My 2014 AWP Conference Schedule

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 View Full Schedule

7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Elliott Bay Book Company, 1521 Tenth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122

The Heaven of Demons Reading:Jennifer Percy and David James Poissant
Cost: Free
Url: http://www.elliottbaybook.com/event/david-james-poissant-jennifer-percy

Join David James Poissant for the book launch of his story collection The Heaven of Animals (Simon & Schuster) + Jen Percy for a reading from Demon Camp(Scribner). Readings followed by signings. Directions: From Convention Center, head East on Pike St. Go 10 blocks. Left on 10th AVE. Store is on Left.

8:00 pm to 10:00 pm

Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122

University Of Washington CW Program Celebration
Cost: Free

Please join us at a reading/party to celebrate our program, students, alumni and friends. The evening will start with a reading by UW faculty members Linda Bierds, David Bosworth, Andrew Feld, Richard Kenney, Heather McHugh, David Shields, Maya Sonenberg, Pimone Triplett and Shawn Wong.

Thursday, February 27, 2014 View Full Schedule

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Willow Room, Sheraton Seattle, 2nd Floor

R108. Lives Not Our Own: The Ethics and Practice of Assuming the Voices of Others. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) A novel written from the perspective of the singer John Mayer. Memoirs told by intertwining the lives of Wyatt Earp, James Baldwin, and a pedophile murderer with those of the authors. Poems crafted from the lives of internment camp detainees and the Japanese bride of a murdered Dutchman. Each of the writers on this panel brings the story of real-life strangers into their writing. Join us as we discuss the whys, hows, research, and responsibilities of the decision to take on the lives of others.

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich's essays appear in The New York Times, Oxford American, Fourth Genre, TriQuarterly Online, and the anthology True Crime. She has received a Rona Jaffe Award and fellowships to the MacDowell Colony and Yaddo. She lives in Boston and teaches at Grub Street and Harvard.

Nicholas Boggs is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of English at NYU. His writing has appeared in PANK, Chelsea Station, Mary Literary, James Baldwin Now, Callaloo, and is forthcoming in the Cambridge Companion to James Baldwin and Best Gay Stories 2013.

Rebecca Morgan Frank is the author of Little Murders Everywhere, a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. A recipient of the Alice Fay di Castagnola Award, she is an assistant professor at the University of Southern Mississippi and co-founder and editor of Memorious.org.

Courtney Maum is the humor columnist behind the "Celebrity Book Review" series on Electric Literature and a satirical advice columnist for Tin House. Her debut novel, I Am Having So Much Fun Here Without You is forthcoming in the summer of 2014. courtneymaum.tumblr.com @cmaum

Justin St. Germain is the author of the memoir Son of a Gun. He received his MFA from the University of Arizona and was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford. He is the Joseph M. Russo Professor at the University of New Mexico.

10:30 am to 11:45 am

Room 3A, Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

R136. How Far, Imagination: Writing Characters of Another Race in Fiction. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Five writers discuss the politics behind the decisions they make about writing race and their thoughts on writing beyond one’s own ethnicity. Is writing characters of another race a matter of imagination, as some writers claim, or verboten? The diverse panel of published and award-winning novelists, essayists, and short story writers will explore topics of social responsibility, appropriation, artistic integrity, and even cultural or ethnic loyalties around the process and research of doing so.

Christine Lee Zilka is the fiction editor at Kartika Review. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in journals and anthologies such as ZYZZYVA, Guernica, Hyphen, and Men Undressed. Awarded a residency at Hedgebrook, she earned her MFA from Mills College.

Mat Johnson is the author of the novel Pym, the graphic novel Incognegro, and several other books. He is a recipient of the United States Artist James Baldwin Fellowship, The Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and the Dos Passos Prize. He teaches at the University of Houston Creative Writing Program.

Patricia Engel is the author of It's Not Love, It's Just Paris and Vida, a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway and Young Lions Fiction Awards and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Her stories have appeared in A Public Space, the Atlantic, Boston Review, Guernica, and Harvard Review.

Randa Jarrar is the author of the critically acclaimed novel A Map of Home. Her work has appeared in Ploughshares, Five Chapters, Guernica, the Oxford American, The New York Times magazine, the Utne Reader, Salon.com, and the Progressive. She is assistant professor at Fresno State's MFA program.

Susan Kiyo Ito co-edited the anthology A Ghost At Heart's Edge: Stories and Poems of Adoption and her work has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She has been a columnist and editor for the online journal Literary Mama. She is a member of the San Francisco Writers' Grotto.

Room 611, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R148. Come Talk Story: Hawai`i Writers on Place, Politics, and Da Kine. (,  ,  ) Hawai`i’s literary culture is unique in that it encompasses indigenous, local, Oceanic, and settler perspectives to create a layered, complex vision of place and politics. With their fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, the writers in this panel are working to break regional branding and push back against a touristic gaze. The reading will be followed by a lively discussion about how work by Hawai`i writers and from Hawai`i presses is shifting the genres of multicultural and American literature.

Kristiana Kahakauwila is the author of This is Paradise, a collection of short stories about Hawai`i, which was selected for the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program and Target’s Emerging Author program. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Western Washington University.

Keala Francis is a creative writer, freelance journalist, and PhD student at UH Manoa. She has won awards for her fiction and her short story, “Language Glass,” was recently published in the journal Essays & Fictions.

Robert Barclay is the author of the novel Melal, which was short-listed for the 2003 Kiriyama Prize and selected by Barnes and Noble for its Discover Great New Writers program. He has also written Hawai`i Smiles: Island Stories. He is a professor of English at Windward Community College.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Room 3B, Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

R197. Writing Rules I Break, Presented by The Southampton Review. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Writing workshop leaders often focus on the rules of narrative arc, point of view, characterization, and punctuation. But the rule breakers of today are the rule makers of the canon. How can we know when to stretch and bend literary principles? A craft talk by writers who know the rules and know when to circumvent them, this panel, which includes fiction writers, memoirists, literary review editors, and a poet, considers when and how rule breakers are able to create livelier, more exciting work.

Lou Ann Walker is the editor-in-chief of TSR: The Southampton Review. The author of A Loss for Words: The Story of Deafness in the Family, as well as many other books and articles, she is a professor at Stony Brook Southampton.

Susan Scarf Merrell is fiction editor of TSR: The Southampton Review, and teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing & Literature at Stony Brook Southampton. Her novel Shirley is forthcoming in 2014.

Dinah Lenney wrote Bigger than Life: A Murder, A Memoir and co-authored Acting for Young Actors. She teaches in the Bennington Writing Seminars, the Rainier Writing Workshop, and the Master of Professional Writing Program at USC. Her new memoir The Object Parade will be published in 2014.

Robert Wrigley teaches at the University of Idaho. His most recent books include Anatomy of Melancholy & Other Poems, and The Church of Omnivorous Light: Selected Poems.

Rachel Pastan is the author of three novels, Alena, Lady of the Snakes, and This Side of Married. A member of the core faculty of the Bennington Writing Seminars, she is also editor-at-large for the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, where she writes the blog "Miranda."

