2019 AWP Conference Schedule

The  #AWP19 Conference & Bookfair in Portland, Oregon’s schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. Visit the offsite event schedule for a listing of literary events taking place throughout the Portland area during our conference.

A version of the schedule accessible to screen readers is also available.

Please note that your personalized schedule on the AWP website can be saved and printed, but it cannot be transferred to the digital conference app because the two systems are independent.

 

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Saturday, March 30, 2019

7:30 am to 8:45 am

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S101. Sober AWP. Daily 12-Step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

8:00 am to 2:00 pm

Registration Area, Exhibit Hall A, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S102. Conference Registration, Sponsored by Butler University MFA in Creative Writing. Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall A of the Oregon Convention Center, Level 1. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement registrations.

8:00 am to 10:30 pm

Near A103, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S103. Mamava Lactation Suite 1. Mamava lactation suites are located outside of the A and E meeting rooms on Level 1 of the Oregon Convention Center. All Mamava suites come with a Bluetooth SmartLock that syncs with Mamava’s mobile app. You may also request a door code for entry in the Administration Office on Level 2 and by calling 503-235-7575.

Near E148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S104. Mamava Lactation Suite 2. Mamava lactation suites are located outside of the A and E meeting rooms on Level 1 of the Oregon Convention Center. All Mamava suites come with a Bluetooth SmartLock that syncs with Mamava’s mobile app. You may also request a door code for entry in the Administration Office on Level 2 and by calling 503-235-7575.

8:00 am to 9:00 am

Skyview Terrace, Oregon Convention Center, Level 3

S104B. Creative Writing – Internationally. Any Conference & Bookfair attendees with an interest in how AWP and its collaborating associations/programs might jointly improve our support to creative writers and writing programs based outside of the United States are invited for an initial exchange of ideas, and a get-acquainted session, on Saturday, March 30 at 8:00 a.m. on the Skyview Terrace of the Oregon Convention Center. This event will be co-hosted by Christopher Merrill of the Iowa International Writing Program, Jill Goldberg of the Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs association, and Chloe Schwenke of AWP.

8:00 am to 6:00 pm

VIP Suite D, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S105. Dickinson Quiet Space. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. Please consult the map in the conference planner for detailed location. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." —Emily Dickinson

8:30 am to 2:00 pm

C127, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S106. Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography. () Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a third year at AWP, photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high res for $85. (Conference discount: sessions usually priced at $350.) Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required.

Adrianne Mathiowetz is a Boston-based portrait and editorial photographer. She is a Spring 2010 photo graduate of The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Wired, and Entertainment Weekly, amongst others. She lives for the in-between moments, and loves to take photos of costume changes, interruptions, and delays.

8:15 am to 8:45 am

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S106B. Narrative Healing: Meditation. () Open to all! Start the day tapping inward to open up your senses and attune your attention for the day ahead. This mindfulness meditation series will focus on breath and body awareness. Comfortable clothing encouraged. Featuring publishing professional and mindfulness meditation teacher Lisa Weinert and others.

Lisa Weinert is passionate about powerful voices and the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She has worked with authors as a publicist, editor, and agent for fifteen years and is the creator of the debut annual Program in Narrative Medicine at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S107. Bookfair Concessions, Bar, & Lounge. Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Oregon Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference planner or mobile app for location details.

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S108. AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Wilkes University Low-Residency MA/MFA in Creative Writing. With more than 700 literary exhibitors, the AWP Bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

Booth 2041, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S109. Writer to Writer Mentorship Program Booth. AWP's Writer to Writer Mentorship Program matches new writers with published authors for a three-month series on the writing life. Now in its fifth year, Writer to Writer is open to all members, but we particularly encourage applications from those writers who have never been associated with an MFA program and those writing from regions, backgrounds, and cultures that are typically underrepresented in the literary world. To learn more, visit AWP’s Bookfair booth, where you will be able to talk with past program mentors and mentees. Diane Zinna, the program’s director, will also be there to answer your questions.

D130, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S110. Traveling Stanzas: Poets for Science. The Wick Poetry Center’s “Traveling Stanzas: Poets for Science” exhibit features twenty art banners designed with science-themed poems curated by Poets for Science founder Jane Hirshfield, as well as interactive writing tools to inspire meaningful discourse at the intersection of science and creativity. Visitors will get a chance to engage with Emerge™ and Thread™, the Wick Center’s apps that prompt users to create erasure poetry in conversation with scientists. This ongoing interdisciplinary project began as a featured exhibit at the 2017 March for Science on the National Mall. More information can be found at the Poets for Science website at http://science.travelingstanzas.com/.

9:00 am to 10:00 am

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S111. Yoga for Writers. (Alysia Sawchyn) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

9:00 am to 10:15 am

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S112. How to Write a Play: The Basics. (, , , ) This workshop is designed for writers who would like to try their hand at writing at play and have never done so before. This panel of award-winning and produced playwrights will take you through the basics of plot, character, and dialogue, along with showing you tips and tricks on how to format your script. Panelists will cover everything from 10-minute plays to full lengths to one-person shows. We will also answer that important question "What next?" after you have your completed script in hand.

Andy Pederson's plays have been produced in New York, Chicago, Atlanta, Memphis, Vermont, and other places. A member of the Dramatists Guild and an alumnus of Goddard College’s MFA program, he is resident playwright of the Saltbox Theatre Collective. He teaches at Concordia University Chicago.

Craig Thornton's absurd play The High Cost of Heating was selected as the runner-up in the Yale Drama Series Prize for 2015. He has a BFA from NYU, MFA from Goddard College, and teaches dramatic writing at Syracuse University. His play In My Shoes was featured in a CNN news story.


Twitter Username: CraigThornton4 ?

Jayme McGhan's twenty-one full-length plays have been produced and developed across the country. He currently serves as the Director of the School of Stage and Screen at Western Carolina University. He is a Resident Playwright at Chicago Dramatists. He holds an MFA in Playwriting from UNLV.

Deborah Jordan is Assoc. Professor of Theatre at Jacksonville University, FL. A thirty-year love affair with theatre has afforded her the opportunity to direct, act, and own two professional theatre companies. Her current play, Ian Stories or My Life in Hell is about raising a son with Asperger's Syndrome.


Twitter Username: Debiannjordan

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S113. Tell Don’t Show: A Panel on Poetic Statement. (, , , ) Long verboten in creative writing pedagogy, poetic “telling” offers a range of ways to enrich a poem’s purpose, tone, and texture. This panel features five poets discussing the import, in their work and the work of others, of poetic statement—that is, a mode of discursive, rhetorically inflected language set apart from a poem’s system of images. How, this panel asks, does poetic statement not only complicate a poem’s aesthetic procedures, but also enable it to speak back to regnant ideology.

Christopher Kempf is the author of Late in the Empire of Men, and the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, NEA Fellowship, and Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford. A recent Emerging Writer Lecturer at Gettysburg College, he is a PhD student in English Literature at the University of Chicago.


Twitter Username: cmkempf

Philip Metres is the author of a number of books and chapbooks, including Sand Opera, Pictures at an Exhibition, A Concordance of Leaves, and To See the Earth. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry, has garnered a Lannan Fellowship, two NEAs, the Hunt Prize, and the Cleveland Arts Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

Corey Van Landingham is the author of Antidote, winner of the Ohio State University Press/The Journal Award in Poetry. She is a recipient of a 2017 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, and a former Wallace Stegner Poetry Fellow at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: ErikaLSanchez

Website: erikalsanchez@gmail.com

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S114. You've Got This: Finding & Sustaining Self-Reliance While Writing A Novel. (, , , , ) Twyla Tharp said "Solitude is an unavoidable part of creativity. Self-reliance is a happy by-product." The novelist is on her/his own, in the dark searching for the proverbial light switch, not always able to rely on workshop feedback where some MFA programs encourage writers to submit short fiction only. Published authors and teachers of novel writing discuss how to maintain motivation until the light goes on, and give advice on every stage of writing a novel, from first drafts to publication.

Vu Tran is the author of the novel Dragonfish. He has received a Whiting Award and an NEA Fellowship, and his fiction has appeared in the O. Henry Prize Stories and the Best American Mysteries. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, he teaches creative writing at the University of Chicago.


Twitter Username: roomwithavu

Website: vutranwriter.com

Brandon Taylor is the associate editor of Electric Literature's Recommended Reading and a staff writer at Literary Hub. His writing has received fellowships from Lambda Literary, Kimbilio Fiction, and the Tin House Summer Writer's workshop. He is a fiction MFA student at the Iowa Writer's Workshop.


Twitter Username: brandonlgtaylor

Julia Fierro is the author of the novels The Gypsy Moth Summer and Cutting Teeth. She founded The Sackett Street Writers' Workshop in 2002, home to over 5,000 writers in NYC, LA and online, named "New York City's Best Writing Class" (TimeOut NY) and "Top Alternative to MFA" by Poets & Writers.


Twitter Username: juliafierro

Website: http://www.juliafierro.com/

Lan Samantha Chang is the author of two novels, All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost and Inheritance, and a collection of short fiction, Hunger. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is professor of creative writing and director of the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa.

Gabriel Packard is the author of the novel The Painted Ocean and is the associate director of the creative writing MFA program at Hunter College in New York City.

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S115. Mining the Everyday: Using Real Life Experiences as Creative Research. (, , , , ) Calling your mother. Watching a Hoarders marathon. Taking notes during a Jewish conversion class. Revisiting a childhood home. Research takes unexpected forms and comes to us in our everyday interactions. In this panel, you’ll get new ideas on what research is, how to conduct it, and how to use it to broaden the scope of an essay, memoir, or story. Panelists also discuss how to strike that just-right balance of research and narrative, one that captivates rather than overwhelms the reader.

Rajpreet Heir is a coordinator at TED and a writer based in New York. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Cosmopolitan, The Washington Post, The Normal School, and The New York Times. She has an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from George Mason University and writes about growing up Indian in Indiana.


Twitter Username: rajtweet_edu

Susanna Vander Vorste is a PhD candidate for literary nonfiction at the University of Cincinnati. Her work examines trauma, Midwestern culture, and the impact of meditation on people's daily lives. Her essays have appeared in Stoneboat, The Chariton Review, The Lindenwood Review, and The Rumpus.


Twitter Username: s_vandervorste

Namrata Poddar writes fiction and nonfiction, and curates a series called "Race, Power, and Storytelling" as interviews editor for Kweli. Her debut collection of stories, Ladies Special, Homebound, was a finalist for Feminist Press's 2018 Louise Meriwether First Book Prize.


Twitter Username: poddar_namrata

Website: www.namratapoddar.com

Kristen Iversen's work includes the books Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats; Molly Brown: Unraveling the Myth; and Shadow Boxing: Art and Craft in Creative Nonfiction. She teaches at University of Cincinnati and is Literary Nonfiction editor of The Cincinnati Review.


Twitter Username: kristeniversen

Website: www.kristeniversen.com

Emily Heiden is a PhD candidate at University of Cincinnati studying Literary Nonfiction. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, Brevity Magazine, and Literary Hub. She has an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from George Mason University and a Master of Arts in Teaching from The University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: _Emily_Heiden_

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S116. The Way & Why to Say No: Women in Academia. (, , , Katharine Coles, Natanya Pulley) Historically, in order to succeed, women have had to create opportunities to say yes. Maybe we can do it all, but we shouldn’t have to. In this panel, we’ll discuss examples of how, when, and why we have decided to set clear boundaries and to deny some of the endless (often unpaid) demands on our time. We have juggled teaching, writing, publishing, and editing, while living our lives, so now let’s discuss how to give ourselves permission to say no, and how to decide what stays and what goes.

Lisa Fay Coutley is the author of Errata (selected by Adrienne Su for the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Award), In the Carnival of Breathing, and Back-Talk. She has received an NEA fellowship and is an Assistant Professor of Poetry in the Writer's Workshop at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.


Twitter Username: LFCoutley

Lillian-Yvonne Bertram is the author of But a Storm is Blowing From Paradise, chosen by Claudia Rankine as winner of the 2010 Benjamin Saltman Award. Her poetry and prose has appeared in numerous journals.

Amina Gautier is the author of three short-story collections: The Loss of All Lost Things, which won the Elixir Press Award; Now We Will Be Happy, which won the Prairie Schooner Book Prize; and At-Risk, which won the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: DrAminaGautier

Website: https://aminagautier.wordpress.com/

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S117. Diaspora & Endurance: Immigrant Legacies in American Poetry. (, , , , ) Many poets with diasporic roots, whether first-generation Americans or citizens born at a multi-generational remove from their ancestral origins, have shaped our country's literature. Panelists will read briefly, hold a craft-based conversation about their exploration of diasporic themes, and engage in a critical discussion focused on major diasporic voices throughout the history of American poetry.

Caitlin Doyle's work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Yale Review, Poetry Daily, the PBS NewsHour Poetry Series, and others. Her recent honors include the Frost Farm Prize and fellowships through Yaddo, MacDowell and the James Merrill House. She serves as the Assistant Editor of The Cincinnati Review.

Safiya Sinclair is the author of Cannibal, winner of the Metcalf Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Whiting Writers' Award, and named an American Library Association Notable Book of the Year. She has won a Pushcart Prize, fellowships from Yaddo, Bread Loaf, and the Poetry Foundation.


Twitter Username: SafiyaSinclair

Allison Joseph is part of the creative writing faculty at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. The author of several books and chapbooks of poems and the Director of the SIUC MFA Program, she serves as editor and poetry edtior for Crab Orchard Review.


Twitter Username: allisonjoseph

D.M. Aderibigbe's first book, How the End First Showed was selected by Aimee Nezhukumatathil for the 2018 Brittingham Prize in Poetry. His poems have appeared in The Nation, The Poetry Review (UK), and jubilat, among others.


Twitter Username: DMAderibigbe

Jenna Le, MD, is the author of two full-length poetry collections: Six Rivers and A History of the Cetacean American Diaspora. Her poetry, fiction, essays, criticism, and translations appear in AGNI Online, Bellevue Literary Review, The Los Angeles Review, Massachusetts Review, and elsewhere.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S118. Beyond the Closet: New Queer Narratives. (, , , , ) Coming Out stories have informed LGBTQ fiction for decades. But as the landscape for LGBTQ rights has expanded, so have the boundaries of LGBTQ fiction. What new narrative possibilities are emerging? How do authors deal with issues of identifying in their fiction without allowing it to consume the work? Are the expectations for LGBTQ fiction shifting as the culture at large shifts? Five authors will discuss how they're navigating the new landscape while remaining true to issues of queer identity.

Eric Sasson is the author of the story collection Margins of Tolerance and the novel Admissions. For three years, he wrote CTRL-ALT, a column on LGBT culture for the Wall Street Journal. His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including the New Republic, VICE, them., and GOOD magazine.


Twitter Username: idazlei

Website: www.ericsassonnow.com

Carter Sickels is the author of the novel The Evening Hour, and the editor of Untangling the Knot: Queer Voices on Marriage, Relationships & Identity. He is Assistant Professor of Creating Writing at Eastern Kentucky University.


Twitter Username: cartersickels

Website: www.cartersickels.com

Viet Dinh teaches at the University of Delaware. He has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as two O. Henry Prizes and the Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction. His debut novel, After Disasters, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Prize, was released in 2016.


Twitter Username: vietpdinh

Dennis Norris II is a 2017 MacDowell Colony Fellow, a 2016 Tin House Scholar, and a 2015 Kimbilio Fiction Fellow. His writing appears in SmokeLong Quarterly and Apogee Journal, where he currently serves as Fiction Editor. He holds degrees from Haverford College and Sarah Lawrence College.


Twitter Username: theearldenden

Patricia Smith is the author of the novel The Year of Needy Girls, a Lambda Literary award finalist. Her nonfiction has appeared in Salon, Broad Street, Prime Number, and various anthologies including Older Queer Voices. She teaches at the Appomattox Regional Governor's School in Petersburg, Virginia.


Twitter Username: pattysmith711

Website: patricia_smith.com

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S119. Vulnerability as a Radical Act. (, , , , ) What happens when we abandon artifice and armor in a poem? When we write into uncomfortable spaces? Risky speech acknowledges the porousness of a poem, letting us see the connective tissue between writer and writing, self and world. Panelists explore how a poetics of vulnerability can enact transformation while resisting the culture of bluster, gaslighting, and dehumanizing rhetoric. Can a relationship forged in vulnerability between reader and writer allow for different kinds of change?

Elyse Fenton is the author of the poetry collections Clamor and Sweet Insurgent. She has published poetry and nonfiction in The New York Times, Best New Poets, Pleiades, American Poetry Review, and elsewhere.

Laurie Filipelli is the author of two books of poems: Elseplace and Girl Paper Stone. She lives in Austin where she coaches, edits, and blogs as Mighty Writing.


Twitter Username: LaurieFilipelli

Celeste Guzman Mendoza is codirector and cofounder of CantoMundo. Her poetry and essays have been published in various anthologies and journals. Her first collection of poetry is Beneath the Halo.

Emily Pérez is the author of House of Sugar, House of Stone, and the chapbooks Made and Unmade and Backyard Migration Route. A CantoMundo fellow, she has received funding and support from Bread Loaf, the Artist Trust, Jack Straw Writers, and the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley.


Twitter Username: budlemon

Sasha West’s first book, Failure and I Bury the Body, won the National Poetry Series and a Texas Institute of Letters award. She is working on a manuscript about climate change. She teaches in Austin, Texas, as an assistant professor of creative writing at St. Edward’s University.

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S120. Native American Voices: A Reading from Recent Works in Native Letters. (, , , , ) The proposed reading would include all Native American writers in attendance at AWP 2019 with books out in the year prior to the conference. This reading would give space for Native American writing across genres and styles. It would highlight the work of those who are part of the surge of new, exciting Native American writing, while still celebrating those in the field who continue to publish powerful works of poetry, fiction and nonfiction.

Shauna Osborn is Executive Director of Puha Hubiya, a nonprofit literacy arts organization, and the author of Arachnid Verve (a poetry collection) which was a finalist for the Oklahoma Book Awards. She has also won awards from New York Public Library, AROHO, and the UNM Writers Conference.


Twitter Username: tenaciousoz

Website: http://shaunamosborn.wordpress.com/

Tommy Orange was born and raised in Oakland, California. He is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. His first novel is, There There.

Crisosto Apache is an enrolled member of the Mescalero Apache Tribe with descent from Mescalero, Chiricahua Apache & Diné (Salt Clan born for Towering House Clan). He has an MFA from IAIA. He teaches and pursues the advocacy of Native American / Indigenous LGBTQ social injustice.


Twitter Username: Crisosto_Apache

Website: http://crisostoapache.com

Rebecca Roanhorse is a Nebula, Sturgeon, Locus, and Hugo Finalist for her short fiction work. She is also a Campbell Finalist for 2017 Best New Science Fiction writer. Her second and third novels are forthcoming. She is represented by Sara Megibow at ktliterary.


Twitter Username: RoanhorseBex

Casandra Lopez, a Chicana/Cahuilla/Tongva/Luiseño writer is the author of the poetry collection Brother Bullet and Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief of As/Us. A CantoMundo and Jack Straw fellow, and Santa Fe Art Institute, SAR, and Hedgebrook resident, she teaches at Northwest Indian College.


Twitter Username: casandramlopez

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S121. Finding Your Tribe After Your MFA. (, , , ) You've got your MFA. What comes next? How do you find your community of writers, and continue to work on your craft? Join community and organizational leaders for a discussion of writing conferences, reading events, and community workshops that will get you excited for what lies beyond your MFA.

Kate Ristau is a folklorist and the author of the Middle Grade series Clockbreakers, and the Young Adult series Shadowgirl. Her essays have appeared in the New York Times and the Washington Post, and she is the business manager of Willamette Writers.


Twitter Username: kateristau

Website: kateristau.com

Armin Tolentino earned his MFA at Rutgers University in Newark. His full length collection of poetry, We Meant to Bring It Home Alive, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: ArminTolentino

C.B. Bernard is the author of Chasing Alaska, a narrative nonfiction mix of travel memoir, nature writing, and immersion journalism named a top book choice by both Publishers Weekly and National Geographic, and a finalist for the Oregon Book Award. 


Twitter Username: cbbernard

Website: www.cbbernard.com

Debby Dodds is the author of the novel Amish Guys Don't Call, a Powell's Best YA of 2017 and has essays in My Little Red BookThe Things That You Would Have SaidThe SunxoJane, Manifest-Station.com, and Hip Mama. She's performed with Jerry Seinfeld, Felicia Day, Zombies, Cookie Monster, and Mickey Mouse.


Twitter Username: DebbyDodds

Website: http://www.DebbyDodds.com

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S122. A Tribute to Ursula K. Le Guin. (, , , , ) This panel celebrates the late Ursula K. Le Guin who, during a fifty-two year career, won top literary awards for her work in multiple genres, challenged gender norms, and inspired countless women’s voices. Among other topics, panelists will discuss Le Guin’s legacy as a feminist science fiction and fantasy writer, the Earthsea series’ rightful place in the canon, the uses of humor in her children’s books, and her distinct treatment of aging in No Time to Spare, a collection of blog posts.

Jody Keisner's recent work appears in Fourth Genre, The Threepenny Review, Brevity, Post Road, Assay, and elsewhere. An assistant professor at the University of Nebraska, she is at work on a collection of essays that explore the physical and psychological landscapes of fear as they relate to women.

Misha Rai is the 2018–2020 Kenyon Review Fellow in Prose. Her novel-in-progress, Blood We Did Not Spill, was awarded the Dana Award in the novel category, the Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies (2016), and a MacDowell Colony Fellowship (2018).


Twitter Username: RaiMisha

Website: www.misharai.com

Mike Cadden is a professor of English at Missouri Western State University where he teaches courses in children's and young adult literature. He is past president of the Children's Literature Association (ChLA) and the author of Ursula K. Le Guin Beyond Genre: Fiction for Children and Adults.

Kelly Daniels is the author of the memoir Cloudbreak, California, one of BuzzFeed's 13 Favorite Memoirs of 2013. A MacDowell fellow and a regular contributor to The Sun magazine, he teaches creative writing at Augustana College, in Rock Island, IL.


Twitter Username: DanielsKel

Website: www.cloudbreakcalifornia.com

Ann Przyzycki is the founding editor of Isthmus, a literary journal based in Seattle. She has an MFA from Western Michigan University, where she was managing editor of Third Coast. Currently a freelance editor, she also has fifteen years' experience working with independent and scholarly presses.

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S123. Poetic-Traumatic Stress Disorders: Languages of Healing. (, , , , ) As Faulkner famously observed, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” Subjects as diverse as music, archaeology, perfume, and the physical and emotional wounds of trauma and mental decline work to locate memory at the intersection of body and mind, the sensory and psychic, instinct and intellect. In this panel, four essayists and poets who grapple with the palpable presence of past events outline strategies they employ to embody the shifting, elusive nature of memory on the page.

Kevin Carollo teaches world literature and writing at Minnesota State University Moorhead, and is Senior Editor for New Rivers Press.

Jehanne Dubrow is the author of six poetry collections, including most recently Dots & DashesThe Arranged Marriage, and Red Army Red. She is as an Associate Professor at the University of North Texas.

Novelist and essayist Elizabeth Mosier is the author of Excavating Memory: Archaeology and Home. A graduate of the MFA Program at Warren Wilson College, her nonfiction has appeared most recently in Cleaver, Creative Nonfiction, 1966: A Journal of Creative Nonfiction, and The Philadelphia Inquirer.


Twitter Username: emosier

Website: www.ElizabethMosier.com

Joel Peckham is the author of five collections of poetry, including Why Not Take All of Me and God’s Bicycle, as well as the memoir Resisting Elegy, and the collection of essays Body Memory.

Nayt Rundquist is the managing editor at New Rivers Press; he teaches writing and publishing courses at Minnesota State University Moorhead. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Etchings, The Long Road to Spring, and UpNorth Lit.

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S124. Wandering Jews Go West. (, , , , ) Jewish life in Oregon began with Goldsmith's general store in 1849. The gold rush brought many immigrants including German Jews west, living up to the "wandering " name. What do we do with this peripatetic honorific or insult? Like pickles, Jewish poets on this panel have picked up wandering world flavors and share poems from North, South, East, and West diasporic influences. These poems address what "home" means for poets on the move, inviting audiences to sit and listen before heading out of town

Philip Terman is the author of five books of poetry, including Our Portion: New and Selected Poems. A selection of his poems has been translated into Arabic. He founded the Chautauqua Writers' Festival and teaches at Clarion University, where he directs the visiting writers series.

Rodger Kamenetz's eleven books of poetry and prose include The Jew in the Lotus, The History of Last Night's Dream, The Lowercase Jew, and To Die Next To You. Founding Director of LSU's MFA program and LSU Distinguished Professor Emeritus, he works now as a dream therapist.


Twitter Username: Jewinthelotus

Website: http://www.kamenetz.com

Robin Becker’s eight books of poems include The Black Bear Inside Me. Emerita Liberal Arts Research Professor of English at Penn State, Becker received fellowships from the Bunting Institute, the Mass Cultural Council, and the NEA. She edits poetry for The Women's Review of Books.

Richard Chess is the author of four books of poetry, Love Nailed to the Doorpost, Third Temple, Chair in the Desert, and Tekiah. He is a regular contributor to Good Letters, the blog hosted by Image Journal. He directs the Center for Jewish Studies at UNC Asheville. www.richardchess.com


Twitter Username: richardchess

Website: www.richardchess.com

Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor is the author of Imperfect Tense (poems), and three books about arts-based education. She was awarded 2015–2018 NEA Big Read grants, a Fulbright (2014) and artist residency (2017) in Mexico. She is Professor of Language and Literacy Education at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: cahnmann

Website: www.teachersactup.com

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S125. Trust Falls: The Editor/Author Relationship. (, , , , ) Hear insights from two authors and their editors about their working relationship. This panel will help writers understand what they can—and cannot—expect from their editors, as well as shed light on best practices for both authors and editors for how to give and receive feedback in a productive way. The panelists will also discuss the truth about publisher’s deadlines, and demystify some of those old-fashioned publishing terms like “legal read,” “galley,” “permissions,” and “blurbs.”

Vivian Lee is an editor at Little A, Amazon Publishing's literary fiction and narrative nonfiction imprint. She graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a BA in Literary Journalism and from the New School University in New York with a MFA in Creative Writing (Nonfiction).


Twitter Username: vivianwmlee

Matthew Salesses's books include The Hundred-Year Flood, I'm Not Saying, I'm Just Saying, and (forthcoming) The Murder of the Doppelgänger and Own Story: Essays. He has written for the New York Times, NPR, Salon, VICE, and other outlets. He is an Assistant Professor of English at Coe College.


Twitter Username: salesses

Website: http://matthewsalesses.com

Kristen Arnett is a queer fiction and essay writer. She's held several writing fellowships and was Ninth Letter's Award Winner in Fiction. She is the author of Felt in the Jaw, a story collection which won the Coil Book Award. Her debut novel, Mostly Dead Things, is forthcoming from Tin House Books.


Twitter Username: Kristen_Arnett

Tony Perez is an editor at Tin House Books.


Twitter Username: tonydperez

Erin Calligan Mooney is a senior editor for Little A, Amazon's Publishing's literary fiction and nonfiction imprint.


Twitter Username: mooneyerinc

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S126. Imagined Research, Researched Imagination. (, , , , ) With the rise of autofiction and hybrid forms, the boundaries of nonfiction have become more porous. Traditionally, imagination was treated with wariness, while research was trusted as factual and true. Yet all histories, whether individual, familial, or cultural, are bound up in memory and narrative. And the construction of a narrative is necessarily an imaginative act. This panel examines the artistic opportunities and ethical concerns of using research and imagination in concert.

Jeremiah Chamberlin teaches at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of Fiction Writers Review, a Contributing Editor for Poets & Writers Magazine, and a coauthor of Creative Composition. Most recently, he was a 2017 Fulbright Research Scholar in Bulgaria.

Natalie Bakopoulos is the author of The Green Shore. Her work has appeared in Ploughshares, Iowa Review, Tin HouseVirginia Quarterly Review, Salon, The New York Times, Granta, O. Henry Prize Stories, and other publications. She was a 2015 Fulbright Scholar in Greece and she has also been a Camargo and MacDowell fellow.


Twitter Username: nbakopoulos

Adrianne Kalfopoulou is the author of two collections of poetry. Her book of essays, Ruin, Essays in Exilic Living engages with issues of transnational identify and critical inquiries into late capitalism's austerity-ravaged Greece. She directs the Writing Program at Deree College in Athens, Greece.


Twitter Username: akalf1

Website: www.adriannekalfopoulou.com

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit. She is a contributing editor for Guernica and the education programs coordinator at the University of Arizona Poetry Center.


Twitter Username: sloaneesh

Arianne Zwartjes is a writer, teacher, outdoor educator, and EMT in Santa Fe. Her most recent book is Detailing Trauma: A Poetic Anatomy. She is working on a researched nonfiction book exploring themes of cultural relocation, violence, migration, and European and American constructions of race.


Twitter Username: arizwartjes

Website: ariannezwartjes.com

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S127. Exophonic Writing in America. (, , , , Ping Wang) This panel focuses on sharing writing and professional practices of writers who write in an acquired language. It addresses issues of acceptance and rejection by the literary community, the process of choosing a language to express particular narratives, feelings, or ideas, the ways in which self-translation becomes creatively generative, and strategies for finding publishers. Panelists discuss their writing processes in various languages and welcome questions from the audience.

