2019 AWP Conference Schedule

The  #AWP19 Conference & Bookfair in Portland, Oregon’s schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. Visit the offsite event schedule for a listing of literary events taking place throughout the Portland area during our conference.

A version of the schedule accessible to screen readers is also available.

Please note that your personalized schedule on the AWP website can be saved and printed, but it cannot be transferred to the digital conference app because the two systems are independent.

 

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Friday, March 29, 2019

7:30 am to 8:45 am

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F101. Sober AWP. Daily 12-Step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Registration Area, Exhibit Hall A, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F102. Conference Registration, Sponsored by Butler University MFA in Creative Writing. Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located XX of the Oregon Convention Center, Level 1. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement registrations.

8:00 am to 10:30 pm

Near A103, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F103. Mamava Lactation Suite 1. Mamava lactation suites are located outside of the A and E meeting rooms on Level 1 of the Oregon Convention Center. All Mamava suites come with a Bluetooth SmartLock that syncs with Mamava’s mobile app. You may also request a door code for entry in the Administration Office on Level 2 and by calling 503-235-7575.

Near E148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F104. Mamava Lactation Suite 2. Mamava lactation suites are located outside of the A and E meeting rooms on Level 1 of the Oregon Convention Center. All Mamava suites come with a Bluetooth SmartLock that syncs with Mamava’s mobile app. You may also request a door code for entry in the Administration Office on Level 2 and by calling 503-235-7575.

8:15 am to 8:45 am

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F104B. Narrative Healing: Meditation. () Open to all! Start the day tapping inward to open up your senses and attune your attention for the day ahead. This mindfulness meditation series will focus on breath and body awareness. Comfortable clothing encouraged. Featuring publishing professional and mindfulness meditation teacher Lisa Weinert and others.

Lisa Weinert is passionate about powerful voices and the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She has worked with authors as a publicist, editor, and agent for fifteen years and is the creator of the debut annual Program in Narrative Medicine at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

C127, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F105. Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography. () Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a third year at AWP, photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high res for $85. (Conference discount: sessions usually priced at $350.) Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required.

Adrianne Mathiowetz is a Boston-based portrait and editorial photographer. She is a Spring 2010 photo graduate of The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Wired, and Entertainment Weekly, amongst others. She lives for the in-between moments, and loves to take photos of costume changes, interruptions, and delays.

8:00 am to 6:00 pm

VIP Suite D, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F106. Dickinson Quiet Space. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. Please consult the map in the conference planner for detailed location. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." —Emily Dickinson

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

F107. Bookfair Concessions, Bar, & Lounge. Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Oregon Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference planner or mobile app for location details.

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F108. AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Wilkes University Low-Residency MA/MFA in Creative Writing. With more than 700 literary exhibitors, the AWP Bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

Booth 2041, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F109. Writer to Writer Mentorship Program Booth. AWP's Writer to Writer Mentorship Program matches new writers with published authors for a three-month series on the writing life. Now in its fifth year, Writer to Writer is open to all members, but we particularly encourage applications from those writers who have never been associated with an MFA program and those writing from regions, backgrounds, and cultures that are typically underrepresented in the literary world. To learn more, visit AWP’s Bookfair booth, where you will be able to talk with past program mentors and mentees. Diane Zinna, the program’s director, will also be there to answer your questions.

D130, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F110. Traveling Stanzas: Poets for Science. The Wick Poetry Center’s “Traveling Stanzas: Poets for Science” exhibit features twenty art banners designed with science-themed poems curated by Poets for Science founder Jane Hirshfield, as well as interactive writing tools to inspire meaningful discourse at the intersection of science and creativity. Visitors will get a chance to engage with Emerge™ and Thread™, the Wick Center’s apps that prompt users to create erasure poetry in conversation with scientists. This ongoing interdisciplinary project began as a featured exhibit at the 2017 March for Science on the National Mall. More information can be found at the Poets for Science website at http://science.travelingstanzas.com/.

9:00 am to 10:00 am

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F111. Yoga for Writers. (Alysia Sawchyn) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

9:00 am to 10:15 am

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F112. Creating Space for Translation: Writers Workshops, MFAs, and the Academy. (, , , , ) This panel gathers together specialists in establishing literary translation writers workshops, MFA programs, and academic tracks. We will address both theoretical and practical issues, including distinguishing translation as a literary art and ensuring its visibility, how to foster translators/authors/co-creators, and what emerging translators need to learn to build a portfolio of literary translations to launch their careers.

Katherine M. Hedeen is Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. She has published over twenty books of Spanish and Spanish American poetry in translation. She is Translation Editor at the Kenyon Review and a two-time recipient of a NEA Translation Project Grant.


Twitter Username: kmhedeen

Aron Aji is the Director of MFA in Literary Translation. He has translated works by Bilge Karasu, Murathan Mungan, Elif Shafak, Latife Tekin, and other Turkish writers, including three book-length works by Karasu: Death in Troy; The Garden of Departed Cats, (2004 National Translation Award); and A Long Day’s Evening

Suzanne Jill Levine is Director of Translation Studies at the University of California and noted translator of Latin American literature by writers such as Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Adolfo Bioy Casares and Manuel Puig. Her books include The Subversive Scribe:Translating Latin American Fiction.

Pedro Serrano has published five books of poetry. He edited and translated La generación del cordero, a bilingual anthology of Contemporary British Poetry. He received the Guggenheim Fellowship. He teaches Poetry and Translation at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and he is the editor of Periódico de Poesía.

Elizabeth Lowe, founder of the University of Illinois Center for Translation Studies, is professor in the New York University M.S. in Translation. She translates fiction from Spanish and Portuguese to English. Elizabeth is translation editor for fiction at Kenyon Review and on the board of Delos.


Twitter Username: eslowe

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F113. She-Radical: Emotional Ally vs. Emotional Labor. (, , , , ) QTPOC often shoulder the bulk of emotional labor in classrooms, boardrooms, in academic and other professional settings. How can QTPOC writers, artists, and educators thrive in their professional worlds, in ways that acknowledge the struggles of their colleagues and mentees, while simultaneously asserting and prioritizing one’s own personal desires vital to nurturing one’s craft? How can speculative fiction, poetry, and translation inform the roles of mentors in interdisciplinary settings?

Carolina De Robertis is the award-winning author of three novels, including The Gods of Tango, as well as editor of the activist anthology Radical Hope. Her books have been translated into seventeen languages. She teaches fiction and literary translation at San Francisco State University.


Twitter Username: caroderobertis

Website: www.carolinaderobertis.com

Soma Mei Sheng Frazier recently served as a San Francisco Library Laureate. Her award-winning fiction chapbooks earned praise from Nikki Giovanni and others. Frazier’s writing has placed in competitions offered by HBO, Zoetrope: All-Story, Glimmer Train and more. Recent work is available in ZYZZYVA.


Twitter Username: somameisheng

Website: http://enizagam.org

Carson Beker is a writer and storyteller, cofounder of The Escapery Writing Unschool, a Lambda Fiction Fellow, and Tin House Fiction Scholar. Their plays have been produced in the Bay Area, and their stories have appeared in Foglifter (Pushcart nominee), Gigantic Sequins, and Bourbon Penn.


Twitter Username: carsonbeker

Ashley Davis is a black queer womxn poet educator. Ashley was a part of the VONA 2017 cohort facilitated by Patricia Smith, was a part of the 2016 Finalist team "House Slam" at the National Poetry Slam, and was a finalist for the 2016 National Underground Individual Poetry Competition.


Twitter Username: ashleydavisart

Nancy Au’s stories appear in Tahoma Literary Review, Lunch Ticket, The Pinch, among many others. She teaches creative writing to biology majors at CSU Stanislaus. Her flash fiction is included in Best Small Fictions 2018. Her full-length collection of short stories is forthcoming.

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F114. The Legacy of Angels in America. (, , , , ) Twenty-five years after Tony Kushner's Angels in America began its ascent into the canon, this panel will look at what this monumental play has to offer readers, students, and audiences in 2019. Is its portrait of an oppressive, right-wing America still relevant? Do its characters feel fresh, or like the very stereotypes they were once meant to subvert? Does its treatment of race and gender stand up to scrutiny? A panel of journalists, academics, and theater-makers debate the Great Work.

Dan Kois is an editor at Slate. He is the co-author, with Isaac Butler, of The World Only Spins Forward, an oral history of Angels in America, published by Bloomsbury. How to Be a Family, his memoir about parenting around the world, will be published by Little, Brown in 2019.


Twitter Username: dankois

Website: http://www.dankois.com

Brian Eugenio Herrera is Associate Professor of Theater at Princeton University. His first book Latin Numbers: Playing Latino in Twentieth-Century U.S. Popular Performance was awarded the George Jean Nathan Prize for Dramatic Criticism.


Twitter Username: stinkylulu

Deborah R. Geis is Professor of English at DePauw University, where she specializes in drama. Her books include Postmodern Theatric(k)s; Suzan-Lori Parks; and the anthologies Considering MAUS and Beat Drama. She is coeditor with Steven F. Kruger of Millennium Approaches: Essays on Angels in America.

Steven W. Thrasher will become the inaugural Daniel H. Renberg Chair at Northwestern University in 2019. He is currently completing his PhD in American Studies at New York University. Thrasher's writing is regularly published in the Guardian, New York Times, BuzzFeed, and Esquire.


Twitter Username: thrasherxy

Isaac Butler is a writer and theatre director. He is the coauthor, with Dan Kois, of The World Only Spins Forward: The Ascent of Angels in America. His writing has appeared in Slate, New York, The Village Voice, American Theatre and others.


Twitter Username: parabasis

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F115. Salvadoran Poets, American Letters. (, , , , ) Twenty-five years after the peace accords ended the civil war in El Salvador, five American published, Salvadoran born and Salvadoran-American poets discuss what might be termed a Salvi Poetics. The authors engage with personal histories and writerly dilemmas, or in which ways their subjectivity is embodied in their craft choices. Topics include: war and post-war identities, linguistic alliances, cultural affinities, resistance and appropriation, syntactic ambiguity and border crossings.

William Archila is the author of The Art of Exile, which won an International Latino Book Award, and The Gravedigger’s Archaeology, which won the Letras Latinas/Red Hen Poetry Prize. He has an MFA from the University of Oregon. He was featured in Spotlight on Hispanic Writers, Library of Congress.

Claudia Castro Luna is Washington State Poet Laureate. She served as Seattle's first Civic Poet (2015–2017), has published a chapbook, This City, and a full collection of poems, Killing Marias. She also writes nonfiction. Her work has been published widely.


Twitter Username: ClaudiaC_L

Jose B. Gonzalez is the author of Toys Made of Rock and When Love Was Reels. He is the coeditor of Latino Boom: An Anthology of U.S. Latino Literature. His poetry has been anthologized in the Norton Introduction to Literature, The Wandering Song, and Theatre Under my Skin.


Twitter Username: josebgonzalez

Website: josebgonzalez.com

Leticia Hernández-Linares is the author of Mucha Muchacha, Too Much Girl and editor of The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the United States. Widely published, her work appears in Pilgrimage and Huizache. She teaches in Latinx Studies at San Francisco State University.


Twitter Username: joinleticia

Alexandra Lytton Regalado is co-founder of Kalina press based in El Salvador and she is author, editor, and/or translator of more than ten Central American-themed books including Vanishing Points and Theatre Under My Skin. Her poetry collection, Matria, is the winner of the St. Lawrence Book Prize.


Twitter Username: kalinaeditorial

Website: www.alexandralyttonregalado.com

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F116. So You’ve Got a Book Deal – Now What? How to Make the Best Use of Pre-launch. (, , , , ) Once the honeymoon of a book deal is over and edits are completed, authors are often confused about how to most effectively spend the months prior to their book’s launch. There are marketing strategies to evaluate, publicity opportunities to pitch, as well as the ever-important work of social media and real-life networking. This panel will empower writers to be publication stakeholders, as well as offer creative ideas and strategies for navigating this exciting and sometimes overwhelming time.

Hafizah Geter's poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in The New Yorker, McSweeney's, Tin House, Boston Review, Gulf Coast, Narrative Magazine, among others. On the board of VIDA, she is an Editor at Little A from Amazon Publishing.


Twitter Username: RhetoricAndThis

Nancy Rommelmann's latest book is To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder. Her articles, book reviews, and essays appear in the Wall Street Journal, the LA Weekly, the New York Times, and other publications. She lives in Portland, Oregon, and New York City.


Twitter Username: nancyromm

Website: www.nancyromm.com

Neal Thompson is a journalist and the author of five books, including A Curious Man, Driving with the Devil, and the 2018 memoir Kickflip Boys. Thompson manages the Amazon Literary Partnership; he previously ran Amazon's Best Books of the Month program and co-owned the Amazon Book Review blog.


Twitter Username: nealthompson

Website: www.nealthompson.com

Lucy Silag is publicity lead at Little A, the literary fiction and nonfiction imprint of Amazon Publishing. She has an MFA in fiction from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and she is also the author of the Beautiful Americans trilogy of YA books.


Twitter Username: lucysilag

Cinelle Barnes, a memoirist, essayist, and educator, has received fellowships from Kundiman and VONA, and she is the writer-in-residence at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art. Her writing has appeared in Catapult, Literary Hub, and Buzzfeed, among others. Monsoon Mansion was her debut memoir.

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F117. Unspoken Intimacies: On Male Friendship, Romance, and Everything in Between. (, , , , ) What responsibility do male authors have in disrupting the patriarchy? How can literature take aim at toxic masculinity? This panel brings together five prose writers whose work challenges masculine norms by engaging with male intimacy and vulnerability to reimagine cultural possibilities. Panelists will discuss craft techniques in fiction and nonfiction, as well as the ethical necessity of portraying intimacy between men in literature.

Alex McElroy’s writing appears in Tin House, The Atlantic, the Kenyon Review Online, Georgia Review, New England Review, and elsewhere. He is the author of the chapbook Daddy Issues, and he is currently fiction editor for Gulf Coast.


Twitter Username: abmcelroy1

Cheston Knapp is the author of Up Up, Down Down and managing editor of Tin House magazine.

Brandon Taylor is the associate editor of Electric Literature's Recommended Reading and a staff writer at Literary Hub. His writing has received fellowships from Lambda Literary, Kimbilio Fiction, and the Tin House Summer Writer's workshop. He is a fiction MFA student at the Iowa Writer's Workshop.


Twitter Username: brandonlgtaylor

Garth Greenwell's first novel, What Belongs to You, won the British Book Award for Debut of the Year, was longlisted for the National Book Award, and was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the LA Times Book Prize. He is the 2018–19 Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: GarthGreenwell

Maurice Carlos Ruffin is a recipient of an Iowa Review Award in fiction. His work has appeared in Virginia Quarterly Review, AGNI, Kenyon Review, and Massachusetts Review. His debut novel, We Cast A Shadow, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: mauriceruffin

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F118. Rewriting History: Why It's Not Okay to Fictionalize Our Memories. (, , , ) Every so often, literary scandals seem to surface, particularly when it comes to memoirs. Is there an unspoken code of ethics that exists for memoirists and essayists? Or is it something deeper, something psychological that gives birth to the betrayal we feel upon discovering that a nonfiction writer has invented a character, setting, or memory? In this panel, nonfiction writers discuss the difficulty in cultivating memories while managing this genre’s ethical demands and expectations.

Mia Herman is the Outreach Director and Creative Nonfiction editor for F(r)iction. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Hofstra University, and her poems and essays have appeared in numerous publications.


Twitter Username: MiaMHerman

Patricia Horvath's memoir All the Difference explores the relationship between disability and self-identity. She is a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in both fiction and creative nonfiction, and her work has been published widely in literary journals.

Lee Gutkind, founding editor of Creative Nonfiction magazine, is the author or editor of many books, including Many Sleepless Nights: The World of Organ Transplantation and Stuck in Time: The Tragedy of Childhood Mental Illness. He is Distinguished Writer in Residence at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: leegutkind

Sarah Gerard is the author of the essay collection Sunshine State, a New York Times critics' choice, and the novel Binary Star, a finalist for the Los Angeles Times' first fiction prize. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Granta, The Baffler, Vice, and elsewhere. 


Twitter Username: sarahnumber4

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F119. Having It All: Writing and Solo Parenting. (, , , , ) Whether a solo parent by choice or by chance, writing while solo parenting can be isolating, which means that questions about how to serve both passions well—our writing and our children—are difficult to ask, share, and explore. These panel members will discuss how to overcome the biggest challenges to productivity; how our lives as solo parents affect what we write, and the ethical questions that arise as we write about our lives, which often means writing about our children.

Debra Monroe has written four books of fiction and two memoirs. Her work has appeared in The New York TimesGuernicaSalonHobartSouthern ReviewGeorgia ReviewRumpus, and been cited in Best American Essays. She won the Flannery O'Connor Award and teaches in the MFA Program at Texas State University.

Sophia Shalmiyev is a Portland-based writer and a Portland State University MFA graduate. Her work has appeared in Electric Literature, the Seattle Review of Books, Portland Review, Entropy, and Vela. Shalmiyev's debut memoir, Mother Winter, is about emigration, motherlessness, and feminism.


Twitter Username: sshalmiyev

Alison Stine is the author of three poetry books: Wait, winner of the Brittingham Prize; Ohio Violence, winner of the Vassar Miller; and Lot of My Sister, along with the novel Supervision and the novella The Protectors. She has received NEA, Wallace Stegner, and Ruth Lilly fellowships.


Twitter Username: alisonstine

Website: http://www.alisonstine.com

Melissa Stephenson’s poetry, nonfiction, and fiction have appeared in publications such as the Washington Post, The Rumpus, and ZYZZYVA. Her forthcoming memoir, Driven, deals with growing up in the Midwest and surviving her only sibling's death. 


Twitter Username: melstephenson17

Emily Withnall is a freelance writer and editor. Her work has appeared in the Kenyon Review, The Rumpus, and Lunch Ticket, among other publications. She is at work on a book about domestic violence and hydraulic fracturing. Emily is the queer solo mom to a tween and teen. 


Twitter Username: emilywithnall

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F120. Dystopias and Utopias in Contemporary Asian American Literature. (, , , ) Ted Chiang writes in Story of Your Life: "Despite knowing the journey and where it leads, I embrace it and welcome every moment." Despite Chiang's renown, little attention has been paid to dystopian and utopian visions in Asian American works, particularly by women. Four writers examine the speculative impulse present in literature that on its face is about contemporary political events, combining brief readings, a Q & A on cross-genre literary work and craft, and an audience writing exercise.

Chaya Bhuvaneswar

Jimin Han is the author of the novel, Small Revolution. Her work appears in Platypus's digital shorts series, NPR's Weekend America, Poets & Writers Magazine, Hyphen Magazine, and the Rumpus, among others. She teaches at The Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College.


Twitter Username: jiminhanwriter

Website: Tumblr.com/blog/notesfromstonebarn.

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the novel, The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, A Haven. Her short stories have appeared in Black Warrior ReviewTriQuarterly, and Kenyon Review Online, among others. She is a PhD candidate in creative writing at the University of Denver.


Twitter Username: thiriimkm

Anita Felicelli is the author of a poetry collection, Letters to an Albatross, and the short story collection Love Songs for a Lost Continent, which won the 2016 Mary Roberts Rinehart Fiction contest. She graduated from UC Berkeley and UC Berkeley Law School.


Twitter Username: anitafelicelli

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F121. Transmogrification of the Transgender Narrative: Cunting-up Trans Nonfiction. (, , , , ) Toward an expansion of possibilities for trans nonfiction through the investigation of process, praxis, and the generously assumed audience, several trans nonfiction writers will discuss writing beyond the transition narrative in an experimental homage to Dodie Bellamy's cunt-ups, where the remarks of each panelist are taken up at random; allowing the conversation to transcend narrative binaries, and to challenge notions of authorship, expertise, and the myth of a single trans story.

Cooper Lee Bombardier's writing is published in Foglifter, Put A Egg On It, The Kenyon Review, CutBank, Nailed Magazine, and The Rumpus; and in the Lambda Award-winning anthology The Remedy, as well as in Meanwhile, Elsewhere, winner of the 2018 American Library Association Stonewall Book Award.


Twitter Username: CooperLeeB

Website: www.cooperleebombardier.com

Brook Shelley's writing has appeared in The Toast, Lean Out, Transfigure, and the Oregon Journal of the Humanities. She speaks at conferences on queer and trans issues and memory.


Twitter Username: Brookshelley

Colette Arrand founded and edits The Wanderer. She is the author of Hold Me Gorilla Monsoon (OPO Books and Objects, 2017) and To Denounce the Evils of Truth. She is a student at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: colettearrand

Ryka Aoki is the author of the performance, prose, and poetry collection, Seasonal Velocities, a Lambda Literary Award Finalist; the novel, He Mele a Hilo: A Hilo Song; and the poetry book, Why Dust Shall Never Settle Upon This Soul. She is a professor at Santa Monica College and Antioch University.


Twitter Username: ryka_aoki

Website: www.rykaryka.com

Grace Reynolds is a writer, photographer, and filmmaker. Her work deals with the politics of identity, the friction of rubbing against societal expectations, and the resulting fallout. She is currently working on a poetry anthology.

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F122. Dear America: A Terrain.org Reading in Response to a Changing Landscape. (, , , , ) Two weeks after the 2016 presidential election, Terrain.org began its Letter to America series. This reading features some of the letters, poems, and more from the 170+ that have so far appeared in a series that presents a diverse literature of resistance and answers the call articulated in Alison Hawthorne Deming’s cris de coeur: “Be artful, inventive, and just, my friends, but do not be silent.”

Derek Sheffield's book of poems is Through the Second Skin. He has been awarded fellowships from Sustainable Arts and Artist Trust. The poetry editor of Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments, he teaches poetry and ecological writing at Wenatchee Valley College.


Twitter Username: terrainorg

Website: https://www.wvc.edu/about/faculty-directory/derek-sheffield.html

Victoria Chang's book, Barbie Chang, was published by Copper Canyon Press. The Boss won the PEN Center Literary Award and a California Book Award. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, Sustainable Arts Fellowship, and Alice Fay di Castnola Award. She teaches at Antioch's low-res program in L.A.


Twitter Username: VChangPoet

Website: www.victoriachangpoet.com

Joe Wilkins is the author of a memoir, The Mountain and the Fathers, and three collections of poetry, including When We Were Birds, winner of the 2017 Stafford/Hall Prize in Poetry from the Oregon Book Award. His debut novel, Fall Back Down When I Die, is forthcoming.

Alison Hawthorne Deming is author of five poetry books, most recently Stairway to Heaven, and four nonfiction books including Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit. She is Agnese Nelms Haury Chair of Environment & Social Justice at the University of Arizona and a Guggenheim Fellow.


Twitter Username: AlisonDeming

Website: www.alisonhawthornedeming.com

Blas Falconer is poetry editor for The Los Angeles Review and teaches in the low-residency MFA at Murray State University. His third poetry collection, Forgive the Body This Failure, was published in 2018. Awards include an NEA Fellowship and the Maureen Egen Writers Exchange.


Twitter Username: blas_falconer

Website: blasfalconer.com

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F123. To my silence, years long: A Tribute to Garrett Hongo. (, , , , ) As a poet, memoirist, essayist, editor, and teacher, Garrett Hongo has been instrumental in transforming the landscape of American literature over the last four decades. Since 1990, Hongo has taught in the University of Oregon's MFA program, where he has mentored countless students and provided a much-needed critical voice. This panel brings together five of Hongo's former students to discuss his work, teaching, and legacy.

Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach is a poet and PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania; she researches American poetry about the Holocaust. Author of the chapbook The Bear Who Ate the Stars, she has held fellowships from Bread Loaf and the Auschwitz Jewish Center.


Twitter Username: julkdas

Jeffrey Schultz is the author of two National Poetry Series selections: Civil Twilight and What Ridiculous Things We Could Ask of Each Other. He is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Pepperdine University.

Major Jackson is the author of four collections, most recently, Roll Deep. A recipient of a Whiting Writer's Award, Pushcart Prize, and Guggenheim Fellowship, Jackson is the Richard A. Dennis Professor at University of Vermont. He serves as editor of the Harvard Review.


Twitter Username: Poet_Major

Website: majorjackson.com

Joshua Robbins is the author of Praise Nothing. He is Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of the Incarnate Word.

Michelle Penaloza is the author of landscape/heartbreak and Last Night I Dreamt of Volcanoes. A Kundiman fellow, Penaloza has been published by New England Review, Pleiades, and Vinyl, with poems forthcoming in Prairie Schooner and Third Coast


Twitter Username: pennyzola

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F124. Each Thread, A Voice: Children's Poetry & The Legacy of John Oliver Simon. (, , , , ) Poet, translator and teacher John Oliver Simon, an instrumental force of California Poets In the Schools will be celebrated through poetry and remembrances by those he mentored, collaborated with and taught for over forty years. Panelists will share their own poetry, and will discuss how poets work with teachers, parents, and children to bring poetry into the classroom and beyond.

Tehmina Khan is a poet who has taught science to preschoolers and English to octogenarians; along the way, she's picked up some new words. She now teaches writing and literature at City College of San Francisco and in San Francisco public schools.

Audrey Larkin is a PhD student in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at UCLA. She is interested in 19th and 20th-century Mexican travel writing and border literature. Her other interests include poetry and literary translation.

Arlyn Miller teaches expressive writing in schools and community venues in the Chicagoland area, working with learners of all ages and abilities. A published writer of poetry, articles, essays, and a mixed media artist, she is the Editor of Poetic License Press and chairs CalPoets Advisory Council.


Twitter Username: PLIncpoetry

Tobey Kaplan, a Cal Poets in the Schools poet-teacher in in the SF Bay Area for over forty years also teaches part-time at several East Bay /SF community colleges. As an education mentor, Ms. Kaplan continues her commitment to the primacy of imaginative language.

Caroline Woods-Mejia graduated from UCSC in 2018 with a BA in Literature and a concentration in Creative Writing. She began writing and translating poetry with John Oliver Simon in the second grade. Now, she continues this tradition by working with students to participate in joyful acts of writing.

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F125. MFA vs LMFAO: Our Nontraditional Paths to Publication (and Yours!). (, , , Lee Herrick, Mark Sarvas) It can sometimes feel like every successful writer went straight from college to MFA to Stegner to book deal. We did NOT do that, but everything worked out in the end. Five successful authors talk about not having an MFA, or getting one later in life (even after publication); how our lives went wide of the traditional path; how we made it all work; and whether that degree, or its absence, matters in the end. We’ll provide resources and advice for those who, like us, are going it alone.

Rebecca Makkai's novels are The Great BelieversThe Hundred-Year House, and The Borrower; her short story collection is Music for Wartime. Her work was chosen for The Best American Short Stories four times, and won a 2016 Pushcart Prize. She is Artistic Director of StoryStudio Chicago.


Twitter Username: rebeccamakkai

Website: www.rebeccamakkai.com

Heidi Durrow is the New York Times best-selling novelist of The Girl Who Fell From the Sky which won the PEN/Bellwether Prize. She is the founder and executive director of the annual film and book festival Mixed Remixed held in Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: heididurrow

Website: www.heidiwdurrow.com

Nayomi Munaweera's debut novel, Island of a Thousand Mirrors, won the 2013 Commonwealth Prize for Asia. The New York Times called it "incandescent." Her second novel, What Lies Between Us drew comparisons to the voices of Michael Ondatjee and Jumpha Lahiri.

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F126. Money Moves & Recruitment Tools: Summer Writing Programs for High School Students. (, , , , ) More and more universities are offering college experience programs and workshops for high school students. Not only is it a way to bring in revenue during the “off time” between semesters, but it is also an effective tool for recruiting prospective students. This discussion-based panel will offer participants the opportunity to brainstorm ideas for summer programs, gain strategies for working with administration challenges, budgets, space restrictions, and faculty recruitment.

Patricia Dunn, MFA, is the Assistant Dean of Grad Studies, Director of the Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College, where she also teaches. She is the author of Rebels By Accident (Sourcebooks Fire). Her writing has appeared in Salon.com, CSM, The Nation, Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women, and others.


Twitter Username: shewrites

Website: patriciadunnauthor.com

Seth Michelson teaches at Washington and Lee University. His most recent books of poetry are Swimming Through Fire (2017) and Eyes Like Broken Windows (2012). He edited Dreaming America: Voices of Undocumented Youth in Maximum-Security Detention (2017), and he has translated eight books of poetry.

Tori Weston is the founder and Assistant Director of the Arts & Communication Pre-College Programs at Emerson College. She received a BFA in Writing and Publishing and an MFA in Creative Writing from Emerson College.


Twitter Username: writergrrl76

Tania Pabón holds an MA in English from the University of Puerto Rico and an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College, where she is an administrator. Her work has appeared in Briller and Gravel, is forthcoming in Pigeon Pages and Breadcrumbs Mag, and was chosen for the AmpLit Fest 2018 Emerging Writer Showcase.


Twitter Username: TaniaPabon

Website: taniapabon.wordpress.com

Sylvia Chan is the author of We Remain Traditional. She serves as court advocate for foster kids in Pima County and nonfiction editor for Entropy, where she curates a domestic violence series. She teaches in the Writing Program at the University of Arizona.