Room 613/614, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R209. The I or the Eye: The Narrator's Role in Nonfiction. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Be it a personal or lyric essay, memoir, a  work of journalism, or criticism, writers of literary nonfiction must decide how to craft their narrators to best suit the subject at hand. Why are some narrators situated center-stage as participants (the I) while others locate themselves more offstage as observers (the Eye)? This panel of writers, teachers, and editors will offer rationales for a range of approaches and suggest strategies to determine how best to present their narrators on the page.

Phillip Lopate has written over twenty books, most recently, the essay collections Portrait Inside My Head and To Show and to Tell: the Craft of Literary Nonfiction. Editor of the anthology Art of the Personal Essay, he directs the MFA nonfiction program at Columbia University.

Elyssa East is the author of Dogtown: Death and Enchantment in a New England Ghost Town, winner of the 2010 PEN New England/LL Winship award in Nonfiction. Her fiction has appeared in Cape Cod Noir and Best of the Akashic Noir. She teaches at Rhode Island School of Design and is working on a novel.

Robert Root teaches nonfiction in the Ashland University MFA Program in Creative Writing. His recent books include the memoir Happenstance, the essay collection Postscripts: Retrospections on Time and Place, and the craft book The Nonfictionist’s Guide: On Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction.

Lia Purpura is the author of seven collections of essays, poems, and translations, most recently Rough LIkeness (essays) and King Baby (poems). Her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Book Critics Circle Award. She is Writer in Residence at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Michael Steinberg is founding editor of Fourth Genre. Still Pitching won the ForeWord Magazine/Independent Press Memoir of the Year. The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers of/on Creative Nonfiction (with Bob Root) is in a 6th edition. He's nonfiction writer in residence in the Solstice MFA program.

Room 615/616/617, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R210. Henry at 100: A Centenary Tribute to John Berryman. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) This panel celebrates the lasting legacy of one of the latter 20th Century’s most original figures, John Berryman, whose epic poem, "The Dream Songs," occupies a unique place in American literature. Yet Berryman remains a controversial figure, and our panel will commemorate his accomplishment while at the same time confronting the more fraught elements of his writing, among them matters of gender, race, and the limitations of the confessional mode.

David Wojahn's eighth collection of poetry, World Tree, was published in 2011 and won the Acadmey of American Poets' Lenore Marshall Prize. He teaches at Virginia Commonwealth University and in the MFA in Writing Program of Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Peter Campion is the author of three collections of poems, Other People, The Lions, and El Dorado. He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, the Larry Levis Reading Prize, The Rome Prize (Prix de Rome) and the Guggenheim Fellowship. 
He directs the MFA program at the University of Minnesota.

Kathleen Graber is the author of two collections of poetry, The Eternal City and Correspondence. She teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Virginia Commonwealth University and the low residency MFA Program at Fairleigh Dickinson University.

J. Allyn Rosser's books of poems are Foiled Again, Misery Prefigured, and Bright Moves. She has received fellowships from the Guggenheim and Lannan Foundations, the NEA, and the Ohio and New Jersey Arts Councils. Rosser teaches at Ohio University and edits New Ohio Review.

Room 618/619/620, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R211. How to Do It Now: New Trends in Literary Publishing. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Hear from some of America’s leading publishing experts on what’s new now and what’s likely to happen next for independent literary publishers.

Jeffrey Lependorf serves as the shared Executive Director of America's two national service organizations for independent literary publishing: the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses (CLMP) and Small Press Distribution.

Rob Spillman is editor and co-founder of Tin House, a fifteen-year-old bi-coastal (Brooklyn and Portland) literary magazine, Executive Editor of Tin House Books, co-founder of the Tin House Writers Workshop, now in its twelfth year, and editor of Gods and Soldiers: The Penguin Anthology of African Writing.

Rachel Fershleiser heads publishing outreach at Tumblr. She has been Community Manager at Bookish and Events Director at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe. She is co-creator of Six-Word Memoirs and co-editor of the New York Times Bestseller Not Quite What I Was Planning and three other books.

Ira Silverberg has worked in the literary world for nearly thirty years. Among the positions he's held are Literature Director of the National Endowment for the Arts, Editor in Chief of Grove Press, and Publisher and founding co-editor of High Risk Books/Serpent's Tail.

Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

R216. Under-the-Radar Trends in Contemporary American Poetry. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) What cultural forces are shaping how younger writers compose and imagine their poems? How have recent political events, social dynamics, and technological advances influenced their aesthetic and ethical concerns? While it is impossible to map out the entire landscape of contemporary American poetry, members of this panel will report on current developments that have not yet come to our collective critical attention.

David Roderick’s first book of poems, Blue Colonial, won of the APR/Honickman Prize. His next book, The Americans, will be published in the fall of 2014. He teaches in the MFA Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Tomás Q. Morín is the author of the poetry collection A Larger Country, winner of the APR/Honickman Prize. He is co-editor with Mari L’Esperance of the anthology, Coming Close: 40 Essays on Philip Levine. He teaches literature and writing at Texas State University.

Shara Lessley is the author of Two-Headed Nightingale. Her awards include a Stegner Fellowship, Diane Middlebrook Fellowship, Colgate University’s O’Connor Fellowship, The Gilman School’s Tickner Fellowship, and a Discovery / The Nation prize. She is the 2014 Mary Wood Fellow at Washington College.

Paul Otremba is the author of The Currency and the forthcoming Pax Americana. His poems, reviews, and criticism have appeared in New England Review, the Kenyon Review, Witness, Houston Chronicle, The Washington Post, and American Poets in the 21st Century. He teaches at Rice University.

Rachel Richardson has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford. She is the author of Copperhead, a poetry collection, and is currently the Kenan Visiting Writer at UNC Chapel Hill.

Room 302, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

R217. From Borges to the Gnostics: Tribute to the work of Willis Barnstone. (,  ,  ,  ) For sixty years, Willis Barnstone has been opening up American poetry to the rest of the world through his more than seventy books of poetry, translation, memoir, criticism, and religious scholarship. Winner of numerous awards, mentor to generations of younger writers, Willis Barnstone is a national treasure. The panelists will share
anecdotes and analyses and read from his work, followed by a reading by Willis Barnstone himself.

Sholeh Wolpé's publications include three collections of poetry, most recently, Keeping Time with Blue Hyacinths, an award-winning book of translations, Sin, and three anthologies. She teaches at Stonecoast MFA program.

Yusef Komunyakaa is author of seventeen collections of poetry. His work has been awarded a Pulitzer Prize and the 2011 Wallace Steven's Award. His plays, musical collaborations, and theater art have been performed internationally. His most recent collection is Testimony, A Tribute to Charlie Parker.

Stanley Moss’s most recent collection of poems is No Tear is Commonplace (2013). In 1977, he founded the Sheep Meadow Press.

Robert Stewart is editor of New Letters, New Letters on the Air radio series, and BkMk Press at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He is author of Outside Language, essays, and Plumbers, poems. In 2008, he won a National Magazine Award for editorial excellence in the essay category.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Ballroom E, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R230. The Narration of Identity and the Cuban-American Experience with Richard Blanco and Cristina Garcia, Sponsored by Blue Flower Arts. (,  ,  ) Richard Blanco and Cristina Garcia give a rare glimpse into their forbidden country, Cuba, through the literary voice of the American immigrant experience. Reading poetry, fiction, and memoir—and in lively conversation with Forrest Gander—they each illuminate the struggles of living in-between two cultures. Throughout their search for a cultural identity, they explore issues of language, gender, family, exile, and history—and discover what it means to truly become an American.