Piotr Florczyk's most recent books are East & West, a volume of poems, and two translations, My People & Other Poems by Wojciech Bonowicz, and Building the Barricade by Anna Świrszczyńska, which won the 2017 Found in Translation Award. He is a doctoral candidate at USC.

Mónica de la Torre is the author of five collections of poetry, including The Happy End/All Welcome. Her most recent translation project, Omar Cáceres's Defense of the Idol, is forthcoming. She is a Bonderman Assistant Professor of the Practice at Brown University.

Gazmend Kapllani is an Albanian-born novelist. He is the author of three novels, a 2012 Radcliffe Fellow and 2013 Brown University Visiting Scholar. He holds a PhD in political science and history from Panteion University of Athens. He teaches creative writing and history at Emerson College.


Twitter Username: gazikap

Website: http://gazikap.blogspot.com

Piotr Gwiazda teaches in the Department of English at the University of Pittsburgh. His recent publications include Aspects of Strangers (poetry), U.S. Poetry in the Age of Empire (literary criticism), and Zero Visibility by Grzegorz Wróblewski (translation from Polish).


Twitter Username: piotrgwiazda

Website: https://piotrgwiazda.net

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S128. Poets at the Borderlands of Change: Celebrating Gloria Anzaldúa. (, , ) A reading from the Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands anthology celebrating the life and work of the ground-breaking and influential poet-theorist Gloria Anzaldúa. These poems, essays and hybrid works interrogate, complicate, and personalize the borderlands in transgressive and transformative ways, opening new paths and revisioning old ones for the next generation of spiritual, political, and cultural border-crossers.

Dan Vera is coeditor of Imaniman: Poets Respond to Gloria Anzaldúa and author of two books of poetry. Winner of the 2017 Oscar Wilde Award and Letras Latinas/Red Hen Poetry Prize, his poetry appears in various publications and university writing curricula. He chairs the board of Split This Rock.


Twitter Username: danvera

Website: http://www.danvera.com

Sarah A. Chavez is the author of the poetry collections, Hands That Break & Scar and All, Day Talking. She holds a PhD from U of Nebraska, Lincoln and teaches at the University of Washington, Tacoma. She serves as Poetry Coordinator for the Best of the Net Anthology and is a proud Macondista.


Twitter Username: sa_chavez7

Website: www.sarahachavez.com

Joe Jiménez's second poetry collection Rattlesnake Allegory is due out in Spring 2019. His essays and poems have recently appeared in The Adroit Journal, Iron Horse, RHINO, Aster(ix), and Waxwing, and on the PBS NewsHour and Lambda Literary sites.


Twitter Username: JoeJimenezSATX

Website: joejimenez.net

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S129. I Teach, Therefore I Essay: Essaying the Classroom. (, , , , Marjorie Sa'adah) Essays offer freedom to ponder ideas that needn’t be proven. If that’s what we want to happen in classrooms, can we view teaching as essaying? What risks and opportunities arise when we wander down uncertain paths with our students, just as we do with the written word? This diverse panel of women writers and teachers shares perspectives on essaying in higher education settings and shelters, where part of the discovery is often personal revelation—which can be particularly complicated for women.

Gail Griffin is the author of three nonfiction books, most recently The Events of October: Murder-Suicide on a Small Campus, a study of a disaster at Kalamazoo College, where she taught for thirty-six years. Her essays and poems have appeared widely. She lives in southwest Michigan and just finished a memoir.

Jennine Capó Crucet is the author of Make Your Home Among Strangers (novel), How to Leave Hialeah (stories), and a forthcoming essay collection. A contributing op-ed writer for The New York Times, she is an associate professor of English and Ethnic Studies at the University of Nebraska.


Twitter Username: crucet

Website: www.jcapocrucet.com

Caitlin McGill’s essays appear in Blackbird, The Chattahoochee Review, Iron Horse and elsewhere. Her work has been supported by the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the VCCA, and one essay from her memoir was a BAE ‘16 Notable. She teaches at Emerson College, GrubStreet, and Writers Without Margins.


Twitter Username: caitlindmcgill

Website: caitlinmcgill.com

Angela Palm is the author of Riverine: A Memoir from Anywhere but Here, an Indie Next selection and winner of the 2014 Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize. Palm was awarded a Bread Loaf Writers' Conference Fellowship in nonfiction. She is a freelance editor.


Twitter Username: angpalm

Website: www.angipalm.com

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S130. Not Your Mother’s University Press: Publishing Nonfiction with Academic Presses. (, , , , ) Determining where to submit nonfiction books in the mass of trade, academic, and indie presses can be more of an essayist exploration than the writing process. Writers who have published memoirs, essay collections, and hybrid texts with The Ohio State University Press will discuss how an academic press became home for work that challenged genre conventions and subject matter. Writers will read a section of work before reflecting along with the press editor on the process, marketing, and release.

Kristen Elias Rowley is Editor in Chief at The Ohio State University Press where she acquires literary trade for the Mad Creek Books imprint. She has worked as an editor since 2006, acquiring nonfiction, fiction, translations, graphic novels, and poetry, as well as American and Latinx studies.


Twitter Username: KEliasRowley

Sarah Fawn Montgomery is the author of Quite Mad: An American Pharma Memoir and three poetry chapbooks. She is an Assistant Professor at Bridgewater State University.


Twitter Username: SF_Montgomery

Anthony Moll is the author of Out of Step: A Memoir, which won the 2017 Non/Fiction Collection Prize from The Ohio State University Press and The Journal. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing and Publishing Arts, and currently teaches creative writing and journalism in Baltimore, Maryland.


Twitter Username: anthonywmoll

Kathryn Nuernberger is the author of two poetry collections, The End of Pink, which won the James Laughlin Prize from the Academy of American Poets, and Rag & Bone. Her lyric essay collection is Brief Interview with the Romantic Past. She teaches creative writing at University of Minnesota.


Twitter Username: KatNuernberger

Sophfronia Scott is author of the novels Unforgivable Love and All I Need To Get By, the memoir This Child of Faith, and an essay collection, Love's Long Line. She has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and she teaches at Bay Path and Regis universities. Her Twitter handle is @Sophfronia.


Twitter Username: Sophfronia

Website: http://www.Sophfronia.com

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S131. "You're Already Doing It!"—Tips and Tricks for Small Press Authors, Sponsored by SPD. (, , , ) Looking to promote your book, but have weird feelings about it? Working with a small press and want to find ways to beef up your publicity? Authors, publishers, and literary workers get together to talk about what's worked for them, and how to get the word out there about your latest title.

Trisha Low is the Publicity Manager at Small Press Distribution. She has previously served at other feminist and arts organizations including The Feminist Press and the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses. She is the author of The Compleat Purge.

Andrea Abi-Karam is an Arab American genderqueer punk poet cyborg, writing on the art of killing bros, the intricacies of cyborg bodies, trauma and delayed healing. Andrea's debut book is EXTRATRANSMISSION. They are the publicist for Nightboat Books.


Twitter Username: wolf_hour

Knox Gardner is a community activist in Seattle, Washington and publisher of Entre Ríos Books, a small queer-run press dedicated poetry and collaboration.


Twitter Username: entreriosbooks

Laura Moriarty was the Deputy Director of Small Press Distribution for two decades. She retired in 2018. She is the author of fourteen books of poetry and two novels including Personal Volcano, just out from Nightboat Books.


Twitter Username: l_moriartypoet

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S132. Iron Horse Literary Review: 20th Anniversary Reading. (, , , ) Iron Horse Literary Review celebrates its 20th anniversary, and the release of its Best Of IHLR Prose and Poetry issues, with readings from a diverse group of contributors. The panel represents Iron Horse's mission to discover new writers and publish them alongside established voices, particularly marginalized voices. Come hear these daring and inventive selections, representing two decades of IHLR fiction and poetry, and learn more about IHLR's aesthetic preferences.

Leslie Jill Patterson's work has appeared in Grist, Barrelhouse, Creative Nonfiction, and other journals. She teaches at Texas Tech University and serves as editor of Iron Horse. Her awards include a 2014 Soros Justice Fellowship and the 2017 Richard J. Margolis Award for Social Justice Writing.


Twitter Username: lesliejillp

Tiana Clark is the author of two collections: I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood, winner of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize, and Equilibrium, winner of the Frost Place chapbook competition. She teaches at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville.


Twitter Username: TianaClarkPoet

Gina Ochsner teaches writing at Corban University and instructs with Seattle Pacific University’s MFA program. She is the author two short story collections and the novel The Hidden Letters of Velta B.

E.M. Tran is a Vietnamese American fiction and creative nonfiction writer. Her work has appeared in such places as Prairie Schooner, where her essay won a Glenna Luschei award, and Territory, an online literary project about maps. 


Twitter Username: etran3

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S133. Real True Crime: Nonfiction Writers Reimagine the Genre. (, , , ) True crime often reinforces social norms, but nonfiction about crimes and criminality can also help writers pose messier political and social questions such as: Is it criminal to enforce policies that lead to disenfranchisement and death? And how do victims reconstruct memories in ways that feel “true”? This panel reframes true crime to include topics, approaches, and voices outside of the traditional “whodunit” narrative, outlining ways to teach and write true crime as a genre of social change.

Laurel Flores Fantauzzo wrote The First Impulse, a nonfiction mystery. She wrote for the New York Times, CNN, and Esquire Philippines, and she was a 2016 finalist for the PEN/Fusion Award. A PhD candidate at RMIT, she teaches at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa.


Twitter Username: laurelfantauzzo

Website: laurelfantauzzo.com

L.M. Ferreira Cabeza-Vanegas has creative nonfiction and literary translation MFAs from the University of Iowa. She is the author of Drown Sever Sing, and Don’t Come Back from Mad Creek Books. She is a Rona Jaffe fellow and works as an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Sarah Viren is the author of the essay collection Mine, which won the River Teeth Book Prize. Her writing and translations have appeared in the Oxford American, AGNI, Ploughshares, the Iowa Review, and other literary magazines. She teaches at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: vurn

Website: sarahviren@wordpress.com

Angela Pelster's essay collection Limber won the Great Lakes Colleges Award New Writer Award in Nonfiction, and was a finalist for the PEN/Diamondstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. She teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S134. When Your Practice is the Research: A New Model for the Creative Writing PhD. (, , , , ) What if a PhD took you further into your ongoing practice as a writer? A new model of advanced practice-based research in creative writing is helping mid-career writers to deepen their oeuvres and careers. Faculty and student perspectives of a trans-cultural, multidisciplinary, low-residency program, based in Vietnam and Australia, reveal how this unconventional approach is making a difference to learning and creative practice. A writing pedagogy expert provides broader critical insight.

David Carlin is codirector of the non/fictionLab and Professor at RMIT University, Australia. Carlin's books include Survival Guide for Life in the Ruins, The Abyssinian Contortionist, Our Father Who Wasn’t There and The Near and the Far, an anthology of Asian and Australian writing.


Twitter Username: dcarlx

Website: www.davidcarlin.net.au

Francesca Rendle-Short is Associate Dean of Writing and Publishing at RMIT University in Melbourne. She is cofounder of non/fictionLab and codirector of WrICE. Francesca is a novelist, memoirist, and essayist whose books include Bite Your Tongue, The Near and The Far, and 100 Love Letters.


Twitter Username: frendles

Website: http://francescarendleshort.com

Bonnie Stone Sunstein is Professor of English and Education at the University of Iowa, where she served as 2015–17 Director of the Nonfiction Writing Program. She's written nine books, and many chapters, articles, and poems, including the newest, on teaching nonfiction, out soon.

Alvin Pang (poet, writer, editor, translator) was Singapore’s 2005 Young Artist of the Year for Literature and a 2002 Iowa International Writing Program fellow. A board member of the International Poetry Studies Institute, he has been translated into over twenty languages and has appeared in festivals and publications worldwide.


Twitter Username: alfpang

Michelle Aung Thin writes about in-between identities and states of at-homeness. Her current projects include a narrative about returning "home" to Myanmar as well as a project for Allen & Unwin about the Rohingya. She codirects the non/fictionLab and teaches in the PRS Asia at RMIT University.


Twitter Username: michelleaungthi

Website: michelleaungthin.com

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S135. The Lifeblood of Regional Literary Celebrations . (, , , , ) Accessible, regional literary celebrations nourish readers and writers alike. A panel of festival organizers, from a wide variety of organizations, will speak to the hows and whys of their literary shindigs, share their deep-in-the-trenches experiences in getting these celebrations off the ground, and discuss the perks and drawbacks of running these types of organizations.

Alessandra Simmons is a poetry editor for cream city review and an English PhD candidate at University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. She has poems published in the Florida Review, The Other Journal, Hawaii Pacific Review, Rabbit Catastrophe, WomenArts Quarterly, and other journals.


Twitter Username: alessandras

Jenni Moody is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her stories have appeared in Crab Orchard Review, Booth, and Aquifer: The Florida Review Online, among others. She attended the MFA program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Clarion West Writers Workshop.


Twitter Username: moodyjenni

Website: www.jennimoody.com

Laura Solomon is the author of three books of poetry. She’s worked with a number of literary journals and small presses, including Verse, Verse Press (now Wave Books), and the Georgia Review. She and her partner Jenny Gropp are the executive directors of Woodland Pattern Book Center in Milwaukee.

Elizabeth Evans Sachs is a professor of English Literature and creative writing at Niagara County Community College; she is also a variously published writer, and the current chair of the Washington Island Literary Festival on Washington Island, Wisconsin.

Franklin K.R. Cline is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation, a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a member of Woodland Pattern Book Center's Board of Directors. His book So What is available via Vegetarian Alcoholic Press.

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S136. Embodying Writing / Performing Translation, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , , , ) Beyond merely transferring text from one language to another, translation invites a recognition and practice of embodiment. This can connect to performance in compelling ways. Here, diaspora translators discuss performing translation, embodying writing (in and as translation), and translating performance. Engaging Haiti, Japan, Puerto Rico, and Mexico, they reckon with race, gender, sexuality, nationality, power, and language justice—in representation and lived experience.

Gabrielle Civil is a black feminist writer, poet, and performance artist. Her texts and translations have appeared in Small AxeThe Third RailTwo LinesObsidian, and more. She is the author of Tourist ArtSwallow the Fish, and Experiments in Joy. The aim of her work is to open up space.

Madhu H. Kaza is a writer, translator, artist, and educator based in New York. She is the editor of Kitchen Table Translation, an anthology of writing by immigrant and diasporic translators, and has taught writing at The New School, NYU, and most recently in the MFA program at Columbia University.


Twitter Username: afmaeli

Sawako Nakayasu’s books include The Ants, Texture Notes, and Mouth: Eats Color. Her newest translations are Tatsumi Hijikata’s Costume en Face, and The Collected Poems of Sagawa Chika, which won the 2016 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. She has received fellowships from the NEA, PEN, and JUSFC.

Urayoán Noel is Associate Professor of English and Spanish at NYU and also teaches at Stetson University's MFA of the Americas. His books include In Visible Movement, Buzzing Hemisphere/Rumor Hemisférico, and Architecture of Dispersed Life: Selected Poetry by Pablo de Rokha.


Twitter Username: urayoannoel

John Pluecker is a writer, translator, artist, and cofounder of Antena and its Houston interpreters' collective. His most recent book-length translations are Gore Capitalism and Antígona González, and he has published many chapbooks, zines, and one full-length book of poetry and image, Ford Over.


Twitter Username: JohnPluecker

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S137. Mind Meld: Reimagining Creative Writing and Science. (, , , ) Einstein described art and science as “branches of the same tree.” In this panel, writers from a diverse range of genres and aesthetics leverage findings from science and scientific language to imagine new futures, unexpected relationships, radical reconfigurations of the present, and the hyperreal. Drawing from findings in cosmology, biology, and physics, the panelists explore the ways science and art inform one another and illuminate some of the mysteries at their intersections.

Brandi Reissenweber’s fiction has appeared in several journals, including The Drum and Willow Springs. She was a James. C. McCreight Fiction Fellow at the University of Wisconsin and a writer in residence at the Kerouac Project. She is an Assistant Professor at Illinois Wesleyan University.

Amy Catanzano is the author of three books including Starlight in Two-Million: A Neo-Scientific Novella, recipient of the Noemi Press Book Award, and Multiversal, recipient of the PEN USA Literary Award in Poetry. She is an associate professor and the poet-in-residence at Wake Forest University.

Adam Dickinson is the author of four books of poetry, including: Anatomic and The Polymers. His work has been nominated for the Governor General’s Literary Award for Poetry (Canada) and the Trillium Book Award for Poetry (Ontario). Dickinson directs the creative writing program at Brock University.


Twitter Username: AdamwDickinson

Will Alexander is author of over thirty books not only as a poet, but as an aphorist, essayist, playwright, novelist, visual artist, and pianist. He is both a City Lights and a New Directions author and is a Whiting Fellow, a Jackson Prize winner, a PEN Oakland and an American Book Award winner.

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S138. Challenging Tokenization: Writers of Color Respond. (, , , , ) Writers from underrepresented communities often face societal pressure to share stories centered around cultural identity and immigration. These panelists trouble the institutional expectations of narratives written by people of color and share their experiences challenging tokenization while sustaining a healthy writing life.

Analicia Sotelo is the author of the collection of poetry Virgin, and the chapbook Nonstop Godhead. She earned her MFA from the University of Houston and currently works for Writers in the Schools in Houston, Texas.


Twitter Username: AnaliciaSotelo

Chris Santiago is a poet and fiction writer and the author of TULA, winner of the Lindquist & Vennum Poetry Prize and a finalist for the Minnesota Book Award. A Kundiman, Mellon/ACLS, and McKnight writing fellow, he is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of St. Thomas.


Twitter Username: santisugi

Janine Joseph is a poet, librettist, and essayist. She is the author of Driving Without a License, winner of the Kundiman Poetry Prize, da Vinci Eye award, and finalist for the Oklahoma Book Award and Eric Hoffer Award. She is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Oklahoma State University.


Twitter Username: ninejoseph

Website: http://www.janinejoseph.com/

Tiphanie Yanique is the author the novel, Land of Love and Drowning, winner of the First Novel Award from the Center for Fiction and the Rosenthal Family Award of the American Academy of Arts & Letters. Her collection of poems, Wife, won the 2016 Forward/Felix Dennis Prize for a first book of poems.


Twitter Username: tiphanieyanique

Website: www.tiphanieyanique.com

Leslie Sainz has received fellowships and residencies from CantoMundo, the Hub City Writers Project, and the Stadler Center for Poetry, where she currently serves as a 2018–2019 Stadler Fellow.


Twitter Username: lesannsai

Website: lesliesainz.com

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S139. Walk in Their Shoes: Children's and Young Adult Novels that Cultivate Empathy. (, , , ) A diverse panel of children's and young adult authors weighs in on the abundance of studies suggesting that readers of middle-grade and young adult fiction develop both an increased capacity to understand other people's points of view and a deeper empathy. We'll talk about how authors, teachers, therapists, and even judges use children's and YA novels in their work to decrease anxiety and depression in kids bullied because of race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, disability, and economic status.

Melissa Hart is the author of Avenging the Owl; Wild Within: How Rescuing Owls Inspired a Family; and Gringa: A Contradictory Girlhood. She's a contributing editor at The Writer Magazine, and her essays have appeared in The Normal School, Fourth Genre, Orion, The Washington Post, The LA Times, etc.


Twitter Username: MelissaMHart

Website: www.melissahart.com

Brian Tashima is the author of the Joel Suzuki series, a YA sci-fi/fantasy series featuring a teenage protagonist on the autism spectrum. He is also a board member of Autism Empowerment, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for people in the autism community.


Twitter Username: joel_suzuki

Carmen T. Bernier-Grand is the author of eleven books for children and young adults. Three of her biographies have won Pura Belpre honors. Among other recognitions for her contributions to children's literature is the Walt Morey Young Readers Literary Legacy Award.

Donna Gephart's award-winning, middle grade novels exhibit humor and heart. They include: In Your Shoes, Lily and Dunkin, Death by Toilet Paper, and How to Survive Middle School. Donna is a popular speaker and creative writing teacher at schools, conferences, libraries, and book festivals.


Twitter Username: Dgephartwrites

Oregon Ballroom 203, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S139. Wait! Wait! Don’t Sign That: A Writer’s Guide to Book Contract Basics. (, , ) Publishing agreements are some of the most important documents authors ever encounter, but for many writers, book contracts remain shrouded in mystery. In this panel, Authors Guild Executive Director Mary Rasenberger will moderate a discussion among publishing industry attorneys, offering an author-friendly introduction to the various standard book contracts. Learn what every book agreement should contain, how best to approach a contract negotiation, and what provisions to avoid or add. The panel will also address agency agreements, as well as some things to bear in mind when considering self- and hybrid publishing.

Mary Rasenberger is the Executive Director of the Authors Guild. Prior to joining the Guild, Mary practiced law for over 25 years, specializing in media and copyright law, and served as senior policy advisor for the U.S. Copyright Office and program manager at the Library of Congress.

Cheryl Davis is the General Counsel of the Authors Guild. Prior to joining the Guild, she was a partner at the firm of Menaker & Herrmann LLP, where she specialized in intellectual property and wrote a number of articles and made presentations about how artists can protect their intellectual property.


Twitter Username: VirgoBrain
Ellis B. Levine, a partner of Cowan DeBaets Abrahams & Sheppard, served as Vice President, Secretary, General Counsel and a member of the Board of Directors of Random House, Inc. from 1989 until 1998. He primarily represents book and audio publishers, authors and literary agents.

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S140. A Job of One’s Own: How to Create a Professional Life That Works for You. (, , , , ) While many writers are trained for a tenure-track university position, the academic market has become extremely competitive, requiring more than an MFA or a PhD. Here are some incredible careers you can create for your future, where your expertise with creative and critical thinking will make an impact. Panelists discuss how they arrived in their industries and how you can adapt your creative skills to craft a meaningful professional career and sustained writing life.

Meggie Monahan received an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Houston where she served as nonfiction editor for Gulf Coast. Meggie lives and works in Houston as Program Manager for Writers in the Schools (WITS).


Twitter Username: MeggieNotMaggie

Natalia Sylvester is the author of the novels Chasing the Sun and Everyone Knows You Go Home. She is a faculty member of the Creative Writing MFA program at Regis University. Her work has appeared in Latina magazine, Writer's Digest, and NBCLatino.com. Twitter/IG: @NataliaSylv.


Twitter Username: NataliaSylv

Ramiza Shamoun Koya writes fiction and nonfiction, and is the Director of Youth Programs at Literary Arts in Portland, Oregon. Her work has appeared in publications such as Mutha MagazineWashington Square Review, and Lumina, and she has been a fellow at MacDowell Colony and Blue Mountain Center.


Twitter Username: RamizaKoya

Nancy Reddy is the author of Double Jinx, winner of the 2014 National Poetry Series, and the chapbook Acadiana. She is the recipient of a Walter E. Dakin fellowship from the Sewanee Writers' Conference and grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation and the New Jersey Council on the Arts.


Twitter Username: nancy_reddy

Rebecca Wadlinger is a graduate of the Michener Center for Writers and earned her PhD from the University of Houston's Creative Writing Program. She currently works in the Creative Department at the Portland advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy.


Twitter Username: the_beccas

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S141. The Voices There Before You: Gentrification as Literary Subject and Activism. (, , , Clarisse Rosaz-Shariyf) “People have a culture that’s been laid down for generations and you come in and now shit gotta change because you’re here?” From Spike Lee to bestsellers, gentrification finds a home in major cities like New York, Los Angeles, Portland, and nationwide.

What does gentrification look like in 2019, and how does it create inequity in free expression? Presented by PEN America, this panel explores the ways in which gentrification becomes not only subject matter but inspiration for literary activism.

Jessica Ceballos y Campbell curates literary arts programming at Avenue 50 Studio (and throughout L.A.), where she also co-organizes the local L.A. Tenants Union to fight rampant displacement. Her work has been published in various journals and anthologies and she’s published three chapbooks.


Twitter Username: @MsOedipaMass

Website: www.jessicaceballos.com

In addition to writing poetry, Javon Johnson is an Assistant Professor and Director of African American and African Diaspora Studies and holds an appointment in Gender and Sexuality Studies in the Interdisciplinary, Gender, and Ethnic Studies Department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.


Twitter Username: javonism

Renée Watson is a New York Times bestselling author and educator. Her YA novel Piecing Me Together received a Coretta Scott King Award and Newbery Honor. In 2016, Renée launched I, Too Arts Collective, a nonprofit housed in the Harlem brownstone where Langston Hughes lived and created.


Twitter Username: reneewauthor

Website: www.reneewatson.net

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S142. Throwing Money into the Wind?: Submitting and Publishing a First Book of Poetry. (, , , , ) Sending out a first full-length poetry manuscript is often a time-consuming and costly endeavor. Contests or open submission periods? Large or small presses? What if the press folds before your manuscript is published? Our panelists discuss their thrilling (and horrifying) recent first-book publication experiences and offer strategies for submission, mistakes to avoid, and what to expect after acceptance regarding contracts, editing, cover selection, and publicity.

Poet and essayist Heidi Czerwiec is the author of the poetry collection Conjoining and the lyric essay collection Fluid States, winner of Pleiades Press’ 2018 Robert C. Jones Prize for Short Prose. She is an editor at Poetry City, USA and Assay, and teaches with the MN Prison Writing Workshop.


Twitter Username: HeidiCzerwiec

Website: http://www.heidiczerwiec.com

Paige Riehl is the author of Suspension (poetry collection), and Blood Ties (poetry chapbook). She is the poetry editor for Midway Journal, a volunteer mentor with the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop, and English faculty at Anoka-Ramsey Community College.


Twitter Username: PaigeRiehl

Website: http://paigeriehl.com/

Avery M. Guess is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Poetry. A PhD student at the University of South Dakota, her chapbook The Patient Admits is available now, and The Truth Is, a full-length collection of poetry, is forthcoming. She is the assistant poetry editor for South Dakota Review.


Twitter Username: AveryMGuess

Yanyi is a poet and critic. The recipient of fellowships from Poets House and Asian American Writers' Workshop, his debut collection is The Year of Blue Water. He serves as associate editor at Foundry.


Twitter Username: yanyi___

Jennifer S. Cheng write poetry, lyric essay, and image-text. She is the author of Moon: Letters, Maps, Poems and House A. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Hong Kong and received fellowships and awards from Brown University, University of Iowa, Kundiman, Bread Loaf, and the Academy of American Poets.


Twitter Username: mooncake

Website: www.jenniferscheng.com

10:30 am to 11:45 am

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S143. Women of Pacific Northwest Science Fiction and Fantasy: A Reading. (, , , ) For decades, the Pacific Northwest has been a generative ground for speculative fiction, influenced by esteemed writers such as Ursula K. LeGuin and Octavia Butler. In their wake, younger generations helped drive a cultural revolution where women have begun to dominate the field of speculative fiction, as illustrated by the 2017 Hugo Awards. Listen as a panel of award-winning writers—Brenda Cooper, Danika Dinsmore, Dominica Phetteplace, Wendy Wagner, and E. Lily Yu—read from recent work.

Danika Dinsmore is a writer, educator, and spokenword artist. She writes poetry and speculative fiction with a focus on middle grade and young adult literature. She teaches creative writing and world-building to students of all ages at schools, conferences, and festivals across North America.


Twitter Username: danika_dinsmore

Website: danikadinsmore.com

E. Lily Yu received the 2017 Artist Trust/Gar LaSalle Storyteller Award. Her short stories have been finalists for the Hugo, Nebula, Sturgeon, Locus, and World Fantasy Awards and have appeared in HazlittMcSweeney'sBoston Review, and Clarkesworld, as well as multiple best-of-the-year anthologies.

Dominica Phetteplace is a graduate of the Clarion West Writer's Workshop. Her work has appeared in Asimov's Science Fiction, [PANK], The Los Angeles Review, Clarkesworld, and Zyzzyva. Her honors include a Pushcart Prize, a Rona Jaffe Award, and a MacDowell Fellowship.


Twitter Username: fetaplace


Twitter Username: brendacooper

Website: http://www.brenda-cooper.com

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S144. No Fantasy or Sci-Fi: Teaching Genre as Workshop. (, , , ) The time of popular genre fiction being barred from workshops is mostly passed. The number of students submitting genre work grows every day, and with it, so does the desire among students to be taught the fundamentals and craft concerns of those genres. From fiction to poetry, our panelists will discuss the challenges and opportunities of introducing work of popular genre masters in the creative writing classroom as well as addressing issues surrounding generic conventions in the workshop.

Saul Lemerond is a Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Hanover College. He received his PhD in English with an emphasis in Creative Writing-Fiction from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. He has a book of short stories, Kayfabe and Other Stories.


Twitter Username: SaulLemerond

Patti Jeane Pangborn is a PhD student in English with a creative writing concentration at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where she teaches first-year writing and sophomore lit courses. She holds an MFA in poetry from Columbia College Chicago. Her chapbook of sci-fi poetry is titled Adrift.


Twitter Username: pattipangborn

Leigh Camacho Rourks's forthcoming collection of short stories, Moon Trees and Other Orphans, is the winner of the 2018 St. Lawrence Book Award. She is also the recipient of the Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Award and the Robert Watson Literary Review Prize.


Twitter Username: ScaredWriter

Website: lcrourks.com

Daniel Altenburg is a PhD candidate in creative writing at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where he teaches English and works as Co-Editor-in-Chief for Rougarou: A Journal of Arts and Literature. He is the author of Flight, a book of poetry.