Twitter Username: sylinchan

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F127. A Poet Laureate of Your Own—a How-To Discussion. (, , , ) In 2017, Orlando's arts-friendly mayor decided that the city should have a poet laureate. A committee was formed, including writers and (slam) performers of poetry, college faculty, community arts organizers/administrators, city officials, a publisher, and a librarian. Three of these members share their experience of the process from inception to selection; Orlando's first poet laureate discusses her experience from application to selection to sharing highlights of her first year in "office."

Ryan Rivas is the publisher of Burrow Press. His fiction has been published in Annalemma, Prick of the Spindle, decomP, Paper Darts, and elsewhere, and his work is anthologized in Best American Nonrequired Reading 2012.

Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés is the author of two short story collections—Oye What I’m Gonna Tell You and Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles, as well as Everyday Chica, the 2010 Longleaf Press Poetry Prize. She teaches literature and fiction in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: CeciliaMilanes

Website: www.oyechica.net

Susan Lilley lives and teaches in central Florida. Her work has appeared in American Poetry Review, Gulf Coast, Poet Lore, The Southern Review, and other journals. Her collection of poetry is forthcoming from Burrow Press in 2019. She serves as the first poet laureate of Orlando, Florida.


Twitter Username: SusanLilley7

Vidhu Aggarwal's book of poems, The Trouble with Humpadori, takes mobile forms in video, comics, and performance. She teaches postcolonial/transnational literatures and creative writing at Rollins College.


Twitter Username: vidhuaggarwal

Website: vidhu_aggarwal

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F128. Information to Astonishment—Research as Creative Process in Nonfiction & Poetry. (, , , , ) Conducting research is frequently an integral part of the writing process. But must it always be germane? This panel of mixed-genre writers will discuss the magic that can happen when investigating and integrating obscure, oblique and sometimes irrelevant material, and demonstrate how found material frequently reveals and enhances themes while also impacting form. Participants will walk away with practical strategies for making the research process less intellectual and more intuitive.

Lia Woodall's award-winning essays appear in under the gum tree, Literal Latté, Sonora Review, and South Loop Review. She is an inaugural member of The Book Project at Lighthouse Writers Workshop and experimental reading groups, Salon Denver and Salon Houston. She writes about twin loss and suicide.


Twitter Username: liawoodall

Richard Froude MD PhD is the author of three cross-genre/nonfiction books: Fabric, The Passenger, and Your Love Alone Is Not Enough. He is a psychiatry resident at the University of Colorado and core faculty in nonfiction/hybrid forms at the Lighthouse Writers Workshop in Denver.

Tyehimba Jess's last book, Olio, won the Pulitzer Prize, Anisfield-Wolf, and Society of Midland Authors Poetry Award and recognition from the BCALA. His first book, Leadbelly, won the National Poetry Series. A NEA, Whiting and Lannan Foundation Award winner, he teaches at College of Staten Island.


Twitter Username: TyehimbaJess

Jessica Wilbanks is the author of the memoir When I Spoke in Tongues: A Story of Faith and Its Loss. She has received national awards for her nonfiction, including a Pushcart Prize, the VanderMey Nonfiction Prize, and Ninth Letter’s inaugural creative nonfiction award.


Twitter Username: creativenonfic

Website: http://jessicawilbanks.com

Dickson Lam is the author of Paper Sons: A Memoir. He holds MFA degrees in creative writing from the University of Houston and Rutgers-Newark. Lam is an Assistant Professor of English at Contra Costa College.

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F129. Who’s Got the Power? Enacting Advocacy for Oneself & Others. (, , , , ) Gender, race, class, and ability in professional literary spaces—from K12 to nonprofits, academia to publishing and beyond—undeniably affect how authority is perceived and performed in those spaces. This panel considers how humanities teachers, writers, and scholars can promote greater inclusivity, equity, and professionalism in public and private when it comes to encountering, wielding, and envisioning authority in institutional spaces, with a focus on practical and implementable solutions.

Khadijah Queen is the author of five books, most recently I'm So Fine: A List of Famous Men & What I Had On. Her verse play Non-Sequitur won the Leslie Scalapino Award for Innovative Women Performance Writers. She is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at University of Colorado, Boulder.


Twitter Username: Authorkq

Website: http://khadijahqueen.com

Prageeta Sharma is the author of four poetry collections: Bliss to Fill, The Opening Question, Infamous Landscapes, and the recent Undergloom. She was a recipient of the 2010 Howard Foundation Award. She is a professor of English at the University of Montana.

TC Tolbert’s works of poetry include Gephyromania, I: Not He: Not I, and territories of folding. S/he is coeditor of Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics. Tucson's Poet Laureate, s/he has been a member of Movement Salon, a compositional improvisation ensemble, since 2007.

Michelle Whittaker is the author of the poetry collection Surge. She was awarded a 2017 NYFA Fellowship in Poetry. She is an Assistant Professor in the Program of Writing and Rhetoric at Stony Brook University.

Christina Olivares is the author of No Map of the Earth Includes Stars, the chaplet Interrupt, and a forthcoming full-length volume. She is the recipient of two Jerome Foundation Travel and Study Grants and a LMCC Workspace Residency.


Twitter Username: olivarespoet

Website: http://www.christinaolivares.com

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F131. Sarah Schulman and Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore. (, , ) Two veteran writers read from their newest novels: Maggie Terry by Sarah Schulman, and Sketchtasy by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore. Both are longtime chroniclers of marginalized communities, who have prioritized the preservation of countercultural queer activism in their work. These books explore precarious moments in contemporary history through a spiraling woman protagonist, and investigate the possibility of “correction”—for criminals, addicts, and others pushed to society’s fringes.

Sarah Schulman is a novelist, nonfiction writer, playwright, screenwriter and AIDS historian. Her nineteenth book is Maggie Terry, a novel of murder and intrigue published by the Feminist Press. Recent work includes Conflict Is Not Abuse, Winner of the Publishing Triangle Nonfiction Prize.


Twitter Username: SarahSchulman3

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore received a Lambda Literary Award for her memoir, The End of San Francisco, and her previous title, Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?, was an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book. Her latest title is a novel, Sketchtasy.


Twitter Username: mbsycamore

Jisu Kim is the senior marketing and sales manager at the Feminist Press at CUNY.

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F132. The PushMePullMe of Advising Lit Journals: Publishing While Getting Published. (, , , , ) Five experienced undergraduate literary journal advisors share strategies for providing quality experiential learning opportunities for their students within the editing and publishing field, developing the time-management skills necessary for timely publication, maintaining their own publishing schedule, and leveraging their roles as advisors when it comes to academic appointments, promotion, and tenure.

John Schulze publishes as Penn Stewart and is the author of the novel Fertile Ground and the short story collection The Water in our Veins. He teaches creative writing and advises Voices, an arts and lit mag, at Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas.


Twitter Username: PennStewart

Website: www.pennstewart.com

Pauls Toutonghi's writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Tin House, Granta, the New York Times, Zoetrope, the Boston Review, One Story, and the Yemen Observer. He has published three books.

Daryl Brown is a professor at the University of North Alabama where he serves as faculty sponsor for Lights & Shadows, UNA's literary and art journal. His work has appeared in Creative Nonfiction, UTNE Reader, New Stories from the South, Yemassee, Crab Orchard Review, and The Best American Nonrequired Reading.

Jeff Newberry is the author of a novel (A Stairway to the Sea) and a poetry collection (Brackish). He teaches in the Writing and Communications Program at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, GA. His collaboration with Justin Evans, Cross Country, is forthcoming from WordTech Editions.


Twitter Username: FlaExile

Website: http://www.jeffnewberry.com

Marianne Kunkel is the author of Hillary, Made Up, The Laughing Game, and numerous poems. She is an assistant professor of creative writing and publishing at Missouri Western State University and editor-in-chief of The Mochila Review.


Twitter Username: mariannekunkel

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F133. Text + (Public) Space. (, , , , ) What happens when street becomes page? When text demands bystander become audience? Flyers, pamphlets, posters, graffiti, paste-ups, zines—this panel presents and interrogates ephemeral texts and how they use public space to create community, construct wonder, and promote social justice. Panelists discuss their artistic practices and pedagogy, as well as the challenges and difficulties of the genre.

Emily Dyer Barker’s experimental fiction has been exhibited nationwide and archived in various special collections libraries. She is currently in the PhD program at the University of Utah and the managing editor for Western Humanities Review.


Twitter Username: emidyerbarker

Chaun Webster is a poet and graphic designer whose work draws from an interest in the sign of graffiti, the layering of collage, simultaneity, and the visuality of text. Webster utilizes these methods in investigating race—specifically the instability of blackness and black subjectivities.

Jen Hofer is an LA-based poet, translator, interpreter, bookmaker, and cofounder of Antena, dedicated to language justice and language experimentation. She has published ten books in translation, three books of poetry, and many DIY books. Her books are forthcoming from Litmus Press and Writ Large Press.

A'misa Chiu is an organizer of the Portland Zine Symposium, publisher of the small art press Eyeball Burp, and long time zinester. She is an instruction librarian at Warner Pacific University in Portland, Oregon, and hosts zine making workshop for local community youth.

Alex Khatchadourian is the founder and editor of Amadeus, an arts and culture magazine steeped in community. 


Twitter Username: amadeusmagazine

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F134. Going Long: Editors & Writers of Longform Nonfiction in Conversation. (, , , , ) In an era of quick reads and short attention spans, longform nonfiction is enjoying a resurgence. Our panel of editors and essayists discuss possibilities, challenges, and new outlets for this versatile form. What technical concerns must we tackle, and what distinguishes these long true stories—beyond sheer length? Are there particular subjects that merit a deep dive over brevity? Join editors and writers from True Story, Longreads, and Bloomsbury’s Object Lessons for a lively conversation.

Jill Christman is the author of two memoirs, Darkroom: A Family Exposure (AWP Award Series in CNF winner) and Borrowed Babies: Apprenticing for Motherhood. She teaches creative nonfiction writing at Ball State University.


Twitter Username: jill_christman

Website: www.jillchristman.com

Mike Dang is the editor-in-chief of Longreads and a cofounder of The Billfold.


Twitter Username: reportermike

Hattie Fletcher is the managing editor of Creative Nonfiction magazine and the editor of True Story magazine. She has been a coordinating editor for the Best Creative Nonfiction series and is coeditor, with Lee Gutkind, of True Stories, Well Told: From the First 20 Years of Creative Nonfiction.

Anna Leahy's publications include the nonfiction books TumorConversing with Cancer, and Generation Space; the poetry books Aperture and Constituents of Matter; and the pedagogy book What We Talk about When We Talk about Creative Writing. She teaches at Chapman University and edits TAB.


Twitter Username: AMLeahy

Christopher Schaberg is the Dorothy Harrell Brown Distinguished Professor of English at Loyola University New Orleans, and the author of three books about airports and air travel. He is also the founding series editor of Object Lessons, an essay and book series about the hidden lives of things.


Twitter Username: airplanereading

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F135. Indigenous Womanisms: Decolonization & Na(rra)tivity. (, , , , ) Continually pivoting the micro/meso/macro, weaving histories in their poetry, performance, prose, and multimedia, womanist/queer/trans Indigenous artists, editors, and publishers will discuss the craft of orchestrating interlocking narratives to produce compelling work. Examining their art-making, editing, and publishing, panelists will share techniques of intertwining sovereignty and sexuality, gender and environmental justice, nation and narration, and how they enact the art of decolonization.

Kristiana Kahakauwila, Kanaka Maoli, is author of This is Paradise: Stories, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection. Associate Professor of English at Western Washington University, she was the 2015–16 Lisa Goldberg Fellow at Harvard University's Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study.

Storme Webber, Voices Rising: LGBTQ of Color Arts & Culture founder, is author of the books/CDs Diaspora and Blues Divine and of the performances Buddy Rabbit, Noirish Lesbiana, and Wild Tales of Renegade Halfbreed Bulldagger. Her solo exhibition, Casino, received the James W. Ray Venture Project Award.


Twitter Username: stormewebber

Amir Rabiyah is author of the poetry book, Prayers for My 17th Chromosome, and coeditor of Writing the Walls Down: A Convergence of LGBTQ Voices. A VONA fellow, their writing appears in Mizna; The Asian American Literary Review; and Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics.


Twitter Username: dandysquid

Website: www.amirrabiyah.com

Ahimsa Timoteo Bodhrán, an AWP WC&C Scholar, is a multimedia artist and author of two poetry collections, Antes y después del Bronx: Lenapehoking and South Bronx Breathing Lessons. A widely published nonfiction writer, he is editor of Yellow Medicine Review's international queer Indigenous issue.

No'ukahau'oli Revilla, Hawaiian/Tahitian, is author of two chapbooks, Say Throne and Permission to Make Digging Sounds, the latter in Effigies III. Former Hawai'i Review poetry editor, she is cofounder of Nolu Ehu: A Queer Nesian Arts Collective. Her work appears in Poetry, Literary Hub, and 'Ōiwi.

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F136. Composing an Anthology from Start to Strong Finish. (, , , , ) From proposal to product, editors examine the undertaking of anthology creation, exploring the detours, potholes, and thoroughfares of the process. Panelists discuss the many facets of anthology deliberation: editorial vision and aesthetic decisions; collaborating with authors, publishers, and other editors; marketing, support, and dissemination, including readings, social media engagement, and classroom distribution; and unexpected issues ranging from the legal to the ethical to the practical.

Simone Muench is the author of six poetry books including Wolf Centos and Suture (written with Dean Rader). Co-editor of the collaborative writing anthology They Said and a recipient of NEA, VSC, and Yaddo fellowships, she serves as advisor for Jet Fuel Review and poetry editor for Tupelo Quarterly.

Jason Koo is the author, most recently, of More Than Mere Light and Sunset Park and coeditor of the Brooklyn Poets Anthology. He is the founder and executive director of Brooklyn Poets and an associate teaching professor of English at Quinnipiac University.

 


Twitter Username: jasonykoo

Website: http://jasonykoo.com

Kristina Marie Darling is author of thirty books, including Dark Horse and Look to your Left: The Poetics of Spectacle. She currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of Tupelo Press and Tupelo Quarterly, a columnist at The Los Angeles Review of Books, and a contributing writer at Publishers Weekly.

Kelli Russell Agodon is the author of four poetry collections, the coeditor of Fire On Her Tongue: An Anthology of Contemporary Women Poets, and The Daily Poet: Day-By-Day Prompts For Your Writing Life. She is the cofounder of Two Sylvias Press and the Co-Director of Poets on the Coast.


Twitter Username: kelliagodon

Website: www.agodon.com

Brian Clements is coeditor of Bullets into Bells: Poets and Citizens Respond to Gun Violence and author/editor of a dozen other volumes of poetry and anthologies. 


Twitter Username: bri_clements

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F137. The Life and Legacy of Margaret Burroughs, Artivist. (, , , ) Margaret Burroughs is known nationally and internationally as the founder of two major art institutions in Chicago, and as an artist, teacher, and community organizer. However, her literary work—poetry, short stories, children’s books, essays, news columns, and plays—has been largely overlooked despite an international reputation, including for her poem, “What Shall I Tell My Children Who Are Black?” Panelists include individuals working to carry on her legacy—writer, editor, and publisher.

Mary Ann Cain is the author of South Side Venus: The Legacy of Margaret Burroughs, Down from Moonshine (a novel), and two books of scholarship on writing studies. She is Professor of English at Purdue University Fort Wayne where she teaches fiction, nonfiction, and women's studies.

Jill Petty is a member of the Prison + Neighborhood Arts Project teaching collective, and has worked for South End Press, Equal Justice Initiative, and Ms. She is an acquisitions editor for Northwestern University Press (Curbstone Press).


Twitter Username: OneRedPencil

 Haki R. Madhubuti  is a leading poet and one of the architects of the Black Arts Movement,is. A publisher, editor, and educator, he has published more than thirty books (some under his former name, Don L. Lee).

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F138. Ten Years of Feminist Lit: Moving Beyond Representation. (, , , , ) Paper Darts began ten years ago in Minneapolis. As one of the only women-run lit magazines in the country, Paper Darts represents a unique, independent model in the publishing industry. While always implicitly political with majority women writers, over the years PD has shifted its mission to be explicitly intersectionally feminist. The panel discusses the importance of moving beyond representation by curating content that challenges sexist and racist tropes often perpetuated in indie lit.

Sagirah Shahid is a Black American Muslim poet. 


Twitter Username: sagirahs

Lizzy Shramko is the outreach coordinator at Paper Darts and a communications specialist for justice-oriented nonprofits. She has a graduate degree in gender studies and her writing has been published in Bitch, City Pages, Greenroom Magazine, and more.


Twitter Username: lizzyshramko

Meghan Murphy is currently the Editor-In-Chief of Paper Darts magazine and press.


Twitter Username: cloudcarvings

Website: www.paperdarts.org

Maya Beck is a 2015 Givens Foundation Fellow, 2017 VONA alum, 2017 We Need Diverse Book mentee, 2017-18 Loft Mentor Series Fellow, 2018 Tin House Workshop alum, and Paper Darts Story Editor whose work is published or forthcoming in LitHub, Mizna, PANK, NAT BRUT, Water~Stone Review, and more.


Twitter Username: mayathebeing

Jessica Eckerstorfer is a Filipina American writer, artist, and feminist. She is the current Arts Editor for Paper Darts magazine, and an MFA Fiction candidate at Columbia College. Her professional background is in arts nonprofit education. She firmly believes in arts accessibility.


Twitter Username: jessica_ponders

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F139. Eco-Fabulism: Five Years Later . (, , , , ) The term eco-fabulism—coined five years ago at AWP—has gained urgency amidst record heat, attacks on the EPA, and dying bees. The original panel is back with a new moderator to share how they’ve carried eco-fabulism forward. The panel discusses recent eco-fabulist writing—its crafting, politics, influence, and limitations. They debate eco-fabulism’s efficacy. Are we preaching to the choir or is eco-fabulism doing unique political work to save the world? And most important, what’s next?

Erin Stalcup is the author of the collection And Yet It Moves and the ecofabulist novel Every Living Species. She has taught in New York City, North Carolina, Texas, and Arizona, and is now faculty in the MFA Program in Writing and Publishing at Vermont College of Fine Arts, and Editor of Hunger Mountain. Stalcup cofounded and coedits Waxwing.

Christian Moody’s fiction has been anthologized in Best New American Voices and Best American Fantasy, and he has published stories in Esquire, The Cincinnati Review, The Collagist, Sonora Review, and other literary journals. He's an assistant professor at the Cleveland Institute of Art.

E. Lily Yu received the 2017 Artist Trust/Gar LaSalle Storyteller Award. Her short stories have been finalists for the Hugo, Nebula, Sturgeon, Locus, and World Fantasy Awards and have appeared in Hazlitt, McSweeney's, Boston Review, and Clarkesworld, as well as multiple best-of-the-year anthologies.

Matt Bell is the author of the novels Scrapper and In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods (a finalist for the Young Lions Fiction Award), as well as the story collection A Tree of a Person or a Wall. He teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: mdbell79

Website: http://www.mdbell.com

Tessa Mellas's collection Lungs Full of Noise won the Iowa Short Fiction Award. An Assistant Professor at the University of Maine at Machias, she runs the Maine Writers Series. Her PhD is from the University of Cincinnati. She is working on an eco-fabulist novella in flash and a book of essays.

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F140. This is My Throat: Women Reclaiming Voice and Body in the Age of Silencing. (, , Dominique Christina) Audre Lorde said, “When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.” Four remarkable feminist authors across three genres will read and discuss topics pertaining to restrained embodiments, from the physical bodies of women to the bodies of government and society that work to marginalize them. Hear some of the most dangerous and empowering voices in writing today. 

Rachel McKibbens is the author of three full-length books of poetry: bludInto the Dark & Emptying Field, and Pink Elephant, as well as the chapbook Mammoth. She is a two-time New York Foundation for the Arts poetry fellow and founder of the Pink Door Writing Retreat.


Twitter Username: RachelMcKibbens

Amber Tamblyn is an author, actress, and director who has been nominated for an Emmy, Golden Globe, and Independent Sprite award. She is the author of three collections of poetry including the critically acclaimed Dark Sparkler and the novel Any Man. She writes for the New York Times.


Twitter Username: ambertamblyn

Website: www.amtam.com

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F141. A Reading of Poems of Protest and Peace. (, , , , ) Five poets read from recent work that investigates the boundaries and hierarchies inherent in war, the workplace and social/racial identities. These writers, with perspectives shaped by diverse geographic, aesthetic, racial, gender and generational backgrounds, will read from work that uses the language, craft or form of the poem to penetrate and disturb public discourse and stir a movement towards peaceful coexistence.

Beth Bachmann is the author of three collections of poetry: Temper, winner of the AWP Donald Hall Prize and Kate Tufts Discovery Award, Do Not Rise, winner of the PSA Alice Fay di Castagnola Award, and CEASE, winner of the VQR Emily Clark Balch Prize. She teaches at Vanderbilt University.


Twitter Username: bethbachmann

Website: www.bethbachmann.com

Kyle Dargan has authored four poetry collections, most recently Honest Engine. He has received the Cave Canem Poetry Prize, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and grants from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. He edits Post No Ills magazine and directs American University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: Free_KGD

Website: http://www.american-boi.com

G.C. Waldrep’s most recent books are a collection, feast gently; a long poem, Testament; and a chapbook, Susquehanna. He teaches at Bucknell University and edits the journal West Branch. From 2007 to 2018 he was editor at large for the Kenyon Review.

Emily Jungmin Yoon is the author of A Cruelty Special to Our Species and Ordinary Misfortunes, winner of the Sunken Garden Chapbook Prize. She is a PhD student at the University of Chicago and is the poetry editor for the Asian American Writers' Workshop.


Twitter Username: emilyyoon

Website: http://emily-yoon-poetry.tumblr.com/

Marwa Helal is a poet and journalist whose work appears in ApogeeHyperallergicThe OffingPoets & Writers, The RecluseWinter Tangerine, and elsewhere. She is the author of Invasive Species and the winner of BOMB Magazine’s Biennial 2016 Poetry Contest.


Twitter Username: marwahelal

Website: marshelal.com

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F142. “Writing’s Not A Race”: A Poetry Reading & Discussion. (, , , , ) “[T]he writing will take place slowly—and that’s alright, writing’s not a race,” pronounced a distinguished poet-critic in a recently published book. Five poets read from forthcoming poetry collections that have all been—unapologetically and by design—“in-progress” for ten to fifteen years. Following the reading, the poets will briefly share why this pace of production and publication suits them, offering a perhaps less fashionable but no less valid model and tradition of artistic practice.

Francisco Aragón is the author of Puerta del Sol and Glow of Our Sweat. He is also the editor of the award-winning anthology, The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry. A third book, After Rubén, is forthcoming. He directs Letras Latinas, the literary program at Notre Dame's Institute for Latino Studies.


Twitter Username: fjaragon1965

Website: http://franciscoaragon.net

John Murillo is the author of the poetry collection, Up Jump the Boogie, and an assistant professor of English at Wesleyan University.

Diana Marie Delgado's first poetry collection, Tracing the Horse, is forthcoming. She is the author of Late Night Talks with Men I Think I Trust. She is a 2017 NEA Fellow in Poetry.


Twitter Username: pompomrituals

Website: http://flavors.me/dianamarie

Gina Franco is the author of the poetry collection, The Keepsake Storm. She teaches writing and literature at Knox College in Illinois, and she is an oblate with the monastic Community of St John.

Brenda Cárdenas, Associate Professor of English at University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, has authored the poetry collections Boomerang and From the Tongues of Brick and Stone, and has co-edited Resist Much/Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance and Between the Heart and the Land: Latina Poets in the Midwest.


Twitter Username: CardenasBrendaE

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F143. The Coast Is Queer: LGBTQ+ Voices from the Pacific Northwest. (, , , , ) How does a sense of place influence the work of LGBTQ+ writers? The Pacific Northwest, a.k.a. the queer-friendly “left coast,” is home to a growing community of LGBTQ+ writers, including transplants from farther east. Join multi-genre queer writers from Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia as they read and discuss what draws them to Cascadia, how locale informs their work, and what it means to write in the Northwest, outside major LGBTQ+ hubs of New York City, San Francisco, and Toronto.

Sara Graefe writes plays, films, TV, and creative nonfiction. She is contributing editor of the new creative nonfiction collection, Swelling with Pride: Queer Conception and Adoption Stories. Her ten produced plays include Dreamspyre and Yellow on Thursdays. She teaches in the Creative Writing program at UBC, Vancouver campus.


Twitter Username: sarageez

Ramón Esquivel teaches playwriting and theatre education Central Washington University. Recent premieres include The Hero Twins: Blood Race  and Above Between Below. Published plays include: LunaNasty, and Nocturnal.


Twitter Username: Bub1974

Website: https://www.dramaticpublishing.com/authors/profile/view/url/ramon-esquivel

Kate Gray’s novel-in-progress smashes Sylvia Plath against Maryanne Buckley, a fictional sister of William F. Buckley, Jr., in 1953. Kate’s first novel, Carry the Sky, stares at bullying without blinking. She is the author of three poetry collections. Her passion comes from coaching writers in PDX.


Twitter Username: dangpoet

Michael V. Smith teaches in the interdisciplinary dept of Creative Studies at University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus. He is the author of six books: two novels, three poetry books, and the Lammy-nominated memoir My Body Is Yours. His short films have toured international festivals, including the BFI and Lincoln Center.


Twitter Username: MichaelVeeSmith

Website: www.michaelvsmith.com

Carol Guess is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry and prose, including Tinderbox Lawn, Darling Endangered, and Doll Studies: Forensics. She is Professor of English at Western Washington University, where she teaches Creative Writing and Queer Studies.

10:30 am to 11:45 am

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F145. Epistle(s) as Literary Device: When a Letter is More Than a Letter. (, , , ) Writing to someone—to “you”—is a unique literary device in that it creates immediate intimacy between reader and writer. Writing in epistle spans each genre, manifests in various forms, and allows for a writer’s voice to expand as the intended reader—the “you”—condenses. In this panel, multi-genre authors read briefly from their work, discuss what writing to “you” (is “you” the reader or someone else?) means and the advantages and pitfalls of using epistle as a literary device.

Lisa Allen holds an MFA in creative nonfiction from The Solstice Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program at Pine Manor College, where she was awarded a Michael Steinberg Fellowship for Creative Nonfiction. She is currently pursuing a post-graduate certificate in poetry, also at Solstice.

Randall Horton is the author of three collections of poetry and most recently, Hook: A Memoir. He is a member of the experimental performance group "Heroes Are Gang Leaders," and Associate Professor of English at the University of New Haven.

Jeanie Thompson directs the Alabama Writers' Forum and is poetry faculty at Spalding University low-res MFA Writing Program. Her five poetry collections include The Seasons Bear Us and The Myth of Water: Poems From the Life of Helen Keller. She was founding editor of Black Warrior Review at the University of Alabama.


Twitter Username: Jeanie Thompson

Derrick Harriell is a poet and the author of Cotton, Ropes, and the forthcoming Stripper in Wonderland. He is an Assistant Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi, where he also works as acting director of the MFA program.

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F146. Undocupoets Speak!. (, , , , ) This panel explores the diversity of undocumented poets and their challenges of moving through the literary world—from the deeply internal work of writing from a self whose presence is contested, to applying to institutions that demand proof of residency in order to participate in the poetic discourse. Poets will read their work, and discuss how their status has informed their craft and the particular aesthetic concerns of writing about, through, and in spite of documentation.

Jan-Henry Gray lived undocumented in the US for more than thirty-two years. His work can be found in many journals and is also included in Nepantla: An Anthology for Queer Poets of Color. His first book, Documents, winner of the 17th annual Poulin Poetry Prize judged by DA Powell, is available now.


Twitter Username: iamheretosay

Jesus I. Valles is a queer, Mexican immigrant, educator, storyteller, and performer. Jesus was a semifinalist for the Write Bloody 2016 poetry contest, a recipient of the 2018 Undocupoets Fellowship, and a 2018 Tin House scholar.


Twitter Username: Jesucia

Anni Liu is a writer and translator completing her MFA at Indiana University. She is the recipient of a Katherine Bakeless Nason Scholarship to the Bread Loaf Environmental Conference and her work is published or forthcoming in Waxwing, Pleiades, The Journal, and The Margins, among others.

Esther Lin lived in the United States as an undocumented immigrant for 21 years. She is the author of The Ghost Wife, winner of the 2017 PSA Chapbook Fellowship and the Crab Orchard Review’s 2018 Richard Peterson P. She is a 2017–19 Wallace Stegner Fellow and is an organizer for Undocupoets.


Twitter Username: Whalebaby

Aline Mello is a writer and editor living in Atlanta. She's an immigrant from Brazil and spends much of her time volunteering with immigrant students. She is an Undocupoet fellow and her work has been published or is upcoming in On She Goes, St. Sucia, Saint Katherine Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: thealinemello

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F147. The Invisible Trenches: Gender, Race, and Class in Creative Writing. (, , , , ) With the rise of creative writing spaces centering women/writers of color, are women out of the gender, race, and class trenches? This panel brings together diverse women writers to ask how these social forces continue to shape women's experiences of creative writing from learning in or teaching the workshop to publishing work to administering a program. Where are we today with regard to positions of power and our access to publication? The panelists will share visions and strategies for equity.