Forrest Gander is a writer & translator with degrees in geology and English literature. Recent books include Eiko & Koma, Fungus Skull Eye Wing: Selected Poems of Alfonso D'Aquino, and Core Samples from the World, a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist.

Richard Blanco’s first book, City of a Hundred Fires, received the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. His second book, Directions to The Beach of the Dead won the PEN/Beyond Margins Award. His third collection, Looking for The Gulf Motel, won the Paterson Poetry Prize and Thom Gunn Award from the Publishing Triangle. He stands as the youngest, first Latino, and first openly gay person to serve as the Presidential inaugural poet.

Cristina García is the author of several novels, including The Agüero Sisters, winner of the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize; and Dreaming in Cuban, finalist for the National Book Award, and, most recently, King of Cuba. She has edited two anthologies, Bordering Fires: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Mexican and Chicano/a Literature and Cubanísimo: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Cuban Literature. Her other work includes three books for young readers and a collection of poetry, The Lesser Tragedy of Death.

Room 304, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

R249. The Kenyon Review 75th Anniversary Reading . (,  ,  ,  ) A reading from writers featured in the Winter 2014 issue of The Kenyon Review, our 75th anniversary issue. The Winter 2014 issue marks our ongoing commitment to publish the very best writing from established and emerging writers. Founded in 1939 at Kenyon College and first edited by poet-critic John Crowe Ransom, The Kenyon Review continues in its 75th year to celebrate writing that maps the spiritual, intellectual, and emotional tides of our contemporary culture.

David Lynn has been the editor of the Kenyon Review since 1994. His most recent book is Year of Fire, short stories.

Kimiko Hahn, author of nine poetry collections, including the recent Toxic Flora. A recent Guggenheim Fellow, she teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing & Literary Translation at Queens College, CUNY.

Charles Baxter is the author of five novels, five books of short stories, and two books of criticism. He teaches at the University of Minnesota.

Jaquira Diaz is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and the Carl Djerassi Fiction Fellowship from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in the Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, the Sun, the Southern Review, Five Chapters, and Pushcart Prize XXXVII.

4:30 pm to 5:45 pm

Room 609, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R267. CW at the U: A Poetry Reading. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Founded in 1947 by Theodore Roethke, the University of Washington Creative Writing Program is one of America’s oldest MFA programs and the preeminent literary institution in the Pacific Northwest. Current faculty members will read their own work along with selected poems by former UW CW faculty members Theodore Roethke, Elizabeth Bishop, William Matthews, Denise Levertov, and David Wagoner.

Andrew Feld is the author of two books of poetry: Citizen and Raptor. He is an associate professor of English at the University of Washington and editor-in-chief of the Seattle Review.

Linda Bierds has published nine books of poetry. Her awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim and MacArthur Foundations and prizes from PEN and the Poetry Society of America. She is the Byron W. and Alice L. Lockwood Professor in the Humanities at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Heather McHugh is the author of poetry, translation, and essays and has taught in distinguished writing programs. Since 2011 her efforts to help lifelong caregivers of family members who are chronically ill or severely disabled prompted the establishment of CAREGIFTED.org (and UNDERSUNG.org).

Pimone Triplett is the author of three books of poetry, Rumor, The Price of Light, and Ruining the Picture. She also co-edited the collection of essays Poets Work, Poets Play. She is an associate professor in the University of Washington's Creative Writing Program.

Room 612, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R269. The AWP George Garrett Award: Who Exactly was George Garrett?. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) This panel, consisting of several celebrated writers who knew Garrett intimately, as well as his biographer, relates the work and life of this AWP co-founder and former president with a conceptual focus on educating younger conference participants about the person and qualities which lie behind an important AWP award. Interspersed with lively tales from Garrett's career, topics broached include his wide-ranging writings, his tireless and prodigious support of younger writers, and his immense service to the profession (including the co-founding the Fellowship of Southern Writers). The panel hopes to articulate Garrett's unfailing dedication to professional service and personal encouragement in the writing life as models for younger writers.

Erika Seay's fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in the Colorado Review, South Carolina Review, New Ohio Review, Cimarron Review, CutBank, and Meridian. She recently received her MFA in Fiction from the University of Arkansas, when she held the Walton Fellowship in Fiction.

Richard Bausch is the author of eleven novels, eight books of stories, and a volume of poems and prose. His twelfth novel, Before, During, After, will appear in Spring 2014.

Robert Bausch is the author of nine novels and a collection of short stories. He has taught at NVCC in Northern Virginia, UVA, Johns Hopkins, George Mason University, American University, and the University of Maryland Baltimore Campus. His newest novel, Far as the Eye Can See is forthcoming in 2014.

Kelly Cherry is the author of twenty-one books, nine chapbooks, and two translations of classical drama. Her most recent poetry collection is The Life and Death of Poetry. She is Eudora Welty Professor Emerita of English and Evjue-Bascom Prof. Emerita in the Humanities at U Wisc.-Madison.

Casey Clabough is the author of eight books, including George Garrett: A Biography. He serves as Literature Editor of Encyclopedia Virginia and Editor of the James Dickey Review. He is a recipient of the Bangladesh International Literary Award and a Brazilian Artists Fellowship, among others.

Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

R277. Literary Matriarchs: Thinking Through Our (Writerly) Mothers. (,  ,  ,  Joan Leegant) Tolstoy, Chekhov, Hemingway, Joyce, Carver, Roth... it's not uncommon for us to discuss the patriarchs of contemporary fiction. This panel will pay homage to the women who have been just as crucial to growing and cementing our literary tradition. Who are our literary matriarchs and what debts do we owe them? Panelists will discuss Welty, Bowen, Fox, Roy, Gallant, Woolf, and others. What do we stand to learn through close study, and how do we strike out on our own?

Karen Brennan is the author of six books of varying genres including the AWP's  short fiction prize winning Wild Desire, the memoir Being with Rachel, and forthcoming collection of poems, little dark. A professor emerita at the University of Utah, she teaches at the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers.

Nina McConigley is the author of the short-story collection Cowboys and East Indians. Nominated for a Pushcart Prize and for The Best New American Voices, she has received scholarships to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and a fellowship to the VSC.

Robin Romm is the author of two books and a chapbook. Her story collection, The Mother Garden, was a finalist for the PEN USA prize. Her memoir, The Mercy Papers, received many accolades and was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She is faculty at Warren Wilson's Low-Residency Program.

Room 303, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

R279. Wesleyan University Press Reading. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Since 1959, Wesleyan University Press has demonstrated a continued dedication to the literary arts. Best known for its award-winning poetry series, the press has also ventured into fiction and hybrid works. This reading shares the diversity of voice and style that is characteristic of Wesleyan. From jazz poetry and politically charged verse to provocative fiction and forms that blur the lines between poetry and prose, Wesleyan continues to nurture exceptional literature in a variety of forms.