Twitter Username: lettersofwreck

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S145. Kafka’s Office, Ailey’s Studio: Creative Writers in Professional Administration. (, , , , ) For creative writers, administration signals bureaucracy, at worst, or artistic free-rein, at best. But in this gig economy, leadership jobs can provide not just stable but also fulfilling work. This panel—comprised of university program directors and a dean, with leaders of national organizations and local nonprofits—discusses complex realities when writers enter into a system’s machine. Writer/administrators share lessons from their creative leadership, even under institutional resistance.

Christy J. Zink is a published fiction and nonfiction writer, with expertise in women's health. She is an assistant professor of writing in George Washington University's University Writing Program and Assistant Director of Writing in the Disciplines, and is the past director of PEN/Faulkner's Writers in Schools program.


Twitter Username: professing

Doug Hesse is Professor and Executive Director of Writing at the University of Denver, and past president of NCTE, CCC, and WPA. He is the coauthor of Creating Nonfiction, and has essays in Fourth Genre, Writing on the EdgeThe Middle of the Middle West, and elsewhere. 

Michael Paul Thomas is an Associate Dean at Monmouth University, where he teaches poetry and directs the Visiting Writers Series. He received his MFA in Poetry from Syracuse University where he was the founding editor of Salt Hill. His work has appeared in the Greensboro Review, Slice, and other journals.


Twitter Username: professorMPT

Lisa Page is coeditor of We Wear The Mask: 15 True Stories of Passing. Her work has appeared in VQR, Playboy, the Washington Post Bookworld, The Crisis, OriginsAmerican Short Fiction, and in several anthologies. She directs the creative writing program at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: LisaPag39212124

Seema Reza is the author of When the World Breaks Open, a memoir in essays and poetry, and coordinates and facilitates a multi-hospital military arts program in Washington D.C. She is a VONA Alumna and serves as a council member-at-large for the Transformative Language Arts Network.


Twitter Username: seemareza

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S146. Latinx Speculative Fiction: What Sets it Apart?. (, , , ) From Puerto Rico to Alaska, Latinx writers are redefining US literature and pushing its boundaries. Readers of speculative fiction have found themselves increasingly absorbed in the work of innovative writers like Junot Díaz, Carmen Maria Machado, and Daniel José Older, who bring a Latinx spin to established literary and popular fiction. What is speculative for the mainstream is real life in real time for us, as we mirror contemporary events in our creative work.

Kathleen Alcalá is the author of six award-winning books of fiction and nonfiction, most recently, The Deepest Roots. Honored by Western States Book Award, PNBA Fiction Award, Governors Writers Award, ArtistTrust, Island Treasure, Intl Latino Book Award, and Con Tinta, she is cofounder of Raven Chronicles.


Twitter Username: katkat_alcala

Website: www.kathleenalcala.com

Pablo Brescia has published three books of short stories: La derrota de lo real/The Defeat of the Real; Fuera de Lugar/Out of Place and La apariencia de las cosas/The Appearance of Things, and the book of hybrid texts No hay tiempo para la poesía/NoTime for Poetry with the pen name Harry Bimer.

David Bowles is a Mexican American author and university professor from the Río Grande Valley of South Texas. He has received awards from the American Library Association, Texas Institute of Letters, and Texas Associated Press. The latest of his thirteen books is Feathered Serpent, Dark Heart of Sky.


Twitter Username: DavidOBowles

Brenda Peynado's work appears in the O. Henry Prize Stories, Tor.com, Georgia Review, Kenyon Review Online, The Sun, and others. She received an MFA at Florida State University and a Fulbright Grant to the Dominican Republic. She is an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: brendapeynado

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S147. It’s Complicated: Writing Poetry from Multiple Subjectivities. (, , , , ) Poets with layered racial, ethnic, and cultural identities push past “it’s complicated” into the potential and perils of writing about identity through a multi-faceted lens. Panelists will explore issues of authority, affinity, and authenticity and discuss membership in identity-based writing communities as well as strategies for complicating the labels that may be applied to their work. Above all, they will explore what it is to live and write from hybrid spaces in the US today.

Emily Pérez is the author of House of Sugar, House of Stone, and the chapbooks Made and Unmade and Backyard Migration Route. A CantoMundo fellow, she has received funding and support from Bread Loaf, the Artist Trust, Jack Straw Writers, and the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley.


Twitter Username: budlemon

Brandon Som is the author of Babel's Moon and The Tribute Horse, winner of the 2015 Kate Tufts Discovery Award. A former fellow at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, he is an assistant professor in the Literature Department at the University of California, San Diego.

Sun Yung Shin is the author of Unbearable Splendor, Rough, and Savage, and Skirt Full of Black. She codirects Poetry Asylum in Minneapolis. The editor of A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota and Outsiders Within, and author of Cooper's Lesson, she is widely published in multiple genres.


Twitter Username: sunyungshin

Website: www.sunyungshin.com

Carolina Ebeid received 2015/2016 NEA Fellowship, and awards from the Stadler Center, CantoMundo, and Bread Loaf Writers Conference. She holds an MFA from the Michener Center, and is a doctoral student at the University of Denver. You Ask Me to Talk About the Interior is her first poetry collection.


Twitter Username: carolinaebeid

Website: carolinaebeid.com

Lisa Marie Brimmer is a queer, black, transracial adoptee artist and writer. She is coeditor of Queer Voices of Minnesota Anthology. Her critical and poetic work was presented at Split This Rock! and The Center for Multi-Ethnic Studies: Europe and the Americas in Graz, Austria.


Twitter Username: 2speakease

Website: Lisa Marie Brimmer

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S148. True Story: Revolutionary Creative Nonfiction. (, , , , Krys Lee) Telling true stories is a revolutionary act but what is the writer’s responsibility to the “truth” of historical events? Five writers explore the politics of telling the truth in works about the intergenerational impact of the Korean War, the Hungarian Revolution, a long-lost ancestor turned freedom fighter in India, an Indigenous Mexican woman’s affair with a Spaniard in the ruins of Tenochtitlan, and a TV show about mixed-race people and the upheaval of multicultural society in 1850s New Orleans.

Anjoli Roy earned her PhD in English and creative writing in 2017. She has published recently with Waxwing, the Asian American Literary Review, River Teeth, and Hippocampus. She is a 2018 Voices of Our Nation Workshop fellow and runs a weekly literature and music radio show on KTUH FM Honolulu.


Twitter Username: anjoliroy

Website: www.anjoliroy.com

Lizz Huerta is a poet, fiction writer, essayist from the Borderlands of So. California. Her work is informed/shaped/ by the borders of land, spirituality, ancestry and labor. She is outside of academia, working as a painting contractor, collecting stories and voices from construction sites.


Twitter Username: lizzhuerta

Nicky Loomis is a writer living in Los Angeles. Her writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, Catapult, Los Angeles Times and others. She spent 2012 in Budapest, Hungary as a Fulbright scholar in creative writing. She currently teaches journalism and creative writing at Crossroads.


Twitter Username: nickyloomis

Lara Stapleton wrote The Lowest Blue Flame Before Nothing, a PEN Open Book Committee selection and an Independent Booksellers' selection. A writer of stories, poems, essays, and teleplays, she is partnered with producer Rachel Watanabe-Batton on the 1850 project, a television show.


Twitter Username: larastapleton

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S149. Indigenous Poetics: A Reading by Emerging Poets from the Institute of American Indian Arts MFA Program. (, , , , ) This reading by recent alumni of the Institute of American Indian Arts is a gathering of emerging poetic voices who all identify as Indigenous. Varied in age, gender identity, and sexual orientation this reading promises to be as diverse as it is enthralling. These poets who come from all parts of the country have committed themselves to the act of rewriting the literary landscape by proving that Indigenous poetics is both vital and vibrant.

Jake Skeets is Black Streak Wood, born for Water's Edge. He is Diné from the Navajo Nation. A graduate of the low-residency Institute of American Indian Arts MFA program, he currently resides in the Navajo Nation and works at Diné College. He is one of the winners of the 2018 "Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Prize.


Twitter Username: blackstreakwood

Michaelsun Stonesweat Knapp, of the Costanoan-Rumsen Carmel Band of Ohlone Indians, graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts's low-residency MFA program, is the winner of the 2016 Muse Times Two poetry contest, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize, was a Periphery Poets Fellow, and was a former editor of poetry for Mud City.

Joaquín Zihuatanejo received his MFA in Poetry from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He is the recipient of the Robert Dana-Anhinga Prize for Poetry and his new book is Arsonist.


Twitter Username: thepoetjz

Arianne True (Choctaw, Chickasaw) is a queer poet, folk artist, and teacher from Seattle, and a recent MFA graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts. Arianne has been a guest editor for Cloudthroat and taught with Writers in the Schools and the Richard Hugo House, among others.

Angie Trudell Vasquez is a poet, writer, and social justice activist. She received her MFA in Creative Writing, specifically poetry, in May 2017 from the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her work has appeared in print, online, and on stage nationally and internationally for the last twenty years.

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S150. Outsiders in Minority Fiction: When You’re From Where You’re Not Supposed to Be. (, , , ) This panel will speak to diverse minority experiences and the multitude of aesthetic responses in fiction to living in places where the American populace doesn’t place them. From African Americans in Appalachia, Native Americans in Denver and Asian Americans in the rural Midwest, many of us write, imaginatively and poetically, about our families and communities and often end up in a place of artistic resistance to mainstream and even alternative expectations in fiction.

Erika T. Wurth's publications include two novels, two poetry collections, and a short story collection. She teaches creative writing at Western Illinois University and was a guest writer at Institute of American Indian Arts. She is Apache/Chickasaw/Cherokee and is represented by Peter Steinberg.


Twitter Username: etwurth

Website: http://www.erikatwurth.com/

David Heska Wanbli Weiden is Associate Professor and Director of the Native American Studies program at Metropolitan State University of Denver. He received his MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts and is a 2018 MacDowell Fellow. He is completing a novel, Winter Counts.


Twitter Username: WanbliWeiden

Website: www.DavidWeiden.com

Keith Lesmeister is the author of the story collection We Could've Been Happy Here (MG Press, 2017). He received his MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars, and currently teaches at Northeast Iowa Community College.

Steven Dunn is the author of the novels Potted Meat and Water & Power. Some of his work can be found in Granta, Blink Ink Print, and Best of Small Fictions 2018. He is currently an MFA candidate at Goddard College.


Twitter Username: ScDunnJr

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S151. Teaching the Impossible: Teaching Novel Writing To Undergraduates. (, , , , ) The short story is often introduced to undergraduates as a precursor to writing a novel. However, novelists and short story writers alike can attest that each form includes its own unique joys and challenges. In this panel, we will discuss how and if to conduct workshop in a novel writing class, how to help students at various stages of the writing process and writing in a variety of genres, pedagogical methods, and how to introduce a project whose length likely surpasses that of the semester.

Tasha Coryell received her MFA from the University of Alabama. She currently teaches full-time at Alabama while simultaneously pursuing a PhD in composition and rhetoric. Her first collection of short stories is Hungry People.


Twitter Username: tashaaaaaaa

Jared Yates Sexton is a writer and political analyst whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the New Republic, Salon, and elsewhere. He's the author of four books of fiction and his book The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore was published by Counterpoint in 2017.


Twitter Username: jysexton

Website: http://www.jysexton.com

Cathy Day is the author of two books: The Circus in Winter and Comeback Season. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The Lit Hub, PANK, The Millions, and Inside Higher Education. She teaches at Ball State University where she currently serves as the department chair.


Twitter Username: daycathy

Website: www.cathyday.com

Daniel Peña is a Pushcart Prize-winning writer and Assistant Professor in the English department at the University of Houston-Downtown. Formerly, he was a Fulbright-Garcia Robles Scholar in Mexico City where he finished his first novel, BANG. He's a regular contributor to the Ploughshares Blog.


Twitter Username: danimalpena

Elizabeth Eslami is the author of the story collection Hibernate, for which she was awarded the Ohio State University Prize in Short Fiction, and the novel Bone Worship. She is the Hampton and Esther Boswell Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at DePauw University.


Twitter Username: elizabetheslami

Website: elizabetheslami.com

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S152. The World Splitting Open: From Memoir to #MeToo. (, , , , ) What would happen, Muriel Rukeyser asked, if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open. Women writers began telling the truth about their lives in the 1990’s, writing memoirs about previously off limits subjects such as rape, domestic violence and sexual harassment. Despite criticism by the literary establishment, they persisted. The world began splitting open. We’ll discuss the role women’s memoir has played in one of the most significant social movements of our time.

Janice Gary is the author of Short Leash: A Memoir of Dog Walking and Deliverance, winner of the Sarton Women's Book Award and finalist, Eric Hoffer Award. She is a fellow at VCCA and teaches CNF at ASU's Master of Liberal Arts Program and memoir workshops at writing centers and conferences.


Twitter Username: jtgary1

Website: www.janicegary.com

Sue William Silverman’s books are The Pat Boone Fan Club: My Life as a White Anglo-Saxon Jew; Love Sick: One Woman’s Journey through Sexual Addiction; Because I Remember Terror, Father, I Remember You; Fearless Confessions: A Writer’s Guide to Memoir. She teaches at Vermont College of Fine Arts.


Twitter Username: SueSilverman

Website: www.SueWilliamSilverman.com

Mexican writer Reyna Grande is the author of the novels Across a Hundred Mountains and Dancing with Butterflies, which received several awards including an American Book Award. Her memoir, The Distance Between Us, is about her life before and after illegally immigrating from Mexico to the US at nine.


Twitter Username: reynagrande

Website: www.reynagrande.com

Karen Salyer McElmurray’s Surrendered Child: A Birth Mother’s Journey was an AWP Award winner. Her novels are The Motel of the Stars, Strange Birds in the Tree of Heaven, and she has coedited an essay collection, Walk Till the Dogs Get Mean. She teaches at Gettysburg College.


Twitter Username: mcelmurraykaren

Website: www.karenmcelmurray.com

Aimee Liu is author of the novels Flash House, Cloud Mountain, and Face. Nonfiction works include Gaining and Solitaire. Her short stories and essays have appeared in more than a dozen anthologies, magazines and literary journals. She teaches in Goddard College's MFA program in Creative Writing.


Twitter Username: aimee_liu

Website: www.aimeeliu.net

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S153. How Poets Progress: On Poetic Development. (, , , ) How do poets move forward in their art and in their lives? How do poets and their poems change over the course of an artistic career? This panel conversation will present a unique opportunity for poets to describe how their own work has developed, poem to poem, book to book, at different stages and by various angles—through moments of breakthroughs and through fallow periods, through inspiration and through perseverance, as poetry critics see them and as the poets see themselves.

Craig Morgan Teicher is the author of, most recently, The Trembling Answers and the essay collection We Begin in Gladness: How Poets Progress; he is also the editor of Once and For All: The Best of Delmore Schwartz. He works at Publishers Weekly and teaches at NYU.


Twitter Username: cteicher

Website: http://www.craigmorganteicher.com

francine j. harris is the author of play dead, winner of 2017 Lambda Literary and Audre Lorde Awards. She has received fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, is a Cave Canem poet, and is the 2018/2019 Rona Jaffe Fellow at the Cullman Center at New York Public Library.


Twitter Username: francinejharris

D. A. Powell's books include Repast and Useless Landscape or A Guide for Boys, recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry. He teaches full-time at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: powell_da

Monica McClure is the author of Tender Data (Birds, LLC) and the chapbooks, Mood Swing and Mala. Her writing has appeared in Tin House, Jubilat, Fence, The Los Angeles Review, The Lit Review, Lambda Literary Review and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: mmmmcclure

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S154. “Work, work, work, work, work, work”: Craft and Teaching as People of Color. (, , , , ) We will explore the multiple identities we inhabit as writers and teachers of color, and how that prepositional phrase affects both the nouns we claim and our relationship to craft and pedagogy. What are some tensions among intersectional identities? How do these experiences both constrain and release the worlds we create? Why do our gender and racial identities affect academic and creative writing classrooms differently? We hope to unpack the various ways our bodies engage with academic labor.

Shinelle L. Espaillat teaches at Dutchess Community College in New York. Her work has appeared in the collections How Higher Education Feels and Shale: Extreme Fiction for Extreme Times, as well as in The Westchester Review, Ghost Parachute, Cleaver Magazine and Midway Journal.


Twitter Username: shinelle920

Gail Upchurch holds a PhD in English with a concentration in fiction from Binghamton University's Program for Writers. She's an Associate Professor of English at Dutchess Community College. Currently at work on a young adult novel, Gail focuses on mutilated and scarred bodies in her writing.

Adrian Khactu teaches American literature at ‘Iolani School (Honolulu, HI). He received his MA in Creative Writing from Temple University and has completed doctoral coursework at the University of Pennsylvania. His fiction explores queer Asian/American identity and Marvin Gaye.


Twitter Username: AdrianKhactu

Racquel Goodison is an Assistant Professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. She has been a resident at Yaddo and the Saltonstall Arts Colony as well as a recipient of the Astraea Emerging Lesbian Writer’s Grant and a scholarship to the Fine Arts Works Center.

Amina Henry is a Brooklyn-based playwright, adjunct lecturer, and arts educator with the Teachers & Writers Collaborative and the Hunts Point Alliance for Children. She is a graduate of Yale University, has an MA in Performance Studies (NYU), and an MFA in Playwriting (Brooklyn College).


Twitter Username: henryamina

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S155. Writing Real in Young Adult Fiction. (, , ) This panel explores ways to write vivid, authentic teen characters, while avoiding tropes and stereotypes, and examines why it is important for YA writers to take on complex issues, such as gender identity, sexual violence, and structural racism, in culturally appropriate ways. How can young readers trust writers to help them transcend their world—or even escape it for a few hours—if writers don't acknowledge the uncomfortable places teens must often inhabit in their daily lives?

Meagan Macvie writes about life in small and vast places. Her first book, The Ocean in My Ears, is set in her hometown of Soldotna, Alaska. The novel was named a 2017 Best Teen Historical Fiction by Kirkus Reviews. Meagan has an MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University.


Twitter Username: meaganmacvie

Website: www.meaganmacvie.com

Nina Packebush is the author of Girls Like Me. Girls Like Me is a Lambda Literary Finalist, an In the Margins Award 2018 recommended book, a Golden Crown Literary Award winner, and is currently a Washington Book Award Finalist. Nina is a contributing editor to Hip Mama Magazine.


Twitter Username: nina_packebush

Website: www.ninapackebush.com

Candice Montgomery is the author of young adult novels, including Home and Away and By Any Means Necessary. It is the goal of her stories to interrogate the spaces of race, love, the body, gender, and sexuality, all while being a witness of life.


Twitter Username: candiceamanda

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S156. The Plot to Kill Plot: Practical Alternatives to "Plotting" Fiction. (, , , , ) Has the term “plot” outlived its usefulness? Do the many cultural and craft-related assumptions connected to traditional notions of plot needlessly close the door on other viable forms of narrative construction? In this panel, five writers of aesthetically varied fiction share practical alternatives to “plotting”—helpful strategies for structuring novels and short stories that question, resist, or otherwise usurp conventional conceptions of plot.

Joseph Scapellato earned his MFA in Fiction at New Mexico State University. He is the author of Big Lonesome, a story collection, and the forthcoming novel, The Made-Up Man. Scapellato is an Assistant Professor of English at Bucknell University.

Matt Bell is the author of the novels Scrapper and In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods (a finalist for the Young Lions Fiction Award), as well as the story collection A Tree of a Person or a Wall. He teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: mdbell79

Website: http://www.mdbell.com

Allegra Hyde's first book, Of This New World, won the John Simmons Short Fiction Award. She is the recipient of three Pushcart Prizes, as well as fellowships from the Lucas Artists Program, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, and the Fulbright Commission. She teaches at the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: allegra_hyde

Ling Ma is the author of Severance. She received her MFA from Cornell University. Her writing has appeared in Granta, Vice, Playboy, Chicago Reader, Ninth Letter and elsewhere. She lives in Chicago.

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the novel, The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, A Haven. Her short stories have appeared in Black Warrior Review, TriQuarterly, and Kenyon Review Online, among others. She is a PhD candidate in creative writing at the University of Denver.


Twitter Username: thiriimkm

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S157. The Most Versatile Essay: Flash Nonfiction in Any/Every Classroom. (, , , , ) Even the most reluctant-to-write students take to flash essays. Drawn to their economy, they're won over by the urgency and potency of the form. From the academy to the incarcerated, beginners to advanced, flash nonfiction is a boon to writers of all stripes, and a vital part of teaching in the technological age. Panelists will discuss the versatility of the form, successful teaching strategies, prompts, exercises, and go-to resources from a range of educational settings and pedagogical perspectives.

Brian Benson is the author of the memoir ​Going Somewhere: A Bicycle Journey Across America.​ He teaches creative nonfiction at Portland’s​ ​Attic Institute and facilitates free Write Around Portland workshops in prisons, schools, and affordable housing.


Twitter Username: MrBrianBenson

Allison K Williams's work has appeared on/in NPR's The Moth and Snap Judgment, CBC's Love Me and DNTO, the Christian Science Monitor, and the New York Times, with flash essays in Kenyon Review, The Drum, and Brevity. She serves as social media editor for Brevity. idowords.net


Twitter Username: guerillamemoir

Website: www.idowords.net

Sayantani Dasgupta is the author of Fire Girl: Essays on India, America, & the In-Between, finalist for the 2016 Foreword Indies Award; and the chapbook The House of Nails: Memories of a New Delhi Childhood. She edits nonfiction for Crab Creek Review, and she has taught in India, Italy, Mexico, and the US.


Twitter Username: sayan10e

Website: www.sdasgupta.com

Anna Vodicka’s essays appear in AFAR, Brevity, Guernica, Harvard Review, the Iowa Review, Longreads, Paste, Best Women's Travel Writing, and other journals and anthologies. She is a Vermont Studio Center Fellow and Hedgebrook alumna, and teaches at Seattle's Hugo House and the King County jail.


Twitter Username: AnnaVodicka

Celeste Chan teaches creative writing to LGBTQ youth with Queer Ancestors Project and coordinates QTPOC Free School. A Hedgebrook, Lambda, and VONA fellow, she works across prose, poetry, flash nonfiction, and oral history projects. For ten years, she toured work internationally with Queer Rebels.


Twitter Username: celestechan2020

Website: www.celestechan.com

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S158. Words Into Pictures: Adapting Literary Works for Film and TV. (, , , ) For screenwriters looking to adapt other writers’ material (novels, short stories, comics, plays, bios, etc.), or writers interested in adapting their own work or having it optioned for the screen, this panel will explore the unique and challenging requirements of visual storytelling and provide successful strategies for adapting pre-existing source material for movies and TV.

Cheryl Eagan-Donovan is a filmmaker whose work has screened at theaters in the US, Canada, and Europe. She teaches screenwriting at Lesley University, Northeastern University, Lasell College and Grub Street Center for Creative Writing, Her new film Nothing is Truer than Truth premiered in 2018.


Twitter Username: ControversyFilm

Brian Price is an award-winning screenwriter who has worked with major studios and independent producers from around the world. He teaches screenwriting at University of California, Los Angeles, Yale University, and Johns Hopkins University, and is the author of Classical Storytelling and Contemporary Screenwriting.


Twitter Username: BPScreenwriting

Samuel W. Gailey is the critically acclaimed author of Deep Winter, which has been optioned by producer Kim Zubick (The Zookeeper's Wife). Before he was a novelist, he worked as a screenwriter for Showtime and Fox. His upcoming novel, The Guilt We Carry, is in negotiations as a French TV movie.


Twitter Username: samuelwgailey

Website: www.samuelwgailey.com

Ayn Gailey is the author of Pornology, slated to be adapted into film. She has an EdM from Harvard, an MFA in Screenwriting from UCLA, and has written for Fox/Showtime. As a Book Whisperer, her work has earned spots on The New York Times bestseller list. Ayn is on the board of the Orcas Island Lit Fest.


Twitter Username: ayngailey

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S159. A 60th Anniversary Celebration of The Massachusetts Review. (, , , , ) 2019 is MR's 60th anniversary, and to celebrate, four of our favorite contributors will read from their new work. For six decades, MR has published literature and art that challenges complacency, encourages international debate, and achieves the highest aesthetic quality. These novelists, journalists, and poets span four continents and embody MR's mission in their work, their commitment to social justice and artistic quality, and their dynamic engagement with the wider literary world.

Maaza Mengiste is a Fulbright Scholar and author of the award-winning Beneath the Lion’s Gaze, selected by The Guardian as one of the 10 best contemporary African books. Her writing can be found in The New Yorker, The Guardian, Granta, The New York Times, BBC Radio 4, Rolling Stone, and other places.


Twitter Username: maazamengiste

Tabish Khair is a novelist, poet and critic. Winner of the All India Poetry Prize, his novels have been shortlisted for major awards, including the Man Asian (Hong Kong), the Encore Prize (UK), and the DSC Prize (UK/India). His latest novel to appear in USA is Just Another Jihadi Jane.


Twitter Username: tabish_khair

Emily Barton is author of the novels The Book of Esther, Brookland, and The Testament of Yves Gundron. She has been reviewing books for the The New York Times Book Review for twenty years, and publishes essays widely. Having taught writing at many programs, she currently teaches in the NYU Graduate Creative Writing Program.


Twitter Username: embleybarton

Website: emilybarton.com

Lena Khalaf Tuffaha's book of poetry, Water and Salt, is published by Red Hen Press. Her chapbook, Arab in Newsland won the 2016 Two Sylvias Press Prize. Her poems have been nominated for the Pushcart, Best of the Net, and the Rita Dove Prize. She holds an MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop at PLU.


Twitter Username: LKTuffaha

Website: www.lenakhalaftuffaha.com

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S160. Good Gig? Teaching Creative Writing in Secondary Schools. (, , , ) Secondary schools, notably those that emphasize the arts, offer intriguing employment opportunities for graduates of creative writing programs. What are the rewards and challenges of teaching in public, private, and charter schools, and how do college teaching practices translate into secondary classrooms? Drawing on a diverse range of experiences, panelists discuss secondary English teaching and chart paths toward professionalization that sustain writers’ interests and talents.

Ben Gunsberg is an Associate Professor of English at Utah State University, where he teaches courses in creative writing and English education. His most recent poetry collection, Welcome, Dangerous Life, will be published in the fall of 2018.


Twitter Username: BenGunsb

Website: http://www.bengunsberg.com/

TJ Beitelman directs the Creative Writing program at the Alabama School of Fine Arts, a public magnet school for the arts where he has taught since 2002. He's also taught writing and literature at Virginia Tech and the University of Alabama. His most recent poetry collection is Americana.


Twitter Username: tjbeitelman

Website: www.tjbman.com

Maurisa Thompson received her MFA from University of California, Riverside, and has taught secondary school in the San Francisco Bay Area for over twelve years. A Gluck Fellow, VONA alum, and recipient of a 2016 Walter Grant, she is currently working on a poetry collection on the Great Migration and a YA detective novel.


Twitter Username: maurisawrites

A.H. Jerriod Avant has earned MFA degrees from Spalding University and New York University. A graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, Jerriod has received two poetry fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. He’s a PhD English student at the University of Rhode Island.


Twitter Username: JerriodAvant

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S161. Taking It All Off. (, , , , ) Telling the truth is perilous for women writers in a pussy-grabbing, #metoo movement era. Whether you're reporting in the Middle East, retelling personal trauma, or sexing up a hot bedroom scene, it's easy to feel exposed. We've got you covered with this multi-genre roundtable. With topics ranging from global travel and dicey field research to balancing risqué self-revelation and academic appointments, we'll talk about what's at stake for women writers who embrace risk in the name of narrative.

Camille T. Dungy's four books of poetry include Trophic Cascade. Her book of essays is Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood and History. She edited Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry, and coedited two other anthologies.

Kathryn Miles is the author of four books, including Quakeland. Her writing has appeared in publications including Best American EssaysBoston GlobeThe New York TimesOutsidePopular Mechanics, and Time. She serves as writer-in-residence at Green Mountain College.


Twitter Username: kathryn_miles

Website: www.kathrynmiles.net

Suzanne Roberts is the author of the memoir Almost Somewhere: Twenty-Eight Days on the John Muir Trail (winner of the National Outdoor Book Award), as well as four collections of poetry. She teaches for the MFA program in creative writing at Sierra Nevada College at Lake Tahoe.


Twitter Username: SuzanneRoberts

Website: http://www.suzanneroberts.net

Tracy Ross is a 2009 National Magazine Award winner, a contributor to Outside, Skiing, Bicycling, Prevention, the Hollywood Reporter, and other magazines, and is the author of critically lauded The Source of All Things: A Memoir, which O Magazine named one of its "Memoirs We Love" in 2011.


Twitter Username: writertracyross

Erika Meitner is the author of five books of poems, including Holy Moly Carry MeCopia, and Ideal Cities, which was a 2009 National Poetry Series winner. She is an associate professor of English at Virginia Tech, where she directs the MFA and undergraduate programs in creative writing.


Twitter Username: rikam99

Website: erikameitner.com

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S162. VIDA Voices & Views Transgender, Non-Binary, & Gender-Nonconforming Interview. (, , , ) The most recent VIDA Count pointed to an underrepresentation of transgender, nonbinary, and gender-nonconforming voices in literature. Seeking to better understand the causes, nature, and ramifications of exclusion, as well as possible solutions, this panel invites interviewees to share works, insights, and concerns relating to representation, identity, bias, publishing barriers, and other issues they have observed and encountered within the literary landscape and society at large.

Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart's Traffic and recombinant, and coeditor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence within Activist Communities. They are part of Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole, Callaloo, Macondo and VONA communities and poetry editor of The Texas Review.


Twitter Username: chinginchen

Website: www.chinginchen.com

Paige Lewis is the author of Space Struck. Their poems have appeared in Poetry, American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, The Georgia Review, Best New Poets, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: Paige_M_Lewis

Melissa Studdard is the author of the poetry collection I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast and the middle-grade novel Six Weeks to Yehidah. She is the executive producer and host of VIDA Voices & Views, an editor for American Microreviews and Interviews, and president of the Women's Caucus.


Twitter Username: MelissaStuddard

Website: www.melissastuddard.com

Cameron Awkward-Rich is the author of Sympathetic Little Monster and the chapbook Transit. A Cave Canem fellow and poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine, he teaches in Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at UMass Amherst.


Twitter Username: cawkward_rich

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S163. Surviving the Writing Life: Whither, Life Balance?. (, , , , ) We’re consumed by looking for work, working, responding to students, attending meetings, attending conferences, networking, getting published, getting an agent, trying to get the agent to respond to emails, trying to get to the doctor, trying to get to a therapist, trying to remember family, trying to get tenure, trying to promote our work, trying to read more, and even trying to write. Can we be anything other than Sisyphean? Is the writer's life really different than anyone else’s?

John King earned an MFA in fiction writing from New York University in 2010, and a PhD in literature from Purdue University in 2003. His work has appeared in Gargoyle, Palooka, Turnrow, and others. He is the host of The Drunken Odyssey: A Podcast About the Writing Life.


Twitter Username: thedrunkenodyssey

Website: thedrunkenodyssey.com

David James Poissant is the author of The Heaven of Animals, winner of the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award, and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. His work has appeared in the Atlantic and the New York Times. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: djpoissant

Website: www.davidjamespoissant.com

Chelsey Clammer is the author of BodyHome and Circadian, winner of the 2015 Red Hen Press Nonfiction Manuscript Award. Her work as appeared in SalonBrevityThe RumpusHobartThe Normal School, and many others. She's a freelance editor and an instructor with Women on Writing.


Twitter Username: ChelseyClammer

Website: www.chelseyclammer.com

Rion Amilcar Scott's story collection, Insurrections, won the 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. He earned an MFA from George Mason University, and he teaches English at Bowie State University.


Twitter Username: reeamilcarscott

Benjamin Hertwig is the recipient of a National Magazine Award, and his first book, Slow War, was shortlisted for the Governor General's Award, the Raymond Souster Prize, and the Stephan G. Stephansson Award. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Sun, Prairie Schooner, and Pleiades.


Twitter Username: benjaminhertwig

Website: www.benjaminhertwig.com

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S164. Editor-Author Relationships: How Should They Be?. (, , , , ) Literary journals and small presses provide a platform for launching the careers of writers, and strong editorial support is key to this role. Collaboration between editor and author happens in real time, on the page. In turn, editors are often writers, with their own distinct experiences sending work into the world and being edited. What can and should editors provide authors, and how can their own experiences as writers and literary citizens inform and expand these collaborative relationships?

Jennifer Acker is founder and Editor in Chief of The Common. Her debut novel The Limits of the World will be published in 2019, along with a nonfiction title. She has an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars, and she teaches and directs the Literary Publishing Internship at Amherst College.


Twitter Username: jen_acker

Website: jenniferacker.com

John Freeman is author of How to Read a Novelist and editor of Freeman's, a literary biannual. His other books include The Tyranny of E-mail and Tales of Two Cities. Former editor of Granta, he teaches at the New School. His work has been translated into twenty languages.


Twitter Username: Freemanreads

Tracy O'Neill is the author of The Hopeful, a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree, and a 2012 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellowship. Her work has appeared in GrantaVQRThe AtlanticThe New YorkerRolling StoneThe Guardian, Guernica, The Literarian, Narrative, and Vol. 1 Brooklyn.


Twitter Username: tracysoneill

Patrick Ryan is the author of The Dream Life of Astronauts and Send Me. His work has appeared in The Best American Short StoriesTin House, the Iowa Review, and elsewhere. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant. A former editor at Granta, Patrick is the editor of One Story.


Twitter Username: patrickryannyc

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S165. Scattered: Homes Throughout the Asian Diaspora. (, , Lee Herrick) Three acclaimed memoirists—graphic and prose—hailing from three very different parts of the Asian diaspora come together to read excerpts from their recent works and to discuss what it means to write about the many versions of homes that take on a life of their own within these books. When homes become ethereal, bonds among women and between generations help to solidify history in time and space throughout the Asian experience.

Krystal Sital is the author of the multigenerational memoir Secrets We Kept: Three Women of Trinidad. She was a finalist for the PEN/Fusion Emerging Writers Prize in 2015 and now teaches creative writing; gender, sexuality and culture; and peoples and cultures of the Caribbean at New Jersey City University.


Twitter Username: krystalAsital

Thi Bui came to the United States in 1978 as part of the “boat people” wave of refugees from Southeast Asia. Her debut graphic memoir, The Best We Could Do, is a national bestseller and a National Book Critics Circle Awards Finalist in autobiography.


Twitter Username: MsThiBui

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S166. The Triumph of Lucia Berlin. (, , , , ) The publication of A Manual for Cleaning Women in 2015 catapulted the late Lucia Berlin from relative obscurity to international acclaim. Her autobiographical stories and jazz-influenced prose reveal the grit and grace of life in the margins and are masterpieces of the form. This panel of five people intimately connected to Berlin and her publishing legacy discuss and pay tribute to her extraordinary life, her influence as a writer and teacher, and her triumphant posthumous success.

Elizabeth Geoghegan studied fiction writing under Lucia Berlin at the University of Colorado at Boulder, and her remembrance "Smoking with Lucia" appeared in The Paris Review. She is the author of The Marco Chronicles and Natural Disasters. Her story collection eightball is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: ElizGeo

Emily Bell is a senior editor at Farrar, Straus & Giroux and the director of FSG Originals. She publishes Lucia Berlin, Amelia Gray, Catherine Lacey, and Laura van den Berg, among others. Prior to Farrar, Straus & Giroux, she worked at Riverhead Books.

Jennifer Dunbar Dorn, a close friend of Lucia Berlin from the ‘60s onward, taught with her and published her work in several magazines at the University of Colorado, as did her late husband, the poet Ed Dorn. Books include Galactic Runway and Eastward Ho, both poetry.

Stephen Emerson is the editor of A Manual for Cleaning Women: Selected Stories of Lucia Berlin and was her close friend and steady correspondent. His books include Neighbors (stories) and The Wife (short novel). After a hiatus, he is now writing new stories steadily, but slowly.

AK is the author of twelve books of poetry and three essay collections. He divides his time between San Francisco, his home base for the past thirty-seven years, and the Lincoln Harbor Sheraton in Weehawken, New Jersey. He enjoyed a lengthy correspondence with Lucia Berlin during her years teaching in Boulder

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S167. Creative Freedom: Writing in US Prisons. (, , , ) These presentations look into the benefits and challenges of creative writing in the US prison system. The panel of formerly incarcerated writers and creative writing instructors will focus on the development of the imagination and its expression as a counterbalance to the dehumanizing experience of incarceration. Each will discuss their own experiences and the role that creative writing has had on lives both inside and outside the prison system.

Mike Puican has had poems in Poetry, Michigan Quarterly Review, and New England Review. His essays and reviews have appeared in TriQuarterly, Kenyon Review, and Brevity. He runs poetry workshops at St. Leonard’s halfway house and the Metropolitan Correctional Center federal prison in Chicago.

Ann Folwell Stanford has taught at DePaul University for twenty-nine years. Her poetry has been published widely in literary magazines and she recently coedited a volume of writing on women, writing, and prison. She facilitated poetry workshops with women at Cook County Jail for nearly ten years in Chicago.

Michael Fischer was released from prison in 2015 and is currently a graduate student at the University of Chicago. He is a Luminarts Foundation Creative Writing Fellow and a writing mentor for Pen-City Writers. His essays appear in Salon, The Sun, Brevity, The Rumpus, Guernica, Hobart, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: FischWriteToo

Eric Boyd is on the board of directors for Chatham University's Words Without Walls program and a winner of the PEN Prison Writing Award, a program for which he is now a longtime mentor. His writing has appeared in Guernica, Joyland, and The Offing. Boyd is a graduate of The Writers Foundry MFA.


Twitter Username: EricBoydtweets

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S168. Going Global in a Nationalist World: Writing & International Collaboration. (, , , , ) With borders closing and anti-“other” sentiments elevated among certain governments and various populations, international collaboration might be considered an essential and potentially subversive act. Besides traditional study abroad programs, how can creative writing programs encourage and support student experiences and writing that cross borders and foster a sense of global awareness and collaboration? EU and US panelists discuss ongoing projects and welcome an open sharing of ideas.

Patricia Ann McNair is the author of And These Are The Good Times and The Temple of Air, winner of Chicago Writers Association Book of the Year. She directs the undergraduate programs in Creative Writing at Columbia College Chicago where she is an Associate Professor in Fiction and Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: PatriciaAMcNair

Website: www.PatriciaAnnMcNair.com

Robin Mukherjee is a Lecturer in Scriptwriting at Bath Spa University. He has contributed extensively to television, film and radio, winning numerous awards, including the London Film Festival's Audience Prize, an AWGIE for Best Adapted Screenplay, and a BAFTA nomination for an original series.

Randall Albers, Professor/Chair Emeritus of Fiction, Department of English and Creative Writing, Columbia College Chicago, chaired the Fiction Writing department for nineteen years, and in that role, initiated and supervised innovative abroad programs in Moscow, Prague, Bath, Florence, and Rome.


Twitter Username: ralbers

Website: http://www.colum.edu/Academics/CreativeWriting/Faculty/randy-albers.php

Carrie Etter is the author of four collections of poetry, The Tethers, Divining for Starters, Imagined Sons, and The Weather in Normal, and edited Infinite Difference: Other Poetries by UK Women Poets. She is Reader in Creative Writing at Bath Spa University.


Twitter Username: Carrie_Etter

Website: http://carrieetter.blogspot.com

Alison MacLeod’s latest story collection, All the Beloved Ghosts, was shortlisted for Canada’s Governor General’s Award for Fiction. Her last novel, Unexploded, was longlisted for The 2013 Man-Booker Prize. She is Director of Thresholds International Online Short Story Forum. www.alison-macleod.com

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S169. Neither From Here or There: The Bilingual Writer's Search for Belonging and Place. (, , , , ) Who decides what writers can/should write about? For some writers of color this idea of home and family can seem distant. Writers search for answers, voice, belonging, and home. For bilingual/bicultural writers, this search for belonging can seem abstract. Here they share how they navigate two worlds, the one we are born into and the one left behind. This panel aims to discuss Gloria Anzaldúa’s idea of Nepantla, the space between two worlds, the gap that bilingual and bicultural writers call home.

Alicia Anabel Santos is an Afrolatina lesbian writer, producer, activist, and priestess. Founder of the NYC Latina Writers Group, providing workshops for writers of color, Santos has published the memoir Finding Your Force: A Journey to Love, and can be found teaching writing to senior citizens in New York.


Twitter Username: diosadominicana

Yoseli Castillo Fuertes is a bilingual Afrolatina lesbian poet activist and educator. Her writing as well as her activism spans from immigrants, educational, women’s and LGBT rights. Her poems and short stories have appeared in various anthologies in New York, Madrid, Argentina, and Santo Domingo.

Wendy Angulo is a New York City born Latina, raised in Caracas, Venezuela. Wendy is a writer, lawyer, and the founder of Wendy Angulo Productions, an organization whose goal is to support, encourage, and promote poetry and visual arts in the borough of Queens.


Twitter Username: WendyAnguloProd

Angela "Angy" Abreu is a Dominican American activist, organizer, poet, and author. Angela is also the founder of Dominican Writers, an online magazine created to highlight content that promotes the works of Dominican writers in the diaspora, but also provides them with tools and resources necessary for their development.


Twitter Username: angy479

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S170. Why They Keep Coming: Examining Two-Year College Creative Writing Students. (, , , ) This panel of two-year college professors discusses the diverse student demographics of their colleges from traditional students, to veterans, immigrants, and those in recovery. Panelists explain how they have increased enrollments in a low-enrollment environment and provide insight as to how universities and literary/writing organizations might gain enrollment and participation from these often-overlooked students.

Dan Portincaso is a writer and Associate Professor of English at Waubonsee Community College in the suburbs of Chicago. He teaches fiction and nonfiction writing courses and is the faculty advisor for the student literary magazine and club. 


Twitter Username: danportincaso

Sharon Coleman teaches creative writing at Berkeley City College. She directs the journal, Milvia Street. She's a contributing editor at Poetry Flash, a member of the Northern California Book Reviewers, and a curator the reading series Lyrics & Dirges. She was nominated twice for a Pushcart.

Kathryn Kysar is the author of two books of poetry, Dark Lake and Pretend the World, and she edited Riding Shotgun: Women Write About Their Mothers. A previous AWP board member, Kysar is the founder of the creative writing program at Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Minneapolis. 


Twitter Username: darklake

Website: www.kathrynkysar.com

Christina M. Rau is the author of the sci-fi fem poetry collection, Liberating The Astronauts and the chapbooks WakeBreatheMove and For The Girls, I. She teaches English and creative writing at Nassau Community College.


Twitter Username: christinamrau

Website: www.christinamrau.com

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S171. Poetry Celebrates. (, , , , ) To many, poetry is angst-ridden (which much of it is) or impenetrable (which it shouldn’t be). Yet there has always been a deep strain of celebration in poetry: indeed, more poetry celebrates than it denigrates, castigates, ruminates. The democratic spirit will hover over this panel as each of its members reads a poem (not his or hers) that celebrates. The panelists will talk about their choices, and then audience members will be asked to read their own favorite poems of celebration.

David Kirby's collection The House on Boulevard St.: New and Selected Poems was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2007. His latest poetry collection is Get Up, Please. See also www.davidkirby.com.

Patricia Smith's books include Incendiary Art (2018 Kingsley Tufts winner, 2018 Pulitzer finalist, Los Angeles Times Book Prize winner), Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah (2013 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize winner), and Blood Dazzler (2008 National Book Award finalist). A 2014 Guggenheim fellow, two-time Pushcart Prize winner, Smith is a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada College's MFA program.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

Adrienne Su is the author of four books of poems, most recently Living Quarters. A 2007 NEA fellow, she is the poet in residence at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania.


Twitter Username: adriennesu

Website: adriennesu.ink

Ira Sukrungruang is the author of the nonfiction books Buddha’s Dog & other Meditations, Southside Buddhist, and Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy. He teaches in the MFA program at University of South Florida and is the editor of Sweet: A Literary Confection.


Twitter Username: sukrungruang

Website: www,sukrungruang.com

Kai Carlson-Wee is a poet, photographer, and the author of Rail. His award-winning poetry film, Riding the Highline, has screened at film festivals across the country. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he is a lecturer at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: kaicarlsonwee

Website: www.kaicarlsonwee.com

Oregon Ballroom 203, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S171B. Legal & Ethical Issues to Consider When Writing About Real People. (, , ) Writing about real people—living, dead, or even fictionalized—creates special risks that can result in costly damages and legal fees. It’s essential for authors to take the proper steps to protect themselves. Authors Guild Executive Director Mary Rasenberger will moderate a discussion about the basics of the laws surrounding defamation; risk mitigation tactics such as media liability insurance; how much can be changed before a memoir is no longer a memoir; and some ethical considerations that can arise outside the realm of the law.

Mary Rasenberger is the Executive Director of the Authors Guild. Prior to joining the Guild, Mary practiced law for over 25 years, specializing in media and copyright law, and served as senior policy advisor for the U.S. Copyright Office and program manager at the Library of Congress.
Cheryl Davis is the General Counsel of the Authors Guild. Prior to joining the Guild, she was a partner at the firm of Menaker & Herrmann LLP, where she specialized in intellectual property and wrote a number of articles and made presentations about how artists can protect their intellectual property.
Twitter Username: VirgoBrain
Ellis B. Levine, a partner of Cowan DeBaets Abrahams & Sheppard, served as Vice President, Secretary, General Counsel and a member of the Board of Directors of Random House, Inc. from 1989 until 1998. He primarily represents book and audio publishers, authors and literary agents.

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S172. “That’s Not Relatable”: Radical Teaching on Race & Intersectionality in Writing. (, , , ) How can we encourage students to meaningfully engage with material that does not reflect—or directly opposes—their lived experiences? Through conversation, Latinx panelists address how to create radically inclusive course curriculum and assignments that de-center the heteronormative, cisgender white male framework that currently dominates higher education. They discuss the challenges they have encountered and strategies for promoting mutual respect in the classroom.

Cynthia Guardado is a Salvadorian American, Professor of English, poet, and activist in the Los Angeles area. She received her Master of Fine Arts from California State University, Fresno, and her poems have appeared in The Acentos Reviewbozalta, and Huizache.

Gabriela Ramirez-Chavez is a Literature PhD candidate at University of California, Santa Cruz who specializes in cross-genre writing and experimental poetics. Her work has most recently appeared in The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the U.S. and Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands.

Marisol Baca is the author of Tremor. She received an MFA from Cornell, was the recipient of the Robert Chasen Poetry Prize, and is a professor at Fresno City College. She teaches in the Resources for American Indian Needs learning community, and founded Women Writers of Color in the Central Valley.


Twitter Username: Bacagirl2

Luivette Resto is a CantoMundo fellow. Her first book of poetry, Unfinished Portrait, was a finalist for the 2009 Paterson Poetry Prize. Her new collection Ascension was published in April 2013. 

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S173. Virtual Pathways: Publishing, Editing, and Writing Millennial Fiction & Poetics. (, , , , Amanda Ghazale Aziz) We live in a connected world of mediated communication and internet activism. How do media technologies alter literary forms? A panel of publishers, editors, and emerging writers investigates the new wave of contemporary literature, from virtual reality stories commissioned by documentary filmmakers to chapters as long as tweets. The publishers and editors who support progressive work offer practical advice about publishing in an industry in transition, unlimited by the geographical boundaries.

Shazia Hafiz Ramji is a poet, writer, editor, and MFA candidate at the University of British Columbia. She is the recipient of the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry and a finalist for the National Magazine Awards. Her first book of poetry, Port of Being, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: Shazia_R

Ashley Opheim is the founder and managing editor of Metatron Press and the author of two poetry collections: Ambient Technology and I Am Here. She was also the scriptwriter for Museum of Symmetry, a virtual reality experience, which was produced by the National Film Board.


Twitter Username: ashleyobscura

Jasper Avery is a poet and MFA candidate at Temple University. Her first full length collection, number one earth, is the winner of the 2017 Metatron Prize and is forthcoming. Her work has also been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and longlisted for the Thomas Morton Memorial Prize.


Twitter Username: saguarohugger

Leigh Nash is the publisher of Invisible Publishing, and co-curator of The Emergency Response Unit, a chapbook press. She is a graduate of the MFA program at the University of Guelph, and she the author of the poetry collection Goodbye, Ukulele.


Twitter Username: nashls

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S174. McSweeney’s: Celebrating Innovative Fiction. (, , , , ) McSweeney’s has been publishing innovative fiction for over twenty years. Founded in 1998 by the author Dave Eggers, the house’s quarterly journal contributors and books have won innumerable prizes. In celebration of McSweeney’s longstanding championing of literary excellence and experimentation, in this panel four recent McSweeney’s authors will discuss their work and the work of a McSweeney’s author that came before them for whom they hold immense admiration.

Lucy Corin’s third book of fiction, One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses was published by McSweeney’s Books. She was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Rome Prize, an NEA, and teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of California, Davis.


Twitter Username: lucyreally

Website: www.lucycorin.com

Patty Yumi Cottrell is the author of the novel Sorry to Disrupt the Peace. Her work has appeared in Vice, BuzzFeed, BOMB, The White Review, and other places. She is a winner of a 2018 Whiting Award in fiction and a Barnes and Noble Discover Prize.


Twitter Username: pmcottrell

C Pam Zhang's debut novel, How Much of These Hills is Gold, is forthcoming. Her speculative and realist fiction appears in Fairy Tale ReviewKenyon ReviewMcSweeney's, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from Bread Loaf, Tin House, Aspen Words, and the Iowa Writers' Workshop.


Twitter Username: cpamzhang

Deb Olin Unferth is the author of five books, including Wait Till You See Me Dance. Her work appears in Harper's, the Paris Review, Tin House, Vice, and Granta. She has received four Pushcart Prizes, a Creative Capital Grant, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Rita Bullwinkel is the author of the story collection Belly Up. She is a Contributing Editor of NOON and an Editor at Large for McSweeney's. She is a recipient of grants and fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, The Sewanee Writers' Conference, and The Helene Wurlitzer Foundation.


Twitter Username: RitaBullwinkel

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S175. 2019 Kingsley & Kate Tufts Poetry Awards Reading. (Don Share, ) For over 25 years the Kingsley & Kate Tufts awards program has cultivated a community confident in the persistence of poetry. Claremont Graduate University's Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award grants $100,000 for a book by a mid-career poet, and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award offers $10,000 for a recently published first book of poetry. Join us to celebrate this year's poets and hear poems by the 2019 winners and finalists.

Genevieve Kaplan is a poet, book artist, and micro-press publisher. Author of In the Ice House, winner of the A Room of Her Own Foundation's poetry publication prize, and three chapbooks, she coordinates the Kingsley & Kate Tufts Poetry Awards at Claremont Graduate University in southern California.


Twitter Username: genevievekaplan

Website: www.genevievekaplan.com

Zachary A. Doss Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S176. Tolsun Books Reading. (Vanessa Couto Johnson, Jennifer Battisti, Jesse Sensibar, Cody Wilson, Brittany Hailer) Arizona small press, Tolsun Books, hosts a reading with their authors books. Encounter an off-duty Elvis, poetic rapture, shrines on the highways of the disappearing American West, a cyclor(am)a of (pun)gent prose poems, and an animal you'll surely become.

Exhibit Hall E, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S176B. Young Writers Workshop. (, ) Join AWP and the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers for a workshop geared toward high school writers, hosted by three poets selected for the 2018 National Student Poets program. The National Student Poets Program—a collaboration of the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers—strives to inspire other young people to achieve excellence in their own creative endeavors and promote the essential role of writing and the arts in academic and personal success.

Darius Atefat-Peckham is a senior at Interlochen Arts Academy in Interlochen, MI, and an Iranian-American poet and essayist. At Interlochen, he serves on the editorial team for the literary magazines The Red Wheelbarrow and The Interlochen Review. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Texas Review, Brevity, Rattle, and elsewhere. Darius also has work forthcoming in the Other Voices International Project Anthology (Reelcontent), Iran Musings: Stories and Memories from the Iranian Diaspora, and the bilingual anthology Persian Sugar and English Tea, Vol. II.
Daniel Blokh is a senior at the Alabama School of Fine Arts in Birmingham, AL. His work often concerns his Russian-Jewish immigrant parents and his experience as a first-generation American. His work has won Princeton’s Lawrence L. Milberg Poetry Prize and been published in the The Kenyon Review, Cosmonaut’s Avenue, Cleaver, Permafrost, Blueshift, and more. Daniel is the author of the creative nonfiction book In Migration (BAM! Publishing, 2017) and two poetry chapbooks, Holding Myself Hostage in the Kitchen (Lit City Press, 2017) and GRIMMENING (Diode Editions, 2018).

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S177. Yoga for Writers. (Melissa Carroll) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S178. Crash Course in Flash: Theories on Brevity. (, , , , ) How do we teach flash? How do we conceptualize the big bang theories that explain the miniature universes of short-form writing? Flash writers and teachers explore the outer limits of compressed forms like flash fiction, flash nonfiction, prose poetry, micro-screenplays, and fragments. Panelists talk about craft strategies for defying the boundaries of word count, how the history of short-form writing shapes contemporary approaches, and what the future might hold.

Grant Faulkner is executive director of National Novel Writing Month and the cofounder of 100 Word Story magazine. His writing has appeared in dozens of publications, including The New York Times and Poets & Writers. His collection of one hundred 100-word stories is Fissures.


Twitter Username: grantfaulkner

Website: http://www.grantfaulkner.com/

José Angel Araguz is a CantoMundo fellow and author of seven chapbooks as well as the collections Everything We Think We Hear, Small Fires, and Until We Are Level Again. He runs the poetry blog The Friday Influence and teaches English and creative writing at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon.


Twitter Username: JoseAraguz

Website: https://thefridayinfluence.wordpress.com

Shivani Mehta's first book, a collection of prose poems entitled Useful Information for the Soon-to-be Beheaded, is out from Press 53. Her work has appeared in numerous journals. 

H.K. Hummel is the author of Lessons in Breathing Underwater, and Short-Form Creative Writing: A Writers Guide and Anthology. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.


Twitter Username: sherrieflick

Website: http://www.sherrieflick.com/

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S179. We Were Never Meant to Survive: Writing About People Who Do Anyway. (, , , , ) The line from Audre Lorde’s poem rings—clangs!—true for many writers who are telling stories about characters facing unlikely futures. This panel addresses the challenge of writing about literal and cultural survival. How do writers tell the truth about racism, xenophobia, and homophobia without overwhelming our work or our readers? How do we find the necessary detail amid the weight of the threats? How do we balance truth-telling with hope? How can we create writing that celebrates survival?

Allen Gee currently holds the Donald L. Jordan Endowed Professorship in creative writing at Columbus State University. He is the Editor of 2040 Books, a multicultural imprint, and is the author of My Chinese-America. His essays and stories have appeared in numerous journals.


Twitter Username: allenrgee

Website: www.allengee.com

Jerry Thompson is a violinist, playwright, and poet. He is the coauthor of Black Artists in Oakland, and owned Black Spring Books, an independent bookstore. He is the coeditor of Oakland Noir and Berkeley Noir. His work has appeared in Zyzzyva and James White Review.


Twitter Username: fleetfoxed

Lucy Jane Bledsoe’s most recent novel is The Evolution of Love. Her story collection, Lava Falls, was published in Fall 2018. Her fiction has won a Yaddo fellowship, the Arts & Letters Prize, a California Arts Council Award, an ALA Stonewall Award, and two National Science Foundation Writer Fellowships.


Twitter Username: LucyBledsoe

Website: www.lucyjanebledsoe.com

Devi S. Laskar has worked as a newspaper reporter covering crime and politics in North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Illinois and Hawaii. She holds an MFA from Columbia University, and an MA in South Asian Studies from UIUC, is a published poet and will publish her debut novel in February 2019.


Twitter Username: devislaskar

Website: devislaskar.com

Wo Chan is a nonbinary drag performer and poet. They have received awards from the New York Foundation of Arts, Kundiman, and the Asian American Writers Workshop. They are a member of Brooklyn-based drag/burlesque collective Switch N’ Play and currently an MFA Candidate in Poetry at NYU.


Twitter Username: wochanofficial

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S180. The Border Against Belonging: American Occupation in Asian American Poetry. (, , , , ) With the increase in American overseas military presence, the border enclosing American identity widens at the same time that the nation grows more hostile towards immigration. Immigrants find themselves occupying a nation that has occupied homelands. They move within a perimeter they’ve been made tangential to. And yet, a border makes costs. A border means having to pay. Join four poets as they discuss the complexities of immigrant narratives in the era of American occupation.

Asa Drake is an information services librarian. Her poetry and book reviews can be found in American Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, Frontier Poetry, and elsewhere. She received her MFA in poetry from The New School and was a finalist for Gold Line Press's 2017 Chapbook Competition.


Twitter Username: AsaLDrake

Website: https://www.asaldrake.com/

Sokunthary Svay is a founding member of the Cambodian American Literary Arts Association, a recipient of the American Opera Projects' Composer and the Voice Fellowship for 2017–19, and the 2018 Emerging Poets Fellowship at Poets House. She is the author of Apsara in New York.


Twitter Username: SokSrai

Chiwan Choi is the author of three books: The Flood, Abductions, and The Yellow House. In 2015, he wrote, presented, and destroyed the novel Ghostmaker. Chiwan is also founding partner of Writ Large Press, a DTLA based indie publisher that uses books and publishing to resist, disrupt, and transgress.


Twitter Username: chiwanchoi

Website: http://chiwanchoi.com

Barbara Jane Reyes is the author of Invocation to Daughters, Diwata, Poeta en San Francisco, and others. She teaches in the Yuchengco Philippine Studies Program at University of San Francisco.

Mai Der Vang is the author of Afterland, winner of the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets, and a recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship. Her writing has appeared in Poetry, Virginia Quarterly Review, the New York Times, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: maider_vang

Website: www.maidervang.com

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S181. The Uncomfortable Whiteness of War Literature. (, , , , ) In the midst of America’s longest conflict, white male perspectives still predominate in contemporary war literature. The canon fails to represent the diverse fabric of the military—people of color, migrants, and women—and the deep moral questions they negotiate through art. This inclusive panel discusses how marginalized writers might address structural bias in their writing careers, how they might be heard in the genre, and how amplifying their voices contributes to a more just society.

Drew Pham is a fiction editor at the Wrath Bearing Tree, and writes about conflict, race, and activism. Previously, Drew served in the US Army. He deployed to Afghanistan with the 10th Mountain Division.