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs is the author of Paper Pavilion, winner of the White Pine Press Poetry Prize; Interrogation Room; and the chapbooks Notes from a Missing Person and Necro Citizens (in German edition). She is associate professor of English and directs Race and Ethnic Studies at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: jkwondobbs

Website: www.jkwondobbs.com

Taiyon J Coleman’s writing appears in Bum Rush the Page; Riding Shotgun, The Ringing Ear, Blues Vision, A Good Time for the Truth, How Dare We Write, and other publications. She is a McKnight Foundation Artist Fellow, and she is Assistant Professor of English Literature at St. Catherine University.

Sagirah Shahid is a Black American Muslim poet. 


Twitter Username: sagirahs

Lisa Lewis's books of poetry include The Unbeliever, Silent Treatment, Vivisect, Burned House with Swimming Pool, and The Body Double. She teaches in the creative writing program at Oklahoma State University and serves as poetry editor of the Cimarron Review.

Aimee Parkison is the author of Refrigerated Music for a Gleaming Woman, which won the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Director of the creative writing program at Oklahoma State University, Parkison has published four books of fiction.


Twitter Username: AimeeParkison

Website: www.aimeeparkison.com

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F148. Grandmasters of Flash: They Wrote the Book on It!. (, , , ) You can tell a literary genre has hit the mainstream when it’s deemed worthy of a textbook. This panel features four authors of flash fiction handbooks talking about what techniques they’ve included and how to teach them. They’ll discuss theory and craft for varying audiences, from high school to college and beyond; the future of the genre; and who may write the next great flash fiction.

David Galef has published novels, story collections, poetry books, children’s books, criticism, and Japanese translation. His latest book is Brevity: A Flash Fiction Handbook. He is a professor of English and the creative writing program director at Montclair State University.


Twitter Username: dgalef

Website: http://davidgalef.com/

John Dufresne is the author of two story collections, six novels, and three books on craft, including Flash! A Guide to Writing Very Short Fiction. He teaches creative writing at Florida International University, and is at work on a novel and an illustrated guide to writing fiction.

Nancy Stohlman's books include Going Short: An Invitation to Flash Fiction (forthcoming), Madam Velvet’s Cabaret of Oddities, The Vixen Scream and Other Bible Stories, and Fast Forward: The Mix Tape, a finalist for a Colorado Book Award. She is the creator of the Fbomb Flash Fiction Reading Series.


Twitter Username: nancystohlman

Website: http://nancystohlman.com/

Randall Brown teaches in the MFA Program at Rosemont College, after a three-year stint as its Director. The author of Mad to Live, his short and very short fictions have been published and anthologized widely. He’s also the managing editor of Matter Press and its Journal of Compressed Creative Arts.


Twitter Username: flashfictionnet

Website: http://randall-brown.com

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F149. Fifty Years of First Books. (, , , Leila Chatti) The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary with a reading by former Fellows Ari Banias, Nick Flynn, Ada Limón, and Sam Ross, all of whom came to the Work Center before the publication of their first books. They'll also share memories of their seven months in Provincetown, and discuss the impact residencies and fellowships have had on the crucial early stages of their writing careers.

Sophia Starmack is the Fellowship Writing Coordinator at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.

Ada Limón is the author of five books of poetry, including Bright Dead Things, which was named a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry and a finalist of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award. Her new book The Carrying has been called "her best yet" by National Public Radio.


Twitter Username: adalimon

Website: adalimon.com

Sam Ross is the author of Company. His work has appeared in Tin House, Denver Quarterly, New Republic, Gulf Coast, and other journals. 


Twitter Username: samrawss

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F150. Fake it Til You Make It?: Understanding Impostor Syndrome in Higher Ed. (, , , , ) Impostor syndrome is a phenomenon in which individuals are unable to accept their successes and worry about being outed as a "fraud" or as unworthy. Panelists will discuss how this condition has affected them as educators and as writers, and will address ways they have learned to cope with it. They will also discuss the intersectionality of the syndrome and its prevalence in academia.

Jeremy Griffin received his MFA from Virginia Tech University and is the author of a collection of short fiction titled A Last Resort for Desperate People from SFASU Press. He is a lecturer at Coastal Carolina University, where he serves as faculty fiction editor for Waccamaw: a Journal of Contemporary Literature.

Jenny Yang Cropp is the author of one poetry collection, String Theory, which was a finalist for the Oklahoma Book Award. She is an assistant professor of English at Southeast Missouri State where she also serves as the poetry editor for Big Muddy.


Twitter Username: JennyYangCropp

Brian Druckenmiller earned his MA at Coastal Carolina University and MFA from the University of Central Florida. He is a Professor of English at Valencia College in Kissimmee, FL, and serves as the Assistant Fiction Editor of The Florida Review.


Twitter Username: brdruckenmiller

Jude Marr is a PhD candidate in English (Creative Writing) at the University of Louisiana Lafayette, where she also teaches, with a focus on the poetry of protest. She is the author of Breakfast for the Birds, and her poems have appeared in many journals. She is poetry editor for r.kv.r.y.


Twitter Username: JudeMarr1

Lanessa Salvatore recently earned her MA in writing from Coastal Carolina University, where she also worked as the managing editor for Waccamaw: a Journal of Contemporary Literature. Currently, she is studying poetry as a MFA candidate at the University of Alabama.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F151. MFA to 2YC: Creative Writers Navigating Community College Teaching Careers. (, , , , ) Community colleges represent a large proportion of college teaching jobs, and working at a community college is a source of income for many creative writers. With a diverse range of perspectives from both part-time and full-time faculty, including several from Portland Community College, this panel will offer practical advice for job-seekers and their mentors about this particular field of instructional labor, reflecting upon the rewards, pitfalls, and relative sustainability of the work.

Blake M. Hausman is the author of the novel, Riding the Trail of Tears, a futuristic revisitation of the Cherokee Removal. He is a faculty member in English at Portland Community College, and his writing has appeared in Studies in American Indian Literatures and American Indian Quarterly.

Rebecca Aronson is the author of Ghost Child of the Atalanta Bloom, and Creature, Creature. She was a recipient of a Prairie Schooner Strousse Award and a Loft Speakeasy Award. She teaches writing, coordinates a visiting writers series, and is cofounder of Bad Mouth, a series of words and music.


Twitter Username: rebmarack

Website: http://rebmarack.wixsite.com/rebecca

Jessica Johnson’s In Absolutes We Seek Each Other was an Oregon Book Award finalist. She teaches creative nonfiction, poetry, and environmental literature at Portland Community College.


Twitter Username: jjopdx

Ramiza Shamoun Koya writes fiction and nonfiction, and is the Director of Youth Programs at Literary Arts in Portland, Oregon. Her work has appeared in publications such as Mutha Magazine, Washington Square Review, and Lumina, and she has been a fellow at MacDowell Colony and Blue Mountain Center.


Twitter Username: RamizaKoya

Christopher Rose has received fellowships from Cave Canem and VONA. He serves as department chair for the English department at the Cascade campus of Portland Community College.

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F152. Turning Tragedy into Hope: Teaching Transformation through Writing. (, , , , ) From Jonestown 1978 to Stoneman Douglas 2018, children and teens are all too often the targets of mass violence. Writers and teachers of writing have a crucial role to play in helping this vulnerable population find strength and healing. This panel, which includes survivor-writers, explores strategies for writing that, in the words of progressive educator Herb Kohl, can “push back” against hopelessness and insist that “love too has a central place in even the most tragic of circumstances.”

Judy Bebelaar taught at Opportunity High when Jim Jones sent 120 Temple teens there. Within nine months, most were in Guyana. She wrote with Ron Cabral And Then They Were Gone: Teenagers of Peoples Temple from High School to Jonestown, about those they knew best: the few who lived, the many who died.

John Cobb was born into People’s Temple and was a member until its tragic end in Jonestown, Guyana in 1978. He lost nine members of his family in Jonestown and is currently penning his memoir.

Deborah Layton escaped Jim Jones’ Death Cult, hoping to save the lives of the 900 friends being held against their will. Seductive Poison shows how entrapment can happen to any of us. It has been required reading at universities across the country and has been optioned for film.

Herbert Kohl is an educator, writer and activist. He is author of more than thirty books. His work centers on social, economic, and racial justice.


Twitter Username: don't have one

Jordan Vilchez was a member of Peoples Temple from ages twelve to twenty-one. She processed her experience by attaining her BA in Humanities and MA in Culture and Spirituality. She hosts workshops in visual arts, poetry, and drama. She writes for the jonestown report and is currently working on her own book.

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F153. Expats, Migrants, Nomads: Rethinking the Immigrant Narrative in the 21st Century. (, , , ) Immigration narratives of the 19th and 20th centuries often involve cliché themes such as "the American dream” and rigid immigrant identities. Contemporary first- and second-generation immigrant writers are often more likely to identify with fluid identities—recrossing borders figuratively and literally—rather than with static, one-dimensional states of emigrant/immigrant.This panel reexamines this narrative in the 21st century. Panelists discuss how the immigrant story has evolved and become more complex.

Mieke Eerkens graduated from University of Iowa’s Nonfiction MFA program. She teaches for UCLA Extension's Writers' Program and has published in The Atlantic and Creative Nonfiction, among others. Her book, All Ships Follow Me: A Family Memoir of War Across Three Continents, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: MiekeEerkens

Website: www.miekeeerkens.com

Marie Myung-Ok Lee is the author of the novel Somebody's Daughter and one forthcoming. Fiction has appeared the Kenyon Review, FiveChapters, TriQuarterly, Witness, Joyland, Guernica. Nonfiction has appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, New York Times. She teaches creative writing at Columbia.


Twitter Username: MarieMyungOkLee

Website: https://www.facebook.com/MarieLeeWriter

Huan Hsu the author of The Porcelain Thief: Searching the Middle Kingdom for Buried China. He teaches journalism and creative writing at Amsterdam University College in the Netherlands.

Mexican writer Reyna Grande is the author of the novels Across a Hundred Mountains and Dancing with Butterflies, which received several awards including an American Book Award. Her memoir, The Distance Between Us, is about her life before and after illegally immigrating from Mexico to the US at nine.


Twitter Username: reynagrande

Website: www.reynagrande.com

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F154. Behind the Book: Navigating the Paths to Publication. (, , , , ) In this session, an agent, editor, and a group of authors will discuss publishing paths, choices, and practices. We'll discuss the aspects besides craft that a modern author needs to consider and prepare for when thinking about their own approach, including: developing a sense of community, accepting setback, dealing with feedback, building an audience, preparing to query, navigating publishing options, working with professionals, and identifying lessons learned for subsequent projects.

Chris Mackenzie Jones is the Marketing and Communications Director at The Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis (www.loft.org). Chris received an MFA in poetry from the University of Florida. He is the author of Behind the Book. Find him at @cimjones.


Twitter Username: cimjones

Brian Benson is the author of the memoir ​Going Somewhere: A Bicycle Journey Across America.​ He teaches creative nonfiction at Portland’s​ ​Attic Institute and facilitates free Write Around Portland workshops in prisons, schools, and affordable housing.


Twitter Username: MrBrianBenson

Bao Phi is Program Director of the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis. He has been a spoken word poet since the early '90s. He has performed in numerous venues all over the country, and, as an arts administrator, strives to serve different communities of writers locally and nationally.

Steve Woodward is an editor at Graywolf Press. He has an MFA from the University of Michigan and teaches at Sierra Nevada College.


Twitter Username: snwood

Monika Woods is a literary agent at Curtis Brown, a writer whose work has been published by JoylandCatapultTyrantBrooklyn Magazine, and Lit Hub, and an editor at the Triangle House Review. She can be found @booksijustread.


Twitter Username: booksijustread

Website: www.booksijustread.com

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F155. Writing Outside the Big 5: Practical Tips for Authors Working with Indie Presses. (, , , , ) Authors’ experiences with indie presses can vary greatly. This panel provides insights from authors who have published story collections and novels with indie presses ranging from micro presses to large indie publishers. It focuses on how authors can best utilize the resources of presses with limited staffs and budgets, marketing, working with an editor who is also the publisher, and what to do if a press folds and it is necessary to find a new publisher after a work’s initial release.

Alice Hatcher is the author of the prize-winning novel The Wonder That Was Ours. Her novel research benefitted from the support of the National Science Foundation, German Marshall Fund, Center for European Studies, American Philosophical Society, and North American Conference for British Studies.

Michelle Ross is the author of There's So Much They Haven't Told You, winner of the 2016 Moon City Press Short Fiction Award. A fiction editor of Atticus Review, she was a consulting editor for the 2018 Best Small Fictions anthology.

Dana Diehl is the author of Our Dreams Might Align (2016). Her chapbook, TV Girls, is from New Delta Review. She lives and teaches in Tucson, Arizona.


Twitter Username: Servestofurther

Kim Magowan lives in San Francisco, California and teaches at the Department of Literatures and Languages at Mills College. Her novel The Light Source is forthcoming, and her short story collection Undoing was the winner of the 2017 Moon City Press Short Fiction Award.


Twitter Username: kimmagowan

Angela Mitchell is the author of the short story collection, Unnatural Habitats & Other Stories. She is the director of the St. Louis Writers Workshop.


Twitter Username: amitchellSTL

Website: www.angela-mitchell.com

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F156. Tell Me a Story: Getting a Debut Collection Published. (, , , , ) It’s well known that short story collections can be difficult to publish, yet several avenues exist, as do strategies for making collections stand out. Authors of debut collections discuss the pros and cons of publication through contests, independent publishers, and big five publishers, as well as how to approach each one. The panelists examine ways to make a collection as strong as it can be through, among other things, story selection, sequencing, and themes.

Matthew Lansburgh's collection of linked stories, Outside Is the Ocean, won the 2017 Iowa Short Fiction Award and is a finalist for the 30th Annual Lambda Literary Award and the 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction. He received an MFA in Fiction from NYU.


Twitter Username: senorlansburgh

Kali Fajardo-Anstine's forthcoming story collection, Sabrina & Corina, and novel, Woman of Light, chronicles the lives of Chicanas in the Southwest. Kali has received fellowships from Yaddo, MacDowell Colony, and Hedgebrook. She has an MFA from the University of Wyoming.


Twitter Username: kalifaja

Ivelisse Rodriguez is the author of Love War Stories. She is also the founder and editor of an interview series focused on contemporary Puerto Rican writers. She has taught creative writing at the United States Coast Guard Academy, Borough of Manhattan Community College, and Salem College.


Twitter Username: aracien11

R.L. Maizes is the author of We Love Anderson Cooper, a short story collection coming July 2019, and a forthcoming novel, Other People's Pets. Her fiction has aired on NPR, and her essays have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: RL_Maizes

Website: http://rlmaizes.com/

Clare Beams’s story collection, We Show What We Have Learned, was a finalist for the PEN/Bingham, Shirley Jackson, and the Young Lions Fiction Awards. A 2014 NEA fellow in prose, she has taught creative writing at Carnegie Mellon University and Catapult. Her novel The Illness Lesson is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: clarebeams

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F157. Literary Prequels, Sequels, & Spinoffs: Writing Fiction from Pre-existing Worlds. (, , , , Brittany Cavallaro) This panel concerns books whose genesis and inspiration is in the world of another author’s imagination. These literary prequels, sequels, and spinoffs require a careful balance—honoring the source material while forging into new territory. Each author’s work concerns a different literary source, and each has taken a different approach to writing in another author’s world. The authors will discuss unique strategies for researching, writing, and revising books directly inspired by another author.

Debra Brenegan is the author of the novel Shame the Devil, and her short fiction and poetry have been widely published in national literary journals. She directs the MA writing program at Mount Mary University and codirects Untold Stories, a writing workshop for survivors of gender-based violence.


Twitter Username: dbrenegan

Website: www.debrabrenegan.com

Ed Falco’s most recent book is the poetry collection, Wolf Moon Blood Moon. He is also the author of several novels, short story collections, and plays. He teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Virginia Tech.


Twitter Username: EdFalco

Website: edfalco.us

Mary Anne Mohanraj is the author of Bodies in Motion (a finalist for the Asian American Book Awards), The Stars Change, and eleven other titles. She directs the Speculative Literature Foundation and DesiLit (an Asian American arts org), and is Clinical Assoc. Prof. of English at Univ. of Illinois.


Twitter Username: mamohanraj

Phong Nguyen is the author of The Adventures of Joe HarperPages from the Textbook of Alternate History, and Memory Sickness. He is coeditor of Pleiades. He coedited the book Nancy Hale: The Life and Work of a Lost American Master. He teaches creative writing at the University of Central Missouri.


Twitter Username: AlternaHistory

Website: http://www.phongvnguyen.com

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F158. You Want It Darker: The Care and Feeding of Darker Narratives. (, , , , ) Writers are "supposed" to write likeable characters with narrative arcs that bend toward, if not justice, at least redemption. But what if things instead bend sinister, descend into the dark, and possibly stay there? How does one write narratives that engage with the calamitous, the violent, the pessimistic, the tragic, while avoiding the gratuitous? Five fiction writers discuss narrative techniques gleaned from some of their favorite narratives where the authors grapple with the dark.

C.J. Hribal is the author of two novels and two short fiction collections, including The Company Car and The Clouds in Memphis, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction. An NEA and Guggenheim Fellow, he teaches at Marquette University and for the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers.


Twitter Username: CJHribal

Website: www.cjhribal.com

Vu Tran is the author of the novel Dragonfish. He has received a Whiting Award and an NEA Fellowship, and his fiction has appeared in the O. Henry Prize Stories and the Best American Mysteries. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, he teaches creative writing at the University of Chicago.


Twitter Username: roomwithavu

Website: vutranwriter.com

Nami Mun is the author of Miles from Nowhere and winner of a Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, and the Chicago Public Library’s 21st Century Award. Her work can be seen in The New York Times, Granta, Tin House, and Tales of Two Americas. A former professor, she teaches at The Writers Room in Chicago.


Twitter Username: nami_mun

Goldie Goldbloom’s first novel, The Paperbark Shoe, won the AWP Novel Award. Her short fiction has been published in Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, and Narrative. She teaches at Northwestern and the University of Chicago and is the recipient of NEA and Dora Maar fellowships. She is an LGBT activist.

Dean Bakopoulos is the author of the novels Please Don't Come Back from the Moon, My American Unhappiness, and Summerlong. The recipient of a Guggenheim and two NEA fellowships, he teaches in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College and is writer-in-residence at Grinnell College.


Twitter Username: deanbakopoulos

Website: www.deanbakopoulos.com

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F159. Asian Ghosts. (, , , ) The ghosts of Asia are very different from their Western counterparts. Our panel features poets, essayists, and fiction writers whose work examines these ghosts through various lenses. Topics covered include the rewards and challenges of invoking such ghosts for literary ends, the politics of representation/appropriation, and the relationships between superstition and rationality, folklore and popular culture, language and haunting.

M Thomas Gammarino is the author of the novels King of the Worlds and Big in Japan: A Hungry Ghost Story, as well as the novella Jellyfish Dreams. He teaches literature and creative writing at Punahou School in Honolulu.


Twitter Username: gammarino

Leanne Dunic is a biracial multi-disciplinary artist and musician, and the author/composer of the trans-media work To Love the Coming End. In 2018, she received the Ema Saiko Poetry Fellowship. Leanne leads the band The Deep Cove and is the artistic director a Japanese Canadian arts organization.


Twitter Username: leannedunic

Website: www.leannedunic.com

Zack Davisson is an award winning translator, writer, and folklorist. He is the author of Yurei: The Japanese Ghost and translator of Showa: A History of Japan. He contributed to exhibitions at the Wereldmuseum Rotterdamn and appeared on National Geographic's Okinawa: The Lost Ghosts of Japan.


Twitter Username: zackdavisson

Khaty Xiong is the author of Poor Anima, which is the first full-length collection of poetry published by a Hmong American woman in the United States. A recipient of the MacDowell Colony fellowship, Xiong has been featured in Poetry, the Academy of American Poets, the New York Times, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: khatyxiong

Website: khatyxiong.com

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F160. Ahsahta Press 45th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) Current Ahsahta Press authors celebrate the 45th year of the press with readings from their new books. Ahsahta started out as a (re-)publisher of historically significant poetry of the West, expanded to contemporary Western poetry, and in 2000 became a publisher of surprising and artful experimental work. A small press with a significant voice, Ahsahta remains committed to making relevant, boundary-pushing work accessible to the average poetry reader.

Stephanie Strickland’s eight books of poetry include Dragon Logic and The Red Virgin. She has also published eleven digital poems. Ringing the Changes, a code-generated project for print based on the ancient art of bell-ringing, and How the Universe Is Made: Poems New & Selected are forthcoming.

Cody-Rose Clevidence is the author of Beast Feast, Perverse, All Monstrous, and Flung Throne. They live in the Arkansas Ozarks with their dog, Pearl.

Heidi Lynn Staples is the author of three poetry collections and the memoir Take Care Fake Bear Torque Cake. Coeditor of Big Energy Poets: Ecopoetry Thinks Climate Change, she teaches in the MFA program at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.

C. Violet Eaton is a poet living in Arkansas. He is the author of Some Habits and Quartet.

Susan Tichy’s recent books are The Avalanche Path in Summer, poems on mountains, wildfire, and geology; and Trafficke, a mixed-form meditation on her family’s 200 years of slave-owning. She teaches in the BFA and MFA programs at George Mason University.

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F161. Writing Beyond Borders: Tools and Strategies for Teaching Multilingual Writing. (, , , ) How do we engage all our students’ linguistic selves? In Miami, we are developing a community of practice to deepen multilingual creative writing pedagogy. This panel begins with a few exercises and a brief history (and justification) of multilingualism in the workshop before exploring specific pedagogical practices including the use of language portraits, spoken-word videos, and assorted writing prompts and activities.

Ana Menéndez is the author of four books of fiction: In Cuba I Was a German ShepherdLoving CheThe Last War, and Adios, Happy Homeland! A former Fulbright Scholar in Egypt, she has worked as a teacher and reporter in the US and abroad. She is now a program director at FIU in Miami.

Mia Leonin has published a memoir and four collections of poetry, most recently, Fable of the Pack-Saddle Child, an illustrated, book-length poem. Her poems appears in numerous journals such as New Letters, Prairie Schooner, and Guernica. She teaches creative writing at the University of Miami.

Sandra M. Castillo is a Cuban American writer whose work explores issues of memory, history, gender, and language, reflecting a personal vision tied primarily by history. She teaches at Miami Dade College.

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F162. The Vermont Studio Center 35th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , Susan Steinberg) One of the largest residencies in the world, the Vermont Studio Center has hosted artists and writers from around the world for thirty-five years. Every writing resident is provided with not just room and board but also time and space in which to create. Every writing resident gets a chance to work one on one with a visiting writer. To honor the Center's contribution to the global creative community, a range of former visiting writers read new work in a variety of genres.

Garrett Hongo grew up on the North Shore of O`ahu and in Los Angeles. He was educated at Pomona College, the University of Michigan, and UC Irvine, where he received an MFA. His latest book of poetry is, Coral Road. He teaches at the University of Oregon.

Peter Ho Davies is the author of the novels The Fortunes and The Welsh Girl, and the story collections The Ugliest House in the World and Equal Love. His fiction has appeared in The Atlantic, Harper's, Granta, The Paris Review, Best American Short Stories, and O. Henry Prize Stories.

Rosanna Warren’s most recent books of poems are Departure and Ghost in a Red Hat. She is the recipient of awards from the Academy of American Poets, the American Academy of Arts & Letters, and the Guggenheim Foundation, among others. She teaches at the University of Chicago. 

Sebastian Matthews is the author of a memoir and three books of poetry, most recently Beginner's Guide to a Head-on Collision. He's currently working on the serialized collage novel The Life & Times of American Crow and a book of short essays entitled Beyond Repair: Encounters in a Fractured World.


Twitter Username: SebMatt

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F163. Impact and Empathy: Service-Learning and Creative Writing. (, , , , ) Service-learning and community engagement not only provide student writers with real-world experiences, applied skills, and opportunities for personal growth, but their empathy and perspectives are expanded in ways that transform the creative process. Teachers from various backgrounds and institutions discuss the practical challenges and unique benefits of service-learning in the creative writing classroom, including work with veterans, oceanographers, food co-ops, and refugee organizations.

Holly Karapetkova is the author of two full-length poetry collections, Words We Might One Day Say and Towline. She currently chairs the English department at Marymount University.


Twitter Username: HollyKarapetkov

Jeremy Schraffenberger is editor of the North American Review and an associate professor at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author of Saint Joe's Passion and The Waxen Poor. His other work has appeared in Best Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, Prairie Schooner, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jdschraff

Website: jdschraffenberger.wordpress.com

Terry Ann Thaxton has published three books of poetry: Getaway Girl, The Terrible Wife, and Mud Song, as well as Creative Writing in the Community: A Guide. She is professor of English at the University of Central Florida where she directs the MFA program.


Twitter Username: terryannthaxton

Website: www.terryannthaxton.com

Mary Crockett Hill is author of the young adult novel How She Died, How I Lived. Her second book of poetry, A Theory of Everything, won the Autumn House Prize. Mary's work has been featured on Best of the Net and Poetry Daily. She edits Roanoke Review and teaches creative writing at Roanoke College.


Twitter Username: MaryLovesBooks

Michelle Y. Burke is the author of the poetry collection Animal Purpose. She is an Assistant Professor in the Humanities at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, where she teaches creative writing, literature, and composition.

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F164. Big in Cascadia: Getting Your Title into Pacific Northwest Indie Bookstores, Sponsored by SPD. (, , , , ) Readers in the Pacific Northwest are some of the most aesthetically adventurous in the country, so it's no surprise that the independent bookstores in the region are excellent at stocking small press literature (and also have some of the best poetry sections in the country). Book buyers from Powell's, the Elliott Bay Book Company, Open Books: A Poem Emporium, and King's Books share tips for publishers and authors seeking to place their books on the region's shelves.

Brent Cunningham is the Managing Director at Small Press Distribution, where he has worked since 1999. Along with SPD’s other directors, he has helped more than double sales at the organization over the past decade. He is the author of two books of poetry, Journey to the Sun and Bird & Forest.

Rick Simonson is senior book buyer and codirector of the reading series at Seattle's Elliott Bay Book Company. He is on the boards of Copper Canyon Press and University of Washington Press, and has served as juror for the Story Prize, the DSC South Asian Literature Prize, and the National Book Award.


Twitter Username: kevinsampsell

Website: www.kevinsampsell.com

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F165. Extreme Exposure: Going Public with Deeply Personal Stories. (, , , , ) After realizing that a story must be told, the writer faces difficult questions. What are the rewards for the writer in going public with their most personal experiences? What are the risks? How might these stories benefit individual readers? What is the value for the larger community? The #MeToo movement has demonstrated the power of sharing stories once shrouded in secrecy. In this panel, essayists and memoirists discuss artistic and personal complexities of sharing their most personal stories.

Nancy Hightower is the author of Elementari Rising and The Acolyte. She was the monthly sci-fi & fantasy reviewer for the Washington Post and the art columnist for Weird Fiction Review, where she wrote about the monstrous and grotesque. She teaches at Hunter College.


Twitter Username: nancyhightower

Website: nancyhightower.com

Alison Kinney is an essayist and the author of a book of cultural nonfiction, Hood. She teaches nonfiction writing at The New School and Catapult.


Twitter Username: Alison_Kinney

Doreen Oliver is a writer and performer. Her essays on autism, race, and the chaos and contradictions of parenting have appeared in several national publications, and her award-winning one-woman show, Everything is Fine Until It's Not, premiered Off-Broadway. She is working on a related memoir.


Twitter Username: doreenoliver

Website: www.doreenoliver.com

Julie Metz is the author of the New York Times bestselling memoir Perfection. She has written for The New York Times, Salon, Dame, Slice, Glamour, Huffington Post and more. Julie has been a podcast guest on Dear Sugar Radio hosted by Cheryl Strayed and Women of the Hour hosted by Lena Dunham.


Twitter Username: juliemetzwriter

Website: www.juliemetz.com

Alice Eve Cohen is a solo theatre artist, playwright, and author of two memoirs: The Year My Mother Came Back and What I Thought I Knew. She received her MFA from The New School, where she teaches creative writing and playwriting.


Twitter Username: AliceEveCohen

Website: www.AliceEveCohen.com

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F166. The Year of Publishing Women: Motivating your Marketing with your Values. (, , , , ) This workshop will begin with a presentation about the origin of Kamila Shamsie’s challenge to make 2018 “The Year of Publishing Women,” followed by Not a Pipe Publishing’s experience with the challenge this year, and the difficulties and opportunities that come with taking a moral stand that’s also a marketing strategy. Then, we'll share the results and engage in a group activity to brainstorm ways that other publishers could engage in similar strategies.

Benjamin Gorman is the author of The Sum of Our Gods, Corporate High School, and The Digital Storm. He's also the copublisher at Not a Pipe Publishing in Independence, Oregon.


Twitter Username: teachergorman

Website: www.teachergorman.com

LeeAnn McLennan writes young adult fantasy involving super heroes set in our everyday world. Her stories draw from pop culture, mythology, and urban experiences.


Twitter Username: atticusmcl

Mikko Azul is an award-winning fantasy author. Find Ms. Azul at author events in the Pacific Northwest speaking and promoting The Year of Publishing Women. Ms. Azul has been featured on Portland Today, in Indie Authors Monthly, Sentence to Paragraph, and with fellow women writers in The Oregonian.