Yusef Komunyakaa is author of seventeen collections of poetry. His work has been awarded a Pulitzer Prize and the 2011 Wallace Stevens Award. His plays, musical collaborations, and theater art have been performed internationally. His most recent collection is Testimony, A Tribute to Charlie Parker.

Brenda Hillman has published nine collections of poetry, most recently Practical Water and Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire. The Filippi Professor of Poetry at St. Mary’s College, she is an activist for social and environmental justice.

Peter Gizzi is the author of numerous books, including The Outernationale and Threshold Songs. His honors include the Lavan Younger Poet Award from the Academy of American Poets and fellowships from the Howard Foundation, the Foundation of Contemporary Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation.

Brenda Coultas is the author of four books of poetry and fiction: Early Films, The Marvelous Bones of Time, A Handmade Museum, and A Critical Mass.

Joseph Harrington is the author of Things Come On (an amneoir), a Rumpus magazine Poetry Book Club selection; the critical work Poetry and the Public; and the chapbook Earth Day Suite.

5:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Mexico Cantina y Cocina, 600 Pine St. #402 Seattle, WA 98101

Con Tinta Celebration
Cost: Free

A meeting and celebration of Con Tinta, an organization of Latina writers from across the country, will be recognizing regional writers from Northwest. This year, the work of Jesus "El Flaco" Maldonado and Kathleen Alcala will be honored. Entertainment by eSe Theatre.

6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Sorrento Hotel, 900 Madison St, Seattle, WA 98104

Cave Canem & Copper Canyon All-Stars: A Poetry Reading
Cost: Free
Url: http://www.cavecanempoets.org/calendar?month=February&year=2014

Just a short walk from the AWP conference, find spectacular views of downtown Seattle and an all-star can't-miss poetry reading featuring this incredible line-up: Mark Bibbins, Jericho Brown, Cyrus Cassells, Natalie Diaz, Fady Joudah, Deborah Landau, Lisa Olstein & Roger Reeves.

8:30 pm to 10:00 pm

Ballroom ABCE, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

R287. #AWP14 Keynote Address by Annie Proulx, Sponsored by the University of Washington Creative Writing Program. () Annie Proulx is the author of eight books, including the novel The Shipping News and the story collection Close Range. Her many honors include a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award, the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, and a PEN/Faulkner award. Her story “Brokeback Mountain,” which originally appeared in the New Yorker, was made into an Academy Award-winning film. Her most recent book is Fine Just the Way It Is. She lives in Wyoming.

Annie Proulx is the author of eight books, including the novel The Shipping News and the story collection Close Range. Her many honors include a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award, the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, and a PEN/Faulkner award. Her story “Brokeback Mountain,” which originally appeared in the New Yorker, was made into an Academy Award-winning film. Her most recent book is Fine Just the Way It Is. She lives in Wyoming.

Friday, February 28, 2014 View Full Schedule

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Room 607, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F117. Tupelo Press 15th Anniversary Reading. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) This showcase reading by four important American poets of diverse aesthetic, regional, and ethnic backgrounds celebrates 15 years of independent literary publishing on the part of Tupelo Press. Tupelo authors write for and speak to issues national and international and explore questions of migration and immigration, slavery, racial, gender, and national identity, and ultimately, of life in the balance.

Jeffrey Levine is the Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Tupelo Press. He is the author of two books of poetry: Mortal, Everlasting and Rumor of Cortez.

CM Burroughs serves as the Elma Stuckey Poet in Residence at Columbia College Chicago. She has been awarded fellowships and grants from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Cave Canem Foundation, and Callaloo Writers Workshop.

 

 

Amaud Jamaul Johnson is the author of two poetry collections, Darktown Follies and Red Summer, winner of the Dorset Prize. His honors include a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and a Bread Loaf Writers' Conference Fellowship. He teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Stacey Waite is the author of Butch Geography, the lake has no saint, love poem to androgyny, and choke, winner of the 2004 Frank O'Hara Prize for Poetry. An assistant professor of English at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, she is the co-host of Prairie Schooner's podcast Air Schooner.

Room 609, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F119. Where Witness Meets the Page: Why We Write What We Write. (,  ,  ,  ,  Julie Wu) To bear witness to atrocity through fiction implies a commitment to both narrative and truth. In the social media age, atrocity often reaches us in 140-character packages. Conversely, witness literature focuses a wide narrative lens on the subject. Why write fiction over nonfiction? What moral and ethical questions do writers confront along the way? How do craft and truth intersect? Five authors with varying degrees of closeness to their subjects discuss how they bear witness through fiction.

Naomi Benaron’s novel Running The Rift won the 2010 Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction. A Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers pick, she was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Book Prize. She teaches through UCLA Writers' Extension and mentors for the Afghan Women's Writing Project.

Lorraine Adams is a Pulitzer winner and the author of two novels, Harbor and The Room and the Chair. She was a 2010 Guggenheim Fellow to support the writing of her current novel.

Nayomi Munaweera's debut novel, Island of a Thousand Mirrors, was long listed for the Man Asian Literary Award and is currently short-listed for the Commonwealth Prize. It will be available in the US in early 2014.

Ru Freeman is a Sri Lankan and American writer whose political and creative work appears internationally. Her novels, A Disobedient Girl and On Sal Mal Lane, are published in English and in translation. She is a national speaker and writes for The Huffington Post.

Room 202, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 2

F128. Happy Endings that Won’t Jerk You Around. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) While stories of hope are often derided as contrived or suspected of emotional manipulation in workshops, they are in actuality some of the hardest to write. How do we instill glimmers of hope while remaining true to realism? How do we avoid sentimentality while still allowing a positive outcome for our characters? Five writers discuss the concept of the happy ending in contemporary and classic novels and stories and talk about their own approaches to crafting the final movements of their work.

Ian Stansel is the author of the story collection Everybody’s Irish. His work has appeared in Ploughshares, Salon, the Cincinnati Review, and elsewhere. He holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a PhD from the University of Houston, where he edited Gulf Coast.

Amber Dermont is the author of The New York Times best-selling novel, The Starboard Sea, and the short story collection, Damage Control.

Danielle Evans is the author of the short-story collection Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self, a co-winner of the 2011 PEN American Robert W. Bingham Prize for a first book and a National Book Foundation 5 under 35 selection. She teaches in the MFA program at American University.

Rebecca Makkai’s first novel, The Borrower, was a Booklist Top Ten Debut of 2011, and her short fiction was chosen for The Best American Short Stories in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011. She has just completed her second novel, The Ghosts, and she teaches at StoryStudio Chicago and Lake Forest College.

Kyle Minor is the author of two collections of short fiction, In the Devil's Territory and Praying Drunk. His work appears in the Southern Review, the Iowa Review, Gulf Coast, Best American Mystery Stories 2008, and Best American Nonrequired Reading 2013. He teaches at IUPUI.

Room 302, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

F130. The Influence of the International: Four Writers Talk. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Many writers limit their reading to other English-language authors and as a result are unfamiliar with other literatures. Four writers talk about how reading international literature, in both the original language and translation, has influenced and shaped their writing. Panelists will discuss various works and writers and their respective literary traditions; consider language, style, narrative conventions, and subjects; and reveal how their reading informs their writing.

