inclusive and nurturant ways. Our presenters, for example, have initiated creative writing in prisons; collaborated with a theater company bringing reader’s theater into schools; and worked with a literary arts organization devoted to developing young writers.