Twitter Username: AzulMikko

Sang Kromah is a communications specialist and writer. She has found her niche in Project GirlSpire, a platform where women and girls change the narrative by creating it.


Twitter Username: sangwrites

Heather S. Ransom is a middle school science, creative writing, and careers teacher. She is also the author of YA sci-fi novels Going Green and Greener, and director of Young Willamette Writers, Southern Oregon.


Twitter Username: heathersransom

Website: www.heathersransom.ink

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F167. Local Learning for Literary Translation: Panel Discussion, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , , ) The Northwest Literary Translators is a group of emerging and established translators who meet monthly in Seattle. A panel of core members discuss our model for peer-to-peer support and grassroots education (workshops, guest speakers, readings, and translation slams), events which address both the business and craft of translation. In a field where formal training is rare, expensive, and typically geographically concentrated, our group provides resources for translators of all backgrounds.

Shelley Fairweather-Vega is a professional translator from Russian and Uzbek in Seattle, Washington, specializing in fiction for adults and children, poetry, academic texts, and other creative work. Shelley is the vice president of the Northwest Translators and Interpreters Society.

Katie King is a journalist, literary translator and digital media executive. She was a foreign correspondent in Latin American, launched news web sites for Reuters and translates Spanish fiction and poetry into English. She's currently a PhD candidate in Hispanic Studies at the UW in Seattle.


Twitter Username: ktking

Website: https://translation3point0.wordpress.com/

Timothy Gregory is an ATA Certified Arabic into English translator with over fifteen years of experience. He holds an MA in Translation from UIUC focused on literary translation, teaches translation technology at Bellevue College, and works as an in-house and freelance translator.


Twitter Username: tarjema

Mia Spangenberg is a Finnish-to-English literary translator living in Seattle. A freelance translator since 2016, she has worked in a variety of genres, including crime fiction, children's picture books, and YA fiction, as well as poetry and nonfiction.

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F168. Poets vs. Poets: Dismantling the Bias Against Performance Poetry. (, , , , ) Performance poetry has become a vital space for underrepresented groups to be heard in the literary community. This panel features esteemed poets from the performance poetry community and offers a discussion of the false binary of page versus stage writing while highlighting the amazing work that performance spaces can create for classrooms and communities.

Jasminne Mendez is an award winning author, performance poet and educator. She received her BA in English Literature and her MEd in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Houston. She is currently an MFA candidate in the creative writing program at the Rainier Writer's Workshop at PLU


Twitter Username: jasminnemendez

Paul Tran is a 2018 "Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Prize winner and Chancellor's Graduate Fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. Their work appears in the New Yorker and Poetry magazine. Paul is the first Asian American since 1993 to win the Nuyorican Poets Cafe Grand Slam.


Twitter Username: speakdeadly

Safia Elhillo is the author of The January Children. A Cave Canem fellow, she holds an MFA from the New School. Elhillo has received the 2015 Brunel International African Poetry Prize and the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets. She lives in DC.


Twitter Username: mafiasafia

Denice Frohman is an award-winning poet, performer, and educator. She is a CantoMundo Fellow, former Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion and Leeway Transformation Award recipient. Her work has appeared in Nepantla: An Anthology for Queer Poets of ColorThe Acentos ReviewESPNW, and more.


Twitter Username: denicefrohman

Bill Moran is a performance poet and a former EMT. He was the 2012 & 2013 Austin Poetry Slam Champion and has an MFA from Louisiana State University. He has performed and lectured throughout Europe, Australia, SE Asia, and the US, and he currently teaches for Writers In The Schools.


Twitter Username: goodghostbill

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F169. The Multimodal Classroom: Embracing Creative Writing in the 21st Century. (, , , ) The first creative writing workshops came into being well before televisions were available to the general public. Since then, the number of creative modalities has proliferated far beyond the page, and we now live in a world with the likes of podcasts, memes, comic books, web-series, and slam poetry. This panel will discuss the value of challenging students to produce work on non-traditional modes as well as discuss the functionality of using nontraditional modalities as teaching tools.

Saul Lemerond is a Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Hanover College. He received his PhD in English with an emphasis in Creative Writing-Fiction from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. He has a book of short stories, Kayfabe and Other Stories.


Twitter Username: SaulLemerond

Billie R. Tadros is the author of one book of poems, The Tree We Planted and Buried You In, and two chapbooks, inter: burial places and Containers. She is an Assistant Professor at the University of Scranton, where she teaches in the Department of English & Theatre.


Twitter Username: BillieRTadros

Website: www.BillieRTadros.com

Leigh Camacho Rourks's forthcoming collection of short stories, Moon Trees and Other Orphans, is the winner of the 2018 St. Lawrence Book Award. She is also the recipient of the Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Award and the Robert Watson Literary Review Prize.


Twitter Username: DrScaredWriter

Website: lcrourks.com

Ephraim Scott Sommers is a singer-songwriter and the author of The Night We Set the Dead Kid on Fire, winner of the 2016 Patricia Bibby First Book Award. He received his PhD from Western Michigan University and is assistant professor of creative writing at Winthrop University.


Twitter Username: ephraim_sommers

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F170. Don't You Say a Word: Censorship and Its Silencing. (, , , , ) Censorship today is not exclusive to authoritarian countries, but is rather a global phenomenon. In this panel we examine the history and variety of censorship, the trauma of silencing on writers, translators, readers, and societies. We shed light on how censorship contributes to the invisibility of literary and creative voices of certain cultures from the international stage, and we explore various modes of resistance toward freedom of expression and more equitable exchange of cultures.

Niloufar Talebi is a writer, award-winning translator, and multidisciplinary artist. Projects include: BelongingVis & IICARUS/RISEPersian Rite of SpringFire AngelsEpiphanyPlentiful Peach, and The Investment. Her work is commissioned by Carnegie Hall, Cal Performances, BAM, Stanford, and Kennedy Center.


Twitter Username: NiloufarTalebi

Website: http://www.niloufartalebi.com

Carolyn Forché’s books of poetry include Blue HourThe Angel of History, which received the Los Angeles Times Book Award; and The Country Between Us. She is also the editor of Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness and the coeditor of Poetry of Witness: The Tradition in English 1500-2001. Her honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. She is the Director of the Lannan Center for Poetry and Poetics and holds the Lannan Chair in Poetry at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.


Twitter Username: carolynforche

Website: www.carolynforche.com

Chris Abani's recent books are The Secret History of Las VegasThe Face: A Memoir and Sanctificum. Honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, the PEN/Hemingway Award, an Edgar Prize, a Ford USA Artists Fellowship, and the PEN Beyond the Margins Award. He is Professor of English at Northwestern University.


Twitter Username: chrisabani

Glen Retief's The Jack Bank: A Memoir of a South African Childhood won a Lambda Literary Award. He teaches creative nonfiction at Susquehanna University, where he also directs the undergraduate creative writing major.

Raad Rahman is a writer, journalist, and human rights advocate whose writing includes topics of literature, modern Islam, child rights and reportage on counterterrorism in South Asia. 


Twitter Username: rad_rahman

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F171. The Future is Disabled: A Reading of Disabled Writers on What's Next. (, , , Dorothy Palmer) Disabled writers have been historically ignored, but with the growing awareness of “CripLit” gaining mass and the disability movement demanding “nothing about us without us,” the importance of disabled writers looking forward with their work cannot be overstated. In this reading, four Deaf and/or disabled writers share excerpts from their recently published books or works in progress. The future of disability literature, freed from the shackles of ableism, starts here.

Raymond Luczak is the author and editor of over twenty books, encompassing poetry, fiction, memoir, and drama. Titles include Flannelwood, The Kinda Fella I Am: Stories, and QDA: A Queer Disability Anthology. A Lambda Literary Award finalist, he has been nominated nine times for the Pushcart Prize.


Twitter Username: deafwoof

Website: http://www.raymondluczak.com/

Marlena Chertock has two books of poetry: Crumb-sized and On that one-way trip to Mars. She uses her skeletal dysplasia as a bridge to scientific poetry. Marlena lives in Washington, DC and serves as Communications Coordinator for the LGBTQ Writers Caucus.


Twitter Username: mchertock

Website: http://marlenachertock.com/

Avery M. Guess is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Poetry. A PhD student at the University of South Dakota, her chapbook The Patient Admits is available now, and The Truth Is, a full-length collection of poetry, is forthcoming. She is the assistant poetry editor for South Dakota Review.


Twitter Username: AveryMGuess

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F172. Nonfiction for Kids and Teens: The Art of Writing Fact Not Fake Information. (, , , , ) Five experienced, award-winning writers offer a window into the creation of the vibrant and imaginative nonfiction books being published for teens and kids today. How a writer discovers her subject, chooses a form (from longer narrative nonfiction to graphic nonfiction to picture books) completes the research for both text and image, and persists to the final fact-checking will be featured. The participants share their own work, as well as innovative books that inspire them.

Mary Cronk Farrell writes with passion about little-known women from history who faced great adversity with courage. Her critically acclaimed, award-winning books include Fannie Never Flinched and Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific.


Twitter Username: MaryCronkFarrel

Phyllis Root has written over fifty books for children, including award-winning natural history picture books. She is an instructor in the Hamline University Master of Fine Arts in Writing for Children and Young Adults program.

Claire Rudolf Murphy is the author of eighteen award-winning books of nonfiction and fiction for children and young adults, including her 2018 book Martin and Bobby: a Journey to Justice. Since 200,8 Murphy has taught in the low residency MFAC program for children's writers at Hamline University.

Jacqueline Briggs Martin is the author of twenty children's books, including Snowflake Bentley, which was awarded the Caldecott Medal in 1999. Her most recent books are the Sibert Honor book Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Re-Mix (cowritten with June Jo Lee) and the Green Earth Award-winner Creekfinding.


Twitter Username: jacbriggsmartin

Website: www.jacquelinebriggsmartin.com

Carmen T. Bernier-Grand is the author of eleven books for children and young adults. Three of her biographies have won Pura Belpre honors. Among other recognitions for her contributions to children's literature is the Walt Morey Young Readers Literary Legacy Award.

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F173. CANCELLED: The Future of Books is Feminist. (, , , ) This event has been cancelled per organizer request.

A.N. Devers's fiction, nonfiction, and poetry have appeared in Lapham's Quarterly, Longreads, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Tin House, and elsewhere. She is a contributing editor at A Public Space and the founder of The Second Shelf, an online and pop-up rare bookshop of women's writing.


Twitter Username: andevers

Website: www.andevers.com

Brooke Sylvia Palmieri is a writer, printer, and historian. When she is not writing about the history of radical archives and libraries of the 17th century, she is the editor of Printing History, the journal of the American Printing History Association.

Lucy Scholes is a freelance literary critic and essayist based in London who writes for a variety of publications in the UK and the US. She has a PhD in mid-20th-century British literature and psychoanalytic theory from the University of London, and used to teach at Goldsmiths College.


Twitter Username: LucyScholes

Khaliah Williams is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Her fiction has appeared in the Hawaii Women's Journal, Frontier Psychiatrist, Day One. You can read her nonfiction at BuzzFeed, American Short Fiction, Salon, and Bookcountry.


Twitter Username: khaliahwilliams

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F174. Writing for Social Change: Inclusive and Equitable Organizations. (, ) Writing for Social Change shares how writing in community and investing in organizational supports can create more respectful and just communities. In a time of public xenophobia, racism, white supremacy and all phobias that cast humans aside, we will share how writing in community brings us closer to our common humanity. We will also share how investing in equitable and inclusive organizational fundamentals is essential for literary organizations to achieve outcomes and effect social change.

Elizebett (Liz) Eslinger (MPA, BA English) is Executive Director of Write Around Portland. She elevates underrepresented voices, builds community and creates social change through the power of writing. Liz is a new mom, essayist, poet and editor of Roads Less Traveled and Oregon Ghost Towns series.

Jenny M. Chu is the daughter of immigrant parents from Saigon and Hong Kong, the first of her immediate family to go to college, and the only to graduate. She received her MFA in Writing from the University of San Francisco, and is the Outreach & Volunteer Manager at Write Around Portland.

Portland Ballroom 253-254, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F175. The Sexuality of Textuality. (, , , ) What are narrative strategies that animate the body rather than disappear the body under cover of character, action, and plot? How might sexuality be written as a territory where narrative and the body generate new meanings? Whose body story counts and for what? How is desire endlessly rewriting us? Four writers whose work in multiple genres moves from the body under endless revision address how desire, power, and sexuality write us alive or dead.

Garth Greenwell's first novel, What Belongs to You, won the British Book Award for Debut of the Year, was longlisted for the National Book Award, and was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the LA Times Book Prize. He is the 2018–19 Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: GarthGreenwell

Carmen Maria Machado is the author of National Book Award finalist story collection Her Body and Other Parties. Her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, The New York Times, Granta, Tin House, Guernica, The Believer, McSweeney's Quarterly Concern, Best American Nonrequired Reading, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: carmenmmachado

Website: http://carmenmariamachado.com/

Lidia Yuknavitch is the author of the novel The Book of Joan and the bestselling novel The Small Backs of Children, as well as the the anti-memoir The Chronology of Water. She founded the Corporeal Writing Workshops. 


Twitter Username: lidiayuknavitch

Website: www.lidiayuknavitch.net

Alexander Chee is the author of the novels Edinburgh and The Queen of the Night, and How To Write An Autobiographical Novel, a collection of essays. He is a recipient of the Whiting Writers Award and a NEA in Fiction, and is an associate professor of English at Dartmouth College.


Twitter Username: alexanderchee

Website: http://alexanderchee.net

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F176. That Which Makes Us: New Poetry From Copper Canyon Press. (, , , , Alison Rollins) Join Copper Canyon Press to celebrate highly anticipated new and recent releases, with a reading by four of the most powerful voices in contemporary poetry. Addressing the urgencies and heartbreaks of of our time—gun violence, environmental degradation, institutionalized racism, culture pulled across borders—each author turns and returns through poetry to that which makes us human: desire, love, forgiveness.


Twitter Username: lauruhboocherry

Website: laurabuccieri.com

Natalie Scenters-Zapico is the author of The Verging Cities, and the forthcoming Lima :: Limón. A professor of literature at Bennington College, she has won awards and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, PEN America, and CantoMundo.


Twitter Username: Nascenters

Website: nataliescenterszapico.net

Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of Oceanic, her fourth book of poetry, and a forthcoming book of nature essays. She serves as poetry editor for Orion magazine and is professor of English in the University of Mississippi's MFA program.


Twitter Username: aimeenez

Website: www.aimeenez.net

Arthur Sze is the author of ten books of poetry, including Sight Lines, Compass Rose, The Ginkgo Light, Quipu, The Redshifting Web, and Archipelago. He is the recipient of the Jackson Poetry Prize from Poets & Writers, and he is also a former chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.

Portland Ballroom 256, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F177A. Reinventing the Wheel: The Tradition of Innovation in Poetry. (, , , , ) Sidney famously writes, “And others’ feet still seemed but strangers in my way” (“Astrophel and Stella”). However, one would only need to read Homer, Virgil, and Dante, the letters between Wordsworth and Coleridge or Moore and Bishop, to recognize the long tradition of poets mentoring and inspiring other poets. The poets will challenge the notion that tradition and innovation are at odds by revealing how specific poems influenced them and led them to better understand different poetic elements.

Kazim Ali is a poet, translator, essayist, and fiction writer. His books include InquisitionBright Felon, and Silver Road: Essays, Maps & Calligraphies. He is associate professor of creative writing and comparative literature at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: kazimalipoet

Website: www.kazimali.com

Jenny Johnson is the author of In Full Velvet. She received a 2016–2017 Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University and a 2015 Whiting Writer's Award in Poetry. She teaches at West Virginia University and in the Rainier Writing Workshop's MFA Program.

Traci Brimhall is the author of three collections of poetry: SaudadeOur Lady of the Ruins, and Rookery. A recipient of an NEA Fellowship, she is an Associate Professor at Kansas State University and lives in Manhattan, KS.


Twitter Username: Traci724

Vandana Khanna is the author of two books of poetry: Train to Agra and Afternoon Masala as well as a chapbook, The Goddess Monologues. She is the copoetry editor of The Los Angeles Review.


Twitter Username: vankhanna

Blas Falconer is poetry editor for The Los Angeles Review and teaches in the low-residency MFA at Murray State University. His third poetry collection, Forgive the Body this Failure, was published in 2018. Awards include an NEA Fellowship and the Maureen Egen Writers Exchange.


Twitter Username: blas_falconer

Website: blasfalconer.com

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F177B. Five Oaks Press Reading. (Jennifer Spiegel) Authors with books published by Five Oaks Press, including Rob Davidson (What Some Would Call Lies) and Jennifer Spiegel (And So We Die, Having First Slept), will read selections from their recent fiction and poetry.

Zachary A. Doss Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F178. Timely vs. Timeless: How to Balance a Hot Topic vs. Creating Timeless Literature. (Susan Choi, Tanya Selvaratnam, Sharma Shields, Julie Buntin) How does the writing process change when the subject matter you chose long ago is suddenly all over the news? Three authors, each with forthcoming books rooted in the past, will discuss the process of writing stories anchored in time when elements of their stories becomes startlingly fresh. How do we tell stories about women, about war, about assault, about prejudice, in a time when such ideas are under present-day scrutiny? Tanya Selveratnam will moderate as each author discusses her unique methods of dealing with current events as they pertain to timeless stories.

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F179. Yoga for Writers. (Melissa Carroll) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F180. Writing What We Know: Mining Personal Experience in YA Fiction. (, , , , ) How can we use our own lives, experiences, communities, and identities as inspiration for our fiction? What possibilities does this open up, and what potential problems does it create? How do we set boundaries for how much of our personal lives we share with our readers? Are we always, more or less, telling our own stories through our writing? These diverse authors will answer these questions and more as they discuss how they use their own lives as a source for their fiction.

Amy Reed is the author of eight contemporary YA novels, including Beautiful, Clean, and her most recent, The Nowhere Girls, about three misfit girls who start a movement to fight rape culture at their school. She also edited Our Stories, Our Voices, an anthology of personal essays by YA authors.


Twitter Username: amyreedfiction

Website: amyreedfiction.com

Lilliam Rivera is an award-winning writer and author of The Education of Margot Sanchez, a contemporary young adult novel. Recently named a "2017 Face to Watch" by the Los Angeles Times, Lilliam is also a 2016 Pushcart Prize winner. Her next YA novel, Dealing in Dreams, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: lilliamr

Website: http://www.lilliamrivera.com

Ryan Douglass is an author and freelance journalist whose work has appeared most frequently in The Huffington Post. His debut young adult novel, Jake in the Box, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: ryandouglassw

Emily X.R. Pan is the New York Times bestselling author of The Astonishing Color of After. She received her MFA from NYU, was the founding editor in chief of Bodega Magazine, and is cocreator of Foreshadow: A Serial YA Anthology. In the past she has worked for Penguin and taught creative writing.


Twitter Username: exrpan

Website: www.exrpan.com

Anica Mrose Rissi is a former executive editor in children's book publishing and the author of the Anna, Banana chapter-book series, the picture books The Teacher's Pet and Watch Out for Wolf!, and a YA novel, Always Forever Maybe. Her essays have been published in The Writer and The New York Times.


Twitter Username: anicarissi

Website: anicarissi.com

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F181. AWP Award Series Reading. (, , , ) A reading featuring the 2017 AWP Award Series winners.

Joshua Bernstein’s forthcoming story collection, STICK-LIGHT, was a finalist for the Robert C. Jones and Beverly Prizes. His work has appeared in Boston Review, Kenyon Review Online, Tampa Review, Tin House (web), and other journals, and won the Hackney Novel Prize, the Knut House Novel Contest, and the John Gunyon Award. A Chicago native, he is an assistant professor of English at the University of Minnesota Duluth and the fiction editor of Tikkun.

Jon Chopan is an assistant professor of creative writing at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida. His first collection, Pulled From the River, was published by Black Lawrence Press in 2012. His work has appeared in Glimmer Train, Hotel Amerika, Post Road, Epiphany, The Southampton Review, and elsewhere.

Wang Ping was born in China and came to the US in 1986. Her publications of poetry and prose include American Visa, Foreign Devil, Of Flesh and Spirit, New Generation: Poetry from China Today, Aching for Beauty: Footbinding in China, The Magic Whip, The Dragon Emperor, The Last Communist Virgin, and Flashcards: Poems by Yu Jian. She won the Eugene Kayden Award for the Best Book in Humanities and is the recipient of an NEA fellowship, the Bush Artist Fellowship for poetry, the McKnight Fellowship for nonfiction, and many others. She received her Distinct Immigrant Award in 2014, and was Venezuela International Poet of Honor in 2015. She’s also a photographer and installation artist. Her multimedia exhibitions include Behind the Gate: After the Flood of the Three Gorges, and Kinship of Rivers at schools, colleges, galleries, museums, lock and dams, and confluences along the Mississippi River. She is professor of English at Macalester College, and founder and director of Kinship of Rivers project.

Brynne Rebele-Henry’s poetry, fiction, and nonfiction have appeared in such journals as Prairie Schooner, Denver Quarterly, jubilat, Fiction International, Rookie, and So to Speak, among other places. Her writing has won numerous awards, including the 2015 Louise Louis/Emily F. Bourne Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America, the 2016 Adroit Prize for Prose, and a 2017 Glenna Luschei Award from Prairie Schooner. Her first book is Fleshgraphs. She was born in 1999.

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F182. Of Color: Poets' Ways of Making—Readings from Essays on Transformative Poetics. (, , , , ) Of Color: Poets’ Ways of Making: An Anthology of Essays on Transformative Poetics brings together the voices of fifteen poets of color, foregrounding craft and poetics. The essays discuss mentorship, models and frameworks of/for writing, the joys and perils of writing in/with/against/making new forms. Contributors will read from their essays and answer questions about the importance of writing craft essays from the perspective and experience of writers of color within the current political climate.

Addie Tsai holds an MFA from Warren Wilson College. She coconceived Dominic Walsh Dance Theater's Victor Frankenstein. She is a doctoral candidate in dance at Texas Woman's University. Tsai teaches creative writing, dance, literature, and humanities at Houston Community College.


Twitter Username: addiebrook

José Angel Araguz is a CantoMundo fellow and author of seven chapbooks as well as the collections Everything We Think We Hear, Small Fires, and Until We Are Level Again. He runs the poetry blog The Friday Influence and teaches English and creative writing at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon.


Twitter Username: JoseAraguz

Website: https://thefridayinfluence.wordpress.com

Dr. Melissa Coss Aquino, a Puerto Rican from the Bronx, is a writer and an Assistant Professor of English at Bronx Community College, CUNY. Her work has been published in Callaloo, the Fairy Tale Review, Hippocampus, and Centro. Her book is 100 years of Jesús Colón.


Twitter Username: mcossaquino

Luisa A. Igloria’s books include The Buddha Wonders if She is Having a Mid-Life Crisis and Ode to the Heart Smaller than a Pencil Eraser (2014 May Swenson Prize). She teaches at Old Dominion University, where from 2009–15 she directed the MFA Creative Writing Program.


Twitter Username: thepoetslizard

Website: www.luisaigloria.com

Amanda Galvan Huynh has received scholarships and fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and Sundress Academy for the Arts. She was a winner of a 2016 AWP Intro Journal Project Award and a finalist for the 2017 Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship.


Twitter Username: amghuynh

Website: amandagalvanhuynh.com

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F183. Knowing the Story: Flannery O'Connor Award Winners on Writing Short Fiction. (, , , , ) Flannery O’Connor is quoted as saying, “I find that most people know what a story is until they sit down to write one.” This panel will explore what five short story writers (all winners of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction) know (or know they don’t know) about short fiction form and style, as well as about polishing a collection for submission. Part reading, part lively discussion, this panel will be both exploration and celebration of short fiction as a thriving literary form.

Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum is the author of three short story collections: This Life She's Chosen, Swimming With Strangers, and What We Do With the Wreckage, which won the 2017 Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. She teaches high school near Seattle.


Twitter Username: kslunstrum

Website: www.kirstensundberglunstrum.com

Lori Ostlund’s story collection The Bigness of the World received the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction and the Edmund White Debut Fiction Award. Her novel, After the Parade, was shortlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. She teaches in the Mile-High MFA program in Denver.


Twitter Username: LoriOstlund

Website: www.loriostlund.com

Amina Gautier is the author of three short-story collections: The Loss of All Lost Things, which won the Elixir Press Award; Now We Will Be Happy, which won the Prairie Schooner Book Prize; and At-Risk, which won the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: DrAminaGautier

Website: https://aminagautier.wordpress.com/

Siamak Vossoughi is a writer whose collection Better Than War received a Flannery O'Connor Award in 2015. He has had some stories published in Glimmer Train, Missouri Review, Kenyon Review, Bellingham Review, Washington Square, and West Branch.


Twitter Username: siamakvossoughi

Becky Mandelbaum is the author of Bad Kansas, which received the 2016 Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction. Her work has appeared in The Missouri Review, The Georgia Review, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and elsewhere. She currently lives in Washington.


Twitter Username: b_mandelbaum

Website: www.beckymandelbaum.com

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F184. The Lifecycle of a Submission: Editors Explain. (, , , , ) Lit mags receive thousands of submissions, and publish only a tiny fraction. Who decides? What makes the difference between acceptance and rejection? Editors from Tin House, Missouri Review, Gettysburg Review, Meridians, and The Common take you behind the scenes, from slush to publication. This panel seeks to demystify the submission process, allowing writers to access editor feedback and learn what's really going on behind the form rejections.

Emily Everett’s short fiction has appeared for Tin House and The Tishman Review, and was nominated for the 2018 PEN/Dau Short Story Prize. Her nonfiction appears online for The Common magazine, where she is managing editor. She earned her MA in Literature from Queen Mary University of London.


Twitter Username: Public_Emily

Leslie Marie Aguilar received her MFA from Indiana University and currently works as the Editorial Assistant for Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism, at Smith College. Her work has been supported by the National Society of Arts and Letters and the Fine Arts Work Center, among others.


Twitter Username: lesliemaguilar

Website: lesliemarieaguilar.com

Mark Drew is the editor of the Gettysburg Review.

Evelyn Somers is a fiction writer and associate editor of the Missouri Review, where she is noted for her one-on-one work with authors. Work she has edited for TMR has appeared in virtually every major prize anthology. She also teaches women and gender studies at the University of Missouri-Columbia.


Twitter Username: evelynsomers13
Alana Csaposs.

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F185. Walking a Fine Line: Politics, Poetry, and the Workshop in a Divided America. (, , , , Josh Robbins) “Poetry is a political act because it involves telling the truth,” June Jordan said in 1998. The status of language, politics, and truth is now more complex than ever, and our workshop students are responding with urgent, politically-engaged poems, which can mean navigating raw, difficult discussions. Professors of community college to graduate workshops offer best practices for fostering productive dialogue, keeping the course craft focused, and engaging students with varied political views.

Sandy Longhorn is the author of three books of poetry, most recently The Alchemy of My Mortal Form. She teaches in the Arkansas Writers MFA Program at the University of Central Arkansas where she directs The C.D. Wright Women Writers Conference.


Twitter Username: sandylonghorn

Website: http://sandylonghorn.blogspot.com

Nicole Cooley is the author of a novel and six books of poems, including most recently Of Marriage. She is the director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Literary Translation at Queens College, CUNY.

Amorak Huey teaches writing at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. He is author of three books of poetry: Ha Ha Ha Thump, Boom Box, and Seducing the Asparagus Queen. A 2017 NEA Fellow, he also has published two chapbooks and a coauthored poetry textbook.


Twitter Username: amorak

Derrick Harriell is a poet and the author of Cotton, Ropes, and forthcoming Stripper in Wonderland. He is an Assistant Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi, where he also works as acting director of the MFA program.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F186. Writing the Coast: Veteran Westerners from Alaska to California. (, , , , ) Five distinguished western writers from Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and California read their poetry, fiction and memoir exploring the diverse geographies and histories of the West Coast. Each reading begins with a brief observation about Western identity(ies). Audience response encouraged.

Valerie Miner is the author of fourteen books including Traveling with Spirits. She's won three Fulbrights and awards from Rockefeller, McKnight, Bogliasco, Jerome, and NEA. Her work is translated into eight languages and published in over sixty anthologies. She teaches at Stanford and U. of Alaska Low Res. MFA .

Ernestine Hayes belongs to the Kaagwaantaan clan of the Tlingit nation. Alaska Writer Laureate 2017–2019, she is the author of Blonde Indian, an Alaska Native memoir (American Book Award) and its sequel, The Tao of Raven. Hayes is professor of Creative Writing at the University of Alaska Southeast.


Twitter Username: ehhayes

Kathleen Alcalá is the author of six award-winning books of fiction and nonfiction, most recently, The Deepest Roots. Honored by Western States Book Award, PNBA Fiction Award, Governors Writers Award, ArtistTrust, Island Treasure, Intl Latino Book Award, and Con Tinta, she is cofounder of Raven Chronicles.


Twitter Username: katkat_alcala

Website: www.kathleenalcala.com

Harold Johnson, since high school, has studied, taught, practiced visual art, and written and read in Portland, Oregon. For two years, he coedited the poetry journal Fireweed. He is the author of the poetry volumes Citizenship and Article.II. and novel The Fort Showalter Blues.