Edward Gauvin's translations have appeared in The New York Times, Tin House, Subtropics, Conjunctions, PEN America, Words Without Borders, the Southern Review, The Harvard Review, and World Literature Today. As H.V. Chao, he has published fiction in the Kenyon Review, Birkensnake, and West Branch.

Maaza Mengiste is a Fulbright Scholar and author of the award-winning Beneath the Lion’s Gaze, selected by The Guardian as one of the 10 best contemporary African books. Her writing can be found in The Guardian, The New York Times, BBC Radio 4, Granta, and Words Without Borders.

Forrest Gander is a writer and translator with degrees in geology and English literature. Recent books include Eiko & Koma, Fungus Skull Eye Wing: Selected Poems of Alfonso D'Aquino, and Core Samples from the World, a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist.

Willis Barnstone, professor of Comparative Literature, Indiana University, is a Guggenheim fellow, four Book-of-the-Month selections. Recent books: Poetics of Translation, Gnostic Bible, Selected Poems of Antonio Machado, Restored New Testament, Café de l’Aube a Paris, and The Poems of Jesus Christ.

Susan Harris is the editorial director of Words without Borders (www.wordswithoutborders.org) and the coeditor, with Ilya Kaminsky, of The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry.

10:30 am to 11:45 am

Willow Room, Sheraton Seattle, 2nd Floor

F136. The Well-Feathered Nest: Family as Fodder in Southern Fiction. (,  ,  ,  ) A survey of Southern fiction reveals a common thread. From Twain to Faulkner, from Welty to Wendell Berry, Southern writers can’t escape the anxiety, the complexity, or the gift of family. Whether blood family or the families we make for ourselves, Southerners have long been cognizant of the foundational struggle of the family unit. Five writers will explore the power and peculiarity of family in Southern fiction, observing how sometimes the best drama is the drama we find on our own doorstep.

Nicole Louise Reid is the author of the story collection So There! and the novel In the Breeze of Passing Things. Her stories have appeared in the Southern Review, Other Voices, Quarterly West, and Meridian. She is editor of RopeWalk Press and teaches fiction at University of Southern Indiana.

Jill McCorkle is the author of four short story collections and six novels including her most recent, Life After Life. Her stories have appeared in various periodicals as well as Best American Short Stories and The Norton Anthology. She teaches at at NC State and the Bennington Writing Program.

Bret Anthony Johnston is the author of Corpus Christi: Stories and the editor of Naming the World and Other Exercises for the Creative Writer. A novel, Remember Me Like This, is forthcoming in May 2014. He is the Director of Creative Writing at Harvard University.

David James Poissant is the author of The Heaven of Animals. His stories have appeared in the Atlantic, Playboy, and One Story. He teaches fiction writing in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida.

Room 3B, Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

F140. Magic and the Intellect. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) In her essay “The Deep Zoo” Rikki Ducornet writes: “the work of the writer is to move beyond the simple definitions or descriptions of things… and to bring a dream to life through the alchemy of language; to move from the street—the place of received ideas—into the forest—the place of the unknown.” On this panel five fiction writers intend to describe, depict, illustrate, and otherwise expose this movement from known to unknown in order to ask: what do we mean when we say “magic”?

Lucy Corin’s third book of fiction, One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses was published in 2013. She was awarded the Rome Prize in Literature in 2012 and directs the Creative Writing Program at the University of California, Davis.

Rikki Ducornet is the author of eight novels as well as collections of poems, short stories and essays. Finalist for the National Book Critics' Circle Award, she has received Fellowships from the Bunting Institute, the Lannan Foundation, a Bard Meda,l and an Academy Award in Literature.

Kate Bernheimer is the author of three novels and two story collections including Horse, Flower, Bird. The World Fantasy Award winning editor of My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: 40 New Fairy Tales and xo Orpheus: 50 New Myths, she teaches in the MFA Program at the University of Arizona.

Sarah Shun-lien Bynum is the author of the novels Ms. Hempel Chronicles, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, and Madeleine Is Sleeping, a finalist for the National Book Award. She was named one of “20 Under 40” fiction writers by the New Yorker, and teaches at Otis College of Art and Design.

Anna Joy Springer is the author of The Vicious Red Relic, Love (2011), a fabulist memoir with soundscape and images. She’s now making a book-length rebus called Thieves With Tiny Eyes and is associate professor of Literature at UC San Diego and Director of its MFA Program in Writing

Room 613/614, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F153. New Stories from the Southwest. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Road to Nowhere and Other New Stories from the Southwest is the second volume in the Southwest anthology series, which was published in July 2013 by the University of New Mexico Press. Four award-winning contributors gather to read from their recently anthologized work. They will be introduced by the founder of the series.

Justin St. Germain is the author of the memoir Son of a Gun. He was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford and is the Joseph M. Russo Professor at the University of New Mexico.

Claire Vaye Watkins' Battleborn won the Story Prize, the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Silver Pen Award from the Nevada Writers Hall of Fame. One of the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35, she is currently teaching at Princeton.

D. Seth Horton has edited or co-edited five collections of short fiction. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in various journals, including Glimmer Train, the Bellingham Review, and Flash.

Room 615/616/617, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F154. Graywolf Press 40th Anniversary. (,  ,  ,  ) In 2014, Graywolf Press celebrates forty years of publishing essential works of contemporary literature. From the Press's beginnings in Port Townsend, Washington, in 1974, to its current roster of award-winning writers, Graywolf has been recognized as one of the leaders in independent publishing. Please join the publisher and director of Graywolf and these fiction writers, nonfiction writers, and poets for a reading in celebration of the next forty years of Graywolf Press.

Tess Gallagher is the author of eight books of poetry, most recently Midnight Lantern, New & Selected Poems, as well as three books of fiction and two of essays, and writings about the work of her late husband Raymond Carver.

Ru Freeman is a Sri Lankan & American writer whose political and creative work appears internationally. Her novels, A Disobedient Girl and On Sal Mal Lane, are published in English and in translation. She is a national speaker, and writes for the Huffington Post.

Justin Hocking is the Executive DIrector of the Independent Publishing Resource Center (IPRC) in Portland, Oregon. His writing has appeared in The Rumpus, The Normal School, Thrasher, and The Portland Review. He is also author of the memoir The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld.

Tree Swenson is executive director of Richard Hugo House in Seattle. She was previously executive director of the Academy of American Poets. A former AWP board president, her work in the literary arts began with co-founding Copper Canyon Press, where she was the publisher and director for twenty years.

Room 618/619/620, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F155. Grove/Atlantic Literary Salon. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Founded in 1917, Grove/Atlantic is one of the last remaining major independent publishers in America. Dedicated to publishing books of artistic merit and integrity and known for taking risks, Grove/Atlantic presents five award-winning authors reading from their most recent and yet-to-be-published books.

Dani Shapiro is the author of the memoirs Devotion and Slow Motion, and the novels Family History and Black & White. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Granta, Tin House, One Story, and Ploughshares. Her new book, Still Writing: The Pleasures and Perils of a Creative Life, was published last fall.