Matthew Komatsu is a writer and currently serving veteran. He holds a MFA from the University of Alaska, is a nonfiction editor of War, Literature & the Arts, and is Board Vice President of the Alaska literary nonprofit 49 Writers. He was a recipient of the 2017 Alaska Literary Award in Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: matthew_komatsu

Website: wwwww.matthewkomatsu.com

Anthony Roy Williams is an Army veteran. He served two tours in Operation Iraqi Freedom, earning an honorable discharge at the end of his service. He is currently working in the nonprofit sector while attending Columbia University as a full-time, second-year MFA in Creative Writing student.


Twitter Username: arwilliams81

Stacey Bell is a writer, playwright, and US Army veteran currently living in New York City. She received her BA in English from Kent State University, and her MA in English with a special concentration in Medieval Literature from California State University, Long Beach.

Christopher Paul Wolfe graduated from West Point in 2000 and served in the US. Army for six years. He holds an MBA from Duke University and an MFA from Columbia University. His work has been featured in BOMB and two anthologies, including The Road Ahead: Fiction From The Forever War.

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S182. Keeping the Boat Afloat: Challenges of Sustainable Nonprofit Publishing, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , , Mary Gannon) In the face of shrinking funding and rising costs, coupled with a literary landscape addressing multiple issues, how can nonprofit literary publishers stay afloat while remaining relevant? Leading small press literary publishers discuss how they address their many challenges—and the changes they make—to keep publishing meaningfully.

Chris Fischbach is publisher of Coffee House Press, a nonprofit literary press in Minneapolis. He joined Coffee House in 1995, and became publisher in 2011. He sits on the board of the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop, and recently served on the board of the Friends of the Hennepin County Library.


Twitter Username: fishmpls

Erika Goldman is Publisher and Editorial Director of Bellevue Literary Press, a nonprofit mission-driven publisher of literary fiction and authoritative nonfiction at the intersection of the arts and sciences, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Tinkers by Paul Harding.

Jamia Wilson is the director and publisher of the Feminist Press. Wilson has contributed to the New York Times, The Today Show, CNN, Elle, and more. She is the author of Young, Gifted, and Black and wrote the oral history in Together We Rise: Behind the Scenes at the Protest Heard Around the World.


Twitter Username: jamiaw

Website: www.jamiawilson.org

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S183. Best Practices for Submitting an AWP Panel Proposal. Join AWP conference committee members and staff for a best practices discussion about submitting a panel proposal for the #AWP20 Conference & Bookfair in San Antonio, Texas. Discussion includes an overview of the proposal system and tips for submitting a more effective proposal.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S184. Purpose and Pathways: The Undergraduate Capstone. (, , , , ) The undergraduate capstone course at both two-year and four-year colleges offers valuable opportunities to a diverse array of students. Panelists from different backgrounds and institutions will explore multiple aspects, challenges, and goals of the undergraduate capstone course as a site for helping students develop not only their writing, but also a clearer vision into their professional and personal future pathways.

Maria Brandt directs Creative Writing at Monroe Community College in Rochester, NY. She is the author of the novella All The Words and the short-play collection NY Plays. Her short fiction has been published in several literary magazines, and her plays have been developed or produced around the country.

Kathryn Kysar is the author of two books of poetry, Dark Lake and Pretend the World, and she edited Riding Shotgun: Women Write About Their Mothers. A previous AWP board member, Kysar is the founder of the creative writing program at Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Minneapolis.


Twitter Username: darklake

Website: www.kathrynkysar.com

Mary F. Rockcastle is the author of the novels In Caddis Wood and Rainy Lake. She is Director of the Creative Writing Programs at Hamline University and Executive Editor of Water~Stone Review. Her awards include a Loft-McKnight Award of Distinction in Prose and a Bush Fellowship.

Dave Smithson is a graduate student at University of Central Florida studying creative writing. He is a first-generation and nontraditional student who started his education as a high school dropout at St. Charles Community College, where he received his GED and Associates of Arts degree. He received his BFA from TSU.

Joe Baumann teaches composition, literature, and creative writing at St. Charles Community College, where he leads the creative writing program. He holds a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S185. Revisiting "The Glass Cage". (, , , ) On the 20th anniversary of Aleida Rodriguez's "The Glass Cage," four award-winning Latinx poets and editors revisit this landmark essay about thematic limits placed on Latinx writers by publishing and literary institutional gatekeepers. What has changed in the intervening years? Are Latinx writers free to explore every subject under the sun? Does repetitive coercive editing produce self-censorship in one's writing and how can we break beyond the banal to a more authentic creativity?

Francisco Aragón is the author of Puerta del Sol and Glow of Our Sweat. He is also the editor of the award-winning anthology, The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry. A third book, After Rubén, is forthcoming. He directs Letras Latinas, the literary program at Notre Dame's Institute for Latino Studies.


Twitter Username: fjaragon1965

Website: http://franciscoaragon.net

Emma Trelles is the author of Tropicalia, winner of the Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize. Her work appears in Best American Poetry, Best of the Net, the Miami Rail, Zócalo Public Square, SWWIM, and others. She programs the Mission Poetry Series and teaches at Santa Barbara City College.

Aleida Rodríguez—poet, essayist, editor, translator—founded rara avis/Books of a Feather. She was the first woman (and Latina and lesbian) to establish a literary venture in the history of Los Angeles. Garden of Exile won a PEN award, among others. Her work has received many awards, including an NEA fellowship.

Dan Vera is coeditor of Imaniman: Poets Respond to Gloria Anzaldúa and author of two books of poetry. Winner of the 2017 Oscar Wilde Award and Letras Latinas/Red Hen Poetry Prize, his poetry appears in various publications and university writing curricula. He chairs the board of Split This Rock.


Twitter Username: danvera

Website: http://www.danvera.com

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S186. The Impact of Race and Politics on Contemporary Black Playwrights. (, , , ) This panel, a Satellite Program of the National Black Writers Conference held at Medgar Evers College, CUNY, expands the narrative on Black playwrights. Many institutions advocate, produce, and celebrate Black playwrights such as August Wilson and Lorraine Hansberry, writers who have become part of the canon. Panelists expand the narrative of the Black playwright and discuss the impact of politics, racism, and social justice issues on the production of contemporary Black plays.

Dr. Brenda M. Greene is Executive Director of the Center for Black Literature, and Director of the National Black Writers Conference at Medgar Evers College, CUNY. Her research and scholarly work include African American literature and composition.

Gloria J. Browne-Marshall is a nationally produced playwright and author, John Jay College professor, syndicated columnist, and civil rights attorney. Her plays include: My Juilliard, Killing Me Softly, and CLASS, her work-in-progress on White rage/Black ambition.


Twitter Username: GBrowneMarshall

Nina Angela Mercer's plays include Gutta Beautiful, Itagua Meji: A Road & A Prayer, Gypsy & The Bully Door, Sparrow, Elijaheen Becomes Wind, A Compulsion for Breathing, and Between Whispered Bloodlines (in development). She wrote and performed in Invocation for Jose Antonio Aponte, a video poem.

Holnes's poetry has appeared in Poetry, American Poetry Review, Callaloo, and elsewhere. His plays have been read, produced, presented at the Kennedy Center, Second Stage Theater, National Black Theater, Kitchen Theater, and elsewhere. He teaches at Medgar Evers College and NYU.

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S187. Contemporary Poems and Their Making. (, , , , ) This reading features a selection of contributors to The Eloquent Poem, a new anthology arranged by poetic mode in which writers discuss the crafting of their included poems. These renowned poets read exemplars of an array of approaches—including the prose poem, the list poem, ars poetica, collage, ekphrasis, to name a few—and then discuss their poems’ genesis, offering insight into not only their writing but entire subspecies of poetry.

Elise Paschen is the author of The NightlifeBestiary, and Infidelities, winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize. She has edited many anthologies, including The Eloquent Poem and Poetry Speaks. Former Executive Director of the Poetry Society of America, she teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.


Twitter Username: ElisePaschen

Kevin Prufer is the author of How He Loved Them, Churches, In a Beautiful Country, and National Anthem. He is codirector of the Unsung Masters Series, and Professor at the University of Houston's Creative Writing Program and the Lesley University Low-Residency MFA Program.

Kimiko Hahn finds material from disparate sources including: black lung, Japanese zuihitsu, and science, as in Brain Fever, one of her nine collections. Awards include a Guggenheim. She teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Translation, Queens College-CUNY and she is board president of Poetry Society of America.

Randall Mann is the author of four collections of poetry, including Straight Razor and Proprietary; and a book of criticism, The Illusion of Intimacy: On Poetry. He lives in San Francisco.


Twitter Username: randallmannpoet

Gabriel Fried is the poetry editor at Persea Books, where he has worked since 1999, and a professor in the graduate creative writing program at the University of Missouri. He is the author of two books of poetry, The Children Are Reading (2017) and Making the New Lamb Take (2007).


Twitter Username: iambicsouthpaw

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S188. Surviving Your Debut Year: Staying Sane and Savvy Before and After Publication. (, , , , ) The year your first book comes out is dizzying. So many questions! (What is good social media etiquette? Do you have to write personal essays? Do you read your reviews?) So many feels! (The honeymoon bliss of signing with an agent. The anguish of asking for blurbs. The joy of depositing an advance. Those inevitable post-launch blues.) On this panel five novelists and short story writers with new books will share their fresh firsthand experience to help you ride the highs and endure the lows.

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah is from Spring Valley, NY. He is a graduate of the Syracuse MFA program and was the '16-'17 Olive B. O'Connor Fellow in fiction at Colgate University. His fist book is Friday Black.


Twitter Username: NK_Adjei

Aja Gabel’s debut novel, The Ensemble, was released in 2018. Her fiction can be found in New England Review, Kenyon Review, BOMB, and elsewhere. She was a 2012–2013 fellow in fiction at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown and holds a PhD from the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: AjaMaybe

Website: www.ajagabel.com

Lillian Li is the author of the novel Number One Chinese Restaurant. Her work has been published in GuernicaGrantaGlimmer Train, and Jezebel. Originally from the D.C. metro area, she lives in Ann Arbor.


Twitter Username: zillianzi

Adrienne Celt is the author of the novels Invitation to a Bonfire and The Daughters, which won the 2015 PEN Southwest Book Award, as well as a collection of comics entitled Apocalypse How? Her work has appeared in the 2016 O. Henry Prize Stories, Zyzzva, Ecotone, The Kenyon Review and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: celtadri

Website: adriennecelt.com

Rachel Lyon is the author of Self-Portrait with Boy, which was longlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. She teaches for the Sackett Street Writers Workshop, Catapult, the Fine Arts Work Center, and elsewhere. Visit Rachel at www.rachellyon.work.


Twitter Username: manateesintrees

Website: www.rachellyon.work

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S189. Prison Is Not A Genre. (, , , , ) Reaching beyond the often-discussed value and how-to of writing programs in prisons, this PEN America panel seeks to challenge personal motivations, institutional practices, and the use of rhetorical language that can inadvertently perpetuate a culture of stigma and separation. Panelists representing a range of lived, creative, organizational and policy perspectives will discuss how to collaborate more ethically, equitably and inventively with work coming out of the prison environment.

Caits Meissner is the author of the illustrated hybrid poetry book Let It Die Hungry. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the City College of New York, and currently serves as the Prison and Justice Writing Program Manager at PEN America.


Twitter Username: caits_meissner

Website: www.caitsmeissner.com

Randall Horton is the author of three collections of poetry and most recently, Hook: A Memoir. He is a member of the experimental performance group "Heroes Are Gang Leaders," and Associate Professor of English at the University of New Haven.

Clint Smith is a PhD candidate at Harvard University and the author of Counting Descent, 2017 BCALA Literary Award-winner and NAACP Image Award finalist. He is a 2014 National Poetry Slam champion and his writing has been published in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, the New Republic, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: ClintSmithIII

Jeanie Thompson directs the Alabama Writers' Forum and is poetry faculty at Spalding University low-res MFA Writing Program. Her five poetry collections include The Seasons Bear Us and The Myth of Water: Poems From the Life of Helen Keller. She was founding editor of Black Warrior Review at the University of Alabama.


Twitter Username: Jeanie Thompson

Dr. Joshua Bennett is an Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College. He is the author of The Sobbing School and Being Property Once Myself: Blackness and the End of Man, which is forthcoming.

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S190. Jewish Women Writers Confront Identity. (, , , , ) In this panel, female Jewish poets and prose writers discuss how identity shapes their work. The writers explore how historical and current events, specifically ones that have impacted Jews, enter their writing, including recent rises in antisemitism and racism. The panelists consider how their experiences as Jews enter into their poems and stories, both politically and personally.

Elizabeth Powell is author of two books of poems, Willy Loman's Reckless Daughter: Living Truthfully Under Imaginary Circumstances and The Republic of Self. The former was chosen as a "Books We Love 2016" at the New Yorker and a Small Press Distribution Poetry Bestseller. She is Associate Professor at Johnson State College.


Twitter Username: astriditkin

Jamie Wendt is the author of the poetry collection Fruit of the Earth. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Nebraska Omaha. Her poems, book reviews, and essays have been published in a variety of journals. She teaches and lives in Chicago.

Hadara Bar-Nadav is the author of several poetry collections, most recently The New Nudity, Lullaby (with Exit Sign), The Frame Called Ruin, and Fountain and Furnace. She is also coauthor of Writing Poems, eighth edition. Bar-Nadav is a Professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.


Twitter Username: Hadarabar

Website: www.HadaraBarNadav.com

Irina Reyn is the author of the novels The Imperial Wife and What Happened to Anna K, as well as the anthology Living on the Edge of the World: New Jersey Writers Take on the Garden State. She teaches creative writing at the University of Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: IrinaReyn1

Simone Zelitch teaches at Community College of Philadelphia where she founded their Creative Writing Certificate. She is the author of five novels including Louisa, an adaptation of the Book of Ruth, and most recently Judenstaat, set in a Jewish state established in Germany in 1948.


Twitter Username: simonezelitch

Website: www.simonezelitch.com

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S191. La Raza Cósmica and Other Myths: Telling the Truth About Race Thru Latinx Poetic. (, , , , ) The diversity of Latinx racial experience defies easy categorization. European colonization produced a hemisphere riddled with caste, vexed by color, and afflicted by an adoration of whiteness. Imperialism, diasporas, and borders only complicate; overlaying power structure over power structure, erasing and muddling convoluted. This panel will explore the poetics that might best communicate the nuanced reality of our raza cósmica, and to try to re-imagine the Americas through poetry.

Lauren Espinoza earned her MFA at Arizona State University where she currently teaches. She is the Workshop Coordinator for CantoMundo. Her poetry has appeared in New Border Voices: An Anthology, Pilgrimage, and Sinister Wisdom. Her manuscript was a finalist for the 2016 Andres Montoya Poetry Prize.

Yesenia Montilla is an Afro Latina poet. Her poetry has appeared in Prairie Schooner, Gulf Coast, Academy of American Poets' Poem-A-Day and others. She received her MFA from Drew University and is a CantoMundo Fellow. The Pink Box is her first collection and was long-listed for the PEN Open Book Award.


Twitter Username: yeseniamontilla

Mario Alejandro Ariza is a Dominican immigrant and a Michener Fellow in poetry at the University of Miami’s Master in Fine Arts program. He holds a Master’s degree in Hispanic Cultural Studies from Columbia University. His poetry can be found in places like The Cincinnati Review and Gulf Coast.


Twitter Username: notmyrealname

Carina del Valle Schorske is a translator, poet, and essayist. She won Gulf Coast's 2016 prize in translation, and her work has appeared in Boston Review, The Offing, Lit Hub, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, the MacDowell Colony, and Bread Loaf.


Twitter Username: fluentmundo

Carmen Giménez Smith, Publisher of Noemi Press, is Professor of English at Virginia Tech. Most recently, she is author of Cruel Futures and Be Recorder. Her last poetry collection, Milk and Filth, was a finalist for the NBCC Award.


Twitter Username: lizitasmith

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S192. Belonging: Creating a New Traditional in Gender Identity. (, , , , ) Children’s literature has placed itself at the forefront of deconstructing sexuality and gender identities. This places it in the unique position of defining new values and traditions, helping to create a growing acceptance of all gender identities. Within the larger classifications of picture books, middle grade, young adult, non-fiction, and recent submissions to editors, the panel will explore the new traditional in gender identity.

J. Albert Mann is the author of five novels, with her next work a young adult biographical fiction about the early life of Margaret Sanger. She has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts in Writing for Children and Young Adults, and is the Director of the We Need Diverse Books Internship Committee.


Twitter Username: jenannmann

Mary Quattlebaum is the author of twenty-seven award-winning children's books, including picture books, novels, nonfiction, and poetry. She teaches in the MFA program in writing for children and young adults in the Vermont College of Fine Arts and frequently presents at schools.

Leah Henderson’s middle grade novel One Shadow on the Wall is a BankStreet “Best Books of 2017” starred for outstanding merit and her short story “Warning: Color May Fade” appears in the young adult anthology Black Enough: Stories of Being Young & Black in America. She received her MFA from Spalding University.


Twitter Username: LeahsMark

Website: leahhendersonbooks.com

Jonah Heller is a graduate of the Writing for Children and Young Adults program at Vermont College of Fine Arts. He works as an assistant editor for Peachtree Publishers in Atlanta, GA.


Twitter Username: jrheller87

Suma Subramaniam is the contributing author of the Hero Next Door anthology. She contributes to From the Mixed-Up Files blog. She is also the mentorship coordinator of Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators Western Washington, and internship grants team member at We Need Diverse Books. She has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts and a certificate in popular fiction from University of Washington.


Twitter Username: suma_v_s

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S193. Growing Up Mixed/Multiracial in the Pacific Northwest. (, , , , ) What’s it like growing up mixed in the Pacific Northwest, where Portland makes headlines as The Whitest City in America yet Seattle boasts the nation’s 2nd-highest multiracial population? Come hear the diverse voices and stories (a bestselling novelist/festival director, a farmgirl/award-winning memoirist, a filmmaker/short-story writer, two acclaimed theatre artists, one transnationally raised, one transracially adopted) that are changing the region’s vibrant literary, film, and theatre scene.

Faith Adiele has authored two memoirs, The Nigerian-Nordic Girl's Guide to Lady Problems and Meeting Faith; coedited Coming of Age Around the World; and was writer/subject/narrator of the PBS documentary film My Journey Home. She teaches at VONA/Voices, SF Writers Grotto, and California College of the Arts.


Twitter Username: meetingfaith

Website: adiele.com

Heidi Durrow is the New York Times best-selling novelist of The Girl Who Fell From the Sky which won the PEN/Bellwether Prize. She is the founder and executive director of the annual film and book festival Mixed Remixed held in Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: heididurrow

Website: www.heidiwdurrow.com

Alyss Dixson is an award winning writer-producer. She studied Comparative Literature at Yale, Film at Columbia University, and Creative Writing at SFSU. She won the Joseph Henry Jackson award, fellowships from Cave Canem Foundation and Callaloo Workshop and been published in Callaloo, Day One, and The Atlantic.


Twitter Username: Salys

Website: www.alyssdixson.com

LisaMarie Rollins, poet/playwright, is the author of the book Other Words For Grief. Her plays include TOKEN and Ungrateful Daughter: One Black Girls Story of being adopted by a White Family.... Her work has been included in Other Tongues: Mixed-Race Women Speak OutAs/UsLine/Break, the Pacific Review, and other publications. She is a VONA/Voices alum and Callaloo Fellow.


Twitter Username: thirdrootprod

Website: birthproject.wordpress.com

Dmae Roberts is a two-time Peabody-winning writer, radio producer, and theatre artist. Her memoir is The Letting Go Trilogies: Stories of a Mixed-Race Family. She is executive producer of MediaRites and Theatre Diaspora, an Asian American/Pacific Islander theatre project in Portland.


Twitter Username: dmaeroberts

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S194. Agents of Change: The Activist Protagonist. (, , , , ) Given the explosive political climate in the US today, from Charlottesville to #MeToo and beyond, many writers are seeking a way to take a stand with their work. But while nonfiction writers might grapple with political issues directly, fiction writers must be more oblique or run the risk of appearing didactic. In this panel, five award-winning authors discuss the protagonist as activist—a character not just in the process of change but in the process of trying to change the world.

Susan DeFreitas is the author of the novel Hot Season, which won a Gold IPPY Award. Her fiction, nonfiction, and poetry have appeared in a wide range of journals, magazines, and anthologies. She is an editor and book marketing strategist with Indigo Editing, as well as an instructor at LitReactor.


Twitter Username: manzanitafire

Rene Denfeld is the bestselling author of The Enchanted and The Child Finder, novels inspired by her work on death row and with sex trafficking victims. Her work has won numerous prestigious awards.


Twitter Username: ReneDenfeld

Website: www.renedenfeld.com

Julia Stoops is the author of Parts per Million. Originally from New Zealand, she has received Oregon Arts Commission fellowships for visual arts and literature, and was a resident at the Ucross Foundation in 2016.


Twitter Username: JuliaStoops

Website: juliastoops.com

Aya De Leon directs Poetry for the People at UC Berkeley. The next book in her award-winning Justice Hustlers series of feminist heist novels is Side Chick Nation, about the hurricane in Puerto Rico. She blogs about race, gender and culture at ayadeleon.com.


Twitter Username: ayadeleon

Website: ayadeleon.com

Cari Luna is the author of The Revolution of Every Day, which won the 2015 Oregon Book Award for Fiction. Her writing has appeared in Salon, Jacobin, Electric Literature, Catapult, The Rumpus, PANK, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: cari_luna

Website: http://cariluna.com/

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S195. Crossing Genres, Exploring Disability: A Tribute to Floyd Skloot. (, , , , ) Few writers can match the career of Floyd Skloot. The longtime Oregonian has published twenty books, with awards in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Yet, he’s done this with virus-induced brain damage. He had to work outside academics, and disability became central to his vision and contribution. In 2010, Poets & Writers listed him among the “50 most inspiring authors in the world.” This tribute considers his work in all genres, and includes his daughter Rebecca, a successful author herself.

John Domini has three books of stories, the latest MOVIEOLA!, and a new novel due in 2019. Other work includes a selection of essays, and he reviews regularly for Washington Post and elsewhere. Awards include an NEA, and he’s taught at Harvard and elsewhere. He lived many years in Portland.


Twitter Username: DavveroDomini

Website: http://www.johndomini.com

Michael Steinberg is founding editor of Fourth GenreStill Pitching won the ForeWord Magazine/Independent Press Memoir of the Year. The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers of/on Creative Nonfiction (with Bob Root) is in a sixth edition. He's nonfiction writer in residence in the Solstice MFA program.

TJ Jarrett is the author of Zion, winner of the 2013 Crab Orchard Open Poetry Competition, and Ain't No Grave. Her poems appear in the Poetry, Boston Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. She was awarded the 2017 George Garrett New Writing Award by the Fellowship of Southern Writers.


Twitter Username: Mathilde1469

Website: www.tjjarrett.com

Rebecca Skloot wrote the #1 New York Times bestseller The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, which was translated into thirty languages and made into an HBO film starring Oprah Winfrey and Rose Byrne. She has a BS in biology and an MFA in creative nonfiction; she’s working on a book about animals, science, and ethics.


Twitter Username: rebeccaskloot

Floyd Skloot is a three-time Pushcart Prize winner and the recipient of a PEN USA Literary Award in Creative Nonfiction. His twenty-one books include the memoirs In the Shadow of Memory and The Wink of the Zenith: The Shaping of a Writer's Life, and the poetry collections Approaching Winter and Far West.


Twitter Username: fskloot

Website: www.floydskloot.com

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S196. Bona Fide Relationships. (, , , ) Through their prose and poetry, writers reflect on the idea of the ”bona fide relationship”—the term the Supreme Court used in 2017 to grant an exception on President Trump’s travel ban. Who counts as close family in the eyes of the state? How do our relationships transcend those recognized by the court? These readings shed light on the ways that individual writers and communities wrestle with an ongoing effort to undermine their sense of belonging.

Zaina Arafat is an Arab American writer. Her work has appeared in Granta, The New York Times, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Believer, The Washington Post, BuzzFeed, and Vice. She holds an MFA from Iowa and an MA from Columbia. Her debut novel is forthcoming. She curated the Bona Fide portfolio.


Twitter Username: ZainaArafat

Hazem Fahmy is a poet, playwright, and critic from Cairo. He is an honors graduate of Wesleyan University's College of Letters where his senior thesis play Barzakh received High Honors. His poetry has been recognized by a Best of the Net nomination as well as by the Watering Hole.


Twitter Username: haz_fahmy

Raad Rahman is a writer, journalist, and human rights advocate whose writing includes topics of literature, modern Islam, child rights, and reportage on counterterrorism in South Asia. 


Twitter Username: rad_rahman

Sobia Khan PhD is Dean for Academic Success at San Antonio College. She has published academic essays, translations and short stories on the American Muslim experience. She is a VONA fellow in fiction with Junot Diaz and a fellow of the Banff Center. Presently, she is completing her novel.


Twitter Username: SobeitKhan

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S197. Back to Basics: Untangling Environmental Stories. (, , , , ) Writing the "environment" often means telling stories of people trying to fill basic needs—food, water, clothing, and shelter—in healthy and sustainable ways, but doing so also means tackling complicated issues of politics, race, gender, and work. This panel addresses how nonfiction writers can craft compelling stories that embrace this complexity. Panelists will discuss approaches to research, strategies for structure, ways to integrate sources, the role of the “I,” and the possibility of hope.

Ana Maria Spagna is the author of seven books including Reclaimers, about people reclaiming sacred land and water, Test Ride on the Sunnyland Bus, winner of the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize, and three essay collections. She teaches in the Antioch University MFA program and lives in the North Cascades.


Twitter Username: amspagna

Website: www.anamariaspagna.com

Sharman Apt Russell is the author of a dozen books translated into a dozen languages. Her Diary of a Citizen Scientist won the 2016 John Burroughs Medal for Distinguished Nature Writing. Forthcoming is Within Our Grasp: Feeding the World's Children for a Better and Greener Future.

Stephany Wilkes is the author of Raw Material: Working Wool in the West. She is a knitter, a sheep shearer certified by the University of California, the President of the Northern California Fibershed Cooperative, and a wool classer certified by the American Sheep Industry Association.


Twitter Username: stephanywilkes

Marlenia Myers is a writer and grants director for a social services organization. She has a dual degree MFA and Urban Sustainability (MA) from Antioch University, Los Angeles. She is currently working on her first book, We Can’t Breathe: The Environmental Fate of Vulnerable People.


Twitter Username: MarleniaMyers

Summer Brennan is the author of three books: The Oyster War, High Heel, and The Parisian Sphinx (forthcoming). She was awarded the Matthew Power Literary Reporting Award, and was shortlisted for the Orion Book Award. Her writing has appeared in newspapers and magazines throughout the country.


Twitter Username: summerbrennan

Website: www.summer-brennan.com

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S198. Publishing Queer: What Was, What Is, and What Just May Be. (, , , , ) How has queer publishing changed over the years? Do agents and publishing houses resist picking up LGBTQ lit or are they embracing it now in the face of America's current climate? What does the future look like? This panel discusses publishing trends with the head of Quill (the queer imprint of Red Hen Press), a literary agent who represents diverse voices, and three award-winning, published writers who will share their personal experiences getting their books sold and marketed.

Kate Carroll de Gutes's book, Objects In Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear, won the 2016 Oregon Book Award and a 2016 Lambda Literary Award. Her latest book, The Authenticity Experiment: Lessons From the Best & Worst Year of My Life, was released in 2017 and won an IPPY for LGBT nonfiction.


Twitter Username: kcdegutes

Website: www.katecarrolldegutes.com

tammy lynne stoner is the author of Sugar Land—a southern-fried novel. She's also the publisher of Gertrude and wrangler of the queer book club GERTIE. Her work has been published two dozen times in places like Folio and American Fiction 2015


Twitter Username: TammyStoner

Website: www.TammyLynneStoner.com

Beth Marshea is the owner of Ladderbird Literary Agency based out of Boston, MA. She believes that diverse representation is the cornerstone of great literature. Beth strives to find manuscripts that tell the stories of all under represented groups. She focuses on beautiful story telling above all.

Tobi Harper is Deputy Director of Red Hen Press, Founder and Editor of Quill (a queer publishing series), Contributing Editor for The Los Angeles Review, Instructor for the UCLA Extension Publishing and Editing program, and a queer literary warrior.


Twitter Username: the_tobi_harper

Nick White is the author of the novel How to Survive a Summer. His fiction has appeared in the Kenyon Review, the Hopkins ReviewGuernica, the Literary Review, and elsewhere. He teaches creative writing at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: nickwhite1985

Website: thenickwhite.com

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S199. Get Lit—Transform Your Teaching by Pairing Classic Poetry With Spoken Word. (, , , , ) Get Lit presents an award-winning pedagogy guaranteed to ignite your classroom through relevancy, rhythm, and rigor. The Get Lit - Words Ignite curriculum fuses classic poetry (from Keats to Kendrick) with original spoken-word response writing. Get Lit can be taught as an English or creative writing course to embolden and inspire.This panel of multi-generational award-winning poets present the power of Get Lit to elevate students' self-expression. “Claim your poem. Claim your life.”

Denice Frohman is an award-winning poet, performer, and educator. She is a CantoMundo Fellow, former Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion and Leeway Transformation Award recipient. Her work has appeared in Nepantla: An Anthology for Queer Poets of ColorThe Acentos Review, ESPNW, and more.


Twitter Username: denicefrohman

Robin Coste Lewis is the author of Voyage of the Sable Venus. She is Writer-in-Residence at the University of Southern California and the Poet Laureate of the City of Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: thesablevenus

Cyrus Roberts is a Get Lit Player, an award-winning youth poetry troupe and the most watched poets on the internet. Roberts is a UN Peace Project ambassador as well as the author of I and Esoteric. His work has been commissioned by the D.C. March for Our Lives, Get Lit Now, Adidas, Toms, and more.