Judith Barrington's fifth poetry book, Long Love: New and Selected Poems was published by Salmon Poetry. She won the 2013 Gregory O’Donoghue International Poetry Prize. Lifesaving: A Memoir, won the Lambda Book Award and her Writing the Memoir From Truth to Art continues to be a best-seller.

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F187. Life Is a Hybrid: Crossing Genre Boundaries in Memoir. (, , , , ) Memoirs are becoming weirder and wilder, going beyond the writer’s life to incorporate journalism, ethnography, true crime, cultural criticism, poetry, and even fiction. Mixing genres, writers layer their work, chasing the complexity of life. But why (and when to) choose to mix it up? What research challenges or opportunities await? And how do you escape categorization when it’s time to publish? Memoirists—some with multiple books and some with debuts—offer practical insights on transgressing genre.

Alexandria (Alex) Marzano-Lesnevich is the author of The Fact of a Body: A Murder & A Memoir, which received a 2018 Lambda Literary Award and the Chautauqua Prize, and was named one of the best books of 2017 by The Guardian, Entertainment Weekly, and Audible.com. They are an assistant professor at Bowdoin.


Twitter Username: alexandriaml

Website: http://www.alexandria-marzano-lesnevich.com/

Emily Maloney’s collection of essays, Cost of Living, about the American healthcare system, is forthcoming from Flatiron Books. Her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Glamour, Virginia Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. She is also a MacDowell Fellow.


Twitter Username: emilyfmaloney

Chris Feliciano Arnold is the author of The Third Bank of the River: Power and Survival in the Twenty-First Century Amazon. The recipient of a 2014 fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, he teaches in the MFA program at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: chrisarnold

Ruth Behar is a cultural anthropologist, fiction writer, and poet. She is the author of The Vulnerable Observer, An Island Called Home, and Traveling Heavy, and a book of poems, Everything I Kept. Her novel, Lucky Broken Girl, won the Pura Belpré Award. She teaches at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: ruthbehar

Website: www.ruthbehar.com

Joshua Rivkin is the author of Chalk: The Art and Erasure of Cy Twombly. A recipient of fellowships from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Ucross Foundation, and the Fine Arts Work Center, his writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Virginia Quarterly Review, Best New Poets, and elsewhere.

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F188. Beyond Worker Bees: The Value of Creative Writing in Community Colleges. (, , , , ) Community colleges funnel most students into programs that have "economic value" but little room for creativity or experimentation. We discuss the radical supposition that incorporating creative writing and workshop pedagogy into core community college curriculum has tremendous value on personal and professional levels, naturally leading to enhanced economic opportunities. We consider innovative approaches like service-learning and digital pedagogy that foster students’ identities as writers.

Dr. Julia Cohen is the author of two collections of poetry and a collection of lyric essays. She recently won the Baltic Writing Residency Chapbook Contest for 2018. She is an editor for Essay Press and an Assistant Professor of English at Wright College.

Frankie Rollins is a fiction writer. She’s authored a collection of stories, The Sin Eater & Other Stories, and published in Feminist Wire, Fairy Tale Review, Conjunctions, and New England Review. She is part of the writing faculty at Pima Community College, teaching creative writing.


Twitter Username: frankie_rollins

Website: www.elizabethfrankierollins.com

Paul Martinez-Pompa is the author of My Kill Adore Him, which was selected for the Andres Montoya Poetry Prize. His poetry and prose have appeared in Mandorla, Make Magazine, Breakbeat Poets and on Chicago Public Radio. He currently edits for Packingtown Review.

Valerie Pell teaches English, literature, creative writing, and women's and gender studies at Wilbur Wright College.

David Campos, a CantoMundo fellow, is the author of Furious Dusk, winner of the Andres Montoya Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in The American Poetry Review, Boxcar Review, and LunaLuna among many others.


Twitter Username: camposwriter

Website: www.davidcampos.co

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F189. On the Road Again: What Touring Writers Need to Know. (, , , , Keetje Kuipers) Three poets known for dynamic performance, a Blue Flower Arts agent, and a university reading series coordinator will share best practices for successful reading tours. Topics include the decision to sign with a speaking agency or remain independent, booking reading tours, publicity and promotion, maximizing social media platforms, community engagement, contracts, taxes, and particular realities such as traveling on a budget, with disability, or away from kids.

Maggie Smith is the author of Lamp of the Body, The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison, and Good Bones, the title poem from which has been translated into nearly a dozen languages. Her poems have appeared in the New York Times, Tin House, The Best American Poetry, and on the CBS drama Madam Secretary.


Twitter Username: maggiesmithpoet

Website: www.maggiesmithpoet.com

Marcus Wicker is the author of Silencer and Maybe the Saddest Thing. He is the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, a Pushcart Prize, the Missouri Review’s Miller Audio Prize, as well as fellowships from Cave Canem, and the Fine Arts Work Center.


Twitter Username: a2poet

Website: marcuswicker.com

Formerly muscle for the IRS, Ron Mitchell is the editor of Southern Indiana Review and SIR Press. He teaches literary publishing and helps run the Southern Indiana Reading Series and New Harmony Writer's Residency at the University of Southern Indiana.

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F190. Reshaping the Short Story: Four Authors on Innovative Contemporary Short Fiction. (, , , , Venita Blackburn) Critics often claim the impending death of the short story as a form, and yet, in the last decade, innumerable beautiful and innovative short story collections have been published and applauded. In this panel, four contemporary American short story writers will discuss their favorite collections of the last ten years, and what about the form of short stories they find most captivating and arresting.

Dave Madden is the author of If You Need Me I'll Be Over There, a story collection, and The Authentic Animal, a nonfiction book on taxidermy. He's received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference. He directs the MFA program at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: maddendave

Website: www.davemadden.org

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah is from Spring Valley, NY. He is a graduate of the Syracuse MFA program and was the '16-'17 Olive B. O'Connor Fellow in fiction at Colgate University. His fist book is Friday Black.


Twitter Username: NK_Adjei

Rita Bullwinkel is the author of the story collection Belly Up. She is a Contributing Editor of NOON and an Editor at Large for McSweeney's. She is a recipient of grants and fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, The Sewanee Writers' Conference, and The Helene Wurlitzer Foundation.


Twitter Username: RitaBullwinkel

Courtney Zoffness won the 2018 Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. She also received the Arts & Letters Creative Nonfiction Prize, the American Literary Review Fiction Prize, and fellowships from the Center for Fiction and the MacDowell Colony. She teaches at Drew University.

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F191. Small Town Fiction From Five Points of View. (, , , Rebecca Clarren, Alexi Zentner) Five novelists. Five perspectives on writing rural. The phrase “small town” conjures images that range from idyllic, outdoorsy, and close-knit to backwater, country, and dead-end, to something even more ominous like gritty, depressed, and secretive. The pieces shared will be cut from a wide swath of small town perceptions and drawn from crime, historical, literary, and women’s fiction. Panelists will highlight small town “characters” and the way rural fiction often includes nature itself as character.

Emily Strelow has an MFA in Writing from University of Washington and an undergraduate degree in environmental science. Her debut novel is The Wild Birds


Twitter Username: EmilyAStrelow

Michelle Hoover is the Fannie Hurst Writer-in-Residence at Brandeis University and teaches at GrubStreet, where she leads the Novel Incubator program. Her novel The Quickening was a MA Book Award Must Read pick. She is a 2014 NEA Fellow. Her second novel Bottomland was the 2017 All Iowa Reads Pick.


Twitter Username: _MichelleHoover

Website: www.michelle-hoover.com

Susan Bernhard is a Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellowship recipient and a graduate of the year-long, MFA-level GrubStreet Novel Incubator program. Her debut novel is Winter Loon.


Twitter Username: esdeebernhard

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F192. Stories in Stereo: Writing About and Around Music. (, , , , ) It’s been said that writing about music is like dancing about architecture—but a dance about architecture could be thrilling, and all writing has music built right into it. As genres blend, so do voices, giving rise to new approaches to music writing: multi-modal, investigative, deeply personal. In this event, four writers share distinct pieces about and built around music, from criticism to fictional world-building to verse, and why they believe music remains so vital to literature.

Brad Efford is a writer and founding editor of The RS 500, an online music writing project.


Twitter Username: thers500

Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His first collection of poems, The Crown Ain't Worth Much, was released by Button Poetry in 2016. His first collection of essays, They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, was published by Two Dollar Radio in 2017.

Brian Oliu is an instructor at the University of Alabama. He is the author of four books of nonfiction and two chapbooks, covering topics ranging from Craigslist Missed Connections, to computer viruses, to 8-bit video games, to NBA basketball. 


Twitter Username: beoliu

Website: http://www.brianoliu.com

Elena Passarello is the author of the essay collections Animals Strike Curious Poses and Let Me Clear My Throat. A recipient of a 2015 Whiting Award, she coedits the In Place book series for West Virginia University Press and teaches in the MFA program at Oregon State University.


Twitter Username: elenavox

Website: www.elenapassarello.com

Natasha Oladokun is a Cave Canem fellow, poet, & essayist. Her work has appeared in the American Poetry Review, Harvard Review Online, The Adroit Journal, Pleiades, Image Journal, & elsewhere. She is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Hollins University, her graduate alma mater.


Twitter Username: NatashaOladokun

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F193. She/He Said: Resisting, Dealing With & Benefiting From Editors’ Suggestions. (, , , , ) Every writer hopes that his or her manuscript will be accepted as is, yet a good editor can turn an almost great poem or story or essay into one that soars. Our panelists include both book and journal editors as well as writers of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. Audience members are encouraged to bring stories of their own experiences to the conversation.

David Kirby's collection The House on Boulevard St.: New and Selected Poems was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2007. His latest poetry collection is Get Up, Please. See also www.davidkirby.com.

Laura Brown is an editor at Park Row Books. Her authors have received awards including the Thurber Prize and Pushcart Prize, have graced the cover of the New York Times Book Review, were named a B&N Discover Pick, and have appeared on national bestseller lists.


Twitter Username: LB1899

Jessica Faust is coeditor and poetry editor of The Southern Review, which she joined in 2004. 

Ed Falco’s most recent book is the poetry collection, Wolf Moon Blood Moon. He is also the author of several novels, short story collections, and plays. He teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Virginia Tech.


Twitter Username: EdFalco

Website: edfalco.us

Emily Nemens became editor of The Paris Review in summer 2018, after five years coediting The Southern Review. Her fiction has appeared in The Gettysburg Review, n+1, the Iowa Review, and Esquire. Her debut novel, The Cactus League, is forthcoming from FSG in 2020.


Twitter Username: emilynemens

Website: www.nemens.com

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F194. Women Writing War. (, , ) Catch-22, For Whom the Bell Tolls, All Quiet on the Western Front: the war novel is often considered the exclusive province of men, though women’s lives are not immune from the effects of war. What happens when women tackle subjects traditionally thought of as male? How are women’s war stories different from men’s? Through roundtable discussion, five female novelists discuss approaches to writing stories set in wartime, addressing questions of experience, gender, and narrative authority.

Rebecca Johns is the author of the award-winning novel Icebergs and The Countess. Her work has appeared in StoryQuarterly, The Mississippi Review, and Ploughshares, among others. She is the director of the MA in Writing and Publishing program at DePaul University in Chicago.


Twitter Username: rebeccajohns71

Website: www.rebeccajohns.com

J. Kasper Kramer is the author of The Story That Cannot Be Told. Her work has appeared in The Rumpus, The Coachella Review, and Catalpa. She teaches at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.


Twitter Username: JKasperKramer

Website: www.jkasperkramer.com

Lisa Sanchez is an Author's Guild Ambassador and House of Puerto Rico, San Diego representative. She is a 2018 Pushcart Prize nominee and Virginia Woolf fiction finalist. She has taught and published widely (PhD, University of California, Irvine). Her first novel about a controversial wartime research group is on submission.


Twitter Username: drlisasanchez

Website: www.thelisasanchez.com

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F195. Game On: Teaching Writing for Video Games. (, , , , ) Video games have come a long way from the days of Space Invaders and Donkey Kong. Complex in structure, rich in design, today’s narrative video games are a viable art form that can promote empathy and reach a broad audience. Our panel of professors, grad students, and video game writers will discuss the merits of teaching writing for video games and will provide a variety of pedagogical insights into this growing artistic genre.

Salvatore Pane is the author of the novel Last Call in the City of Bridges as well as Mega Man 3. His work has appeared in American Short Fiction, Hobart, and Paste. He is an assistant professor of creative writing and new media at the University of St. Thomas.

Eric Freeze teaches at Wabash College. He has published fiction and essays in periodicals including The Southern Review, Harvard Review, and Boston Review. He is author of Dominant Traits (stories), Hemingway on a Bike (essays), and Invisible Men (stories). 

Julialicia Case is a third-year PhD student in creative writing at the University of Cincinnati, where she studies digital narratives and contemporary fiction and teaches courses in video games as literature and digital creative writing. She writes fiction, creative nonfiction, and digital work.

Nick Francis Potter is the author of New Animals, a hybrid collection of prose and comics. He teaches classes in writing, cartooning, and digital media at the University of Missouri, and currently serves as the comics editor at Anomaly.


Twitter Username: haircut_drone

Natalie Mesnard is a writer and game designer currently employed at Grove Atlantic as a digital media strategist. She has worked with numerous literary magazines as an editor, teacher, volunteer, and advocate. Her award-winning board game, DemocraSea, is forthcoming from Game Salute.


Twitter Username: nataliemesnard

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F196. Beautiful Minds: Writing Mental Illness. (, , , , ) In the face of stigma and sensationalized representations of mental illness in the news and popular media, thoughtful writers can shed light on genuine experiences of mental illness. Five writers spanning the genres of fiction, CNF, and poetry will talk about why they’ve chosen to write on this subject, along with the challenges, risks, and opportunities they’ve encountered in doing so, and will share advice for other writers exploring mental illness in their own work.

David Ebenbach is the author of six books of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, including the novel Miss Portland. He teaches Creative Writing and Literature at Georgetown University and is a project manager at Georgetown’s teaching center, the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship.


Twitter Username: debenbach

Website: www.davidebenbach.com

Angie Chuang is a nonfiction writer and an associate professor of journalism at University of Colorado Boulder. Her first book, The Four Words for Home, won an Independent Publishers Award. Her work has appeared in Creative Nonfiction, Litro, The Asian American Literary Review, Vela, and others.


Twitter Username: angiechuang

Katy Richey’s work has appeared in RattleCincinnati ReviewRHINO, and The Offing. She received an honorable mention for the 2015 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, and she has received fellowships from Fine Arts Work Center, Maryland State Arts Council, and the Cave Canem Foundation.

Christopher Ankney is the author of one book, Hearsay, winner to the Jean Feldman Poetry Prize and finalist for the Ohioana Book Prize for Poetry. He serves as an editor for Washington Writers’ Publishing House. He is an Assistant Professor of English at College of Southern Maryland.


Twitter Username: ChristophAnkney

Website: http://www.christopherankney.com

Jessie Chaffee's debut, Florence in Ecstasy, was an SF Chronicle Best Book of 2017 and is forthcoming in translation in five countries. She received a Fulbright grant to complete the novel and was the writer-in-residence at Florence University of the Arts. She is an editor at Words Without Borders.


Twitter Username: JessieLChaffee

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F197. Literary Communities for the Rest of America. (, , , ) As many writers and artists get priced out of major cities, leaders from literary centers across the country are building communities away from the coasts—often in places that have been long overlooked. Directors and coordinators from thriving institutions and festivals share their experiences of growing literary communities outside traditionally “cultural” cities, and discuss how they serve their communities.

Kristen Radtke is the author of the graphic memoir Imagine Wanting Only This. She is the art director and New York editor of the Believer. Her work has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, Oxford American, Guernica, and other places.


Twitter Username: kristenradtke

Website: www.kristenradtke.com

Sara Ortiz is the program manager of The Believer magazine and Black Mountain Institute. She has curated events and marketed books for literary institutions, such as McNally Jackson Books, Scholastic Inc., Penguin Random House, and the Texas Library Association.


Twitter Username: chikitlinski

Molly Rose Quinn is the cofounder and Executive Director of the Center for Southern Literary Arts in Memphis, Tennessee. Her writing has appeared in Black Warrior Review, Lenny Letter, espnW, and other places.


Twitter Username: mollyrosamota

Website: mollyrosequinn.tumblr.com

Steph Opitz is the founding director of Wordplay at The Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis.


Twitter Username: stephopitz

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F198. Poetics of Oblique Violence. (, , , , ) Of violence, Toni Morrison writes: “wanting to is doing it.” This panel responds to Morrison’s provocation by exploring the poetics of oblique violence. When a poem’s speaker hints at violence, rehearses destruction in their imagination, nests allusions to brutal acts, articulates a desire to cause pain through fictional or historical conceits, or utters dreams of mayhem in the most ambiguous terms—do these more ambivalent articulations imply desire? And, if so: is wanting to a way of doing it?

Nomi Stone's second collection of poems, Kill Class, is forthcoming from Tupelo Press in 2019. Poems appear recently or will soon in Poetry, American Poetry Review, The Best American Poetry, Bettering American Poetry, and elsewhere. She is a postdoctoral researcher in anthropology at Princeton University.


Twitter Username: Nomistonestone

Website: www.nomistone.net

Sumita Chakraborty is poetry editor of AGNI, art editor of At Length, and a doctoral candidate in English at Emory. Her poems and prose can be found in POETRY, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Cultural Critique, and more.


Twitter Username: chakrabsumita

Sara Eliza Johnson is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in poetry, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and two Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Her first book, Bone Map, won the 2013 National Poetry Series. She teaches at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks.


Twitter Username: saraelizaj

Website: saraelizajohnson.com

Paige Lewis is the author of Space Struck. Their poems have appeared in PoetryAmerican Poetry ReviewPloughsharesThe Georgia ReviewBest New Poets, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: Paige_M_Lewis

Roy G. Guzmán is pursuing a PhD in Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature at the University of Minnesota, where they also received an MFA in creative writing. They are a 2017 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellow.


Twitter Username: dreamingauze

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F199. Obsession in the Archives: The Art of Research in Fiction and Poetry. (, , , , ) The muse strikes in the form of research—now what? Having conducted intensive research on subjects such as Black Vaudeville, octopuses, and the life of Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, panelists share strategies for coping with research-mania and wrangling intimidating amounts of information. They also discuss taking creative liberties with their findings, considering the questions of when and how fictionalized fact can best serve the “truth.”

Valerie Vogrin is the author of a novel, Shebang. She was awarded a Pushcart Prize in 2010. She is a professor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville where she is managing editor of Sou’wester.

Amaud Jamaul Johnson is the author of two poetry collections, Darktown Follies (Tupelo 2013) and Red Summer (Tupelo 2006), winner of the Dorset Prize. His honors include a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and a Bread Loaf Writers' Conference Fellowship. He teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Nicky Beer is the author of two books of poems, The Octopus Game and The Diminishing House, both winners of the Colorado Book Award for Poetry. Her awards include an NEA grant and a Ruth Lilly Fellowship. She is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver.


Twitter Username: nbeerpoet

Website: nickybeer.com

Jasmin Darznik is the author of the novel Song of a Captive Bird and a memoir, The Good Daughter. She is a professor in the MFA and Writing and Literature programs at California College of the Arts in San Francisco.


Twitter Username: jasmindarznik

Silas Hansen teaches creative writing at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. His essays have appeared in Slate, Colorado Review, The Normal School, Hayden's Ferry Review, Redivider, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: silas_hansen

Website: www.silashansen.net

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F200. Writers as Translators, Translators as Writers. (, , , , ) Readers, writers, and translators alike discover at some point that mastery of the source language alone can’t guarantee the success of a translation: A literary translation succeeds to the extent that it’s a compelling work of art in its target language. In this panel covering a variety of languages, traditions, and time periods, five esteemed faculty of the Bread Loaf Translators’ Conference—successful writers and translators themselves—each examine poets or writers whose translation activity spurred innovation in their creative work or vice versa.

Geoffrey Brock is a poet and a translator of Italian poetry and prose. He is the author of Voices Bright Flags and Weighing Light, the editor of The FSG Book of 20th-Century Italian Poetry, and the translator of works by Cesare Pavese, Umberto Eco, Italo Calvino, and others. He teaches at the University of Arkansas.


Twitter Username: gbrock

Brooks Haxton is a publishing writer of poetry, nonfiction, scripts, and translations. He teaches creative writing at Syracuse University and at the Warren Wilson College low residency MFA program. He has received awards from the NEA, NEH, and Guggenheim Foundation among others.


Twitter Username: brkshxtn

Mónica de la Torre is the author of five collections of poetry, including The Happy End/All Welcome. Her most recent translation project, Omar Cáceres's Defense of the Idol, is forthcoming. She is a Bonderman Assistant Professor of the Practice at Brown University.

Bill Johnston's translation of Twelve Stations, a mock epic poem by Tomasz Rozycki, won the 2016 Found in Translation Prize. He is a previous winner of the PEN Translation Prize and the Best Translated Book Award. He teaches literary translation at Indiana University.

Jennifer Grotz is a poet, translator, and director of the Bread Loaf Writers' Conferences. She teaches at the University of Rochester.

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F201. Writing Medicine: Fusing Practices to Exercise Intuition for Inner Healing. (, , , , ) How do you successfully explore personal challenges and traumas to regain confidence? By reframing struggles, you gain clarity for problem-solving and a new tell-a-vision of emotional health. Learn how the practices of dialogue and expressive writing expand inner healing for the marginalized and disenfranchised plus writers and therapists. Panelists offer insights from writing and teaching in the field, including discussion of intuition and creativity’s role with resources and action steps.

Lore Raymond coauthored seven books including Midlife Transformations and 365 Life Shifts. She teaches writing at Eckerd College, Keep St. Pete Lit, and the Metta Center. For thirteen years, her monthly Divine Dialogue Writing Circle has empowered writers to explore issues of inner healing.

Alicia Anabel Santos is an Afrolatina lesbian writer, producer, activist, and priestess. Founder of the NYC Latina Writers Group, providing workshops for writers of color, Santos has published the memoir Finding Your Force: A Journey to Love, and can be found teaching writing to senior citizens in New York.


Twitter Username: diosadominicana

Website: http://www.aliciaanabelsantos.com/

Tawni Waters is the author of two novels, The Long Ride Home and Beauty of the Broken, which won the International Literacy Association’s Award for Young Adult Literature. She is also the author of a book of poems, Siren Song. She teaches writing throughout the US, Europe, and Mexico.


Twitter Username: tawniwaters

Website: https://www.facebook.com/tawniveewaters?ref=hl

Shawna Ayoub Ainslie teaches expressive writing for trauma release and recovery to survivors of violence and US veterans through the Center for Creative Writing and Ivy Tech Community College. She puts her work into practice as an essayist published in HuffPo, Medium, and The Manifest-Station.


Twitter Username: shawnamawna

Alexis Donkin, the daughter of two ministers, has authored twenty books including Thrive: How I Became a Superhero, and Six Degrees of Separation: 42 Days Through Faith. World travels and a cum laude degree in Peace & Conflict Studies inform her writing and Christian intuitive life coaching.


Twitter Username: alexisdonkin

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F202. Allama Iqbal’s Diasporic Children: A Reading by Pakistani American Poets. (, , , ) How do poets envision home? The poet Iqbal is often credited with conceiving of the idea of Pakistan as a homeland for Muslims. And since the birth of the nation in 1947, poetry has been an integral part of its people’s DNA. In America, many with roots in Pakistan continue to turn to poetry to feed their hunger for belonging. Four award-winning Pakistani American poets share work that explores varying ideas of home while also showcasing the beauty and diversity of their literary heritage.

Faisal Mohyuddin is the author of The Displaced Children of Displaced Children, winner of the 2017 Sexton Prize in Poetry, and the chapbook The Riddle of Longing. He teaches English at Highland Park High School in Illinois and serves as an educator adviser to the global not-for-profit Narrative 4.


Twitter Username: fmohyu

Website: www.faisalmohyuddin.com

Shadab Zeest Hashmi, author of Kohl & Chalk and Baker of Tarifa, has an MFA from Warren Wilson. She has won the San Diego Book Award and the Nazim Hikmet Poetry Prize. Her work has been published in journals and anthologies worldwide and has been translated into Spanish and Urdu.


Twitter Username: ShadabZeest

Website: http://shadabhashmi.com/

Adeeba Shahid Talukder is a Pakistani American poet and translator. Her collection of poems, Shahr-e-jaanaan: The City of The Beloved, won the 2017 Kundiman Poetry Prize. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Michigan and a Poets House Emerging Poets Fellowship.


Twitter Username: Adeebaloo

Raza Ali Hasan is the author of three books of poetry. His fourth poetry book is out to various contests. His poems have appeared in many poetry journals. He received his MFA from Syracuse University. He teaches in the English department at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F203. PR for CW: Responding to Enrollment Challenges in Grad and Undergrad Programs. (, , , , ) As colleges and universities nationwide deal with declining enrollments, particularly in the humanities, creative writing programs are under increasing pressure to innovate and, in some cases, to justify themselves. Panelists from both public and private universities will discuss how their programs are responding positively to these challenges before engaging the audience in conversation about the future.

Michele Morano is the author of Grammar Lessons: Translating a Life in Spain and of fiction and creative nonfiction published in many venues, including Best American Essays, Fourth Genre, Brevity, Boulevard, and Ninth Letter. She chairs the English Department at DePaul University in Chicago.


Twitter Username: MicheleMorano

Website: www.michelemorano.com

Cathy Day is the author of two books: The Circus in Winter and Comeback Season. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The Lit HubPANKThe Millions, and Inside Higher Education. She teaches at Ball State University where she currently serves as the department chair.


Twitter Username: daycathy

Website: www.cathyday.com

Joanna Eleftheriou teaches at the University of Houston-Clear Lake and the Writing Workshops in Greece. Her translations, fiction, essays, and poetry appear in journals including Arts & Letters, Chautauqua, and Crab Orchard Review.


Twitter Username: JOANNAessayist

John T. Price is the award-winning author of three memoirs, including Daddy Long Legs:The Natural Education of a Father and Man Killed by Pheasant and Other Kinships, and editor of The Tallgrass Prairie Reader. He is director of the Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Steve Heller is Chair of the MFA in Creative Writing Program at Antioch University Los Angeles, whose mission includes the education of literary artists, community engagement, and the pursuit of social, economic, and environmental justice. He is the author of four books and 60+ stories and essays.

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F204. Diana's Diaspora: Diana Der-Hovanessian's Influence on Armenian American Writers. (, , , , ) Diana Der-Hovanessian, a renowned poet, translator, mentor, and cultural leader, opened a door for Armenian Americans to read and write themselves into being. Armenian American writers read and discuss her work, share insights about her character through anecdote and memory, and analyze her impact on American poetry, translation, and Armenian culture. A year after her death, they look at her legacy to inspire the future of Armenian poetry, including her emphasis on poetry by and for women.

Arminé Iknadossian's debut poetry collection, All That Wasted Fruit, addresses the sacred feminine. Cofounder of Outside the Lines: A Creative Collaborative for Women, Arminé also leads Poetry in the Labyrinth at The Last Bookstore in Los Angeles and performs her poems for The Poetry Brothel.


Twitter Username: armineiknadossian

Nancy Agabian is the author of Princess Freak, a poetry/performance collection, and Me as her again: True Stories of an Armenian Daughter, a memoir. Her novel, The Fear of Large and Small Nations, was a finalist for the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially-Engaged Fiction. She teaches writing at NYU.


Twitter Username: nancyagabian

Lory Bedikian’s The Book of Lamenting won the Philip Levine Prize for Poetry. She has an MFA from the University of Oregon. Her work was a finalist for the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry and for the AROHO’s Orlando Prize. She received a grant from the Money for Women/Barbara Deming Memorial fund.

Shahé Mankerian's poetry collection, History of Forgetfulness, has been a finalist for the Bibby First Book Award, the Crab Orchard Series, the Quercus Award, and the White Pine Press Competition. He is the co-director of the L.A. Writing Project and the principal of St. Gregory Hovsepian School.


Twitter Username: baronshahe

Lola Koundakjian has authored two poetry books and read in four international poetry festivals in Quebec, Peru, Colombia and West Bank. She co-curates the Zohrab Center's poetry reading series in midtown Manhattan, and runs the Armenian Poetry Project in multiple languages and audio.

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F205. The Power of Women's Publishing to Normalize Lost Conversations. (, , ) Traditional newsrooms and publishers tend to overlook marginalized voices: women, people of color, people from diverse sexual orientations and cultures. But when women take control, the narrative changes. Editors and writers from Rebellious Magazine for Women will discuss women's ability to normalize lost conversations about topics such as sex, relationships and faith. Come share your own successes and frustrations working in a male-dominated field; leave empowered to change the conversation.

Karen Hawkins is Founder and Rebelle-in-Chief of Rebellious Magazine for Women. Karen is an award-winning reporter and editor whose journalism background includes positions with The Associated Press, the Windy City Times, and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.


Twitter Username: ChiefRebelle

Rachel Berg Scherer is a freelance writer, editor, and teacher in the Minneapolis area. Rachel’s work has appeared in regional and national magazines, Social Studies Advanced Placement textbooks, and study guides. She also writes a monthly feminist parenting column for Rebellious Magazine for Women.