Josh Weil is the author of the novella collection The New Valley, a New York Times Editors Choice that won the Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a 5-under-35 Award from the National Book Foundation. His novel, The Great Glass Sea, will be published in early 2014.

Patricia Engel is the author of It's Not Love, It's Just Paris and Vida, a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway and Young Lions Fiction Awards and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Her stories have appeared in A Public Space, The Atlantic, Boston Review, Guernica, and Harvard Review.

Margaret Wrinkle is the author of the novel Wash, which was short-listed for the Center for Fiction's Flaherty Dunnan First Novel Prize and nominated for the Crook's Corner Prize for debut Southern novel. Her award-winning documentary, broken\ground, explores the racial divide in Birmingham, Alabama.

Pablo Medina is the author of fourteen books of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and translation, among them the critically acclaimed novel Cubop City Blues and, with Mark Statman, an English version of Lorca's Poet in New York. A recipient of numerous awards, he teaches at Emerson College.

Room 304, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

F163. Independent Bookselling: Opportunities for Authors. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) As bookstore chains disappear and independent bookstores become even more important, what should writers and authors know about working with booksellers? This panel from Seattle-area bookstores—Elliott Bay, Village Books, Third Place Books, University Bookstore, and Queen Anne Book Company—will discuss how writers can work with independent booksellers to market a book. Topics will include author events, store placement, joint promotion, and how to spread the word to the book-buying public.

Robert Sindelar is the managing partner of Third Place Books, a general interest bookstore in the Ravenna neighborhood of Seattle.

Pam Cady has been a bookseller for over thirty years. She is currently manager of the General Books department at the University Book Store in Seattle, Washington.

Chuck Robinson is co-owner, with his wife Dee, of Village Books in Bellingham, Washington, an independent bookstore they founded in 1980. He has served on the boards and as president of both the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association and the American Booksellers Association.

Rick Simonson is senior book buyer and co-directs the reading series at Seattle's Elliott Bay Book Company. On the boards of Copper Canyon Press and University of Washington Press, he has served as juror for the STORY Prize, the DSC South Asian Literature Prize, and the National Book Award.

Janis Segress has been in the independent book industry since 2006 as a bookseller, head buyer, and currently as manager and co-owner, along with Judy and Krijn de Jonge, of Queen Anne Book Company in Seattle, Washington.

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Ballroom E, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F178. A Reading and Conversation by Fady Joudah and Ghassan Zaqtan. (,  ,  ,  ) A reading by Ghassan Zaqtan, the most important Palestinian poet writing today, and his English-language translator, Fady Joudah, will be followed by a lively discussion (moderated by John Donatich) about poetry under siege, translation, and the importance of Palestinian literature on the world stage. Zaqtan has been a major influence for the last two decades, moving away from the lush aesthetics of his giant predecessors Adonis and Darwish. Joudah will also read some of his work that highlights the natural affinity his poetry has for Zaqtan's poetry. Mark Doty will introduce the event.

John Donatich is the Director of Yale University Press. He serves as founder and editor of the Margellos World Republic of Letters, a literature in translation series that publishes such authors as Adonis, Claudio Magris, Norman Manea, and Witold Gombrow.

Ghassan Zaqtan, a poet, novelist, editor, and playwright, is perhaps the most important Palestinian poet writing today. He lives in Ramallah, Palestine. His first collection to be translated into English from Yale University Press, Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me, won the Griffin International Poetry Prize in 2013.

Fady Joudah is a Palestinian American physician, poet, and translator. His collection The Earth in the Attic won the Yale Younger Poets Prize, and his translation of the final three collections of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish, The Butterfly’s Burden, was a finalist for the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. His translation of Ghassan Zaqtan's Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me won the Griffin International Poetry Prize for 2013. He works as a physician in Houston. He has been a field member of Doctors Without Borders since 2001.

Mark Doty's eight books of poems have received the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. He is also the author of four books of nonfiction prose and a handbook for writers. A new book of poems, Deep Lane, is forthcoming. He teaches at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Cedar Room, Sheraton Seattle, 2nd Floor

F200. Once More Unto the Breach: A Multilingual Reading of War-Informed Literature in Translation . (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Throughout the ages, war has inspired a diverse body of literature from all across the world. This panel, translating from Bosnian, French, Hebrew, Spanish, and Vietnamese, will bring to English the human experience of love and loss with a backdrop of war from such landscapes as the deserts of Djibouti to the beaches of Vieques Island, ranging in time from the rebellion leading to the start of the Nguyen Dynasty to the present-day conflict between Palestine and Israel.

Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored four titles, including Stone Lyre: Poems of René Char. Recipient of grants from the NEA, the Maryland Arts Council, and the Arts & Humanities Council of Montgomery County, she is an associate editor for Tupelo Press and translation editor for Blue Lyra Review.

John Balaban is the author of twelve books of poetry and prose, which have won The Lamont Prize, a National Poetry Series Selection, two nominations for the National Book Award, and a medal from the Vietnamese Ministry of Culture. He teaches at North Carolina State University, Raleigh.

Erica Mena is a poet, translator, and book artist. Her translations include The Eternonaut by H.G. Oesterheld and Solano Lopez. Her work has appeared in the Iowa Review, Kenyon Review, PEN America, Vanitas, and Words Without Borders. She is founding editor of Anomalous Press.

Marcela Sulak's two poetry collections are Immigrant and the chapbook Of All The Things That Don't Exist, I Love You Best. She translated three collections of poetry from Hapsburg Bohemia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. She directs the Shaindy Rudoff Graduate Program in Creative Writing.

Russell Scott Valentino is a scholar, editor, writer, and translator based in Bloomington, Indiana. He is senior editor at Autumn Hill Books and a contributing editor at the Buenos Aires Review. He currently serves as Vice President of the American Literary Translators Association.

Ballroom ABC, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F212. A Reading and Conversation with Chris Abani and Chang-rae Lee, Sponsored by the University of Washington Bothell MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics . (,  ,  ) Chris Abani, author of numerous works of prose and poetry, and Chang-rae Lee, author of the novels Native Speaker and The Surrendered, will present readings of their award-winning work, followed by a discussion moderated by Steph Opitz.

Chris Abani's prose includes Song For Night, GraceLand, and Masters of the Board. His poetry collections include Sanctificum, Feed Me The Sun: Collected Long Poems, and Kalakuta Republic. He is a professor at the University of California Riverside and the recipient of the PEN Center USA Freedom to Write Award, the Prince Claus Award, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, a California Book Award, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, a PEN/Beyond the Margins Award, the PEN/Hemingway Book Prize, and a Guggenheim fellowship.

Chang-rae Lee is the author of the novels Native Speaker, A Gesture Life, Aloft, and most recently, The Surrendered, which in 2011 won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. His new novel, On Such A Full Sea, is forthcoming. His other awards and citations include the PEN/Hemingway Award, the American Book Award, the Barnes & Noble Discover Award, the ALA Notable Book of the Year Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Academy in Rome. He is a professor of creative writing in the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University.

Steph Opitz is the literary director of the Texas Book Festival, the fiction co-chair for the Brooklyn Book Festival, and the book reviewer for Marie Claire.