Raul Herrera has written and performed for the United Nations, the White House, and more. A former Get Lit Player, his work is featured in Get Lit Rising, and he is currently writing DANTE, Get Lit’s hip-hop adaptation of Dante’s Inferno, under the tutelage of Tim Robbins.

Kelly Grace Thomas is the Manager of Education for Get Lit–Words Ignite and author of the forthcoming Boat/Burned. She is also a Neil Postman Award winner and a Pushcart Prize nominee. Kelly’s poems have appeared in Muzzle, the Los Angeles Review, and more.


Twitter Username: kellygracethoma

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S200. Punk Rock Presses: rinky dink, Forklift Ohio, Cardboard House, The Wax Paper. (, , , , ) Punk is a style of music, a state of mind, and a subculture of the small press world. Though punk is often perceived as nothing more than an anti-establishment posture, a punk ideology espouses a DIY ethos, is nonconformist in its productions, and resists selling out under pressure. These four presses define what it means to be punk publishers, and they’re thriving in a world of better-funded, perfect-bound counterparts—and wondering how long before the raw becomes the cooked!

Rosemarie Dombrowski is the inaugural Poet Laureate of Phoenix, AZ and the founder of rinky dink press. She is the author of two collections of poetry as well as the recipient of a 2017 Arts Hero Award and the winner of the 2017 Split Rock Review chapbook competition.

Giancarlo Huapaya (Lima, Peru) has published three collections of poetry, the most recent, Taller Sub Verso (Sub Verse Workshop) He is the founder and editor of Cardboard House Press, a nonprofit publishing house for Latin American and Spanish literature in translation.


Twitter Username: giancah

The Wax Paper is a seasonally printed literary broadsheet of moving words and still images.


Twitter Username: paperwax

Shawnte Orion is the author of three collections of poetry: The Existentialist Cookbook, Faithful as the Ground, and The Infernal Gaze. He attended Paradise Valley Community College for one day and he is an editor for Rinky Dink Press. He has performed at bars, hair salons, and laundromats.


Twitter Username: ShawnteOrion

Matt Hart’s eighth book of poems, Everything Breaking for Good, is forthcoming from YesYes Books. A cofounder and the editor-in-chief of Forklift, Ohio: A Journal of Poetry, Cooking & Light Industrial Safety, he teaches at the Art Academy of Cincinnati and shouts in the band NEVERNEW.

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S201. Centering the Othered: Embracing Speculative Literature in Writing Classrooms. (, , , , ) This panel addresses the social and political relevance of a broad range of fantastic, magical and weird fictions. The recent rise of Black horror, Indigenous futurisms, Asian speculations, and feminist dystopias, among others, demonstrate the cultural and aesthetic diversity found in genre writing, yet speculative genres are still largely ignored in creative writing programs. Panelists who write and teach genre fiction share their tools for bringing spec lit into the classroom.

Emily Pohl-Weary is the author of Ghost Sick (poetry), Not Your Ordinary Wolf Girl (YA), and the Hugo Award-winning Better to Have Loved: The Life of Judith Merril (biography). She is an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia. Her PhD research was on transgressive writing pedagogy.


Twitter Username: emilypohlweary

Website: emilypohlweary.com

Nalo Hopkinson, professor of Creative Writing at the University of California Riverside, has received the John W Campbell Award, the World Fantasy Award, the Andre Norton Award. She was fiction coeditor of People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction. She is writing a graphic novel for the Sandman series.


Twitter Username: nalo_hopkinson

Larissa Lai is the author of six books including the novels Salt Fish Girl and The Tiger Flu. Winner of an Astraea Award and shortlisted for seven more, she holds a Canada Research Chair at the University of Calgary and directs The Insurgent Architects' House for Creative Writing.


Twitter Username: haamyue

Website: www.larissalai.com

Elizabeth Leung is a student in the Master of Arts in Children’s Literature program at UBC. She works as a research assistant examining young adult literature and a teaching assistant in creative writing classes. She is also writing a young adult novel about a sentient AI and teenagers with dyslexia.

Amber Dawn lives on unceded Coast Salish territory. She is the author of the speculative fiction novels Sub Rosa and Sodom Road Exit, memoir How Poetry Saved My Life: A Hustler's Memoir, and poetry collection Where the Words End and My Body Begins. She teaches at the University of British Columbia.


Twitter Username: amberdawnwrites

Website: amberdawnwrites@gmail.com

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S202. Politics and Pragmatics of Translating Asian Languages. (, , , ) Four accomplished translators, working in Chinese, Japanese, Thai, and Vietnamese, discuss the political and pragmatic difficulties posed by translating Asian languages. Panelists will address challenges arising from formal aspects of the languages, from the political dimensions and consequences of the work, and from working in a field underrepresented in US publishing, academic programs, and at AWP. Panelists will also present resources for aspiring translators and propose an Asian languages translators’ network.

Charles Waugh is an editor and translator of the books Wild Mustard: New Voices from Vietnam and Family of Fallen Leaves. A Fulbright fellow and NEA Literary Translation grantee, he has published in the Literary Review, Words Without Borders, Foreign Policy, Two Lines, and many other fine journals.

Bonnie Chau has an MFA in fiction and translation from Columbia University. She is the author of the story collection All Roads Lead to Blood, and her writing has appeared in many journals. A Kundiman fellow and 2017 ALTA Travel Fellow, she works at Poets & Writers and at an independent bookstore.


Twitter Username: bonniecchau

Michelle Kyoko Crowson is a writer, translator, and PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of Oregon. She holds an MFA from Vermont College. She writes a monthly culture column for Bento Box Magazine, a Japan-themed print and online publication out of Toronto.

Noh Anothai was a researcher with Fulbright Thailand between 2012–2013. Since then, his translations from Thai have appeared in journals like Asymptote, whose Spring 2017 issue he headlined. His translation of Thai national poet Sunthorn Phu is the first to be published outside of Thailand.

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S203. Two-Country Careers: Writers on Living and Writing in More than One Place. (, , , , ) Writers who divide their time between two countries are crucial bridges between America and the world. Immersed in two literary cultures, two languages, and sometimes two ethical systems, writers who go abroad and return and leave again often enter a state of disorientation—and perhaps, skepticism of seemingly basic truths—which is important for creative work. Panelists who spend part of each year abroad discuss how a two-country life affects writing, reading, and translating.

Aviya Kushner is the author of The Grammar of God. She is the language columnist at The Forward and a Howard Foundation fellow in nonfiction. An associate professor at Columbia College Chicago, she is also a contributing editor at A Public Space.


Twitter Username: AviyaKushner

Website: www.aviyakushner@gmail.com

Cole Swensen is the author of seventeen books of poetry, most recently On Walking On. A 2006 Guggenheim Fellow, she has won the Iowa Poetry Prize, the SF State Poetry Center Book Award, and the 2004 PEN/USA Award in Translation, among others. She teaches in Literary Arts at Brown University.

Curtis Bauer is a poet, translator, letterpress printer, chapbook publisher, and teacher. He lives in Lubbock, TX where he teaches Creative Writing & Comparative Literature at Texas Tech University, runs Q Avenue Press, and is Translations Editor for The Common.


Twitter Username: cwbauer

Website: http://curtisbauer.net/

Xu Xi 許素細 is author of fourteen books, most recently This Fish is Fowl (essays), Insignificance (stories), Dear Hong Kong (elegy memoir), and That Man in Our Lives (novel). She is Faculty Codirector of the International MFA in Creative Writing & Literary Translation at Vermont College of Fine Arts.


Twitter Username: xuxiwriter

Website: www.xuxiwriter.com

Martha Cooley is the author of two novels: The Archivist (a national bestseller) and Thirty-Three Swoons, as well as a memoir, Guesswork. Her short fiction, essays, and translations have appeared in numerous literary magazines. She judged the 2011 PEN American Center prize for poetry in translation.


Twitter Username: signoramartha

Website: www.marthacooley.com

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S204. Healing Harm/Harming Heal: The Power and Pain in Writing Through Trauma. (, , , , ) Trauma is rarely simple. When writing on trauma, we hope it is an incising of a painful thing, cauterizing the injury. As a medical term, "trauma" is a systemic change—one that can harm or heal. The idea of "closure" is often elusive or impossible to attain. To write "through" trauma is perhaps misrepresentative, for what's on the other side? During this panel, each of these writers will attempt to consider what, exactly, writing through trauma does—if it healed or harmed, and how.

Diana Arterian is the author of Playing Monster :: Seiche, the chapbooks With Lightness & Darkness and Death Centos, and co-editor of Among Margins: Critical & Lyrical Writing on Aesthetics. She's a poetry editor at Noemi Press and earning her PhD in Literature & Creative Writing at USC.

Natalie Eilbert is the author of the poetry collections, Indictus, which won the 2016 Noemi Press Poetry Prize, and Swan Feast. Her work has been featured in The New Yorker, Tin House, Granta, and elsewhere. 


Twitter Username: natalie_eilbert

Website: venusofnatalie.tumblr.com

Vanessa Angélica Villarreal was born in the Rio Grande Valley borderlands to formerly undocumented Mexican immigrants. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Southern California, a CantoMundo Fellow, and the author of the mythic hybrid poetry collection, Beast Meridian.


Twitter Username: Vanessid

Tarfia Faizullah is the author of Seam and Register of Illuminated Villages. She is the recipient of three Pushcart Prizes, a Fulbright fellowship, and a GLCA award, among other honors. She is a visiting artist-in-residence at The School of the Art Institute in Chicago.

Tiana Clark is the author of two collections: I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood, winner of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize, and Equilibrium, winner of the Frost Place chapbook competition. She teaches at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville.


Twitter Username: TianaClarkPoet

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S205. Strange Attractors: Women Writing Chance. (, , , ) Why is it that the women writers you know and admire so often describe the arc of their lives as if they had been wandering in a forest when a surprise, both urgent and oddly inevitable, led them to the freedom, justice, and rightness of where they stand now? From their vantage, they cannot see life having emerged differently. In Strange Attractors, thirty-six writers of our time discuss chance. Come hear why surprise is a necessary and inevitable friend to your creative life.

Edie Meidav is the author of three award-winning novels: Lola, California, Crawl Space, and The Far Field: A Novel of Ceylon. Her books—editorial picks by The New York Times and The L.A. Times—have been excerpted widely. An editor at Conjunctions, she is on the fiction faculty at the UMass Amherst MFA.


Twitter Username: lolacalifornia

Website: www.ediemeidav.com

Rebecca Wolff is the editor of Fence and Fence Books and publisher of the Constant Critic. She is the author of four books of poems, most recently One Morning—, a novel called The Beginners, and many prose essays. Wolff is a fellow at the New York State Writers Institute and lives in Hudson, New York.

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S205B. When Writing Becomes a Movement: Indigenous Women Storytelling Meets Social Justice. (, , ) Debra Magpie Earling, Jennifer Foerster, and Eden Robinson each read from their own work, followed by a discussion on how storytelling reflects and can sometimes drive action in native communities by becoming a means of expressing and unearthing histories and traumas buried, erased, or simply not listened to.

Debra Magpie Earling is Bitterroot Salish. Her novel Perma Red won the Western Writers Association Spur Award, WWA’s Medicine Pipe Bearer Award for Best First Novel, a WILLA Literary Award, and the American Book Award. She collaborated with artist Peter Koch on The Lost Journals of Sacajewea. She is the recipient of a 2007 Guggenheim Fellowship. Perma Red is currently being adapted for a television series.
Jennifer Elise Foerster serves as Interim Director of the Institute of American Indian Arts’ MFA Low-Residency Program, where she also teaches, and codirects an arts mentorship program for Mvskoke youth in Oklahoma. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship, a Lannan Foundation Writing Residency Fellowship, and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship in Poetry at Stanford. A member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, she is the author of Leaving Tulsa and Bright Raft in the Afterweather, both published by the University of Arizona Press. Jennifer earned her MFA from the Vermont College of the Fine Arts and her PhD in English and Literary Arts from the University of Denver.
Eden Robinson is a Haisla/Heiltsuk author who grew up in Haisla, British Columbia. Her first book, Traplines, a collection of short stories, won the Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize and was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1998. Monkey Beach, her first novel, was shortlisted for both the Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Literary Award for fiction in 2000 and won the BC Book Prizes' Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. Her novel Son of a Trickster was shortlisted for the Giller Prize. Her latest novel is its sequel, Trickster Drift.

Oregon Ballroom 203, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S206. What a Heroine Can Do: Female Protagonists Take Back the Narrative. (, , , , ) Cora, Offred, Katniss. To ignore the female protagonist is to slight a necessary and integral character in literature, denying not only her past achievements but also her future potential to be an agent of her own change. In this panel, five established and emerging fiction writers give voice to the dynamically resonant women at the centers of their novels. Through individual readings of their potent protagonists, these writers challenge the patriarchal view that a woman cannot be a hero.

Alexander Lumans was awarded a 2018 NEA Grant in Prose. He was the Spring 2014 Philip Roth Resident at Bucknell. He has received scholarships to MacDowell, Yaddo, VCCA, Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and The Arctic Circle Residency. His novel manuscript is about a female Polar Guard in the Norwegian Arctic.


Twitter Username: oldmanlumans

Website: http://www.alexanderlumans.com/

Kirstin Chen's new novel, Bury What We Cannot Take, has been named a Most Anticipated Upcoming Book by Electric Literature, The Millions, The Rumpus, Harper’s Bazaar, and InStyle, among others. She is also the author of Soy Sauce for Beginners.


Twitter Username: kirstin_chen

Marie-Helene Bertino is the author of Safe as Houses and 2 A.M. at The Cat’s Pajamas. Awards include The Frank O'Connor International Story Fellowship in Cork, Ireland, The O. Henry Prize, The Pushcart Prize, and The Iowa Prize. She teaches at NYU, The New School, and the Institute for American Indian Arts.


Twitter Username: mhbertino

Website: www.mariehelenebertino.com

Alissa Nutting is author of the novels Made for Love and Tampa, as well as the story collection Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls. Her work has recently appeared in The New York Times, Salon, and the Indiana Review. She is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at Grinnell College.


Twitter Username: alissanutting

Mira Jacob is the author of the novel, The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing, which was shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award, honored by the APALA, and named one of the best books of 2014 by Kirkus Reviews, the Boston Globe, Goodreads, Bustle, and The Millions.


Twitter Username: mirajacob

Website: mirajacob.com

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S207. Writing Against Assumptions: On Crafting Diverse Narrators. (, , , ) Though recent efforts have resulted in a slightly more diverse landscape, the traditional literary canon remains overwhelmingly white, male, straight, and nondisabled. A panel of women, LGBT writers, disabled writers, and writers of color discuss how they push back against reader assumptions to craft narrators with diverse backgrounds, while not catering to normative assumptions about identity. Panelists work in multiple genres including creative nonfiction, poetry, and fiction.

Cade Leebron is a writer living in Columbus, Ohio. She holds an MFA from Ohio State. Her work has appeared in Brevity, American Literary Review, Electric Literature, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: CadeyLadey

Website: www.mslifeisbestlife.com

Jillian Weise is the author of The Amputee's Guide to Sex, The Colony, and The Book of Goodbyes. Recent work appears in Boston Review, Poetry, and the New York Times. She teaches at Clemson University.

Laura Espósto is a current MFA candidate at the University of Arizona. Her work has appeared in journals such as Rattle, Word Riot, Tinderbox, and Reservoir.

Chet'la Sebree is the author of the forthcoming collection Mistress. The 2014–2016 Stadler Fellow at the Stadler Center for Poetry, she has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, and Vermont Studio Center. She is a graduate of American University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: Nahtil

Website: http://www.chetlasebree.com

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S208. Writing In and Out of Worlds. (, , , ) A reading by Wesleyan authors, illustrating differing experiences and methods of expression in 21st-century language arts. Whether reconfiguring the language of colonizing documents, staging stories to music, paring language into explosive soundbites, or questioning our perceptions by splicing language in unexpected ways, these poets illustrate how ethnicity, culture, sexuality, gender, and politics shape one’s work, and how poetry can be used to bear witness and to articulate the world we want.

Rae Armantrout's most recent books are Wobble and Partly: New and Selected Poems. An earlier book, Versed, won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 2015, she received the Levinson Prize from Poetry Magazine.

Abigail Chabitnoy is a member of Tangirnaq Native Village in Kodiak, AK. She has an MFA from Colorado State University and was a 2016 Peripheral Poets Fellow. Her work has appeared in Tin House and Boston Review, among others. Her debut book, How to Dress a Fish, is forthcoming from Wesleyan in 2018.


Twitter Username: achabitnoy

sam sax is the author of Madness, the winner of the National Poetry Series selected by Terrance Hayes. His second book is Bury It. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Lambda Literary, and the Michener Center.


Twitter Username: samsax1

Website: www.samsax.com

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S209. How a Hiring Committee Reads: Best Practices for Cover Letters, CVs, etc.. (, , , ) What is the hiring committee looking for? Nothing in particular. Or, maybe, everything. It wants a strong candidate who fires imaginations and helps out with departmental business. So, how do you know if the job is a good fit for you and vice versa? How do you present who you are and what you do best? Hiring committee veterans from private and public, 4 year and 2 year colleges and universities will discuss the process of—and offer practical tips for—applying to full and part-time jobs.

Judith Baumel is a poet, critic, and translator. She is Professor of English and Founding Director of the Creative Writing Program at Adelphi University. She served as president on the AWP Board of Trustees. Her books of poetry are The Weight of Numbers, Now, and The Kangaroo Girl.


Twitter Username: JudithBaumel

Website: http://www.judithbaumel.com

Kyle Dargan has authored four poetry collections, most recently Honest Engine. He has received the Cave Canem Poetry Prize, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and grants from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. He edits Post No Ills magazine and directs American University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: Free_KGD

Website: http://www.american-boi.com

Eva Foster earned an MFA from the University of Maryland and a PhD in creative writing and literature from the University of Houston. She has been published in the Florida Review and the Helen Burns Poetry Anthology. She is associate department chair of English at Houston Community College.

Jacqueline Jones LaMon is the author of two collections, Last Seen, a Felix Pollak Poetry Prize selection, and Gravity, U.S.A., recipient of the Quercus Review Press Poetry Series Book Award; and the novel, In the Arms of One Who Loves Me. She teaches at Adelphi University


Twitter Username: JaJoLaMo

Website: www.jacquelinejoneslamon.com

Zachary A. Doss Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S209B. AWP George Garrett Award Winner and National Student Poets Reading. Join AWP's George Garrett Award Winner, Ekiwah Adler-Belendez, for a reading with the four winners of the 2018 National Student Poet Program; Darius Atefat-Peckham, Daniel Blokh, Heather Laurel Jensen, and Ariana Smith.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S210. The Future of Gender: Optimism and Realism in Transgender Children’s Books. (, , , , April Daniels) Recent years have seen a (relative) explosion of transgender characters in books for young readers, yet these representations have largely not centered the voices of transgender people. This panel will define an agenda for a more open and truly responsive trans literature for young readers and put forth visions for a more expansive future, while also providing perspectives on how to better craft these stories for interested writers.

Alex Gino is author of George, the Lambda Literary and Stonewall Award-winning middle grade story of a transgender girl. Alex believes that young people need and deserve tools to make sense of their world. Their new book, You Don't Know Everything, Jilly P! explores privilege and allyship.


Twitter Username: lxgino

Vee Signorelli is the admin and cofounder of YA Pride (previously known as GayYA). A bookseller and library aide, Signorelli is a sophomore in college and hopes to someday become a Teen Services librarian and published author.


Twitter Username: findmereading

Kyle Lukoff is an elementary school librarian, serving children aged 2 through 11. He is also a published picture book author, with previous publications in professional publications, anthologies, and review journals.

Mason J. is a multidisciplinary artist, youth advocate, and archivist-in-training inspired by life as a Two Spirit AfroLatinx queer. An alumnus of VONA, Radar Productions, and Still Here SF they currently hold the inaugural fellowship title at the San Francisco Public Library’s James C. Hormel LGBTQIA Center.


Twitter Username: crashtwitty

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S211. Monstrous Men, Monstrous Women. (, , , , ) As each “Me, Too” narrative unfolds, the challenge to write this cultural moment with exigency grows. From Gen X insouciance to world-weary cynicism aimed at apologists excusing their own bad acts as trauma-borne, this panel examines in new ways the effects of being locked inside or outside of the predatory gaze. Panelists further consider the flip-side of unwanted sexual attention—invisibility—along with the impact of monstrosity on the literature we read and write.

Lynn Pruett has published a novel, stories, and essays in Michigan Quarterly Review, Border Crossing, Southern Exposure, Arts & Letters, and Farmer's Pride. She's received the Al Smith Fellowship, the Joanna Scott Award, and a residency at Yaddo. She teaches in the low-residency program at Murray State University.


Twitter Username: julep_pruett

Lorraine M. López, Gertrude Conaway Chair, teaches in the MFA Program at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of six books of fiction, editor or coeditor of three essay collections, and associate editor of the Afro-Hispanic Review. Her most recent publication is The Darling, a novel.

Elena Britos is a second year MFA candidate at Vanderbilt University, and she is the fiction editor of the Nashville Review. Elena received her BA from Bowdoin College. She teaches undergraduate creative writing at Vanderbilt, as well as workshops for teens and adults at GrubStreet in Boston.

Joy Castro is the author of the literary thrillers Hell or High Water and Nearer Home, the memoirs The Truth Book and Island of Bones, and the short fiction collection How Winter Began. Editor of the collection Family Trouble, she teaches at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.


Twitter Username: _JoyCastro

Website: www.joycastro.com

Lee Conell's debut story collection Subcortical was recently awarded the 2018 Story Prize Spotlight Award and an Independent Book Publishers Award. Her fiction has received the Chicago Tribune's Nelson Algren Award and appeared in Glimmer TrainKenyon ReviewAmerican Short Fiction, and Guernica.


Twitter Username: leeconell

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S212. Easy A: Evaluation in the Creative Writing Classroom. (, , , ) How we respond to and grade creative writing is often at the front of students’ (and instructors’) minds: do we grade for skill? For completion? For other factors? This panel brings together panelists who work with university, high school, and prison students to explore different methods of responding to student writing. From staff member to adjunct faculty to nontenure-track and tenure-track faculty, this panel also takes the instructor’s own position into account to examine power and grading.

Laura Leigh Morris' first book, Jaws of Life, was released by West Virginia University Press in March 2018. She teaches creative writing at Furman University and was previously a National Endowment for the Arts/Bureau of Prisons Artist-in-Residence at Bryan Federal Prison Camp in Bryan, Texas.


Twitter Username: lauraleighwrite

Florence Davies is a young adult writer and administrator for the Texas A&M University Writing Center, serving as head coordinator for the Black Box Writers Residency program for four years. She received an MFA in Writing & Literature from Stony Brook University in 2013 and her BA in English from TAMU.


Twitter Username: thewriterflo

Jonathan Corcoran is the author of the story collection The Rope Swing, which was named a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Gay Fiction and long-listed for the Story Prize. He teaches writing at Rutgers University–Newark and in the low-residency MFA program at West Virginia Wesleyan College.


Twitter Username: thejoncorcoran

Website: jonathancorcoranwrites.com

Amber Foster is a nontenure-track Assistant Professor of Writing for the Writing Program at the University of Southern California. In the summer, she teaches the USC Summer Programs Creative Writing Workshop—an intensive, four-week creative writing course for college-bound high school students.

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S213. Launching a Literary Start-up. (, , , , Dedi Felman) “If I’d known what it would take, I never would have done it” is a common refrain among founders—of startups, of organizations, and yes, of books and magazines. Always, it takes more work than expected. But the literary scene today is alive with new endeavors—proof that transforming an idea into a platform is hard but not impossible. This panel brings together four founders to talk about this tricky-to-perceive line between hard and impossible.

Colleen Kinder has written essays and articles for The New Republic, Salon, National Geographic Traveler, The New York Times, theatlantic.com, the WSJ, Ninth Letter, A Public Space, The New York Times Magazine and Creative Nonfiction. Author of Delaying the Real World, she teaches at Yale.


Twitter Username: sarahmenkedick

Joel Whitney is a founder of Guernica: A Magazine of Arts & Politics and author of Finks: How the CIA Tricked the World's Best Writers, which has been called "riveting" (Kirkus), "ingeniously researched" (Pankaj Mishra in The Guardian), and “a powerful warning” (The New Republic).


Twitter Username: joel_whitney

Website: joelwhitney.net

Ander Monson is the author of eight books of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, including the forthcoming I Will Take the Answer and The Gnome Stories. He teaches at the University of Arizona and edits the magazine DIAGRAM, the website Essay Daily, and the New Michigan Press.


Twitter Username: angermonsoon

Website: http://otherelectricities.com

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S214. Furious Flower Presents Black Poets on Poetics. (, , , ) What makes a great poem? What does one bring to the making of a poem as a Black writer, and does it matter? This panel asks these questions of poets who are contributors to the third Furious Flower anthology, Furious Flower: Seeding the Future of African American Poetry. This groundbreaking collection gathers for the first time essays on poetics by Black poets, showcasing a diversity of approaches to poetic craft. The poets read from their essays and discuss their poetics.

Lauren K. Alleyne is an award-winning poet. She is the author of Difficult Fruit, and Honeyfish, and has published her work widely. She is Assistant Director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center and Associate Professor of English at James Madison University.


Twitter Username: poetlka

Frank X Walker is a cofounder of the Affrilachian Poets, a Cave Canem fellow, and Editor of PLUCK!. The author of nine collections of poetry and a recipient of a Lannan Foundation Poetry Fellowship, Walker is Professor of English and African American and Africana Studies at the University of Kentucky.

Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon is the author of Open Interval, a 2009 National Book Award finalist, and Black Swan, winner of the 2001 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, as well as Poems in Conversation and a Conversation, a chapbook collaboration with Elizabeth Alexander.

Ross Gay is the author of the poetry collections, Against Which, Bringing the Shovel Down, and Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, and the essay collection, The Book of Delights. He teaches at Indiana University.

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S215. How to Design a Novel Workshop. (, , , , ) Ever the misfit in traditional workshops, the novel needs its own space to grow. In a conversation for anyone who writes novels, teaches novel courses, or wants to, five writers reveal how we structure generative, productive novel workshops. We’ll exchange imaginative prompts and craft exercises that spur writers on and see them through the long haul. And we’ll reflect on how teaching this expansive, unruly genre has altered the way we understand the workshop form—and the novel itself.

James Hannaham is the author of the novels God Says No and Delicious Foods, and a longtime contributor to The Village Voice and other publications. He teaches in the brand new MFA program at the Pratt Institute.

Leni Zumas is the author of two novels (Red Clocks and The Listeners) and a story collection (Farewell Navigator). She is the Director of Creative Writing at Portland State University.


Twitter Username: lenizumas

Website: www.lenizumas.com

Matthew Salesses's books include The Hundred-Year Flood, I'm Not Saying, I'm Just Saying, and (forthcoming) The Murder of the Doppelgänger and Own Story: Essays. He has written for the New York Times, NPR, Salon, VICE, and other outlets. He is an Assistant Professor of English at Coe College.


Twitter Username: salesses

Website: http://matthewsalesses.com

Chelsey Johnson received an MFA from the University of Iowa and a Stegner Fellowship from Stanford. She is the author of the novel Stray City and her stories have appeared in One StoryPloughshares, NPR's Selected Shorts, and elsewhere. She teaches at Northern Arizona University.


Twitter Username: chelseyhotel

Susan Choi is the author of four novels: The Foreign Student, American Woman, A Person of Interest, and My Education. She lives in Brooklyn.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S216. How to (Not) Write About Genocide: Reimagining Cambodian American Literature. (, , , , ) Departing from survival literature of the previous generation, this panel explores the growing imagination of Cambodian diaspora. Five second-generation Cambodian American poets and prose writers read from their work and discuss ways in which writers from communities with histories of genocide can resist the tokenization of trauma writing. The conversation asks how we can reimagine new radical, reparative ways to write towards a fuller collective memory.

Angela So holds a MFA in Fiction from the Ohio State University. Her prose has appeared in Glimmer Train, The Pinch, Day One, and the Houston Chronicle. She has received fellowships from Kundiman and Vermont Studio Center.

Monica Sok is the author of Year Zero. Her work has been recognized with a 2018 "Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Prize. She has been awarded fellowships from Hedgebrook, Jerome Foundation, Kundiman, and NEA among others. She is a 2018–2020 Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: monicasokwrites

Anthony Veasna So is a writer, cartoonist, Paul & Daisy Soros Fellow, and MFA candidate in Fiction at Syracuse University, where he is a University Fellow. He graduated from Stanford University with a BA in English Literature and Art Practice. His work has appeared in n+1, Hobart, and Ninth Letter.


Twitter Username: fakemaddoxjolie

Sokunthary Svay is a founding member of the Cambodian American Literary Arts Association, a recipient of the American Opera Projects' Composer and the Voice Fellowship for 2017–19, and the 2018 Emerging Poets Fellowship at Poets House. She is the author of Apsara in New York.


Twitter Username: SokSrai

Danny Thanh Nguyen is a Lambda Literary and Kundiman Fellow. His writing has appeared in The Journal, Gulf Coast, Foglifter, New Delta Review, Entropy, and more. He is currently working on a collections of stories and a collection of personal essays.