Twitter Username: midwestwriting

Website: www.midwestwriting.com

Jera Brown is a sex and relationship advice columnist for Rebellious Magazine and a freelancer writing about sexuality, spirituality, and social justice. Her work has appeared in The Rumpus, VICE, Marie Claire, Sojourners, among others. She's a graduate of the Columbia College Chicago MFA program.


Twitter Username: thejerabrown

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F206. Making Sure Everyone is Here: The Empathetic Classroom as Inclusive Space. (, , , , ) “Empathy requires inquiry as much as imagination. Empathy requires knowing you know nothing.” These are just some of the ideas presented by Leslie Jamison in her provocative book The Empathy Exams. On this panel, teachers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines discuss strategies, uses, and misuses of empathy in the classroom. Each panelist explores a different aspect of empathy as a way of broadening the discussion of empathy’s pedagogic function.

Katie Peterson is the author of four books of poetry including The Accounts (winner of the 2014 University of North Texas Rilke Prize) and A Piece of Good News. She directs the Creative Writing Program at the University of California, Davis.

Kimberly Grey is the author of The Opposite of Light. She is the recipient of a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and a Civitella Ranieri Fellowship. She teaches for the Stanford Online High School and Stanford Online Writers Studio.


Twitter Username: kimmygrey

Kathleen Spada teaches at the University of Cincinnati where she is also a doctoral candidate in Rhetoric & Composition. She holds an MA in English from Northern Kentucky University. Her research consists of auto-ethnography, literary nonfiction, and new approaches to teaching composition as creative praxis.


Twitter Username: spadak2

F. Douglas Brown is the author of two poetry collections: ICON, and Zero to Three, winner of the 2013 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. He also co-authored, Begotten, with poet Geffrey Davis. Brown is both a Cave Canem and Kundiman fellow, and he teaches literature at Loyola High School of Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: fdouglasbrown

Website: www.fdouglasbrown.com

Chiyuma Elliott is an Assistant Professor of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of two books of poetry: California Winter League and Vigil.

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F207. Script Tips: The Secrets to Dynamic Dialogue. (, , , ) One of the most important elements in any screenplay is the dialogue. This panel will show examples of great dialogue from films and screenplays as well as examine how those moments sharpen the plotline, theme, or character arc. Screenwriters and instructors will leave with a new arsenal of examples to help them improve their own work or the work of others.

Leslie Kreiner Wilson, PhD, is a produced screenwriter and directs the MFA Program in Writing for Screen and Television at Pepperdine University. Her recent publications include fiction as well as essays on early screenwriters Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and Mae West in various academic journals.

Tom Provost wrote Under Suspicion, starring Oscar-winners Morgan Freeman and Gene Hackman. It was nominated for an Edgar Award. He wrote and directed The Presence, starring Oscar-winner Mira Sorvino. The film won numerous Best Picture and Best Director awards. He is an honors graduate from University of Texas at Austin.


Twitter Username: provostom

Website: cinemalanguage.org

Andrea Baltazar is an Assistant Professor of Communication at Weber State University where she teaches audio production, editing, and documentary filmmaking. She’s also a writer/director of a short film entitled “Urban Uber.” She graduated from Pepperdine University with an MFA in screenwriting.

Andrés Orozco is the writer/director of various award winning films, including Yo Soy Tu NiñaGod Speaks Spanish, and 16 Summers. He is an Assistant Professor at Weber State University, where he teaches digital media, screenwriting, and oversees film production. He's also a working SAG actor.


Twitter Username: orozcofilms

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F208. The Strengths of Complexity and the Power of Limitations: Writers on Disability. (, , , ) These authors are diverse in identities and disability, but each of them writes in a way that confronts what is considered normal. Their work includes the resilience of a ferociously ambitious self, the spiritual experience of a day-to-day life that can be a tug of war between chaos and order, the sometimes funny in using a wheelchair, and essential connections to the natural world, as well as an exploration of the intersection between disability, queerness, race, culture, and desire. The reading will be followed by a moderated discussion between the panelists. This event will be live streamed on Friday, March 29 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. on https://www.awpwriter.org/.

Sandra Gail Lambert's books include A Certain Loneliness: A Memoir and a novel, The River's Memory. She is a NEA Creative Writing Fellow, and a co-editor of the anthology Older Queer Voices:The Intimacy of Survival. Lambert has been published in The Paris Review, The Southern Review, and Brevity.


Twitter Username: sandralambert

Website: www.sandragaillambert.com

Esmé Weijun Wang, author of the novel The Border of Paradise, was chosen by Granta as a Best of Young American Novelists in 2017. She received the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize in 2016, and has written essays for publications including The Believer, The New Inquiry, and Salon.


Twitter Username: esmewang

Website: http://www.esmewang.com/

Sarah Einstein is an Asst. Professor of Creative Writing at UT Chattanooga. Her book, Mot: A Memoir was selected for the AWP Prize in CNF for 2014. She's the Special Projects Editor for Brevity and her work has appeared in The Sun, Ninth Letter, and other journals & been awarded a Pushcart Prize.


Twitter Username: sarahemc2

Website: http://saraheinstein.com/

Naomi Ortiz is a facilitator, writer, poet, and visual artist. Caring about the world should not burn us out. Ortiz's book, Sustaining Spirit: Self Care for Social Justice, explores with readers how self-care can work in everyday life by examining relationships between ourselves, community, and place. She is a Disabled Mestiza (Latina/Indigenous/White) who was raised in Latinx culture and lives in the U.S./Mexico borderlands. For speaking/workshops on self-care, disability justice, and living in multiple worlds, visit: NaomiOrtiz.com. Twitter: @ThinkFreestyle. Instagram: NaomiOrtizWriterArtist

Oregon Ballroom 203, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F209. Unpublished Writer to Author: Get from Agent to Book Deal to Career as Author. (, , , , ) The road from unpublished writer to author is long and filled with potential pitfalls. What should you do before approaching an agent? How do you get one interested in you? What are do’s and don’ts while working with an editor? Should you hire an independent publicist? How do you give a good reading? These seasoned authors who have successfully navigated this rocky terrain talk about their experiences with different agencies and publishing houses, and share their top tips and hard-earned advice.

Jean Kwok is the New York Times and international bestselling author of the award-winning novels Girl in Translation and Mambo in Chinatown. Her work has been published in eighteen countries and is taught in schools across the world. She has spoken at Harvard, Columbia and many other schools and venues.


Twitter Username: jeankwok

Website: https://jeankwok.com/index.shtml

Julia Fierro is the author of the novels The Gypsy Moth Summer and Cutting Teeth. She founded The Sackett Street Writers' Workshop in 2002, home to over 5,000 writers in NYC, LA and online, named "New York City's Best Writing Class" (TimeOut NY) and "Top Alternative to MFA" by Poets & Writers.


Twitter Username: juliafierro

Website: http://www.juliafierro.com/

Juan Martinez is an assistant professor at Northwestern University. Best Worst American, his story collection, was released in 2017, and his work has appeared in Huizache, Glimmer Train, McSweeney's, Ecotone, Selected Shorts, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: fulmerford

Website: http://www.fulmerford.com

Courtney Maum is the author of the novels Touch and I am Having So Much Fun Here Without You, and the chapbook Notes from Mexico. Her book reviews and essays on the writing life have been widely published in outlets such as The New York Times, O: The Oprah Magazine, Tin House, Electric Lit, and Buzzfeed.


Twitter Username: cmaum

Website: https://www.courtneymaum.com/

Barbara Jones is an executive editor at Henry Holt & Company, where she acquires and edits fiction, memoir, and narrative nonfiction. She was previously the editorial director at Hyperion Books, and previous to that, a longtime magazine editor, at Harper’s Magazine, Vogue, Real Simple, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: voicereader

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F210. Real Women Talk Dirty: Feminisms of Sex in Fiction. (, , , , ) One way to define dirt is as “matter out of place.” Is “dirty” literature labelled as such because of its content, or because of its irreverent treatment of such matter? What would advocates of heteroglossia or mixed discourses think of "dirty fiction"—that its determined blending makes it the sharpest edge of realism? Is the depiction of sex crucial to the goals of feminisms, and how? This all-woman panel discusses craft hazards and opportunities of rendering the sexually explicit.

Merritt Tierce is the author of the novel Love Me Back and writes for the Netflix show Orange is the New Black. A National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 author and Rona Jaffe Writers' Award winner, Tierce has been a fellow at the Yaddo, MacDowell, Willapa Bay, Omi, and Can Cab artist colonies.

Debra Monroe has written four books of fiction and two memoirs. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Guernica, Salon, Hobart, Southern Review, Georgia Review, Rumpus, and been cited in Best American Essays. She won the Flannery O'Connor Award and teaches in the MFA Program at Texas State University.

Mary Anne Mohanraj is the author of Bodies in Motion (a finalist for the Asian American Book Awards), The Stars Change, and eleven other titles. She directs the Speculative Literature Foundation and DesiLit (an Asian American arts org), and is Clinical Assoc. Prof. of English at Univ. of Illinois.


Twitter Username: mamohanraj

Nalo Hopkinson, professor of Creative Writing at the University of California Riverside, has received the John W Campbell Award, the World Fantasy Award, the Andre Norton Award. She was fiction coeditor of People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction. She is writing a graphic novel for the Sandman series.


Twitter Username: nalo_hopkinson

Claire Vaye Watkins is the author of Gold Fame Citrus and Battleborn, winner of the Story Prize, the Dylan Thomas Prize, the Young Lions Fiction Award, and others. A Guggenheim Fellow and one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists, she is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: clairevaye

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F211. Poets Writing Whiteness, Presented by The Racial Imaginary Institute. (, , , , ) This panel presents four poets whose work has explicitly confronted whiteness, moderated by The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII) member Monica Youn. TRII brings together artists and thinkers to mark, challenge, and beset white dominance, to make visible what has been presented as inevitable so that we can transform our imaginings of race. We hope to catalyze other writers and artists to reimagine our racial pathologies, to scrutinize not only obvious bigotry but also our own complicity.

Monica Youn's book Blackacre won the William Carlos Williams Award, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and Kingsley Tufts Award and longlisted for the National Book Award. Her previous book Ignatz was a finalist for the National Book Award. She teaches at Princeton.


Twitter Username: monicayoun

Sharon Olds is most recently the author of Odes, and Stag’s Leap, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize and the T.S Eliot Prize (UK). She teaches in the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at New York University.

Shane McCrae is the author of, most recently, In the Language of My Captor, winner of the 2018 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Poetry, and The Gilded Auction Block, and has received a Lannan Literary Award, a Whiting Writer’s Award, and an NEA fellowship. He teaches at Columbia University in New York.


Twitter Username: akasomeguy

Natalie Scenters-Zapico is the author of The Verging Cities, and the forthcoming Lima :: Limón. A professor of literature at Bennington College, she has won awards and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, PEN America, and CantoMundo.


Twitter Username: Nascenters

Website: nataliescenterszapico.net

Joy Katz is the author of three poetry books and many essays. Her new manuscript, White: An Abstract, documents every minute of whiteness in her life. She collaborates on social practice art, including, recently, OverHear/OverHere, live music for shift workers. She lives and teaches in Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: Joy_Katz

Portland Ballroom 253-254, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F212. Filthy Presidentiad: Walt Whitman in the Age of Trump, Sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. () The 2019 bicentennial of Walt Whitman, democracy’s bard, falls in the shadow of a demagogic presidency. “What a filthy Presidentiad!” Whitman thundered. His jeremiad had Franklin Pierce in mind, but his words of outrage resonate today. Martín Espada, a poet in the tradition of Whitman, invokes “Song of Myself” and other works to celebrate Whitman’s vision of radical egalitarianism, his prophetic warnings against those “fat with wealth of money and products and business ventures,” and his empathy for “the rights of them the others are down upon,” those stereotyped and scapegoated in Trump’s America.

Martín Espada has published more than fifteen books. His new collection of poems is called Vivas to Those Who Have Failed. Other books of poems include The Trouble Ball, The Republic of Poetry and Alabanza. His honors include the Shelley Memorial Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F213. A Poem for Our Time: Poets Nominate the Poems We Need in 2019—and Beyond. (, , , , ) Established poets from the faculty of the Napa Valley Writers’ Conference each select and discuss a poem, either their own or the work of a poet they admire, that speaks to a contemporary issue of their choosing. Matters of political leadership, the environment, the state of the arts, identity, and other concerns are all on the table for this careful examination of the role of poetry in these critical times.

Nan Cohen is the author of two poetry collections: Rope Bridge and Unfinished City. She lives in Los Angeles, where she is chair of English at Viewpoint School. A former Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, she is Poetry Program Director of the Napa Valley Writers' Conference.


Twitter Username: nancohen

Ada Limón is the author of five books of poetry, including Bright Dead Things, which was named a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry and a finalist of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award. Her new book The Carrying has been called "her best yet" by National Public Radio.


Twitter Username: adalimon

Website: adalimon.com

David St. John is the author of many collections of poetry, including The Last Troubadour: New & Selected Poems. He is chair of the Department of English and teaches in the PhD Program in Literature and Creative Writing at University of Southern California.

Major Jackson is the author of four collections, most recently, Roll Deep. A recipient of a Whiting Writer's Award, Pushcart Prize, and Guggenheim Fellowship, Jackson is the Richard A. Dennis Professor at University of Vermont. He serves as editor of the Harvard Review.


Twitter Username: Poet_Major

Website: majorjackson.com

Matthew Zapruder is editor at large for Wave Books, and teaches poetry in the Saint Mary's College of California MFA. His most recent book of poems is Sun Bear. Why Poetry, is his book of prose. 


Twitter Username: matthewzapruder

Portland Ballroom 256, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F214. All Your Faves Are Problematic: #MeToo and the Ethics of Public Call-Outs. (, , , ) With courts that convict just 2 percent of rapists, calling out predators publicly has become a vital tool in promoting the safety of vulnerable individuals. The members of this panel discuss candidly how they worked to call out prominent sexual predators, offering concrete tools for healing and advocacy. Their bold, ambitious aim: to end victim-shaming and silencing, foster protection of assault and harassment victims, and encourage greater professionalization in literary workplaces.

Bettina Judd's research focus is on Black women's creative production and feminist thought. Her collection of poems Patient won the 2013 Black Lawrence Press Hudson Book Prize. She is currently Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle.


Twitter Username: bettinajudd

Ashaki M. Jackson is an applied social psychologist, program evaluator and poet. She is a Cave Canem and VONA alumna who serves on the VIDA: Women In Literary Arts board. A cofounder of Women Who Submit, Jackson is the author of Surveillance and Language Lesson.


Twitter Username: ashakijackson

Website: www.ashakijackson.com

Lynn Melnick is author of the poetry collections Landscape with Sex and Violence and If I Should Say I Have Hope, both with YesYes Books. She is a 2017-2018 Cullman Center Fellow at the NYPL. She serves on the Executive Board of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: LynnMelnick

Khadijah Queen is the author of five books, most recently I'm So Fine: A List of Famous Men & What I Had On. Her verse play Non-Sequitur won the Leslie Scalapino Award for Innovative Women Performance Writers. She is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at University of Colorado, Boulder.


Twitter Username: Authorkq

Website: http://khadijahqueen.com

Zachary A. Doss Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F215. New Poetry from Omnidawn. (Tyrone Williams, Jason Bayani, Jaswinder Bolina, Norma Cole, Sara Mumolo) Come to hear Omnidawn's authors read from their new titles! They will each share about the work and read as well. A Q&A will follow.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F215B. Naugatuck River Review and Wordpeace Reading. (Lori Desrosiers) Naugatuck River Review is a journal of narrative poetry in its 11th year of publication. Wordpeace.com is an online journal of poetry, short fiction, non-fiction essays and artwork dedicated to peace and social justice. NRR will be featuring contest winners and poets in this year's journals, including some from the Portland area. Wordpeace will feature several writers from the most recent issue.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F216. Writing Into the Great Land: Women Poets of Alaska. (, , , , ) Alaska contains 663,300 square miles of diverse terrain encompassing permafrost, rocky shorelines, cities, mountains, islands, volcanoes, and more. Obviously, no single poet could give voice to all of it. Five poets discuss what it means to write as a woman into a landscape as large and varied as Alaska’s. Coming from very different environments and cultures, each will discuss what living in Alaska brings to their writing and writing practices.

Erin Coughlin Hollowell lives at the end of the road in Homer, Alaska. She has published two full-length poetry collections: Pause Traveler and Every Atom. Her poetry has appeared in literary magazines. She teaches in the UAA MFA Program and is the Executive Director of Storyknife Writers Retreat.


Twitter Username: beingpoetry

Website: http://www.erincoughlinhollowell.com

Susanna J. Mishler is the author of Termination Dust, a Lambda Literary Award finalist. Her poems appear in Alaska Quarterly Review, The Iowa Review, Kenyon Review Online, Mid-American Review, and elsewhere. She lives in Anchorage, Alaska and earns her living as an electrician.

Nicole Stellon O’Donnell's most recent book is You Are No Longer in Trouble. She won an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Rasmuson Foundation. A recipient of a Fulbright Distinguished Award in Teaching, she teaches language arts at a school housed inside a juvenile detention facility.


Twitter Username: steamlaundry

Website: www.nicolestellon.com

Marie Tozier is an Inupiaq poet who lives in Nome, Alaska. Her first book, Open the Dark, is soon to be published. She is a graduate of the University of Alaska Anchorage low-residency MFA program. Tozier writes and teaches with emphasis on memory, place, and the truth of one's own journey.

Emily Wall is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Alaska. She holds an MFA in poetry and her work has been published most recently in Prairie Schooner and AQR. She has two books: Liveaboard and Freshly Rooted with a third book, Breaking Into Air: Birth Poems, forthcoming.


Twitter Username: EmilydWall

Website: www.emily-wall.com

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F217. 2018/2019 Writers' Conferences & Centers (WC&C) Meeting. An opportunity for members of Writers’ Conferences & Centers to meet one another and the staff of AWP to discuss issues pertinent to building a strong community of WC&C programs.

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F218. From the First "The End" to Hitting Send: On Revising the Novel. (, , , , ) Kill your darlings. Read it out loud. Have a friend edit it. Plenty of advice exists for revising short fiction, but shoring up a novel spanning hundreds of pages presents a different set of challenges—especially since many workshops focus on short stories. The novelists on this panel have all written books that evolved from messy drafts to published works of art, and they share strategies, techniques, and revision tips—along with some trials and errors—with those who aspire to do the same.

Katie Cortese is the author of Girl Power and Other Short-Short Stories and the forthcoming Make Way for Her and Other Stories. Her work recently appeared in Indiana Review, Wigleaf, Juked, and elsewhere. She teaches at Texas Tech University and is the fiction editor for Iron Horse Literary Review.


Twitter Username: KatieCortese

Website: www.katiecortese.com

Chantel Acevedo's novels include The Distant Marvels, a Booklist Editors Choice pick, A Falling Star, and Love and Ghost Letters. Her most recent novel is The Living Infinite. An Associate Professor, she teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Miami.


Twitter Username: chantelacevedo

Randa Jarrar is the author of the critically acclaimed novel A Map of Home and the short story collection Him, Me, Muhammad Ali. Her essays have appeared in The SunGuernicaOxford AmericanNew York Times MagazineUtne Reader, and Salon. She is Associate Professor at Fresno State's MFA Program.


Twitter Username: randajarrar

Website: randajarrar.com

Derek Palacio is the author of the novella How to Shake the Other Man and the novel The Mortifications. He is the co-director, with Claire Vaye Watkins, of the Mojave School, a free creative writing workshop for teenagers in rural Nevada. He teaches at IAIA and Ashland University.


Twitter Username: derekpalacio

Website: derekpalacio.com

SJ Sindu is the author of the novel Marriage of a Thousand Lies, which won a Publishing Triangle Award and was an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist. She holds a PhD in Creative Writing from Florida State University, and teaches at Ringling College of Art and Design.


Twitter Username: sjsindu

Website: http://sjsindu.com

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F219. MANOA and The Contemporary Pacific: A Thirty-year Celebration. (, , , , ) MANOA and The Contemporary Pacific have published literature from Asia, the Pacific, and the Americas since 1989. They have influenced Americans' awareness of international writing and promoted minority languages and communities of the Pacific hemisphere. Panelists will talk about introducing readers to thousands of authors and translators, representing familiar and unfamiliar Pacific and Asian languages, including Tibetan, Nepali, Nuosu, Native Hawaiian, Tahitian, Khmer, and Uchinaaguchi.

Noah Perales-Estoesta received his undergraduate degree from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2015 before living in Brazil for a year as a Fulbright scholar. He now works as development and digital projects specialist for the University of Hawaii Press in Honolulu.

Alexander Mawyer is Associate Professor at the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, Codirector of the University of Hawai‘i's Biocultural Initiative of the Pacific, and Editor of The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs.

Frank Stewart is an editor of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, author of four books of poetry and one of prose on environmental literature, and editor of dozens of anthologies and sixty volumes of Manoa. Winner of the Whiting and other writing awards, Stewart is the President of the Manoa Foundation.

Pat Matsueda is the managing editor of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing and a recipient of an Elliott Cades Award for Literature. Her poetry collection Stray was published in 2006; her novella, Bedeviled, was published in 2016/2017.


Twitter Username: patmatsueda

Website: http://someperfectfuture.com

Robert Shapard was cofounder and editor of Manoa in its early years. His fiction and essays have appeared in World Literature Today, New World Writing, New England Review, Kenyon Review, Juked, Necessary Fiction, and HocTok. Recently,he edited Flash Fiction International

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F220. The Art of the Book Review. (, , , , ) Thousands of books are published each year. We're led to many of them by intelligent, engaging, well-made book reviews, which not only investigate and articulate the mysteries and pleasures a literary text offers, but also please the reader with their style. Five widely published writers/critics/editors discuss the review as a genre in its own right, a unique form that offers—and invites—critical reflection, raises the level of public discourse, and establishes professional reputation.

Carolyn Kellogg is Books Editor at the LA Times. She assigns and edits all books coverage, online and in print, for the largest newspaper on the west coast. She also helps steer the paper's Festival of Books, the nation's largest literary festival. Her literary coverage is award winning.


Twitter Username: paperhaus

Gabino Iglesias is a writer, journalist, editor, and book reviewer. He’s the author of Zero Saints, Hungry Darkness, and Gutmouth. His reviews have appeared in a plethora of venues and he is the book review editor for PANK.


Twitter Username: Gabino_Iglesias

Scott Esposito is the author of The Surrender and coauthor of The End of Oulipo?. He is editor-in-chief of The Quarterly Conversation, a senior editor to Two Lines, and a contributing editor to BOMB


Twitter Username: ScottEsposito

Joseph Salvatore is books editor at the Brooklyn Rail and a frequent reviewer at the New York Times Book Review. He is an associate professor of writing at The New School, founding editor of their literary journal LIT, and the author of the story collection To Assume a Pleasing Shape.


Twitter Username: jasalvatore

Website: www.josephsalvatore.com

Siddhartha Deb is the author of The Beautiful and the Damned, winner of the PEN Open award and a finalist for the Orwell Prize. A columnist for The Baffler and The New York Times Book Review and contributing editor to The New Republic, his writing has appeared in The Guardian, The Nation, and n+1.


Twitter Username: debhartha

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F221. Sustainable Print: How to Make It As an Indy Lit Mag. (, , , , ) What does it take to make it as an independent print journal today? What are the challenges and benefits of navigating a precarious literary market without the support of an institution? Editors will discuss tactics for survival as well as issues related to sustainability and aesthetic vision: how to pay contributors, whether to charge for submissions, how to value creative labor, how to design within constraints, and how to create a niche in a dynamic literary landscape.

Brianna Van Dyke is the founding editor of Ruminate, a contemplative literary arts magazine entering its twelfth year of publication. Work first published in Ruminate has gone on to receive two Pushcart Prizes and numerous notable mentions from the Best American Essays and Best American Short Stories.


Twitter Username: ruminatemag

Website: www.ruminatemagazine.org

Sid Miller is the author of three books of poetry. He lives on a small farm outside of Portland, Oregon and is the editor of the independent press, Burnside Review.

Collier Nogues's poetry collections are The Ground I Stand On Is Not My Ground and On the Other Side, Blue. She is a PhD Fellow at the University of Hong Kong, and curates Hong Kong's English-medium poetry craft talk series. She edits poetry for Juked and Tongue magazines.


Twitter Username: colliernogues

Website: www.colliernogues.com

Kimberly Ann Southwick is the founder and editor in chief of the literary arts journal Gigantic Sequins, which celebrates in 2019 the 10th anniversary of its first issue's debut. She has two poetry chapbooks, most recently EFS & VEES. She is a PhD Candidate at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


Twitter Username: kimannjosouth

Jim Gearhart is Publisher and Managing Editor of Tahoma Literary Review, which publishes fiction, nonfiction, and poetry three times a year. He writes fiction and nonfiction.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F222. Preaching Beyond the Choir: The Value of Creative Writing Outside the Major. (, , , , ) This panel considers what best to offer a student if given one shot, one class, to make creative writing relevant in the student’s day-to-day life. Panelists will share diverse approaches to the classroom that expose students to ways of viewing both written work, and the world around them, as spaces that can be shifted and enhanced through creative effort. They will engage in a discussion on the importance of exposure and representation, aspiration and a writer’s brass tacks.

Katherine Zlabek is the author of the chapbook Let The Rivers Clap Their Hands. Her fiction has appeared in Boulevard, the Kenyon Review, and Ninth Letter. She won an AWP Intro Journals Award in 2012. She currently teaches writing in Washington, DC.

David James Poissant is the author of The Heaven of Animals, winner of the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award, and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. His work has appeared in the Atlantic and the New York Times. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: djpoissant

Website: www.davidjamespoissant.com

Charles Rice-González is an Assistant Professor at Hostos Community College/CUNY. His novel, Chulito, received awards and recognition from the American Library Association and the National Book Critics Circle. He earned an MFA from Goddard College, cofounded BAAD! The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance, and is a playwright.


Twitter Username: ricegonzalez

Website: www.charlesricegonzalez.com

Michelle Y. Burke is the author of the poetry collection Animal Purpose. She is an Assistant Professor in the Humanities at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, where she teaches creative writing, literature, and composition.

Melinda Moustakis is the author of Bear Down Bear North: Alaska Stories, which won the Flannery O' Connor Award. She is the recipient of a PEN/ O. Henry Prize, Hodder Fellowship, NEA Fellowship, Kenyon Review Fellowship, Jenny McKean Moore Fellowship, and the Rona Jaffe Cullman Fellowship at NYPL.


Twitter Username: mmmoustakis

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F223. Beyond Survival: Identity & Second Generation Fiction. (, , , Camille Acker) Panelists will discuss what happens when literature moves away from the struggles of marginality, i.e the "coming out,” the “immigrant,” and the “Civil Rights” story, to talk about identity in new and normative ways. The three women write from their personal perspectives on immigration, queerness, and race, seeking contemporary narratives answering the question, “What are we doing now that we have survived?”

Tyrese Coleman is an essayist, fiction writer, and associate editor for SmokeLong Quarterly. Her first collection How To Sit was published in 2018 with Mason Jar Press.


Twitter Username: tylachelleco

Hilary Zaid is an alumna of the Squaw Valley Community of Writers and the Tin House Writers' Workshop, and a Tennessee Williams Scholar at Sewannee Writers' Conference, and the author of a novel, Paper Is White.


Twitter Username: hilaryzaid

YZ Chin is the author of Though I Get Home, which won the inaugural Louise Meriwether First Book Prize. She is also the author of two chapbooks, In Passing and deter. She works as a software engineer by day, and writes by night.


Twitter Username: yz_chin

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F224. My Brother, My Antagonist: Memoirists on Developing Family Members as Characters. (, , , , ) Complex family relationships drive many writers to memoir, but translating those relationships to the page vividly, fairly, and sensitively can be just as complex. This panel of memoirists shares stories, craft tips, and frank advice about the tough, tricky, and surprising process of turning their closest family members into rich, fully-dimensional characters, and what happened to those relationships once they did.

Mike Scalise's memoir, The Brand New Catastrophe, won the Christopher Doheny Award from the Center for Fiction. He's an 826DC advisory board member, and has received fellowships from Bread Loaf, Yaddo, Ucross, and was the Philip Roth Writer In Residence at Bucknell University.


Twitter Username: mikescalise

Jennifer Hope Choi is the recipient of the Carson McCullers Center Fellowship and the BuzzFeed Emerging Writer’s Fellowship. Her work has appeared in Best American Travel Writing 2018, VQR, Guernica, The American Scholar, The Atlantic, Lucky Peach, and elsewhere. She is working on a memoir.


Twitter Username: missjenchoi

Justin St. Germain is the author of the memoir Son of a Gun. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Tin House, Barrelhouse, Hobart, The Best of the West anthology, and elsewhere. He attended the University of Arizona and was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. He teaches at Oregon State University.

T Kira Madden is an APIA writer living in New York City. She has received fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and Hedgebrook, and serves as the founding Editor-in-chief of No Tokens, a journal of literature and art. Her memoir is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: tkmadden

Allie Rowbottom holds a PhD in Creative Writing and Literature from the University of Houston and an MFA from CalArts. She is the author of Jell-O Girls: A Family History, a memoir of motherhood, mother-loss, and Jell-O.