Room 303, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

F231. Beyond the “Axis of Evil:” Shattering the Stereotypes of Iran and Iranians Through Fiction. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) The anthology Tremors collects the work of Iranian-American fiction writers for the first time. Four Iranian writers will present work that reflects some of the pain of history in Iran and the US but also offers a bracing counter-narrative to prevailing political discourse and a tenacious spirit of resilience. Discussion topics will include minorities, the Green Revolution, the post 9/11 climate, the challenges of assimilation, and the complications of otherness.

Persis Karim is a poet, editor, and professor at San Jose State University. In addition to writing poetry, she is co editor of Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers (2013) and editor and contributing poet to Let Me Tell You Where I've Been: New Writing by Women of the Iranian Diaspora (2005).

Anita Amirrezvani’s first novel, The Blood of Flowers, has appeared in twenty-five languages. Her second novel, Equal of the Sun, was published  in 2012. She co-edited the 2013 anthology Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian-American Writers, and she teaches at the California College of the Arts.

Omid Fallahazad is an Iranian American writer who has made the transition to writing in English since 2001. By then, some of his works in Farsi had slipped past the censors in Iran. Sabzeh, his fiction in English, has recently appeared in Tremors, a new anthology of Iranian American writers.

Jasmin Darznik is the author of The Good Daughter. A New York Times bestseller, the memoir has been translated into eight languages and was shortlisted for the 2013 Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Her essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Los Angeles Times.

Marjan Kamali is the author of the novel Together Tea. She has an MFA in creative writing from New York University and an MBA from Columbia University. Her work has been a top finalist in Glimmer Train's Fiction Open and the Asian American Short Story Contest.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Room 3B, Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

F241. Uncovering Hip Hop Poetry. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Since Kool Herc put his two turntables together in the South Bronx back in 1973, Hip Hop has evolved into an international phenomenon. As with the Black Arts Movement and the Harlem Renaissance, Hip Hop is a multi-disciplinary artistic enterprise. Yet the poetics of Hip Hop have not received the same attention as other aspects of the art-form. Five poets will discuss Hip Hop poetics, exploring form, aesthetics, messaging, and Hip Hop’s position in the literary poetic conversation.

Victorio Reyes is currently an MFA student at VCFA. She was featured in the anthology of emerging writers: Chorus, edited by Saul Williams. He was also a member of Broadcast Live whose most recent release, Boomerang Metropolis, reached #25 on the CMJ Hip Hop Charts.

Adrian Matejka is the author of The Devil’s Garden, Mixology, which was a winner of the 2008 National Poetry Series, and The Big Smoke. He teaches creative writing and English literature at Indiana University Bloomington.

Roger Reeves, awarded a 2013 National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, has poems in or forthcoming in Poetry, Ploughshares, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, and Tin House. His first book, King Me, is forthcoming.

Pamela L. Taylor is a data guru by day and a poet by night. She has a doctorate in Psychology from UCLA, an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and she is a Cave Canem Fellow. As part of Living Poetry, she organizes and promotes poetry events in the Triangle area of North Carolina .

Tara Betts is a PhD candidate at SUNY Binghamton. She is the author of one full-length poetry collection and the libretto "The Greatest!: An Homage to Muhammad Ali." Her work appears in numerous anthologies and journals.

Ballroom E, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F247. Natalie Diaz, Lucia Perillo, and Dean Young: Reading and Conversation, Sponsored by Copper Canyon Press. (,  ,  ,  ) Natalie Diaz, author of When My Brother Was an Aztec, joins two of contemporary literature's leading poets, Lucia Perillo and Dean Young, for a reading and conversation. Perillo is a Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award winner and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Young is the current Texas Poet Laureate, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Griffin Poetry Prize. The event concludes with a conversation between the poets, moderated by the Executive Editor of Copper Canyon Press, Michael Wiegers.

Michael Wiegers, a veteran of independent literary publishing for over two decades, is the executive editor of Copper Canyon Press, and the poetry editor of Narrative magazine. He translates poetry from Spanish and has edited poetry books from around the globe.

Dean Young is the author of fourteen books, including Fall Higher, The Art of Recklessness: Poetry as Assertive Force and Contradiction, and Elegy on Toy Piano. His work has been honored as finalists for both the Pulitzer Prize and Griffin Poetry Prize, and his most recent collection, Bender: New and Selected, was on the Los Angeles Times’ “Best of 2012” list. He is the William Livingston Chair of Poetry at the University of Texas in Austin.

Natalie Diaz is Mojave and Pima. She was awarded 2012 Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Literature Fellowship, a 2012 Lannan Residency, and a 2012 Lannan Literary Fellowship. Her first book, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published in June 2012.

Lucia Perillo is the author of six books of poetry, including Inseminating the Elephants, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and On the Spectrum of Possible Deaths, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other honors include the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and a MacArthur Fellowship. She currently resides in Olympia, Washington.

Room 612, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F255. Found in Translation: How Translators and Authors Translate the Untranslatable. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) The topic of untranslatability has been discussed by many theorists, but most of these reflections stem from one perspective only, namely, the translator’s. This panel offers a multidimensional discussion between a Peruvian poet and a Peruvian American narrator and their respective translators, concerning the challenges of the untranslatable, a discussion made all the more relevant and poignant by the fact that both authors are fluent in the target language.

María José Zubieta is a professor at New York University where she teaches translation and interpretation. She has served as advisor for several translation projects at NYU. Also, she was the coordinator of a collective translation project in conjunction with the University of Granada in Spain.

Mariela Dreyfus is the author of six poetry books, most recently Cuaderno músico. She has translated into Spanish the poetry of Diane Wakoski, Allen Ginsberg, and Daniel T. Moran. She currently teaches poetry and literary translation in the MFA in Creative Writing in Spanish at New York University.

Daniel Alarcón is an award-winning novelist, journalist, and radio producer. He is the author of six books, including two story collections, and the novel At NIght We Walk in Circles, published in 2013.

Jorge Cornejo is a book editor and translator. He has created and developed books and book collections for various prestigious publishing houses in Peru on topics such as history, art, children, and cooking. He has translated most of Daniel Alarcón's works into Spanish.

E.M. O’Connor has translated the poetry collection Fish by Mariela Dreyfus and the novel I Lived on Butterfly Hill by Marjorie Agosín. Her essays, poetry, and translations have appeared in various journals. She teaches Literature and Spanish at Lesley University and is writing her first novel.

Room 101, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 1

F261. The (She) Devil Inside: Unlikable Women in Fiction. (,  ,  ,  ) “Bad men get to be king. Bad women get to swallow poison and die,” wrote Lisa Santoro in the Huffington Post. But why should we settle for such a fate for our female characters, as readers and especially as writers? Do fictional women always have to be sympathetic to be worth reading? Using examples from multiple genres, this panel will examine how bad women can make for good storytelling.

Rebecca Johns is the author of the award-winning novel Icebergs and The Countess. Her work has appeared in the Mississippi Review, Narrative, and Ploughshares. She teaches at DePaul University in Chicago.

Julia Fierro's debut novel, Cutting Teeth, will be released in 2014. Her writing has appeared in Guernica, The Millions, and Poets & Writers. She founded The Sackett St. Writers' Workshop in 2002, a creative home to 2000+ NYC writers.