Twitter Username: engrishlessons

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S217. Fifty Years of FIELD: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics. (, , , , ) Since 1969, FIELD Magazine has been known as one of the country's leading journals of contemporary poetry and poetics. In 2019, FIELD will publish its 100th and final issue. This panel, featuring two founding editors and three later additions, will discuss the magazine's history and values, including its annual symposium of essays on the work of a major poet, its commitment to translation, and its openness to a wide variety of voices, both established and emerging.

David Walker is an editor of FIELD and Oberlin College Press. He teaches English and creative writing at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: DavidWalk3

David Young works at Oberlin College Press. He is the author of eleven collections of poetry, several anthologies, half a dozen critical studies, and many translations, including Rilke, Montale, Petrarch, Du Fu, Basho, and Miroslav Holub.

Stuart Friebert has published fifteen books of poetry, fifteen volumes of translations, two prose memoirs, and co-edited several anthologies. He founded The Writing Program at Oberlin, with help from colleagues; and cofounded Field/Oberlin College Press.

Martha Collins's most recent book of poems is Night Unto Night. She has also published eight earlier poetry collections and three cotranslated volumes of Vietnamese poetry. She is editor-at-large for FIELD magazine and an editor for the Oberlin College Press.

Kazim Ali is a poet, translator, essayist and fiction writer. His books include Inquisition, Bright Felon, and Silver Road: Essays, Maps & Calligraphies. He is associate professor of creative writing and comparative literature at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: kazimalipoet

Website: www.kazimali.com

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S218. Listening To The Art: Committing To Your Book No Matter How Long It Takes. (, , , , Susan Ito) "The whole culture is telling you to hurry, while the art tells you to take your time. Always listen to the art.” Sounds good in theory, but it's harder to do when the manuscript is taking months or years to finish. How can a writer see a project through to its full realization when it seems like the rest of the world is moving at the speed of the Internet? Five published writers talk about writing their books and the challenges and rewards of listening to the art.

Laura Sims is the author of Looker, a debut novel. She has published four books of poetry, most recently Staying Alive, and is the editor of Fare Forward: Letters from David Markson


Twitter Username: ljsims50

Website: www.laurasims.net

Cara Benson is the author of the short prose collection Made and winner of the bpNichol Award. A recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, she is anthologized in Best American Poetry. Benson is a Creative Writing Instructor and Manuscript Consultant for Grub Street.


Twitter Username: cbenson67

Bridgett M. Davis is the author of the memoir The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother's Life In The Detroit Numbers, and the novels Into The Go-Slow and Shifting Through Neutral. She is a Professor at Baruch College, CUNY and Director of the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program.


Twitter Username: bridgettmdavis

Website: bridgettdavis.com

Reema Zaman is an award-winning author, speaker, actress, and Oregon Literary Arts' Writer of Color Fellow. Her debut memoir, I Am Yours, explores the difficulties, danger, and ultimately, necessity of women owning and using their voice. As a speaker, she speaks on the power we humans hold within.


Twitter Username: ReemaZaman

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S219. Getting Home: Writing & Publishing Debut POC Story Collections. (, , , ) Finding a home for a story collection is hard. It’s harder still for people of color writing about worlds bypassed by the larger reading public. This panel features debut authors whose collections explore what it means to speculate on racialized experience in the US, Malaysia, Puerto Rico, and Colombia. They discuss how perceptions of identity wind through issues of craft and cultural expectations: What do readers seek in their work? To what degree do authors fulfill or frustrate assumptions?

Ivelisse Rodriguez is the author of Love War Stories. She is also the founder and editor of an interview series focused on contemporary Puerto Rican writers. She has taught creative writing at the United States Coast Guard Academy, Borough of Manhattan Community College, and Salem College.


Twitter Username: aracien11

YZ Chin is the author of Though I Get Home, which won the inaugural Louise Meriwether First Book Prize. She is also the author of two chapbooks, In Passing and deter. She works as a software engineer by day, and writes by night.


Twitter Username: yz_chin

Abbey Mei Otis is the author of the story collection Alien Virus Love Disaster. She loves people and art forms on the margins. She has studied at the Michener Center for Writers and the Clarion West Writers Workshop, and now teaches fiction at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: abbeyangry

Juan Martinez is an assistant professor at Northwestern University. Best Worst American, his story collection, was released in 2017, and his work has appeared in HuizacheGlimmer TrainMcSweeney'sEcotoneSelected Shorts, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: fulmerford

Website: http://www.fulmerford.com

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S220. Teaching Intersectional Writing. (, , , ) In this ugly political climate, intersectionality is more important than ever. As teachers of college writing we want to teach about intersectionality to encourage intersectional writing from students in order to ensure they recognize the complexities of oppression. How can we most effectively do this? Which creative texts work successfully in the classroom? This panel of teaching writers who focus on intersectionality in their work will share their insights about texts from a variety of genres.

Daniel Shank Cruz has published scholarship on a variety of contemporary North American authors as well as personal essays. He is also the author of Queering Mennonite Literature, forthcoming from Penn State University Press. He is an Associate Professor of English at Utica College.

Melissa Tuckey is poet, editor, and educator living in upstate New York. She's author of Tenuous Chapel, selected by Charles Simic for the ABZ First Book Award and editor of Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology. She is a cofounder of Split This Rock.


Twitter Username: melissaTuckey

Website: www.melissatuckey.net

Dr. Christina Marrocco is a professor at ECC where she teaches Creative Writing and other courses to a diverse population. Her writing often deals with working class concerns and the Italian American diaspora. Christina has recently published poetry and short story work as well as research writing.

Suzanne Richardson earned her MFA at the University of New Mexico. She currently teaches English and creative writing at Utica College in upstate New York. She has authored a chapbook of poetry, The Softest Part of a Woman is a Wound. Her nonfiction and fiction have appeared various journals.


Twitter Username: oozannesay

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S221. Teaching Outside the Academy: The Case for Writers' Centers & Conferences. (, , , , ) Earning an MFA is a wonderful opportunity but not everyone has the resources and/or time to follow this route to becoming a published writer. Hear from leaders in the field as they offer the benefits and challenges of teaching and learning outside the Academy. Join the directors of two of the oldest writers centers in the country, teachers from two of the most established manuscript review and poetry conferences, and writing instructors as they discuss experiences within and outside of academia.

Jennifer Franklin (Brown AB, Columbia MFA) is the author No Small Gift and Looming. Her poetry has been published in The Paris ReviewThe NationBoston Review, and on poets.org. Coeditor of Slapering Hol Press, she teaches at The Hudson Valley Writers' Center.

Martha Rhodes is the author of five poetry collections, most recently The Thin Wall. She teaches at the Warren Wilson College and Sarah Lawrence College MFA writing programs. She directed the Conference on Poetry from 2010–2018. She is the director of Four Way Books.

Tree Swenson is executive director of Hugo House in Seattle. She was previously executive director of the Academy of American Poets. A former AWP board president, her work in the literary arts began with cofounding Copper Canyon Press, where she was publisher and executive director for twenty years.

Chris Campanioni is a first-generation Cuban and Polish American, and the recipient of an Academy of American Poets prize and an International Latino Book Award. He edits PANK, At Large, and Tupelo Quarterly and teaches Latino literature and creative writing at Pace University and Baruch College.


Twitter Username: chriscampanioni

Website: www.chriscampanioni.com

Fred Marchant is the author of five books of poetry, the most recent of which is Said Not Said. He is the editor of Another World Instead: Early Poetry of William Stafford, and the founding director of the Suffolk University Poetry Center in Boston. He teaches workshops in venues around the country


Twitter Username: FredMarchant

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S222. Crossovers: Writing for Both Teens and Adults. (, , , , ) YA crossover is an appealing idea: a book sold to both teens and adults, read more widely because its meaning shape shifts across age groups. This panel brings together writers who write for both teens and adults within the same project; for a YA audience sometimes and for adults at others; and writers who don’t think about age at all when they write. The panel asks what lessons we learn as early readers and explores why writers should never underestimate their readers, no matter their ages.

Sarah Blakley-Cartwright is the author of Red Riding Hood, a New York Times #1 bestseller. She is Associate Editor of A Public Space.


Twitter Username: sarblakcart

Lilliam Rivera is an award-winning writer and author of The Education of Margot Sanchez, a contemporary young adult novel. Recently named a "2017 Face to Watch" by the Los Angeles Times, Lilliam is also a 2016 Pushcart Prize winner. Her next YA novel, Dealing in Dreams, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: lilliamr

Website: http://www.lilliamrivera.com

Patrick Ryan is the author of The Dream Life of Astronauts and Send Me. His work has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Tin House, the Iowa Review, and elsewhere. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant. A former editor at Granta, Patrick is the editor of One Story.


Twitter Username: patrickryannyc

Megan Cummins is a writer and editor in Brooklyn, New York.


Twitter Username: cummins_megan

Sarah Nicole Smetana is the author of The Midnights. She received her BFA in Creative Writing from Chapman University and her MFA in Fiction from The New School. 


Twitter Username: sarahnsmetana

Website: www.sarahnicolesmetana.com

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S223. Different Strokes for Different Folks: Small Press Publishing Demystified. (, , , , Kate Leland) Interested in starting a small press? Maybe you’d like to publish with one? This panel of editors and authors will focus on the benefits and limitations of small press publishing, acknowledging that approaches, budgets, and editorial motivations differ widely, though the pressures and constraints are often very much the same. In order for the small press community and its authors to flourish, we must encourage visibility, share what we know, and develop creative, tailored solutions.

Meghan McNamara is a founding editor at Stillhouse Press and currently serves as the Director of Media & Communications. She attended George Mason University's MFA Creative Writing program for fiction and has a deep affinity for the short form, though she is currently at work on her first novel.


Twitter Username: MeghanMcNamara

Michelle Dotter is the editor-in-chief of Dzanc Books, a small independent press based in Ann Arbor, MI. She earned a degree in Creative Writing from Colorado College before beginning her editing career with MacAdam/Cage Publishing in San Francisco. 

Diane Goettel, the owner and Executive Editor of Black Lawrence Press, coedited the anthologies Art & Understanding and Feast. From 2009–2017, Diane lived in Hong Kong where she taught creative writing to school-age children.


Twitter Username: BlackLawrence

Anne Panning has published a novel, Butter, and two short story collections, including Super America, which won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. Her memoir, Dragonfly Notes: On Distance and Loss, is forthcoming from Stillhouse Press in September 2018. She teaches at the College at Brockport, State University of New York.


Twitter Username: AnnePanning

Website: www.annepanning.com

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S224. Not Sorry: Five Canadian Poets. (, , , , ) “By Canada I have always been fascinated,” writes Matthew Zapruder, a not-uncommon fetishizing of the friendly, progressive neighbour to the north. How does a national poetics develop under this false yet compelling illusion? Lauded as belonging to the "next wave,” of Canadian poets, these five readers defy expectations. The aim is not to "get along with everyone," but to interrogate our dark, dysfunctional sides, as in Ali Blythe: “Good morning, my unattractive / tendency, I’ve made coffee.”

Kayla Czaga is the author of For Your Safety Please Hold On, which was nominated for the Governor General's Award for poetry. She holds an MFA from UBC and her poetry has appeared in journals in Canada and the US. Her second collection of poetry is forthcoming from House of Anansi in 2019.


Twitter Username: kaylaczaga

Ali Blythe's critically acclaimed first book, Twoism, explores trans-being poetics and desire. He is winner of the Vallum Award for Poetry, finalist for the BC Book awards, and recipient of an honour of distinction from the Writers Trust of Canada for emerging LGBTQ writers. 


Twitter Username: aliblyther

Website: www.hialiblythe.com/

Ben Ladouceur is the author of Otter, which won the Gerald Lampert Award for best poetry debut in Canada and was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. In 2018, he received the Dayne Ogilvie Award for Emerging LGBT Writers. His second book Mad Long Emotion is out in spring 2019.


Twitter Username: itsbenladouceur

Website: benladouceur.com

Jordan Abel is a Nisga'a writer and the author of Injun (winner of the Griffin Poetry Prize), Un/inhabited, and The Place of Scraps (winner of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize). Currently, Abel teaches Indigenous Literatures and Creative Writing at the University of Alberta.


Twitter Username: jordoisdead

Sheryda Warrener is the author of two poetry collections, most recently Floating is Everything. In 2017, she won the Thomas Morton Memorial Prize. She lives in Vancouver, where she’s a lecturer in the Creative Writing program at University of British Columbia and facilitates Artspeak Gallery’s Studio for Emerging Writers.

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S225. Screenwriting: Eight Techniques Guaranteed to Take Your Script to the Next Level. (, , ) In this panel, screenwriters will discuss eight screenwriting techniques from successful films and screenplays such as setup/payoff, revealing character through action, and disclosure of information. This session will help both writers and instructors polish scripts that will stand out from the slush pile.

Leslie Kreiner Wilson, PhD, is a produced screenwriter and directs the MFA Program in Writing for Screen and Television at Pepperdine University. Her recent publications include fiction as well as essays on early screenwriters Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and Mae West in various academic journals.

Andrea Baltazar is an Assistant Professor of Communication at Weber State University where she teaches audio production, editing, and documentary filmmaking. She’s also a writer/director of a short film entitled “Urban Uber.” She graduated from Pepperdine University with an MFA in screenwriting.

Andrés Orozco is the writer/director of various award winning films, including Yo Soy Tu Niña, God Speaks Spanish, and 16 Summers. He is an Assistant Professor at Weber State University, where he teaches digital media, screenwriting, and oversees film production. He's also a working SAG actor.


Twitter Username: orozcofilms

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S226. Writing After Publication: Now What?. (, , , , ) This panel will explore the complicated aftermath of a writer's life following debut publication. How is writing a second book different from writing a debut? How does publication change our notions of what it means to be a writer? How can we sit back down at the writing desk, and why is it important to do so? We’ll address perceived success and failure, and the skills required and acquired to build a sustainable writing life beyond the milestone of publication.

Danya Kukafka is the author of the novel Girl in Snow, a national bestseller translated into over a dozen languages worldwide. She currently lives in Seattle.


Twitter Username: danyakukafka

Danielle Lazarin is the author of Back Talk: Stories. Her award-winning fiction can be found in The Southern Review, Buzzfeed, Colorado Review, Indiana Review, Glimmer Train, Boston Review, amongst others, and her essays in The Cut and Lenny Letter. She lives in New York.


Twitter Username: d_lazarin

Brit Bennett earned her MFA in fiction at the Helen Zell Writers' Program. Her essays appear in The New Yorker, New York Times Magazine, Paris Review, and Jezebel. Her debut novel is The Mothers.


Twitter Username: britrbennett

Aja Gabel’s debut novel, The Ensemble, was released in 2018. Her fiction can be found in New England ReviewKenyon ReviewBOMB, and elsewhere. She was a 2012–2013 fellow in fiction at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown and holds a PhD from the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: AjaMaybe

Website: www.ajagabel.com

Dickson Lam is the author of Paper Sons: A Memoir. He holds MFA degrees in creative writing from the University of Houston and Rutgers-Newark. Lam is an Assistant Professor of English at Contra Costa College.

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S227. Crafting Diversity: Race, Sex, Gender, and Poverty in Working-Class Fiction. (, , , ) Diversity in American fiction has been a central issue in our time. With respect to diversity, working-class fiction is a unique genre that allows readers to see how other issues spring from the topic of diversity. Further, working-class fiction addresses the lives of people that make up the largest socioeconomic class in the U.S., yet writers rarely make this group the focus of their work. These panelists read excerpts of their fiction and discuss how it is shaped by issues of diversity.

Stephen D. Gutierrez is the author of Live from Fresno y Los, and of two mixed collections of stories and essays, Elements and The Mexican Man in His Backyard. He is widely published in both genres and an American Book Award winner. He teaches at California State University East Bay.

Ron Cooper's novels include All My Sins Remembered, Purple Jesus, and The Gospel of the Twin. His poems, stories, and essays have appeared in numerous publications. He teaches at the College of Central Florida.

Gonzalo Baeza is the author of the short story collection La ciudad de los hoteles vacios (The city of vacant hotels). His fiction has been published in The Texas Review, Boulevard, and Estados Hispanos de América, among others.

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S228. The Landscape of Memory: Writing Places That Don’t Exist. (, , , ) While setting is often seen as the purview of fiction writers, place has become its own sub-genre in the creative nonfiction community. Whether tracking breaking stories in situ or casting generations into the past, the writer’s job is often to create the landscape of memory out of the ether. How, aside from Proust’s madeleine, can we gain access to places to which we no longer have access, and landscapes that are essentially make-believe? How do writers render a remembered landscape real?

Kelly McMasters is the author of Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town and co-editor of This is the Place: Women Writing on Home. Her essays have appeared in The New Times, Paris Review Daily, American Scholar, River Teeth, and others. She is an Assistant Professor of English at Hofstra University.


Twitter Username: kellymcmasters2

Miranda Weiss is the author of the memoir Tide, Feather, Snow: A Life in Alaska, a Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association bestseller. Her science and nature writing has appeared in the Washington Post, The American Scholar, Alaska Magazine, and elsewhere.

Emily Arnason Casey’s writing has been published in The Normal School, The Rumpus, Hotel Amerika, Briar Cliff Review, and elsewhere. Her forthcoming book is titled Made Holy: Essays. She teaches writing at the Community College of Vermont and is the Nonfiction Editor at Atlas & Alice Magazine.


Twitter Username: emilyarna

Jericho Parms is the author of Lost Wax. Her essays have appeared in Fourth Genre, The Normal School, Hotel Amerika, Brevity, and elsewhere. She is the Associate Director of the MFA in Writing Program at Vermont College of Fine Arts and teaches at Champlain College. jerichoparms.com

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S229. The Non-Residency Residency: From Working Writers. (, , , , ) Writers’ residencies can be a fantastic way to set aside time and space to write, but not everyone can press pause on their professional and family lives in order to attend one. There are, however, alternative models to the traditional residency. From coworking spaces, to programs in interdisciplinary art centers, to self-started retreats, panelists discuss a range of opportunities available to writers looking to deepen their practice and build community—and find time to write.

Emily Wolahan is author of Hinge (National Poetry Review Press, 2015). Her poetry has been published in Boston Review, Gulf Coast, and Georgia Review, among other places. She is senior editor at Two Lines Press and a current Affiliate Artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts.

Dean Rader's recent books include Self-Portrait as Wikipedia Entry, Suture (written with Simone Muench), and Bullets Into Bells: Poets and Citizens Respond to Gun Violence in the U.S. (with Brian Clements and Alexandra Teague). He is a professor at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: deanrader

Website: http://deanrader.com

Aimee Phan is the author of two books of fiction: We Should Never Meet and The Reeducation of Cherry Truong. She has received fellowships from the NEA, the MacDowell Colony, the Rockefeller Foundation and Hedgebrook. She teaches in the MFA Program in Writing at California College of the Arts.


Twitter Username: aimeephan

Website: Aimeephan.com

Kate Folk is a fiction writer whose work has appeared in publications including One Story, ZYZZYVA, Conjunctions, and Granta. She has received support for her writing from the Headlands Center for the Arts and the MacDowell Colony. An editor at Joyland Magazine, she is currently working on a novel.


Twitter Username: katefolk

Yalitza Ferreras is a recent Steinbeck Fellow at SJSU. Her writing appears in Best American Short Stories, Colorado Review, Wise Latinas, and Daring to Write: Contemporary Narratives by Dominican Women. She is the recipient of fellowships from Yaddo, Djerassi, Barbara Deming Fund, and VONA.


Twitter Username: yalitzawrites

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S230. The Future of Criticism: A Conversation with Established and Emerging Critics. (, , , , ) In a moment of rapid change, noted emerging and established critics gather and ask: What is the purpose of criticism now? How do we speak? To whom? Who do we imagine our audience(s) to be, and how do we reach them? As modes and means of distributing information increase, what forms of criticism have use and impact? And most importantly, in a world in flux, are critics activists?

Jane Ciabattari is a literary critic and author of the story collections Stealing the Fire and California Tales. She is National Book Critics Circle VP/Online (and a former NBCC president), a columnist for BBC Culture and The Literary Hub, and a member of the San Francisco Writers Grotto.


Twitter Username: janeciab

Website: www.janeciabattari.com

Ismail Muhammad is staff writer at the Millions, contributing editor at ZYZZYVA, and a Ph.D. candidate in English at U.C. Berkeley. His nonfiction and criticism have appeared in Slate, Paris Review, the Nation, and other venues. He's at work on a novel about the Great Migration.


Twitter Username: trapmotives

Kate Tuttle, President of the National Book Critics Circle, writes about books for the Boston Globe. Her reviews have also appeared in the New York TimesLos Angeles TimesWashington Post, and Newsday. Her essays on childhood, race, and politics have appeared in Dame, the Rumpus, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: katekilla

Oscar Villalon is the managing editor of ZYZZYVA. He is a former book editor at the San Francisco Chronicle, as well as a past board member of the National Book Critics Circle. He is also a contributing editor to Literary Hub.


Twitter Username: ovillalon

Hope Wabuke is the author of The Leaving and Movement No.1: Trains. She received a National Endowment for the Arts Award in 2017, and has been published widely in various magazines. She is also an Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and a contributing editor for The Root.


Twitter Username: HopeWabuke

Website: www.hopewabuke.com

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S231. The Art of Trauma. (, , , , ) Trauma has been described as “speechless horror.” In this discussion, writers explore strategies to piece together stories about sexual abuse, domestic violence, addiction, and mental illness. The panelists consider how we write poetry and narratives about the debilitating consequences of trauma on the body, mind, and soul. In commenting on their own work and the work of others, they discuss the craft, ethics, and emotions in writing about and through trauma.

Susan Ayres, a poet and translator, is an MFA candidate of Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her poems have appeared in numerous literary journals. As a professor at Texas A&M University School of Law, she researches intersections between law, literature, and culture.

Wendy Chin-Tanner is the author of two poetry collections: Turn, which was a finalist for the Oregon Book Awards and Anyone Will Tell You. A former academic in sociology, she is a founding editor at Kin Poetry Journal and poetry editor at The Nervous Breakdown.

Alice Anderson's first poetry collection Human Nature won the NYU Prize and the Great Lakes Colleges Associations Best First Book Prize. Her second collection is The Watermark. A memoir, Some Bright Morning, I'll Fly Away is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: alicepoet

Valerie Martínez's books of poetry include Absence, Luminescent, And They Called It Horizon, World to World, and Each and Her. She was the Poet Laureate of Santa Fe, NM from 2008–2010. Martinez is currently the Director of History and Literary Arts at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.


Twitter Username: valmatz

Website: www.valeriemartinez.net

C. Russell Price is an Appalachian, genderqueer, punk poet. Their chapbook Tonight, We Fuck The Trailer Park Out of Each Other explores class, race, sexuality, and gender in the South. They currently live and perform in Chicago where they teach creative writing at Northwestern University.


Twitter Username: C_Russell_Price

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S232. The Intersection of Writing and Performing. (, , , , ) Crossing decades of working on page, stage, screen, radio, and web our panelists are writer/entertainers straddling two worlds. Panelists discuss the art and craft of writing to perform, discovering the performance within the written work, inspiring written work from performance, and various other ways writing and performance inform each other. From elementary school visits to “book burlesque,” our panelists have created careers lifting words off the page.

Danika Dinsmore is a writer, educator, and spokenword artist. She writes poetry and speculative fiction with a focus on middle grade and young adult literature. She teaches creative writing and world-building to students of all ages at schools, conferences, and festivals across North America.


Twitter Username: danika_dinsmore

Website: danikadinsmore.com

Debby Dodds is the author of the novel Amish Guys Don't Call, a Powell's Best YA of 2017 and has essays in My Little Red Book, The Things That You Would Have Said, The Sun, xoJane, Manifest-Station.com, and Hip Mama. She's performed with Jerry Seinfeld, Felicia Day, Zombies, Cookie Monster, and Mickey Mouse.


Twitter Username: DebbyDodds

Website: http://www.DebbyDodds.com

Leah Baer is a writer, an actor, and a storyteller who began acting in Hollywood in the 1960s. She now performs her work at ROAR, Booklovers Burlesque, and Unchaste Readers. She is working on her memoir, and studying screenwriting at the Corporeal Writing Center.

Jonathan Oak is a writer, musician, and spoken word artist living in Portland. He studied improv at Torch Theater, hosted a poetry radio show, was a competitor and coach at PSI, and ran writing and performance workshops for fifteen plus years. He is currently leading the dark cabaret band Bright & Shiny.


Twitter Username: greycrayons

Website: facebook.com/brightandshinymusic

Jessica Standifird lives in Portland, Oregon. Most recently her work was read by Parker Posey at the Writer’s Guild Initiative Gala in New York City. Standifird has performed at venues across the country and organizes events, most notably the annual The Poe Show, celebrating Poe through film, readings, and music.


Twitter Username: wordmule

Website: jessicastandifird.com

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S233. The Challenges and Rewards of Transnational Bilingual Writing Workshops. (, , , , Maria Lorena Sosa) Building bridges rather than walls over the last decade, the University of Texas at El Paso bilingual MFA has created a grand experiment in bilingualism, challenging artificial boundaries between countries, peoples, and languages, producing award-winning writers in both Spanish and English, expanding MFA programs’ reach in the U.S. and throughout the Americas. This panel discusses the practical challenges and rewards of acquiring greater proficiency in a second language in the first bilingual MFA program in the world.

Lex Williford has won the Iowa Short Fiction Award and the 10th Annual Rose Metal Chapbook Contest. Coeditor with Michael Martone of The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction and Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Nonfiction, he teaches in University of Texas at El Paso's bilingual and online MFA programs.


Twitter Username: lexwilliford

Website: www.lexwilliford.com

Irma Nikicicz is a graduate student of the Bilingual Creative Writing MFA program at the University of Texas at El Paso.


Twitter Username: Irma_Nikicicz

Chandra Edwards-Cottingham is currently a graduate student from Texas, studying in UTEP's Bilingual MFA program.

Jesus Peña is a second-year MFA writing student at the University of Texas at El Paso. He currently teaches Rhetoric and Writing Studies.

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S234. Not Yet a Genre: Writing Beyond Words. (, , , , ) There are times when words are not enough—when the image wants to remain an image, when the body is best described by the motion of the body itself. Using schematics, paper cutouts and drawings, aerial acrobatics, embroidery, and film, these writers genre-bend beyond poetry and prose to create a conversation between elements on and off the page. Panelists show and read examples of their work, discuss their process and techniques, and engage in a Q&A session.

Ellie Kozlowski is a poet, nonfiction writer, filmmaker, and comic artist. Her writing has appeared in Knockout, Sundress, Lilac City Fairy Tales, and elsewhere. Her films won first place in the TWIST Queer Film Festival's Filmmaking Challenge two years in a row.


Twitter Username: EllieKozlowski

Kathryn Smith is the author of the poetry collection Book of Exodus. Her interdisciplinary project combining poetry, erasure, and embroidery received a Spokane Arts Grant Award.

Oliver Baez Bendorf is the author of The Spectral Wilderness. A CantoMundo and Lambda fellow, his poems and comics have appeared in American Poetry ReviewPoetry NorthwestWest Branch, and elsewhere. As of Fall 2018, he is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing (Poetry) at Kalamazoo College.


Twitter Username: queerpoetics

Website: oliverbendorf.org

Emily Van Kley is the author of The Cold and the Rust. Her work has been awarded the Iowa Review Award, the Florida Review Editors' Prize, the Loraine Williams Prize for Poetry, and the Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize. Her poems appear in Best American Poetry among other publications.

Dustin Parsons is the author of Exploded View: Essays on Fatherhood, with Diagrams. He is the winner of a New York Fine Arts grant and an Ohio Arts Grant in nonfiction. He teaches at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: DustinParsons07

Website: www.dustinparsons.info

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S237. One Size Doesn't Fit All; The Equity-Minded Workshop in a Two-Year College. (, , , , ) Can the Writing Workshop in the Two-Year College classroom act as a site of transformative inclusion? A place that doesn't just recognize differences, but sees those differences as locations for empowerment. How do educators address systemic inequities alongside institutional pressures of student retention and higher graduation-rates? What texts are best at inspiring a multi-cultural responsive environment? This panel will discuss practical and innovative approaches to these questions and more.

Jasmin Rae Ziegler received her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She is a 2017–2018 Loft Mentor Fellow in Poetry. She teaches Creative Writing, Literature, and Composition at Anoka Ramsey Community College and serves as Advisor to the Creative Writing Club.

Mary Lannon, an associate professor at Nassau Community College, has stories published at Story and New World Writing. She seeks a publishing home for her first novel with the impossibly long title of An Explanation of the Fundamentals of the Derivation of Dilapidated Brown Station Wagon Theory.


Twitter Username: LannonMf

Website: www.mirandajmcleod.com

Jennifer Derilo is an assistant professor of English and writing center coordinator at San Diego Mesa College. She is on the board of directors for So Say We All, a literary nonprofit, and she is a proud alumna of the Voices of Our Nation’s Arts (VONA) workshop.

Yasmin Ramirez is a 2018 Dickinson House Fellow. Her fiction/creative nonfiction works have appeared in Cream City ReviewAcentos Review, and Huizache, among others. She completed her first collection of CNF narratives titled Por Un Amor and she is Professor of English and Creative Writing at El Paso Community College.


Twitter Username: yazmo8

Website: yasminramirez.com

Jorge Villalobos teaches creative writing, with an emphasis on poetry and fiction, at San Diego Mesa College. He has a background in hybrid literature that nurtures the empowerment of underrepresented students' voices through culturally responsive texts.