Twitter Username: allierowbottom

Website: http://www.allierowbottom.com/

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F225. Can I Pick Your Brain? The Fine Line Between Giving Back and Getting Paid. (, , Shawn Levy, Hank Phillipi Ryan) The right connections in publishing can jumpstart your career and make the journey more enjoyable. But there is a fine line when asking for a favor (or a freebie) and networking. This panel looks at how emerging writers can gracefully navigate the art of “the ask” and how established authors can balance their time and effort and meaningful connections. Five publishing insiders share secrets of effective networking without looking self-interested—and when to say no without looking unsupportive.

Ann Garvin, PhD, is the author of the USA Today Bestselling book I Like You Just Fine When You're Not Around, The Dog Year, and On Maggie's Watch. Professor at the University of Wisconsin Whitewater and Miami University MFA, she coruns The 5th Semester, and she is the founder of the Tall Poppy Writers.


Twitter Username: anngarvin_

Ibrahim Ahmad is the editorial director at Akashic Books, where he has worked in various capacities since 2000. He teaches at the Wilkes MFA Low-Residency Creative Writing Program, leads frequent writing workshops, and is the cofounder of Brooklyn Wordsmiths, an editorial and consulting program.


Twitter Username: AkashicBooks

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F226. Hold for Oprah: Connecting with Literary Influencers & Bloggers, Sponsored by CLMP . (, , , Jennifer Abel Kovitz) In today's increasingly noisy marketplace, small publishers must do more than routine marketing and social media campaigns to connect to readers and drive sales. Industry experts will discuss how they develop digital relationships with key literary influencers, bloggers, and other "big mouths" to raise the profile of their authors and books.


Twitter Username: cxorlando

Karen Gu is the publicity associate at Graywolf Press. She also runs the Graywolf Press instagram (@Graywolfpress).


Twitter Username: karenygu

Trisha Low is the Publicity Manager at Small Press Distribution. She has previously served at other feminist and arts organizations including The Feminist Press and the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses. She is the author of The Compleat Purge.

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F227. Immortalizing Our Beloveds: The Risks and Rewards of Writing About Family. (, , , , ) Acclaimed memoirists discuss the fraught yet thrilling adventure of writing about love and marriage, parenthood, sex, family history, and other deeply, dangerously personal stories. What are the boundaries? What's safe to expose, and what's off limits? (As one writer's wife put it: "We do not have sex in this book.") How should a writer honor their loved ones, negotiate with a partne, parent, or child, yet remain loyal to the story? And how can memoir, according to Mary Karr, "immortalize our beloveds"?

Adrienne Brodeur is the Executive Director of Aspen Words, a program of the Aspen Institute. The founder of Zoetrope: All-Story magazine, Adrienne worked as a book editor from 2005–2013. She has had essays in The New York Times, and her memoir, Wild Game, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: adriennebrodeur

Neal Thompson is a journalist and the author of five books, including A Curious ManDriving with the Devil, and the 2018 memoir Kickflip Boys. Thompson manages the Amazon Literary Partnership; he previously ran Amazon's Best Books of the Month program and co-owned the Amazon Book Review blog.


Twitter Username: nealthompson

Website: www.nealthompson.com

Cinelle Barnes, a memoirist, essayist, and educator, has received fellowships from Kundiman and VONA, and she is the writer-in-residence at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art. Her writing has appeared in CatapultLiterary Hub, and Buzzfeed, among others. Monsoon Mansion was her debut memoir.

Nicole Chung is the author of the memoir All You Can Ever Know. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, GQ, Longreads, Hazlitt, and BuzzFeed, among many others. She is the web editor in chief of Catapult and the former managing editor of The Toast.


Twitter Username: nicole_soojung

Website: nicolechung.net

Claire Dederer is the author of the memoirs Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning and Poser: My Life in Twenty-Three Poses, which was a national bestseller and has been translated into twelve languages. Her essays and criticism have appeared in The Atlantic, Vogue, The Nation, and The New York Times.


Twitter Username: ClaireDederer

Website: www.clairedederer.com

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F228. Finding the Poem: Working from Source Material. (, , , ) Archives, field guides, dictionaries, literary texts, public records, oral stories—poets turn to these primary sources to fuel new poems. Five poets discuss working from sources as a means to research their way to inspiration, speak to the world outside of the self, and instigate surprising thematic connections. Reading examples from their own poems, they consider strategies for incorporating source materials, ethical and formal concerns, and the felicities of conversing with texts.

Judy Halebsky is the author of the poetry collections, Tree Line and Sky=Empty, as well as the chapbook, Space/Gap/Interval/Distance. Her honors include fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Millay Colony. She teaches literature and creative writing at Dominican University of California.

Chanda Feldman is the author of Approaching the Fields: Poems. She is a Cave Canem Fellow, and has received a NEA Fellowship for Poetry and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. She holds an MFA from Cornell University. Chanda is a Visiting Professor at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: chanda_feldman

Website: www.chandafeldman.com

Nan Cohen is the author of two poetry collections: Rope Bridge and Unfinished City. She lives in Los Angeles, where she is chair of English at Viewpoint School. A former Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, she is Poetry Program Director of the Napa Valley Writers' Conference.


Twitter Username: nancohen

Rebecca Lindenberg is the author of Love, an Index and The Logan Notebooks, winner of the 2015 Utah Book Award. She's the recipient of an Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Fellowship and an NEA Literature Grant. She's a member of the poetry faculty at the University of Cincinnati.

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F229. The Personal Political Essay. (, , , ) What is the role of the personal political essay in our time? Our panel will discuss the generally accepted idea that personal essays are a nuanced witnessing that resists political certainty, but we will also consider the riskier possibility of an explicitly political personal essay—in the tradition of "Civil Disobedience,” "Notes of a Native Son," and "The Clan of One-Breasted Women”—that goes beyond a literature of witness to a literature of commitment.

Phillip Lopate has written over twenty books, most recently, Portrait Inside My Head, To Show and to Tell: The Craft of Literary Nonfiction and A Mother's Tale. He has also edited the anthology Art of the Personal Essay, and is a MFA nonfiction professor at Columbia University.

Mimi Schwartz’s books include When History Is Personal, Good Neighbors, Bad Times, Thoughts from a Queen-Sized Bed, and Writing True: The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction, coauthored with Sondra Perl. 

Steven Harvey is the author of a memoir, The Book of Knowledge and Wonder, and three collections of personal essays including A Geometry of Lilies. Two of his essays have been selected for The Best American Essays: “The Book of Knowledge” in 2013 and “The Other Steve Harvey” in 2018.


Twitter Username: THEsharvey

Website: www.steven-harvey-author.com

Joe Mackall is the author of Plain Secrets: An Outsider Among the Amish and the memoir The Last Street Before Cleveland. He is co-founder and -editor of River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post and on NPR's "Morning Edition."

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F230. On the 20th Anniversary of Tupelo Press, a Celebration of Native poets. (, , , , Bojan Louis) This panel features craft talks by poets whose work appears in Tupelo Press’s Native Voices anthology. This book, the first of its kind, embodies the dynamic conversations that take place in Indigenous poetry through writerly craft across generational, geographic, and stylistic divides. By foregrounding craft, we hope to initiate a conversation about Indigenous writing that moves beyond theme and narrative, considering instead the ways that form and technique can be politically charged.

CMarie Fuhrman is an Indigenous daughter of the West. CMarie’s most current poetry and nonfiction can be found in and several literary journals and online. Cindy is coeditor of Native Voices: an anthology of Indigenous poetry.

Deborah A. Miranda (Ohlone-Costanoan Esselen Nation), is the author of Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir, Indian Cartography, The Zen of La Llorona, and co-editor of Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literatures. She is Full Professor of English at Washington and Lee University.

Michael Wasson, author of This American Ghost and Self-Portrait with Smeared Centuries, is a 2018 NACF National Artist Fellow in Literature and recipient of the 2017 Adrienne Rich Award for Poetry. He is nimíipuu from the Nez Perce Reservation in Idaho.

LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) is a novelist, poet, and filmmaker. Her latest book Savage Conversations is due from Coffee House Press in February, 2019. Some awards include a United States Artist Ford Fellowship, and an American Book Award. She's the Eidson Distinguished Chair in English at UGA, Athens.


Twitter Username: LeAnneHowe

Website: http://mikokings.wordpress.com/

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F231. Writing & Mothering: Black Women Writing Under a Quadruple "Minority" in America. (, , , , ) The life of an artist focuses on untethering oneself from the margins that restrict creativity. The life of a mother, however, is all about the ties that bind. Reconciling the struggles of parenting, writing, race, gender and activism serves as the critical components of this panel. Panelists, including authors, faculty, and editors, discuss how their roles as black mothers have fortified their writing careers while also presenting unique challenges warranting discussion and discourse.

LaCoya Katoe is a writer, college English instructor, tutor, and teaching artist. She facilitates literature, poetry and writing workshops for teens in underserved communities, holds an MFA from Antioch University LA and is a VONA fellow.

Cassandra Lane is Managing Editor of L.A. Parent magazine. She received her MFA from Antioch University. Her stories have appeared in a variety of publications, including the New York Times’ “Conception” series in 2018. Her book-length project explores the impact of her great-grandfather's lynching.


Twitter Username: casslanewrites

Website: cassandralane.net

Ryane Nicole Granados is a writer, professor, and former AWP Writer to Writer Mentee. She holds an MFA from Antioch University LA, has received several writing fellowships and has work appearing in numerous publications. Her fiction novella is forthcoming in early 2019.


Twitter Username: awriterslyfe

Tameka Cage Conley, PhD is a graduate of the fiction program of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and 2018–19 recipient of the Provost Visiting Writer Fellowship at the University of Iowa. Her work is published or forthcoming in Ploughshares, VQR, Callaloo, African American Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: DrTCageConley

Cherene Sherrard is the author of the poetry collection Vixen, Dorothy West’s Paradise: A Biography of Class and Color, and a poetry chapbook entitled Mistress, Reclining. A Cave Canem fellow, she is a professor of English at University of Wisconsin–Madison.

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F232. #SonnetsSoWhite?: Poets of Color on Race and Traditional Verseforms. (, , , , ) Writing in received forms has long been considered a particularly white tradition, and poets of color who write in form are too often seen as engaging in a mode largely exclusive to white writers. Our panel challenges this notion and asks poets of color to discuss how traditional verseforms factor into their personal and poetic identities. The aim is to restructure the conversation around the politics of form by celebrating it as a powerful poetic device fully accessible to writers of color.

Chad Abushanab is the author of The Last Visit, which won the Donald Justice Poetry Prize. His poems appear in The Believer, Best New Poets, Southern Poetry Review, Ecotone, and elsewhere. He is a PhD Candidate in Literature and Creative Writing at Texas Tech, and currently lives in Iowa City.


Twitter Username: chadabushanab

Erica Dawson is the author of three books of poetry: When Rap Spoke Straight to God; The Small Blades Hurt; and Big-Eyed Afraid. With a PhD from University of Cincinnati, she is an Associate Professor of English and Writing at University of Tampa, and serves as Director of UT's low-residency MFA.

TJ Jarrett is the author of Zion, winner of the 2013 Crab Orchard Open Poetry Competition, and Ain't No Grave. Her poems appear in the PoetryBoston ReviewVirginia Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. She was awarded the 2017 George Garrett New Writing Award by the Fellowship of Southern Writers.


Twitter Username: Mathilde1469

Website: www.tjjarrett.com

Cortney Lamar Charleston is the author of Telepathologies. He has received a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation as well as fellowships from Cave Canem, The Conversation Literary Festival and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.


Twitter Username: bardsbesidebars

Jee Leong Koh is the author of four books of poems and a book of zuihitsu. He is the organizer of Singapore Unbound, which brings Singaporean and American authors and audiences together for conversations about literature and society. He runs the biennial Singapore Literature Festival in NYC.


Twitter Username: Jee_Leong_Koh

Website: https://singaporeunbound.org/

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F233. Celebrating 20 Years of the Oxford American Southern Music Issue. (, L. Lamar Wilson, Harmony Holiday, Lauren Du Graf) This reading celebrates the 20th music issue of the Oxford American, whose mission is to explore the complexity and vitality of the American South. New Yorker editor David Remnick has called this annual issue his “favorite magazine day of the year.” This event showcases Oxford American writers who explore the particular ways music expresses identity and makes human connections, pushing against perceived boundaries of Southern culture to demonstrate the contradictions and diversity within Southern music.

Sara A. Lewis received her PhD in fiction at the University of Southern Mississippi's Center for Writers. She is Associate Editor of the Oxford American.

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F234. Dirty Works: Fiction From the New American Working Class. (, , , ) Writers from poor and working-class regions read stories and novel excerpts set in the unique, underrepresented areas that inspired their respective fiction. These authors deliver their work in raw, unfiltered voices, focusing on places often ignored as literary settings. While a working-class or impoverished upbringing creates many obstacles for aspiring writers, these authors draw invaluable experience from such disadvantages, and hardship ultimately enriches their literary nuance and style.

Gonzalo Baeza is the author of the short story collection La ciudad de los hoteles vacios (The city of vacant hotels). His fiction has been published in The Texas ReviewBoulevard, and Estados Hispanos de América, among others.

Joseph D. Haske is a writer and critic whose debut novel is North Dixie Highway. His fiction appears in journals such as Boulevard, Fiction InternationalTexas Review, Four Way Review, Pleiades, and in the Chicago Tribune's literary supplement, Printers Row.


Twitter Username: jhaske4

Website: josephdhaske.com

Jodi Angel’s collection of short stories, You Only Get Letters From Jail, was named a Best Best Book of 2013 by Esquire. Her work has appeared in Esquire, Tin House, One Story, Zoetrope: All Story, Electric Literature: Recommended Reading, The Offing, and Best American Mystery Stories 2014.


Twitter Username: jodiangel3

Website: www.jodiangel.com

Daniel M. Mendoza is the editor of Stray Dogs: Interviews with Working-Class Writers. He is an assistant editor at Pleiades: A Journal of New Writing. His fiction and essays have appeared in journals across the country.

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F235. Poetry in Community: Ideas, Initiatives, Impacts. (, , , ) Why does bringing poetry to communities matter? This panel discusses the innovative and explorative opportunities being offered in community development in creative writing from four distinct centers around the country. Panelists discuss how their centers collaborate to create points of engagement, the types of programming they provide, importance of community initiatives, impact in the community, and new trends in creative writing in regard to community development.

Felicia Zamora authored the books Of Form & Gather& in Open, Marvel; and Instrument of Gaps. Winner of the 2015 Tomaž Šalamun Prize, she published two chapbooks, and she was the 2017 Poet Laureate of Fort Collins, Colorado, and is associate poetry editor for Colorado Review.

Michael McLane is the Literature Program Officer at Utah Humanities and director for the Utah Humanities Book Festival. He is an editor with Sugar House Review and saltfront. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Colorado State and an MS in Environmental Humanities from the University of Utah.

Wren Awry is a K-12 Education Coordinator at the University of Arizona Poetry Center. Their poems and essays have been published by Entropy, Essay Daily, Fairy Tale Review's Fairyland, and Ghost City Press, among other venues. They currently curate Bone + All's Nourishing Resistance interview series.


Twitter Username: WrenAwry

Charlie Malone is the Outreach Manager at the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State. Malone coordinates these efforts in hospitals, detention centers, schools, recovery groups, and more. He earned his MA from Kent State and MFA from Colorado State. Malone has published in over a dozen journals.


Twitter Username: @C_J_Malone

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F236. New Poetic Visions of the West. (, , , , ) Western landscapes have featured prominently in the American nature writing canon for the last 200 years. But what role can perspective play in re-envisioning poetry about the West? Using techniques from queer theory, ecopoetry, and cinema studies, these poets present historic and contemporary visions of the West that defy convention and upset tradition. Panelists will discuss how they explore themes of immigration, identity, language, and intimacy in their poems set in the West.

Alyse Knorr is the author of the poetry books Mega-City Redux, Copper Mother, and Annotated Glass, as well as the chapbooks Alternates and Epithalamia and the non-fiction book Super Mario Bros. 3. She teaches at Regis University and serves as a coeditor of Switchback Books.

Kate Partridge is the author of the poetry collection Ends of the Earth. She is a Research Enhancement Fellow at the University of Southern California, where she is pursuing a PhD in creative writing and literature. She edits Switchback Books.

Sean Hill, the author of two books of poems, Dangerous Goods and Blood Ties & Brown Liquor, is an assistant professor at UA-Fairbanks. His honors and awards include a fellowship from the NEA. His poems have appeared in journals and in anthologies including Black Nature and Villanelles.


Twitter Username: adamalzeal

Website: http://www.seanhillpoetry.com

Lee Ann Roripaugh is the author of four volumes of poetry. She directs the creative writing program at the University of South Dakota, and is Editor in Chief of South Dakota Review. Roripaugh currently serves as the state Poet Laureate for South Dakota.


Twitter Username: artichokeheart

Website: http://southdakota.academia.edu/LeeAnnRoripaugh

Olena Kalytiak Davis is the author of four books including: The Poem She Didn't Write and Other Poems and And Her Soul Out of Nothing (Britingham Prize). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, her poems have appeared in numerous volumes of the Best American Poetry series.

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F237. The Ice Worker Still Sings: 20th Anniversary of a Classic Text. (, , , , ) Of Andrés Montoya’s book, noted poet-critic Rigoberto González wrote, in 2008: “[I]n this generation, The Ice Worker Sings should be known as the finest book of poetry to come out of our community.” 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of this classic text, winner of an American Book Award after the poet’s death, and recently re-issued. Five published Latinx poets, none of whom knew Montoya personally, discuss what this seminal book of poetry has meant to their work and their artistic sensibilities.

Steven Sanchez is a CantoMundo Fellow and Lambda Literary Fellow. His debut book of poems, Phantom Tongue, was selected by Mark Doty as the winner of the Rochelle Ratner Memorial Award. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Fresno State.


Twitter Username: Steven_Sanchez

Manuel Paul López’s books and chapbook include These Days of Candy, The Yearning Feed, 1984 and Death of a Mexican and Other Poems. He co-edited Reclaiming Our Stories: Narratives of Identity, Resilience and Empowerment. A CantoMundo fellow, he teaches at San Diego City College.

Sarah A. Chavez is the author of the poetry collections, Hands That Break & Scar and All, Day Talking. She holds a PhD from U of Nebraska, Lincoln and teaches at the University of Washington, Tacoma. She serves as Poetry Coordinator for the Best of the Net Anthology and is a proud Macondista.


Twitter Username: sa_chavez7

Website: www.sarahachavez.com

Sara Borjas is a third generation Chicana and a Fresno poet. She is the recipient of the Blue Mesa Poetry Prize and has received fellowships from ThT Community of Writers at Squaw Valley Workshop Fellow, CantoMundo, and the Postgraduate Writer's Workshop. She teaches creative writing at UC Riverside.

Heidi Andrea Restrepo Rhodes is a queer, disabled, mixed-race, second-generation Colombian immigrant, poet, artist, scholar, and activist. Her manuscript The Inheritance of Haunting was awarded the 2018 Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize.

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F238. I'm Unprepared: Navigating Trauma in Writing Classrooms. (, , , , ) In the age of “trigger warnings” and #MeToo classrooms are frequently spaces that hold acknowledged and unacknowledged trauma. This reality can leave educators at a loss for how to identify and manage behaviors related to and masking trauma. This panel will provide tools for how to support both students and colleagues through these challenges in the writing classroom.

Rachel M. Simon is the author of the poetry collection Theory of Orange and the chapbook Marginal Road. She works as the Associate Director of Multicultural Affairs and LGBTQQ Coordinator at Pace University. She teaches college courses at Bedford Hills Women's Prison and SUNY Purchase College.

Olivia Worden holds an MFA in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College. She has taught writing and diversity workshops at Roger Williams University, Sarah Lawrence College, Andrus, Westchester County Correctional Facility, and Pace University. She is the Director of the Social Justice Intensive at SLC.

Adam Falkner is the author of Adoption (Winner of the 2018 Diode Editions Chapbook Award), and the Founder and Executive Director of the Dialogue Arts Project. He is an Arthur Zankel Fellow and PhD candidate in the English Education program at Columbia University.

Juan J. Morales is the author of three poetry collections including The Handyman's Guide to End Times. He is a CantoMundo Fellow, a Macondista, the Editor of Pilgrimage Magazine, and the Chair of English and World Languages at Colorado State University-Pueblo.


Twitter Username: moralesjuanj

Arhm Choi Wild is a Kundiman fellow and holds a MFA from Sarah Lawrence. She has been published in the anthology Daring to Repair, as well as with Barrow Street, Split this Rock, Scholars & Rogues, and Two Hawks Quarterly, among other places. She currently teaches in NYC.

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F239. Who Has the Rights? The How, Why, and Whom of Translation, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , , ) Translation can be a confusing field to navigate, especially for new translators. This panel addresses ethical and practical aspects of translation, including why translation matters, who has the right to translate whom, how texts are chosen and permissions are obtained, what grants and fellowships are available, and what specific issues can arise from translating non-Romanized texts into English. Examples are drawn from the panelists’ work with Hindi, Japanese, and Korean.

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello is the author of Hour of the Ox, winner of the Donald Hall Poetry Prize and a Florida Book Award Bronze Medal. She has received fellowships from Kundiman and the American Literary Translators Association, and serves as a program coordinator for Miami Book Fair.


Twitter Username: marcicalabretta

Website: www.marcicalabretta.com

Poet and translator Rajiv Mohabir, translated I Even Regret Night (PEN/Heim Award), author of The Cowherd's Son, and The Taxidermist's Cut, is an Assistant Professor of poetry at Auburn University's creative writing program.


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Sawako Nakayasu’s books include The AntsTexture Notes, and Mouth: Eats Color. Her newest translations are Tatsumi Hijikata’s Costume en Face, and The Collected Poems of Sagawa Chika, which won the 2016 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. She has received fellowships from the NEA, PEN, and JUSFC.

E.J. Koh is the author of A Lesser Love, awarded the Pleiades Editors Prize, and her memoir The Magical Language of Others. Koh accepted fellowships from the American Literary Translators Association, MacDowell Colony, and elsewhere. Koh has received prizes for her poetry, stories, and translations.


Twitter Username: thisisEJKoh

Website: http://www.thisisejkoh.com

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F240. The Curtain, the Threshold, and the Door: Paratext in Book-Length Projects. (, , , , ) It's an opening quote, a back-cover blurb, cover catchphrase, query letter, synopsis, and the very title of the work itself—paratexts such as these invite potential readers into a primary text by provoking curiosity. As authors, how can we mold and manipulate paratext without compromising a book's emotional core? In this panel, we consider paratext as a creative tool and "fertilizer" that supports a book commercially and creatively, with advice on choosing and writing your paratext.

Anne-Marie Yerks is the author of Dream Junkies and teaches in the Southern New Hampshire online MFA program. Her work has appeared in Good Housekeeping, Redbook, Marie Claire, and in literary journals like Juked and Streetlight


Twitter Username: amy1620

Christine Flanagan, MFA, is an Associate Professor of English at University of the Sciences whose teaching includes environmental humanities and travel-based creative writing courses. She is the author of The Letters of Flannery O'Connor and Caroline Gordon.


Twitter Username: wayneroad

Tyler Dilts's work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The LA Review of Books, and The Best American Mystery Stories. He is the author of the novels A King of Infinite Space, The Pain Scale, and A Cold and Broken Hallelujah. He teaches in Long Beach, California.


Twitter Username: tylerdilts

Website: tylerdilts.com

Alexander Cendrowski is a recent graduate of the University of South Florida's MFA program. Alex's manuscript, The Aquanaut Hotel, employs juxtaposition between independent textual and graphic narratives to highlight the reader’s inherent construction of meaning and reality.


Twitter Username: CendrowskiAlex

Katharine Beutner is a writer, teacher, and organizer. She teaches at the College of Wooster; previously, she taught at UH Mānoa. Her novel Alcestis won the 2011 Edmund White Award, and her writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of BooksThe ToastPublic BooksTriQuarterly, and other publications.

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F241. Both, Neither, and Something Else Entirely: Genderqueer Writers & Writing. (, , , , ) Genderqueer writers investigate the pleasures, joys, and challenges of writing and publishing fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and more outside of the gender binary. We’ll explore: navigating use of non-binary pronouns (they/theirs, ze/hir, and more) in text, professional misgendering of authors as well as characters, queering the boundaries and norms of publishing, challenges and opportunities that small and independent publishing offer non-binary writers, and the importance of representation.

Sassafras Lowrey is the 2013 winner of the Lambda Literary Emerging Writer Award. Ze is the author of two celebrated novels: Lost Boi and Roving Pack. Lowrey is also editor of the two-time American Library Association honored Kicked Out anthology of current and former homeless LGBTQ youth.


Twitter Username: SassafrasLowrey

Website: www.SassafrasLowrey.com

Shelley Marlow is the author of Two Augusts in a Row in a Row. The art edition of Two Augusts In a Row In a Row was recently released with 24 artworks by Marlow. Marlow received an Acker Award for Excellence in Avant Guard Writing. Marlow served as the Fiction Editor of Ping Pong Magazine.

Jacq Greyja is a graduate student and William Dickey Fellow in the Poetry MFA program at San Francisco State University. They are the author of the poetry chapbook Greater Grave. Their poems have appeared in Peach Mag, Apogee, Bettering American Poetry: Volume II, and elsewhere.

Tiff Ferentini is a Publishing Associate at Kodansha Comics and Marketing Manager for Monkey Business: New Writing from Japan. Their writing has appeared in The GamblerOff the Rocks: The LGBTQ Anthology of Newtown Writers PressSongs of My Selfie: An Anthology of Millennial Writing, and others.


Twitter Username: Ferenteeny

Kenning (FKA Kenyatta) JP Garcia is a performer/poet, humorist, and cronista. JP is the author of This Sentimental Education, Slow Living, and So This Is Story. JP is also a cohost and organizer for the St. Rocco's Reading Series and is an editor at Rigorous, Five 2 One and the Operating System.


Twitter Username: kjpgarcia

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F242. Fat & Queer: Confronting Fat Bias in Life and In Literature. (, , , , ) As queer bodies step into the spotlight in life and in literature, fat queer voices remain consigned to the shadows. This panel of established and emerging writers explores the challenges and rewards of writing while fat, creating fat characters, and exploring fat queer love, sex, anger, and joy. Panelists offer ways to transform negative narratives around fatness and queerness into positive ones. They'll celebrate illuminating examples of #FATandQUEER literature and resources.
Snacks provided.

Miguel M. Morales grew up in Texas working as a migrant/seasonal farmworker and child laborer. A Lambda Literary Fellow and an alum of the Macondo Writers Workshop, Miguel's work appears in several anthologies and literary journals. He is the coeditor of Pulse/Pulso: In Remembrance of Orlando.


Twitter Username: TrustMiguel

Brian Kornell’s essays have appeared in The RumpusThe Kenyon Review Online, The Poetry Foundation’s Harriet Blog, Ninth Letter and elsewhere. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing. He wrote Fat and Queer, a five-part series, for Queen Mob's Teahouse. He has been awarded fellowships to VCCA and FAWC.


Twitter Username: briankornell

Website: briankornell.com

Valerie Wetlaufer holds a PhD from the University of Utah, and an MFA from Florida State University. She is the author of Call Me by My Other Name and the Lambda Award-winning poetry collection Mysterious Acts by My People. She is an Adjunct Professor of English at Mount Mercy University in Iowa.


Twitter Username: v_phd

Website: www.valeriewetlaufer.com

Sarah Einstein is an Asst. Professor of Creative Writing at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Her book Mot: A Memoir was selected for the AWP Prize in creative nonfiction for 2014. She's the Special Projects Editor for Brevity and her work has appeared in The Sun, Ninth Letter, and other journals and been awarded a Pushcart Prize.


Twitter Username: sarahemc2

Website: http://saraheinstein.com/

Baruch Porras Hernandez is based in San Francisco. He is the voice for Shipwreck, an erotic fanfiction competition show and podcast, and a Lambda Literary Fellow in Poetry as well as in Playwriting. He is the founder of the Latinx literary series Donde Esta Mi Gente?, and regularly hosts literary shows for KQED.


Twitter Username: baruchisonfire

Website: baruchporrashernandez.wordpress.com

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F243. Making Light—Humor’s Serious Place in Children’s/YA Literature. (, , , , ) We dispel two myths: that humor is insignificant because it is lighthearted, and that with humor you’ve either got it or you don’t. We discuss the craft of humor and demonstrate how to purposefully write funnier. From our experience as writers with wide knowledge of children’s/YA lit, we examine how humor lies at the intersection of truth and pain, and how humor gives effective means to speak to pain and injustice, offering healing, hope, and light.

Tom Birdseye is the author of nineteen books for young readers. Combined, they have garnered numerous awards, including forty-three state children's choice nominations. He is on the faculty of the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA program in Writing for Children and Young Adults.


Twitter Username: TomBirdseye1

Eric Taylor is the author of Using Folktales and editor of Some Fruits of Solitude. He has published children’s and adult poetry and creative nonfiction. He’s taught at writing conferences and colleges. He’s seeking publication for several children’s books. He holds an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Jenn Bailey holds an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She won the Candlewick award for Plink! and the Flying Pig Humor award for Once. She’s presented at national and regional SCBWI conferences and at HWKT and OYAN workshops. Bailey edits for StarBright Books. Her debut picture book is titled A Friend for Henry.