Twitter Username: MrV_SDMesa

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S238. Coloring Outside the Gender Binary: How Transgender Poets are Redefining What It Means to Be Human, Sponsored by AWP. (, , , , ) Until very recently, the English language, and most of the poetry written in it, has been based on the gender binary assumption that all human beings are always, either, and only male or female, as determined by the sex of their bodies at birth. We see this assumption at work in the traditional system of gendered pronouns and honorifics, in words for our most intimate roles and relationships, which designate parents as mothers or fathers, children as daughters or sons, and so on, and in subtler habits that reflect and reinforce the idea that human beings are born and remain simply male or female.

Joy Ladin, Gottesman Professor of English at Yeshiva University, is the author of nine books of poetry, including Lambda Literary Award finalists Transmigration and Impersonation, and memoir, National Jewish Book Award finalist Through the Door of Life, She is a 2016 NEA fellowship recipient.


Twitter Username: joyladin

Website: joyladin.com

Cameron Awkward-Rich is the author of Sympathetic Little Monster and the chapbook Transit. A Cave Canem fellow and poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine, he teaches in Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at UMass Amherst.


Twitter Username: cawkward_rich

Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart's Traffic and recombinant, and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence within Activist Communities. They are part of Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole, Callaloo, Macondo and VONA communities and poetry editor of the Texas Review.


Twitter Username: chinginchen

Website: www.chinginchen.com

Max Wolf Valerio is author of the Lambda Finalist, The Testosterone Files; the performance, Exile: Vision Quest at the Edge of Identity; the poetry book, The Criminal:The Invisibility of Parallel Forces; and work in Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics.


Twitter Username: hypotenusewolf

Website: http://hypotenusewolf.wordpress.com/

Trace Peterson is a trans woman poet critic and author of the poetry collection Since I Moved In, she is also Founding Editor/Publisher of EOAGH Books which has won 2 Lambda Literary Awards, and Co-editor of the anthology Troubling the Line, which was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in 2014.


Twitter Username: tracepeterson

Website: http://eoagh.com

Oregon Ballroom 203, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S239. From Which We Spring: A Tribute to Los Angeles Iconoclast Poet Wanda Coleman. (, , , , ) "A yearning to avenge the raping of the womb /  from which we spring." Five poets discuss the art, life and legacy of poet Wanda Coleman, known as the unofficial poet laureate of Los Angeles. Wanda passed away unexpectedly at the age of sixty-seven, but her ferocious and firey voice charged generations of writers. Hear these five influential authors read some of her most provocative and captivating work while discussing the life of one of America's most potent yet unknown black feminist writers.

Amber Tamblyn is an author, actress, and director who has been nominated for an Emmy, Golden Globe, and Independent Sprite award. She is the author of three collections of poetry including the critically acclaimed Dark Sparkler and the novel Any Man. She writes for the New York Times.


Twitter Username: ambertamblyn

Website: www.amtam.com

Kevin Young is the author of thirteen books of poetry and prose, most recently Brown. His nonfiction book Bunk won the Anisfield-Wolf Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award. He is director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and poetry editor of the New Yorker.


Twitter Username: Deardarkness

Website: kevinyoungpoetry.com

Jeffrey McDaniel is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Chapel of Inadvertent Joy. He teaches at Sarah Lawrence College.

Mahogany L. Browne is a Cave Canem, Poets House, Rauschenberg, Bearing Witness, and Serenbe Focus alum, playwright, poet, and organizer. Publisher of Penmanship Books, she earned her MFA in Writing & Activism from Pratt Institute, and she serves as Artistic Director of Urban Word NYC.


Twitter Username: mobrowne

Website: www.mobrowne.com

Patricia Smith's books include Incendiary Art (2018 Kingsley Tufts winner, 2018 Pulitzer finalist, Los Angeles Times Book Prize winner), Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah (2013 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize winner), and Blood Dazzler (2008 National Book Award finalist). A 2014 Guggenheim fellow, two-time Pushcart Prize winner, Smith is a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada College's MFA program.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S240. I Sold It! Now What?. (, , , ) Writers expend tremendous energy on selling their books. But once a manuscript has been sold, there’s a year or more before publication, and the work of editing and promoting has just begun. How can writers make the best use of this time? What are the most important steps in the pre-publication process? Can you really “build a platform” in a year? Two authors, an agent, editor, and a publicist discuss both the small- and large-press experience and outline the path to a successful launch day.

Anjali Sachdeva teaches English at the University of Pittsburgh. Her fiction and nonfiction have been published in the Yale Review, Gulf Coast, Creative Nonfiction, and Best American Nonrequired Reading, among others. She is the author of the short story collection All the Names They Used for God.


Twitter Username: AnjaliWrites

Alyson Sinclair is a freelance publicist and communications consultant specializing in book publicity for new releases, book festivals, and communications projects for literary nonprofits. Clients include Farrar, Straus and Giroux, McSweeney's, Graywolf Press, Coffee House Press, Random House, Portland Book Festival, Memphis Literary Arts Festival, and others.


Twitter Username: alysonsinclair

Website: https://www.nectarliterary.com/

Olivia Taylor Smith is the Cofounder and Executive Editor at the Unnamed Press, an independent publisher of contemporary literature and nonfiction from the US. and around the world.


Twitter Username: OliviaTSmith

Sarah Levitt is a literary agent at Aevitas Creative Management who specializes in narrative nonfiction and literary fiction. Her list includes journalists, academics, historians, scientists, and musicians, among others.


Twitter Username: slevittslevitt

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S241. Editing into Negative Capability: Methods & Impacts of Manuscript Revision. (, , , ) This panel will consider multiple possibilities of editing including refashioning, opening, reframing, collapsing multiple manuscripts into one. This is not always an enjoyable process—it rarely is. There can be grieving for cut material and reckoning with demands to make narratives/manuscripts more economical, palatable, or “relatable.” Who decides on the final shape of a manuscript and how? How does editing open up the potential of a work? Where does power emerge?

Diana Arterian is the author of Playing Monster :: Seiche, the chapbooks With Lightness & Darkness and Death Centos, and coeditor of Among Margins: Critical & Lyrical Writing on Aesthetics. She's a poetry editor at Noemi Press and earning her PhD in Literature & Creative Writing at USC.

Gabrielle Civil is a black feminist writer, poet, and performance artist. Her texts and translations have appeared in Small Axe, The Third Rail, Two Lines, Obsidian, and more. She is the author of Tourist Art, Swallow the Fish, and Experiments in Joy. The aim of her work is to open up space.

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit. A contributing editor for Guernica, she is the Education Programs Coordinator at the University of Arizona Poetry Center.


Twitter Username: sloaneesh

Sarah Vap is the author of five collections of poetry and poetics. Her most recent book, Viability, was published by Penguin in 2016.

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

S242. Rx for Writers Targeted by Hate Speech and Trolling. (, , , Viktorya Vilk) As the internet and social media become ever more influential in writers’ careers, we discuss how they can deal with hate speech and trolling targeting their work and, in some cases, their sense of personal safety. This discussion aims to surface the experiences of writers facing such harassment and equip them with the tools and techniques available to combat this kind of assault on their work and online presence.

Yumi Wilson is president of Journalism and Women Symposium and a tenured journalism professor at San Francisco State University. She is a former reporter and editor at the Chronicle and a former communications manager at LinkedIn. In 2013, she was chosen as one of Twitter’s “12 Smartest Women of Color on Twitter."

JoBeth McDaniel is a magazine journalist, nonfiction author, and graduate of Mount St. Mary's University MFA program. Her work is published widely, with essays selected for anthologies and college textbooks. She founded Facebook's School After 30 to encourage age diversity in higher education.


Twitter Username: heyjbmc

Website: jobeth.com

Candace Williams is a black queer nerd, poet, and middle school educator. Her chapbook, Spells for Black Wizards, won the TAR Series. She’s appeared in Sixth Finch, Bennington Review, and Bettering American Poetry 2016. In a past life, she was in charge of digital marketing at tech startups.


Twitter Username: teacherc

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S242B. LitNet: Contests, Subscriptions, and Fighting Pirates . (Anastasia Zhuravlova, Anastasia Zhuravlova) Meet LitNet: your quintessential literary platform. We're an international social literary marketplace that dreams of becoming a global community of bibliophiles. We let writers sell books they have just started writing and help readers take part in shaping those. LitNet is all about caring about our users, selling books in innovative ways, fighting pirates, and making our writers' lives more fun! Hear more and meet the winners of our inspiring literary contest!

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S243. Narrative Healing: Yoga & Writing Workshop. (Lisa Weinert) Open to all! This full-body, full-spirit storytelling experience will use yoga, writing and listening exercises to inspire a holistic and freeing storytelling experience. This 75-minute afternoon workshop will include a gentle yoga practice, writing prompts and listening exercises. These classes will build off each other; come for the entire series or drop in for a single class. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a pen and paper.

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S244. Flash Fiction Exercises that Work from Award-Winning Masters of the Form. (, , , , ) Expert writers of flash fiction will share their favorite exercises, ones that are either used in classrooms or have been used to produce award-winning work. The discussion will include details on individual prompts from each panelist and a brief reading of their own work that has come from the exercise. Question and answer session will follow the total presentation regarding the form, how to submit for contests, the editorial process surrounding flash fiction, and revisions.

Venita Blackburn received the Prairie Schooner book prize in fiction 2016 for her collected stories, Black Jesus and Other Superheroes. She was a finalist for the PEN/Bingham and Young Lions Awards in 2018. She is an Assistant Professor of fiction at California State University, Fresno.


Twitter Username: venitablackburn

Anthony Varallo is the author of the short story collections Everyone Was There, This Day in History, Out Loud, and Think of Me and I'll Know. He teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the College of Charleston, where he is the fiction editor of Crazyhorse.

Kim Chinquee is the author of the collections Oh Baby, Pretty, Pistol, and Shot Girls. Her work has been published in journals including The Nation, NOON, Conjunctions, Ploughshares, and others. She is Senior Editor of New World Writing, and she codirects the writing major at SUNY-Buffalo State.


Twitter Username: kimchinquee

Website: www.kimchinquee.com

Sherrie Flick is the author of two short story collections: Thank Your Lucky Stars and Whiskey, Etc. Her work appears in PloughsharesFlash Fiction ForwardNew Sudden Fiction, and New Micro. She is series editor for The Best Small Fictions 2018 and teaches in Chatham University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: sherrieflick

Website: http://www.sherrieflick.com/

Genevieve Plunkett's stories have appeared in The O. Henry Prize Stories 2017, New England Review, Massachusetts Review, Crazyhorse, Willow Springs, West Branch, and The Best Small Fictions.

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S245. Have I Said Too Much?: The Professor/Student Relationship. (, , , , ) With the rising use of social media and the importance of an online presence, it is easier than ever for students to connect with their English professors. With the divide between professor and student growing fainter, it’s difficult to create the invaluable bond students expect from potential mentors while preserving boundaries. How much do we say? How does this affect the personal aspects of our writing? Hear writers in various genres talk frankly about the challenges they face as educators.

Michelle Bermudez is a Latinx poet who received an MFA in creative writing from Adelphi University. Her poems have been published in Persian Sugar in English Tea: An Anthology of Short Poems and Haikus (Volume 2), as well as in Isacoustic, and elsewhere. 


Twitter Username: MMBlaze_0619

Michael Paul Thomas is an Associate Dean at Monmouth University, where he teaches poetry and directs the Visiting Writers Series. He received his MFA in Poetry from Syracuse University where he was the founding editor of Salt Hill. His work has appeared in the Greensboro Review, Slice, and other journals.


Twitter Username: professorMPT

Victorio Reyes Asili is a PhD candidate in English at University at Albany and holds an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts. His poems have appeared in various publications, including the Acentos Review, Pilgrimage Magazine, Word Riot, Obsidian, and the anthologies It Was Written, Black Lives Have Always Mattered, and Chorus.


Twitter Username: ghettohippie

Website: victorioreyes.blogspot.com

Angela Morales, a graduate of the University of Iowa's nonfiction writing program, is the author of The Girls in My Town, a collection of personal essays, winner of the River Teeth Book Prize and the PEN Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, 2016.


Twitter Username: professorbgirl

Website: http://www.angelamorales.net

Jordan Rindenow (Adelphi University BA '14, MFA '17) is a writer of multiple genres, adjunct instructor, and constant student of all things literary. She has completed her graduate thesis (a collection of short stories) and is currently working on forthcoming writing projects.


Twitter Username: joourdin

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S246. Sex at the Intersections: The Erotics of Queer and Of-Color Poetry. (, , , , ) Is there a difference between the "dirty" and the "erotic”? Is the poetry of sex inherently progressive, not only politically, but aesthetically, because the way it treats its subject matter is transgressive? What challenges face queer writers of color who write, often graphically, about the libido and its relation to the body? This panel links intersectional activism with poetic form to deliver both food for thought and practical writing wisdom.

Kate Osana Simonian is an Australian writer of Middle-Eastern descent. She has won the Nelson Algren Prize and her work has been published by the Michigan Quarterly Review, Chicago Tribune, and Best Australian Stories. She is completing her PhD at Texas Tech on a Presidential Fellowship.


Twitter Username: kate_o_simonian

Lannan Fellow & Whiting Award winner, Rickey Laurentiis is the author of Boy with Thorn, winner of the Cave Canem Prize and the Levis Reading Prize, among other honors. Laurentiis is currently the inaugural Fellow in Creative Writing at the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics in Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: rckylrnts

Timothy Liu is the author of ten books of poems, including Don't Go Back To Sleep and Kingdom Come: A Fantasia. He is Professor of English at William Paterson University.


Twitter Username: arabadjisliu

Website: Http://timothyliu.net

francine j. harris is the author of play dead, winner of 2017 Lambda Literary and Audre Lorde Awards. She has received fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, is a Cave Canem poet, and is the 2018/2019 Rona Jaffe Fellow at the Cullman Center at New York Public Library.


Twitter Username: francinejharris

Randall Mann is the author of four collections of poetry, including Straight Razor and Proprietary; and a book of criticism, The Illusion of Intimacy: On Poetry. He lives in San Francisco.


Twitter Username: randallmannpoet

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S247. Crafting Narrative Identity with Unreliable Memories. (, , , ) Memoir is built on truth, but subject to the whims of memory. How do our unreliable brains affect our ability to tell true stories? What are the techniques writers use when their recollections are obliterated by amnesia, trauma, or the illness and death of familial memory keepers?
Panelists discuss diverse approaches to navigating the complicated path toward an honest narrative identity, and share literary strategies for excavating details and rendering emotional truth to the page.

Wendy Fontaine's essays have appeared in Compose, Full Grown People, Hippocampus, Passages North, Readers Digest, Mud Season Review, Brain Child and elsewhere. In 2015, she won the Tiferet Prize for Creative Nonfiction. She recently finished a memoir about finding her way after divorce.


Twitter Username: wendymfontaine

Website: wendyfontaine.com

Tanya Ward Goodman is the author of the award-winning memoir Leaving Tinkertown. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous publications including the Los Angeles Times, Coast Magazine, LuxeFourth River, and Panorama: A Journal of Intelligent Travel. She is working on a second memoir.


Twitter Username: campfiresally

Leslie Schwartz is the author of two novels, Jumping the Green and Angels Crest, and the memoir The Lost Chapters. Her books have been translated into thirteen languages. Angels Crest, the movie, was released in 2011. Schwartz has an MFA in creative writing and has taught writing for twenty-five years.


Twitter Username: lesliexschwartz

Hope Edelman has published seven nonfiction books, including the bestsellers Motherless Daughters and the creative nonfiction anthology, I'll Tell You Mine. Her articles and essays have been published widely. She teaches workshops throughout the year, including at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival every July.


Twitter Username: hope_edelman

Website: www.hopeedelman.com

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S248. Support for PoCs in Publishing: A Conversation. (, , , , ) As a marginalized writer, how do you find support and care within the book business? What can you expect from your agent, editor, or publicist during the publication process? Young PoC publishing professionals will share industry insights and working experiences before an extended Q&A—please bring questions, and let's have frank conversations about publication, formal and informal publishing relationships, finding and building community, and how identity, money, and class affect access and opportunity.

Jenny Xu is the poetry editor at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Victory Matsui is an editor at One World, a new imprint of Random House that publishes works of literature that challenge the status quo. Victory works with Thi Bui, Anelise Chen, Riva Lehrer, Jordy Rosenberg, and Maurice Carlos Ruffin. Pronouns: they/them.


Twitter Username: vmatsuigeneris

Monica Odom is an agent at Liza Dawson Associates, where she represents a variety of nonfiction, literary and upmarket fiction, and illustrators. Monica earned her Masters in Publishing: Digital & Print Media from New York University in 2014, and has a BA in English from Montclair State University


Twitter Username: Modomodom

Karen Gu is the publicity associate at Graywolf Press. She also runs the Graywolf Press instagram (@Graywolfpress).


Twitter Username: karenygu

Annie Hwang is a literary agent at Folio Literary Management where she represents literary fiction and select nonfiction. A former journalist, Annie is constantly on the hunt for underrepresented voices and gifted storytelling that stretches its genre to new heights.


Twitter Username: AnnieAHwang

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S249. Poetry Northwest 60th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) Five poets read to honor of the distinguished history of Poetry Northwest, the region’s oldest literary magazine. Each poet has been awarded one of the prizes honoring founding editors Carolyn Kizer and Richard Hugo. In addition to reading from their own new work, each poet chooses a poem or two from a previous decade to trace the legacy of the magazine as a cornerstone of Northwest letters, with emphasis on the groundbreaking feminism and international diversity of Kizer’s original vision.

Kevin Craft is the executive editor of Poetry Northwest Editions. His books include Solar Prominence and Vagrants & Accidentals. He directs the Written Arts Program at Everett Community College.

Sierra Nelson's collaborative and solo poetry books include I Take Back the Sponge Cake and forthcoming The Lachrymose Report and 100 Rooms. Cofounder of performance group Vis-a-Vis Society, Nelson teaches through Hugo House, WITS at Seattle Children’s Hospital, and University of Washington.


Twitter Username: songsforsquid

Website: http://songsforsquid.tumblr.com/

Troy Jollimore is the author of three collections of poetry: Tom Thomson in Purgatory, At Lake Scugog, and Syllabus of Errors. His awards include the National Book Critics Circle Award, and fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers Conference and the Guggenheim Foundation.


Twitter Username: TroyJollimore

Website: www.troyjollimore.com

Supritha Rajan is associate professor of English at the University of Rochester. Her poetry was awarded the Richard Hugo Prize by Poetry Northwest and has appeared in such journals as Literary Imagination, Colorado Review, and Antioch Review.

Olena Kalytiak Davis is the author of four books including: The Poem She Didn't Write and Other Poems and And Her Soul Out of Nothing (Britingham Prize). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, her poems have appeared in numerous volumes of the Best American Poetry series.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S250. YA in the Era of #MeToo: Changing the Conversation about Sexual Assault. (, , , , ) Four novelists who write about sexual assault will discuss their approach to this difficult topic—as well as how young adult literature gives teen readers new tools to understand the devastating effects of rape culture, empathize with its victims and survivors, and create change in their own lives. The panel will also touch on the possible pitfalls of the movement as it relates to YA literature, such as the lack of representation and intersectionality, and the risk of retraumatizing readers.

Mary Crockett Hill is author of the young adult novel How She Died, How I Lived. Her second book of poetry, A Theory of Everything, won the Autumn House Prize. Mary's work has been featured on Best of the Net and Poetry Daily. She edits Roanoke Review and teaches creative writing at Roanoke College.


Twitter Username: MaryLovesBooks

Amy Reed is the author of eight contemporary YA novels, including BeautifulClean, and her most recent, The Nowhere Girls, about three misfit girls who start a movement to fight rape culture at their school. She also edited Our Stories, Our Voices, an anthology of personal essays by YA authors.


Twitter Username: amyreedfiction

Website: amyreedfiction.com

Amber Smith is the New York Times bestselling author of The Way I Used to Be (Amelia Bloomer List, TAYSHAS List, Bank Street Best Book of the Year) and The Last to Let Go, which received starred reviews from Booklist and VOYA, and has contributed to the anthology Our Stories, Our Voices.


Twitter Username: ASmithAuthor

Nicole Maggi is the author of the young adult novels What They Don't Know, The Forgetting (a 2016 International Thriller Writers Thriller Award finalist and a 2015 Junior Library Guild Selection), and the Twin Willows Trilogy.


Twitter Username: nicolemaggi

Brendan Kiely is The New York Times bestselling author of Tradition, All American Boys (with Jason Reynolds), and other titles. His work has been published in ten languages and received awards including a Coretta Scott King Author Honor, YALSA Top Ten Best Fiction, and Kirkus Reviews Best of 2014.


Twitter Username: KielyBrendan

Website: www.brendankiely.com

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S251. Glitter! Legos! Origami—Oh My! Artistic Play in the Creative Writing Classroom. (, , , , ) How can teachers integrate artistic play to foster a sense of experimentation? How can experiments that seem like crafts and games short-circuit the fear of risk, encourage play instead, and push student writers to reach beyond the walls of the classroom into a larger community of writers? How can teachers inspire students to take ownership of their learning experiences through hands-on work that feels like play? Do scented markers and glitter really help to get ideas to the page?

Alison Pelegrin is the author of four poetry collections, most recently Waterlines and Hurricane Party. She is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Louisiana Division of the Arts and teaches at Southeastern Louisiana University.


Twitter Username: AlisonPelegrin

Traci Brimhall is the author of three collections of poetry: Saudade, Our Lady of the Ruins, and Rookery. A recipient of an NEA Fellowship, she is an Associate Professor at Kansas State University and lives in Manhattan, KS.


Twitter Username: Traci724

Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of Oceanic, her fourth book of poetry, and a forthcoming book of nature essays. She serves as poetry editor for Orion magazine and is professor of English in the University of Mississippi's MFA program.


Twitter Username: aimeenez

Website: www.aimeenez.net

Oliver Baez Bendorf is the author of The Spectral Wilderness. A CantoMundo and Lambda fellow, his poems and comics have appeared in American Poetry Review, Poetry Northwest, West Branch, and elsewhere. As of Fall 2018, he is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing (Poetry) at Kalamazoo College.


Twitter Username: queerpoetics

Website: oliverbendorf.org

Brynn Saito is the author of two books of poetry, Power Made Us Swoon and The Palace of Contemplating Departure. Brynn is an Assistant Professor in the MFA program at California State University, Fresno.


Twitter Username: brynnsaito

Website: http://brynnsaito.com

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S252. Poetry and the Body: Writing the Corporeal. (, , ) In this poetry craft and criticism panel, we aim to have a meaningful dialogue about how the corporeal and related elements enter into our creative processes and how they also inform the delivery of our work in public settings. Drawing from history, memory, and geography, we aim to more fully place the corporeal among the elements that guide our work. We hope poets in the audience will be inspired to consider how the corporeal informs their own creation, forms, content, and delivery.

Peter Joseph Gloviczki (PhD, University of Minnesota, 2012) is a teacher, a communication researcher, and a poet. He works as an assistant professor of communication at Coker College in Hartsville, South Carolina.

Alex Lemon’s most recent books are Feverland: A Memoir in Shards and The Wish Book. He is the author of Happy: A Memoir and three other poetry collections: Mosquito, Hallelujah Blackout, and Fancy Beasts. A fifth poetry collection, Or Beauty, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions. He teaches at TCU.


Twitter Username: Alxlemon

Website: www.alexlemon.com

Kelly Davio is a poet and essayist. Her most recent books are the essay collection It’s Just Nerves and the poetry collection The Book of the Unreal Woman. Davio works as a medical editor in London.


Twitter Username: kellydavio

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S253. Decentralizing Exoticism: Why Can't I Just Write About Avocado Toast and My Ex?. (, , , , Safia Jama) As writers from marginalized communities (POC, LGBTQ+, immigrant), our panelists often feel compelled to or are approached to write stories centered on their marginalization. But does the focus of marginalized writing have to be (anti) whiteness/exclusion based? Can’t our stories, like ourselves, be defined by more than a singular struggle? Our panelists—contributors to a forthcoming anthology that aims to bust such stereotypes—speak about marginalized writers finding their literary safe space.

Pallavi Dhawan is a prosecutor and writer. She received her BA and JD from the University of California, Los Angeles. She has attended the VONA/Voices Writing Workshop and the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley. She is currently coediting an anthology for POC.

Tom Pyun is a writer and MFA candidate at Antioch University. He was a fellow with Vermont Studio Center, Gemini Ink, and VONA/Voices. His work has appeared in the Rumpus, Joyland, and Blue Mesa Review, and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and a Best of the Net award.


Twitter Username: thp100

Ramy Eletreby is a queer Muslim Arab American writer, performer, educator-facilitator in Los Angeles, California. Though he primarily works with youth, Ramy facilitates creative projects based in social justice with various communities throughout the greater Los Angeles region.


Twitter Username: dramarams

Kanika Punwani has an MFA in creative writing (fiction) from Rutgers University–Newark and is a VONA alum. An editor and writer, her nonfiction spans the travel, lifestyle, and culture sectors and has appeared in several Indian publications. She is currently working on a debut short story collection.


Twitter Username: Improvisations

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S254. The Other Side of the Story: The Trouble with Writing About Real People. (, , , , ) Joan Didion claimed that “writers are always selling somebody out” even as they strive for honesty and self-scrutiny. As a writer crafts each sentence to best articulate their point of view, they inevitably face a conflict with the subjects of their stories, which may inhibit the process, spur retaliation, and threaten relationships. We will explore the personal, artistic, and legal implications of choosing to write about family, friends, lovers and public figures, and offer strategies for coping.

Sophia Shalmiyev is a Portland-based writer and a Portland State University MFA graduate. Her work has appeared in Electric Literature, the Seattle Review of BooksPortland ReviewEntropy, and Vela. Shalmiyev's debut memoir, Mother Winter, is about emigration, motherlessness, and feminism.


Twitter Username: sshalmiyev

Chris Kraus is the author of four novels, three books of art and cultural criticism, and most recently After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography. She is a co-editor of Semiotexte alongside Hedi El Kholti and Sylvere Lotringer, and will hold the Mary Routt Chair of Writing at Scripps College in 2019.

Melissa Febos is the author of the memoir, Whip Smart, and the essay collection, Abandon Me. She serves on the Board of Directors for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, and is Associate Professor of Creative Nonfiction at Monmouth University and MFA faculty at the Bennington Writing Seminars.


Twitter Username: melissafebos

Website: melissafebos.com

Lacy M. Johnson is a Houston-based professor, curator, activist, and is author of the essay collection The Reckonings, the widely-acclaimed memoir The Other Side, and Trespasses: A Memoir. She teaches creative nonfiction at Rice University.


Twitter Username: lacymjohnson

Website: www.lacymjohnson.com

Kiese Laymon is a black southern writer, born and raised in Jackson, He is a Professor English and Creative Writing at University of Mississippi and is the author of Long Division and How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America. His memoir Heavy is forthcoming from Scribner in October 2018.

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S255. The New Speculative: Writing Between Labels, Identities, Borders, & Bodies. (, , , ) Mainstream literary and poetic institutions struggle to fully conceptualize the trans/nonbinary protagonist or the significance of work that does not prioritize white bodies, even as calls for diversity in literature are expanding representation. Panelists push past tokenizing tropes and sidekicks to explore writing in between traditional margins. We discuss destabilizing literary convention, production, readership, form, and interpretation in order to tell more honest, nuanced stories.

Everett Maroon is a memoirist, humorist, and fiction writer. He is a member of the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association and was a finalist in their 2010 literary contest for memoir. Everett is the author of a memoir, Bumbling into Body Hair, and a young adult novel, The Unintentional Time Traveler.


Twitter Username: everettmaroon

Website: www.transplantportation.com

Trace Peterson is a trans woman poet critic. Author of the poetry collection Since I Moved In, she is also founding editor/publisher of EOAGH Books, which has won two Lambda Literary Awards, and coeditor of the anthology Troubling the Line, which was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in 2014.


Twitter Username: tracepeterson

Website: http://eoagh.com

Amir Rabiyah is author of the poetry book Prayers for My 17th Chromosome, and coeditor of Writing the Walls Down: A Convergence of LGBTQ Voices. A VONA fellow, their writing appears in Mizna; The Asian American Literary Review and Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics.


Twitter Username: dandysquid

Website: www.amirrabiyah.com

Ashley Young is a Black, Queer and genderqueer, poet, writer, tarot reader, and witch. They are a contributor to GO Magazine and have been featured in three anthologies. They are currently working on their first novel, an Audre Lorde-inspired biomythography, as well as a collection of poetry.

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

S256. Property of the Imagination: Caribbean Literature in Translation, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , , , ) Linguistically and culturally diverse, Caribbean literatures have developed out of shared but fragmented histories of colonialism, slavery, migration, and syncreticism. While these countries are geographically close to the US, they remain underrepresented in international literature. Four translators of writers from Puerto Rico, Cuba, Martinique, and Haiti share their translations and speak about what has drawn them into the luminescent world of Caribbean writing.

Michael Holtmann is the director of the Center for the Art of Translation and publisher of Two Lines Press. He serves on the board of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) and the international programming committee of the Bay Area Book Festival.


Twitter Username: michaelholtmann

Aaron Coleman is the author of Threat Come Close and St. Trigger, a chapbook that won the 2015 Button Poetry Prize. A Fulbright Scholar, Cave Canem fellow, and ALTA's 2017 Jansen Memorial Fellow, Aaron is currently a PhD student in Comparative Literature at Washington University in St. Louis.