Twitter Username: jennbailey

Anita Fitch Pazner earned her MFA in writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts in 2017. A veteran Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators conference coordinator and speaker, her articles have appeared in blogs, magazines, and newspapers.


Twitter Username: AnitaPazner

Jay Whistler holds an MFA in writing (Vermont College of Fine Arts) and an MA in tech writing. She’s worked as a university writing instructor, was a regional advisor for SCBWI Switzerland, has presented at SCBWI events, and has had articles appear in various publications, most recently in Publishers Weekly.


Twitter Username: JayWhistler

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F244. A Reading & Conversation with Kaveh Akbar, Jos Charles, and Fady Joudah, Sponsored by Alice James Books and Milkweed Editions. (, , , ) Three award-winning poets sharing their most recent work: In Footnotes in the Order of Disappearance, Fady Joudah finds tenderness for the other, the dead, and the disappeared. In feeld, Jos Charles offers a lyrical unraveling of the circuity of gender and speech. In Calling a Wolf a Wolf, Kaveh Akbar confronts addiction and the strenuous path of recovery, beginning with the wilds of the mind. Introduced and moderated by Victoria Chang.

Victoria Chang's book, Barbie Chang, was published by Copper Canyon Press. The Boss won the PEN Center Literary Award and a California Book Award. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, Sustainable Arts Fellowship, and Alice Fay di Castnola Award. She teaches at Antioch's low-res program in L.A.


Twitter Username: VChangPoet

Website: www.victoriachangpoet.com

Fady Joudah is a Palestinian American physician, poet, and translator. He is the recipient of the Griffin International Poetry Prize in 2013 for his translation of Ghassan Zaqtan's Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me. His collection The Earth in the Attic won the Yale Younger Poets prize, and his translations of Mahmoud Darwish’s poetry earned him a Banipal prize from the UK and a PEN Center USA Award in translation. Alight and the ebook Textu, which is composed on cell phone in character count, are his most recent poetry collections.

Jos Charles is author of feeld, a winner of the 2017 National Poetry Series, selected by Fady Joudah, and Safe Space. In 2016, she received the Poetry Foundation's Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship. She has an MFA from the University of Arizona and resides in Long Beach, CA.


Twitter Username: josdcharles

Kaveh Akbar is founding editor of DIVEDAPPER. His poems appear in PoetryAmerican Poetry ReviewPloughsharesTin House, and elsewhere. The recipient of a Ruth Lilly & Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, Kaveh's first book is Calling a Wolf a Wolf.


Twitter Username: kavehakbar

Website: kavehakbar.com

Oregon Ballroom 203, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F245. Extraordinary Journeys: Women Writers On and Off the Trail. (, , , , ) Nothing shapes a narrative like a journey, and no form of travel allows as much detail to be absorbed as a walk. The trail itself can serve as a subject and narrative device, but also as a conduit for reflecting on issues such as racism, sexism, environmental justice, trauma, addiction, and healing. This panel brings together four women walkers, hikers, and roamers of urban and wild places to talk about how following a trail and laying down a narrative can intersect to serve a higher purpose.

Jennifer Sahn is executive editor of Pacific Standard. Stories she has edited have won the National Magazine Award, O. Henry Prize, and Pushcart Prize, among others, have been frequently selected for the Longreads Top Five, and have been widely reprinted in the Best American Series anthologies.


Twitter Username: throwin_shadows

Website: www.jennifersahn.net

Rahawa Haile is an Eritrean American writer. In Open Country, her memoir about thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, explores what it means to move through America and the world as a black woman and is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: RahawaHaile

Kathryn Miles is the author of four books, including Quakeland (Dutton 2017). Her writing has appeared in publications including Best American Essays, Boston Globe, The New York Times, Outside, Popular Mechanics, and Time. She serves as writer-in-residence at Green Mountain College.


Twitter Username: kathryn_miles

Website: www.kathrynmiles.net

Cheryl Strayed is the bestselling author of the memoir Wild, the novel Torch, and the nonfiction collections Tiny Beautiful Things and Brave Enough. Her essays have appeared in The Best American Essays, the New York Times, Vogue, The Sun, Tin House, the Missouri Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: CherylStrayed

Website: http://www.cherylstrayed.com/

Joan Naviyuk Kane is the author of six books and chapbooks of poetry and prose, for which she has received a Whiting Writer’s Award, the Donald Hall Prize, and other awards. A 2018 Guggenheim Fellow in Poetry, she teaches in the low-res MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts.


Twitter Username: eskimoment

Website: thejoankane.com

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F246. "Bad Hombres" and "Malas Mujeres:" Immigrant Women Writers in the Age of Trump. (, , , , ) For immigrant women writers, the anti-immigrant and anti-woman rhetoric of the current administration viscerally affects our daily existence. This panel features diverse writers whose work includes memoir, poetry, fiction, essay, and hybrid texts. Writers will discuss how they negotiate writing in a time when both their intersected identities as women and immigrants are under attack, as well as strategies that succeed or fail when creating safe spaces online and in literary communities.

Hope Wabuke is the author of The Leaving and Movement No.1: Trains. She received a National Endowment for the Arts Award in 2017, and has been published widely in various magazines. She is also an Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and a contributing editor for The Root.


Twitter Username: HopeWabuke

Website: www.hopewabuke.com

Marivi Soliven has taught writing at the University of the Philippines and University of California, San Diego, and authored seventeen books. She landed a Hedgebrook writing residency in 2012. Her debut novel The Mango Bride won Grand Prize at the Palanca Awards, the Philippine counterpart of the Pulitzer Prize.


Twitter Username: marivisoliven

Mahtem Shiferraw is a poet and visual artist from Ethiopia and Eritrea. Her work has been published in many literary journals. She won the Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets for her poetry collection Fuchsia. She received her MFA from Vermont College.

Huda Al-Marashi is the author of the memoir, First Comes Marriage: My Not-So American Love Story.


Twitter Username: HudaAlMarashi

Natalia Sylvester is the author of the novels Chasing the Sun and Everyone Knows You Go Home. She is a faculty member of the Creative Writing MFA program at Regis University. Her work has appeared in Latina magazine, Writer's Digest, and NBCLatino.com. Twitter/IG: @NataliaSylv.


Twitter Username: NataliaSylv

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F247. A Dialogue with the Editors of Bloomsbury’s New Book Series in Creative Writing. (, , , ) Five editors and authors of a new international book series on Research in Creative Writing (Bloomsbury Publishing) discuss creative methodologies that writers use to inform their art and teaching. The session provides frames for connecting imaginative research and innovative pedagogy in college and university classrooms. It also invites audience members to ask questions about how they might develop manuscript proposals for the book series.

Janelle Adsit's books include the poetry collection Unremitting Entrance, and texts for classroom-use: Toward an Inclusive Creative Writing, and Critical Creative Writing: Essential Readings. She is Assistant Professor of creative writing at Humboldt State University.

Conchitina Cruz teaches creative writing and literature at the University of the Philippines in Diliman. Her books of poetry include Dark Hours, elsewhere held and lingered, and There Is No Emergency. She helps run the small press expo Better Living Through Xeroxography.

James Ryan is a PhD student in Composition and Rhetoric at University Wisconsin–Madison. He is currently coauthoring a creative writing workshop handbook that draws on the fields of rhetoric, composition, and literary theory.

Steve Westbrook is Associate Professor of English at California State University, Fullerton, where he teaches courses in creative writing and cultural studies. With James Ryan, he is the coauthor of The Critical Work of Creative Writing. His long poem is Vox Americana.

Portland Ballroom 253-254, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F248. A Reading and Conversation with Erica Jong, Lidia Yuknavitch, and Raymond Luczak, Sponsored by Red Hen Press. (, , , ) In the 21st century, where has the story gone? Are we living and writing a whole new narrative? Paying attention to characters we didn't notice, seeing what's wrong with heroes and saints, and embracing outlaws and fighters for truth? Stories take on new shapes as we move into the future.

Erica Jong, celebrated poet, novelist and essayist with over twenty-five books published in forty-five languages, including international best-sellers, Fear of Flying & Fear of Dying. She’s adapting her favorite novel, Fanny: Being the True History of the Adventures of Fanny Hackabout-Jones for an unlimited television series and has a new poetry volume due for release.


Twitter Username: EricaJong

Raymond Luczak is the author and editor of over twenty books, encompassing poetry, fiction, memoir, and drama. Titles include FlannelwoodThe Kinda Fella I Am: Stories, and QDA: A Queer Disability Anthology. A Lambda Literary Award finalist, he has been nominated nine times for the Pushcart Prize.


Twitter Username: deafwoof

Website: http://www.raymondluczak.com/

Lidia Yuknavitch is the author of the novel The Book of Joan and the bestselling novel The Small Backs of Children, as well as the the anti-memoir The Chronology of Water. She founded the Corporeal Writing Workshops. 


Twitter Username: lidiayuknavitch

Website: www.lidiayuknavitch.net

Susannah Nevison is the author of two books of poetry: Lethal Theater, winner of the Wheeler Poetry Prize, and Teratology, winner of the Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize. She teaches at Sweet Briar College.


Twitter Username: snevison

Website: www.susannahnevison.com

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F249. Act of Gratitude: Poetry International's 20th Anniversary Celebratory Reading. (, , ) This event celebrates twenty years of Poetry International’s commitment to increasing the presence of global literature translated into English, and to placing that work in conversation with exciting voices in English-language literature. Come hear acclaimed poets, translators, and members of our editorial staff read and discuss contemporary literature.

Sherwin Bitsui is the author of Flood Song and Shapeshift. He is the recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship, a Native Arts & Culture Foundation Fellowship, an American Book Award, and a PEN Open Book Award. He teaches at the Low Residency in Creative Writing at IAIA.


Twitter Username: sbitsui

Catherine Barnett has received the James Laughlin Award, a Guggenheim, and a Whiting. Her third book of poems, Human Hours, was published last fall. Author of The Game of Boxes and Into Perfect Spheres Such Holes Are Pierced, she is core faculty at NYU and is a distinguished lecturer at Hunter.

Jennifer Minniti- Shippey is Managing Editor of Poetry International, co-founder and faculty director of Poetic Youth, and a lecturer at San Diego State University. Her publications include the chapbooks Done Dating DJs and Earth's Horses & Boys.


Twitter Username: ElectricJenny

Portland Ballroom 256, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

F250. Me Too: Writing Your Way Through (and Out of) Childhood Sexual Abuse. (, , , , ) How to write the fragmented, charged, often shameful memory of childhood sexual abuse in a way that isn’t mired in self-pity, rage, or the standard-issue language of confession? And how to excavate a history half- or mis- remembered, as early trauma often is? What are the pitfalls when writing becomes therapy and when publishing becomes public? Five poets discuss their struggles with these questions as both writers and teachers to make poems that demonstrate the courage to heal.

Nickole Brown’s books are Sister , Fanny Says (with a 2017 audiobook), and To Those Who Were Our First Gods. She received a Weatherford Award for Appalachian Poetry and an NEA. She teaches at Sewanee and the Hindman Settlement School.

Laure-Anne Bosselaar is the author of The Hour Between Dog & WolfSmall Gods of Grief (Isabella Gardner Prize), and A New Hunger (ALA Notable Book). She taught at Sarah Lawrence College and teaches at the Solstice Low-Residency MFA Program. Her fourth collection is, These Many Rooms.

Dorianne Laux’s new and selected poems, Only as the Day Is Long, is forthcoming. She teaches for the Program in Creative Writing at North Carolina State University and is founding faculty of Pacific University's Low Residency MFA Program.


Twitter Username: doriannelaux

Website: http://doriannelaux.net

Richard Hoffman is author of seven books, Half the House: A Memoir; the poetry collections Without Paradise, Gold Star Road, Emblem, and Noon until Night; Interference & Other Stories; and the memoir Love & Fury. He is Senior Writer-in-Residence at Emerson College.


Twitter Username: rhoffman49

Website: richardhoffman.org

Kamilah Aisha Moon is the author of Starshine & Clay and She Has a Name. A Pushcart prize winner, Moon was also selected as a PSA New American Poet. Widely published in journals and anthologies, Moon holds an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and teaches at Agnes Scott College.


Twitter Username: kamoonshine

Website: http://www.kamilahaishamoon.org

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F251. America, We Call Your Name: Celebrating 20 Years of Sixteen Rivers Press. (Camille Norton, Dean Radar, Maya Khosla, ) Celebrating 20 Years as a Northern California Publishing Collective in 2019, Sixteen Rivers Press presents poets reading from our anniversary anthology, America, I Call Your Name: Poems of Resistance and Resilience. Since its founding in 1999, Sixteen Rivers has been renowned for mentoring poets in the art of book-making and for publishing books of poetry that reflect an evolving sense of the diversity of Northern California’s geographies, cultural identities, and poetic styles.

Barbara Swift Brauer is a freelance writer living in San Geronimo, California. Her poetry collection is At Ease in the Borrowed World. A second collection, Rain, Like a Thief, is forthcoming.

Zachary A. Doss Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F252. What is the Literary Graphic Novel?. (Peter Bagge, James Sturm, , Candida Rifkind, Rina Ayuyang) Luminaries of the literary graphic novel medium participate in a wide-ranging discussion of their craft. Topics will include how to tackle different genres (fiction, reportage, autobiography, and biography), authorial voice and style, influences, getting published, and more.

Craig Thompson is a cartoonist and the author of the award-winning books Blankets, Carnet de Voyage, Good-bye Chunky Rice, and Habibi. Thompson's graphic novel Blankets won numerous industry awards and has been published in nearly twenty languages around the world.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F253. Narrative Healing: Yoga & Writing Workshop. (Lisa Weinert) Open to all! This full body, full spirit storytelling experience will use yoga, writing and listening exercises to inspire a holistic and freeing storytelling experience. This 75 minute afternoon workshop will include a gentle yoga practice, writing prompts and listening exercises. These classes will build off each other, come for the entire series or drop in for a single class. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a pen and paper.

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F254. Between the Margins and Mainstream: Liminal Spaces of Jewish American Literature. (, , , , ) For many American Jews, being “Jewish” is not a religious nor an ethnic signifier; Jewish Americans have diverse conceptions of marriage, gender, culture, and spiritual practice. While Jewish identity remains, it is not easily classifiable in social or literary spheres. How does this anomalous position play out in contemporary Jewish American literature? This panel of Jewish-identified writers and performers will address how they and others have grappled with an increasingly elusive identity.

Jacob M. Appel is the author of the novels The Man Who Wouldn't Stand Up and The Biology of Luck. His stories have been published in more than two hundred literary journals including Virginia Quarterly Review, Missouri Review, and Subtropics; a collection is forthcoming.

Molly Antopol is author of The UnAmericans, which won a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 Award, the NYPL Young Lions Fiction Award, the Berlin Prize, the French-American Prize, among others; and was longlisted for the National Book Award. She teaches at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: mollyantopol

Website: www.mollyantopol.com

Alicia Jo Rabins is a poet, composer, performer, and Torah scholar. She is the author of Divinity School (selected by C.D. Wright for the 2015 APR/Honickman First Book Prize) and Fruit Geode


Twitter Username: ohaliciajo

Aaron Tillman is the author of the short story collection Every Single Bone in My Brain and the book of critical nonfiction, Magical American Jew. He is Associate Professor of English and Director the Honors Program at Newbury College.

Erika Meitner is the author of five books of poems, including Holy Moly Carry Me, Copia, and Ideal Cities, which was a 2009 National Poetry Series winner. She is an associate professor of English at Virginia Tech, where she directs the MFA and undergraduate programs in creative writing.


Twitter Username: rikam99

Website: erikameitner.com

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F255. Not a Wasted Word: A Practical Field Guide to Plotting and Structuring Novellas. (, , , ) Once a preferred genre, novellas have made a comeback—with writers like Denis Johnson, Gillian Flynn, Teju Cole and Haruki Murakami capitalizing on the form. This panel will touch on the history and value of novellas and short novels while focusing on craft. Panelists will share how they distill ideas, approach structure, integrate research, and develop characters and texture in a smaller space. The goal is to demystify the novella by offering practical tips and publishing avenues.

Robert James Russell is the author of the novellas Mesilla and Sea of Trees, and the chapbook Don't Ask Me to Spell It Out. He is a founder and the managing editor of the literary journals Midwestern Gothic and CHEAP POP. Robert currently lives and teaches in South Bend, Indiana.


Twitter Username: robhollywood

Website: www.robertjamesrussell.com

Theodora Bishop is the author of the novella, On the Rocks and winner of The Cupboard’s contest for her prose chapbook, Mother Tongues. She holds an MFA from the University of Alabama and is pursuing her PhD in Creative Writing and Literature at the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: TheodoraZBishop

Juan Carlos Reyes is as an Assistant Professor of creative writing at Seattle University and is the editor of Big Fiction. His first book, A Summer's Lynching, won the Quarterly West Novella prize. His collection, Elements of a Bystander, won the Arcadia Press 2017 Chapbook Prize.


Twitter Username: JCReyesian

Lee Upton's most recent books are Visitations: Stories and Bottle the Bottles the Bottles the Bottles: Poems. Her other books include The Tao of Humiliation, Swallowing the Sea, and the novella The Guide to the Flying Island.

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F256. Beyond the Desk: Engaging Community As a Writer-Activist. (, , , , ) Writing requires solitude, but being a writer requires community. What does it mean, though, to be a writer-activist today? This panel will focus on how five Pacific Northwest writers have woven activism into their writing lives, from the personal to the broadly political. Discussion will include how to find and create arts-activism opportunities in your own community, the relationship between engaged literary citizenship and engaged democracy, and the influence activism has on the panelists’ own writing.

Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum is the author of three short story collections: This Life She's ChosenSwimming With Strangers, and What We Do With the Wreckage, which won the 2017 Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. She teaches high school near Seattle.


Twitter Username: kslunstrum

Website: www.kirstensundberglunstrum.com

Samuel Ligon is the author of two novels and two books of stories. He’s coeditor, with Kate Lebo, of Pie & Whiskey: Writers Under the Influence of Butter and Booze. He teaches at Eastern Washington University and is Artistic Director of the Port Townsend Writer's Conference.


Twitter Username: samuel_ligon

Kristen Millares Young is Writer-in-Residence at Hugo House. She is the author of Subduction. Her work appears in the Washington Post, Guardian, The New York Times, Crosscut, Hobart and Moss. She is a cofounder & board chair of InvestigateWest, a nonprofit news studio with major legal impact.


Twitter Username: kristenmillares

Website: www.kristenmyoung.com

Dawn Pichon Barron, writer and educator, lives and works at the south end of the Salish Sea. Her chapbook is, Escape Girl Blues.


Twitter Username: pigeongirlsgot

Julia Hands holds and MFA from Western Washington University and now coordinates the Write Our Democracy Write-In series and volunteers for Lit Crawl Seattle. She is the Assistant Program Manager at the Centrum Writers Conference and has been published in 5x5, Evansville Review, and Blink-Ink.

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F257. Mountain Writers Center – A Nonprofit Model (1993–2003) . (, , , , ) After twenty years of building a regional network, in 1993, Mountain Writers opened the first writer’s center in Oregon, immediately increasing funding for NW literary activity—readings, workshops, craft talks—featuring acclaimed poets and writers: Bei Dao, Lucille Clifton, Billy Collins, Mark Doty, David James Duncan, Jack Gilbert, Yusef Komunyakaa, Denise Levertov, Louis Simpson, James Tate, C.K. Williams, and hundreds more. Former Center staff, faculty, and students discuss the impact.

Dorianne Laux’s new and selected poems, Only as the Day Is Long, is forthcoming. She teaches for the Program in Creative Writing at North Carolina State University and is founding faculty of Pacific University's Low Residency MFA Program.


Twitter Username: doriannelaux

Website: http://doriannelaux.net

Joseph Millar's fourth collection is Kingdom. He teaches in Pacific University Low residency Program. He is a NEA and Guggenheim recipient.

Michael Robins is the author of four poetry collections, including In Memory of Brilliance & Value and People You May Know (forthcoming). He teaches literature and creative writing at Columbia College Chicago.

Jennifer Grotz is a poet, translator, and director of the Bread Loaf Writers' Conferences. She teaches at the University of Rochester.

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F258. Commonplace Live: A Reading Featuring Guests of Rachel Zucker’s Podcast. (, , , , ) This reading features Ross Gay, Gabrielle Calvocoressi, Sabrina Orah Mark, and Adam Faulkner, former guests of Commonplace, a podcast Rachel Zucker started in 2016. A series of intimate and captivating interviews by Rachel Zucker with poets and artists about quotidian objects, experiences or obsessions, Commonplace conversations explore the politics, phobias, spiritual practices, and other extraliterary forms of knowledge that are vital to an artist’s life and work.

Rachel Zucker is the author of nine books including MOTHERs and The Pedestrians. She received an NEA fellowship and her book Museum of Accidents was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She teaches at New York University, and she is the host of the podcast Commonplace: Conversations with Poets (and Other People).


Twitter Username: rachzuck

Website: www.rachelzucker.net

Ross Gay is the author of the poetry collections, Against Which, Bringing the Shovel Down, and Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, and the essay collection, The Book of Delights. He teaches at Indiana University.

Adam Falkner is the author of Adoption (Winner of the 2018 Diode Editions Chapbook Award), and the Founder and Executive Director of the Dialogue Arts Project. He is an Arthur Zankel Fellow and PhD candidate in the English Education program at Columbia University.

Sabrina Orah Mark is the author of the poetry collections The Babies and Tsim Tsum. Her collection of stories is, Wild Milk.

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart and Apocalyptic Swing. Her third book of poems, Rocket Fantastic recently won The Publishing Triangle's Audre Lorde Prize. She has poems forthcoming The New Yorker and other journals. 


Twitter Username: rocketfantastic

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F259. Translating from Non-European and Overlooked Languages. (, , , ) World literature can't be understood without translations from other than the “major” languages and countries. But translating from outside the mainstream poses challenges: applying Western valuation to non-Western work; imposing context on unfamiliar literary and cultural ideas. The dearth of American and global markets for such translations adds further challenges. Translators of Asia-Pacific languages join with editors of international journals to talk about publishing translations.

Frank Stewart is an editor of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, author of four books of poetry and one of prose on environmental literature, and editor of dozens of anthologies and sixty volumes of Manoa. Winner of the Whiting and other writing awards, Stewart is the President of the Manoa Foundation.

Alexander Mawyer is Associate Professor at the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, Codirector of the University of Hawai‘i's Biocultural Initiative of the Pacific, and Editor of The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs.

Sharon May coedited In the Shadow of Angkor: Contemporary Writing from Cambodia for Manoa journal and is editing an issue of Cambodian writing for Words Without Borders. Her fiction has appeared in Best New American Voices, the Chicago Tribune, Manoa, Tin House, and elsewhere.

Tony Barnstone is Professor of English at Whittier College; his is the author of Pulp SonnetsBeast in the Apartment, and nineteen other books and the album "Tokyo's Burning." His awards include fellowships from the NEA and NEH, the Poets Prize, the John Ciardi Prize, the Benjamin Saltman Award, the Grand Prize Strokestown International Poetry Prize, and a Pushcart Prize.


Twitter Username: TokyosBurning

Website: http://www.whittier.edu/academics/english/barnstone

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F260. The Revision That Got Away From Me. (, , , , ) We all expect to revise our books while we’re creating them alone in our rooms, and sure, we assume we’ll do some editing with our editors once the book has been acquired. But what happens when, post-acquisition, the book becomes something utterly different during the editorial revision process? Five YA authors discuss and read from the revision that got away from them. They’ll talk about how they coped, and how the process opened up unexpected possibilities and directions for their work.

Erin Saldin is the author of the Young Adult novels The Dead Enders and The Girls of No Return. Saldin holds an MFA from the University of Virginia, where she was a Henry Hoyns Fellow in Fiction. She teaches at the University of Montana.

Eliot Schrefer is a two-time finalist for the National Book Award. His New York Times-bestselling books have been named to the NPR Best of the Year list and the American Library Association best fiction list for young adults. He has also won the Green Earth Book Award and Sigurd Olson Nature Writing Award.


Twitter Username: EliotSchrefer

Website: www.eliotschrefer.com

Maria Dahvana Headley is the New York Times-bestselling author of seven books in a variety of genres, most recently The Mere Wife, a contemporary retelling of Beowulf. Upcoming are a new verse translation of Beowulf, a short story collection, and a queer young adult superhero novel, The Combustible.


Twitter Username: MARIADAHVANA

Brandy Colbert is the award-winning author of the young adult novels PointeLittle & Lion, and Finding Yvonne, as well as the forthcoming The Revolution of Birdie Randolph and critically acclaimed essays and short fiction that have been published in various anthologies.


Twitter Username: brandycolbert

Todd Mitchell is a Green Earth Honor Book award-winning author of several books for teens and middle grade readers including: The Last Panther, Backwards, and The Secret to Lying. Currently, he directs the Beginning Creative Writing Teaching Program at Colorado State University.


Twitter Username: tmitchellbooks

Website: www.ToddMitchellBooks.com

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F261. Dispatches From the Land of Erasure: Arab American Writers Forum. (, , , , ) Arab American poets have struggled to make their voices heard over the din of empire, in a culture eager to use them as voiceless props in an imperial drama about America and the globe. Drawing on the Boston Review forum that appeared in May 2018, this panel will address the dynamics of imperial erasure and poetic insistence as resistance, moving the conversation beyond the bounds of Arab American experience and into a broader conversation about intersectionality and empire. 

Marwa Helal is a poet and journalist whose work appears in Apogee, Hyperallergic, The Offing, Poets & Writers, The Recluse, Winter Tangerine, and elsewhere. She is the author of Invasive Species and the winner of BOMB Magazine’s Biennial 2016 Poetry Contest.


Twitter Username: marwahelal

Website: marshelal.com

George Abraham is a Palestinian-American poet, activist and PhD candidate at Harvard. He is the author of two chapbooks: the specimen's apology (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2019) and al youm (The Atlas Review, 2017). His writing has appeared in Tin House, Boston Review, The Rumpus, Puerto del Sol, and Nepantla.


Twitter Username: IntifadaBatata

Lena Khalaf Tuffaha's book of poetry, Water and Salt, is published by Red Hen Press. Her chapbook, Arab in Newsland won the 2016 Two Sylvias Press Prize. Her poems have been nominated for the Pushcart, Best of the Net, and the Rita Dove Prize. She holds an MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop at PLU.


Twitter Username: LKTuffaha

Website: www.lenakhalaftuffaha.com

Farid Matuk is the author of This Is a Nice Neighborhood and The Real Horse. Matuk serves on the editorial team at Fence and on the faculty of the MFA program at University of Arizona.

Philip Metres is the author of a number of books and chapbooks, including Sand OperaPictures at an ExhibitionA Concordance of Leaves, and To See the Earth. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry, has garnered a Lannan Fellowship, two NEAs, the Hunt Prize, and the Cleveland Arts Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F262. The Seemingly Impossible Second Act: Structuring the Middle of Your Novel. (, , , ) Starting a novel can be a great deal of fun. We might also have the book's ending worked out ahead of time. The trouble, for many novelists, comes with the middle of the book, the second act in which the problems introduced in the first third are developed and complicated in a way that leads to the end. This panel assembles a diverse cast of novelists of differing backgrounds and experiences to discuss the middle of the novel with an eye towards offering sound advice to fellow writers.

Michael Spurgeon is a tenured professor at American River College, the author of the novel Let The Water Hold Me Down, cofounder of the Sacramento creative writing nonprofit 916 Ink, and one of the founders and organizers of SummerWords, American River College's summer creative writing festival.

Kirstin Chen's new novel, Bury What We Cannot Take, has been named a Most Anticipated Upcoming Book by Electric Literature, The Millions, The Rumpus, Harper’s Bazaar, and InStyle, among others. She is also the author of Soy Sauce for Beginners.


Twitter Username: kirstin_chen

Nayomi Munaweera's debut novel, Island of a Thousand Mirrors, won the 2013 Commonwealth Prize for Asia. The New York Times called it "incandescent." Her second novel, What Lies Between Us drew comparisons to the voices of Michael Ondatjee and Jumpha Lahiri.

Derek Palacio is the author of the novella How to Shake the Other Man and the novel The Mortifications. He is the co-director, with Claire Vaye Watkins, of the Mojave School, a free creative writing workshop for teenagers in rural Nevada. He teaches at IAIA and Ashland University.


Twitter Username: derekpalacio

Website: derekpalacio.com

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

F263. Beauty and the Body, Being and Belonging. (, , , ) To write about beauty and the body is to approach history, space, and prevailing ideas of being and belonging. We write politically about where we come from, how we grew up, and how we live—sometimes on our own terms first, and sometimes in response to how others see us. How do we locate the sublime in the modes in which we move, remain still, and take up room? Poets, essayists, and fiction writers read work that explores our relationships with bodies, and how these ideas continue to evolve.

Porochista Khakpour is the author of the forthcoming memoir Sick, and the novels Sons & Other Flammable Objects and The Last Illusion. She received fellowships from the NEA, Ucross, Yaddo, and more. She writes for The New York TimesThe Los Angeles TimesBookforumWSJVQR, and more.


Twitter Username: Pkhakpour

Website: www.porochistakhakpour.com

Derrick Austin is the author of Trouble the Water. A Cave Canem fellow, his work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2015, The Nation,