Lan Samantha Chang is the author of two novels, All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost and Inheritance, and a collection of short fiction, Hunger. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and she is a professor of creative writing and director of the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa.

Marie Myung-Ok Lee is the author of the novel Somebody's Daughter and one forthcoming in 2015. Her fiction has appeared the Kenyon Review, FiveChapters, TriQuarterly, Witness, and Guernica, and her nonfiction has appeared in the Atlantic, Salon, The New York Times. She teaches creative writing at Brown and Columbia.

Room 302, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

F264. Crossing the Veil: Engaging the Editor who Rejects your Work. (,  ,  ,  ) The editor may always be right but, more importantly, he or she always has the final say. Two poets and two prose writers open up about personalized rejection notes—glimpses into literary journals’ behind-the-scenes discussions—and instances in which editors wrestled with publishing their somewhat risky work. This panel will showcase accomplished authors speaking frankly about respectfully talking back to editors and will promote a submission culture of professionalism, transparency, and candor.

Marianne Kunkel is the Managing Editor of Prairie Schooner and a PhD student in poetry at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her poems have appeared in Columbia Poetry Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Poet Lore, and Rattle, and her chapbook is The Laughing Game.

Jennine Capó Crucet is the author of How to Leave Hialeah, which won the John Gardner Book Prize, the Iowa Short Fiction Award, and the Devil’s Kitchen Award. Winner of a PEN/O. Henry Prize, she was a recent Picador Fellow at the University of Leipzig. She is an assistant professor at Florida State.

Tim Johnston is the author of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize-winning collection of stories Irish Girl, the novel Never So Green, and the forthcoming novel The Life Before. He currently teaches in the MFA program in Creative Writing at Memphis University.

Stacey Waite is the author of Butch Geography, the lake has no saint, love poem to androgyny, and choke, which won of the 2004 Frank O'Hara Prize for Poetry. She is assistant professor of English at University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is the co-host of Prairie Schooner's podcast Air Schooner.

4:30 pm to 5:45 pm

Ballroom ABC, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

F279. Image & Idea: Rachel Kushner & Colm Tóibín, a Reading and Conversation, Sponsored by The Center for Fiction. (,  ,  ) Colm Tóibín (The Testament of Mary) described Rachel Kushner’s The Flamethrowers as, “an ambitious and serious American novel. The scope is wide. The political and the personal are locked in a deep and fascinating embrace.” And in Tóibín's latest novel he takes on nothing less than the mother of Christ. Hear these two authors read and speak about the larger ideas that inspired them and the need for scope in the contemporary novel.

Noreen Tomassi is Director of The Center for Fiction in New York City, the only nonprofit literary center in the U.S. solely devoted to the art of fiction.

Colm Tóibín is the author of seven novels including The Blackwater Lightship; The Master, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Brooklyn, winner of the Costa Book Award; and The Testament of Mary, longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Twice shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, he is currently Mellon Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.

Rachel Kushner’s most recent novel, The Flamethrowers, was published in 2013. Her debut novel, Telex From Cuba, was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, winner of the California Book Award, and a New York Times best seller and Notable Book. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New York Times, Paris Review, and Believer. She is a 2013 Guggenheim Fellow.

Room LL5, Western New England MFA Annex, Lower Level

F293. Place and Ethnicity in Literary Nonfiction. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) What occurs when ethnicity intersects with writing about varying locales? This diverse panel will discuss several of the issues that arise when writers contemplate and examine different spaces, such as rural borders, other countries, the suburbs, or urban neighborhoods. We’ll speak to what extent protest can figure into one’s work, how we portray specific immigrant cultures and communities, and share observations we’ve made about assimilation and alienation in America.

Allen Gee’s essays have appeared in Crab Orchard Review, South Loop Review, and Lumina. He has been a Yaddo fellow and is currently an Associate Professor at Georgia College & State University, where he edits fiction and creative nonfiction for Arts & Letters.

Geeta Kothari is the nonfiction editor at the Kenyon Review. Her writing has appeared in various anthologies and journals. She is the editor of ‘Did My Mama Like to Dance?’ and Other Stories about Mothers and Daughters and teaches at the University of Pittsburgh.

Rubén Martínez is a writer, performer, and teacher. He holds the Fletcher Jones Chair in Literature and Writing at Loyola Marymount University and is a resident artist at Stanford University's Institute for Diversity in the Arts. He is the author of several nonfiction and multi-genre works.

Neela Vaswani is author of the short story collection Where the Long Grass Bends; a memoir, You Have Given Me a Country; and co-author of the YA novel-in-letters, Same Sun Here. She teaches at Manhattanville College's MFA in Writing Program and Spalding University’s brief-residency MFA Program.

Mark O’Connor is an Associate Professor at Slippery Rock University where he teaches creative writing. He has received Pennsylvania Arts Fellowship for Creative Nonfiction and a Cultural Arts Council Grant. His work has been published in the Massachusetts Review, Creative Nonfiction, and Gulf Coast.

Room 202, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 2

F295. Using the Gifts of the Region in an Era of Globalization. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) This panel features five authors, writing about regions as distinct as the Virgin Islands, Panama, New York, India, and Montana, who have effectively incorporated what Flannery O’Connor refers to in Mystery and Manners as the gifts of the region in their work through inclusion of local color, dialect, and history. These writers will explore how writers convey the complexity of territories transformed by colonization, globalization, cultural hybridity, and power struggles.

Keya Mitra is an assistant professor of creative writing and literature at Pacific University. Her work has appeared in Best New American Voices, the Kenyon Review, and Ontario Review in addition to other journals. She was a 2008 Fulbright Scholar in creative writing in India.

Tiphanie Yanique is the author of How to Escape from a Leper Colony. Her writing has won a BOCAS Fiction Prize, the Boston Review Prize, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers Award, a Pushcart Prize, a Fulbright Scholarship, and an Academy of American Poets Prize. She is a professor at the New School.

Shann Ray is the author of American Masculine: Stories; Forgiveness and Power in the Age of Atrocity; and Balefire: Poems. His work has been honored with an American Book Award, and he has served as an NEA Fellow. He teaches leadership and forgiveness studies at Gonzaga University.

Cristina Henríquez is the author of three books: Come Together, Fall Apart; The World in Half; and The Book of Unknown Americans, forthcoming in June 2014. She is also the recipient of an Alfredo Cisneros Del Moral Foundation Award.

Matt Burgess is the author of Dogfight, A Love Story, which was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers pick and a New York Times Editors' Choice.

6:45 pm to 9:00 pm

Impact Hub Seattle, 220 2nd Ave S Seattle, WA 98104

Dirty Laundry Lit Present: TERMINAL
Cost: Free
Url: http://www.penusa.org/dirty-laundry-lit-terminal

PEN Center USA will present Dirty Laundry Lit: TERMINAL, an ensemble reading featuring Jamaal May, Franny Choi, Matthew Nienow, Lilliam Rivera, Stephanie Janis, Mag Gabbert, and Tod Goldberg. Dirty Laundry Lit's creator Natashia Deón will host the event.

7:30 pm to 9:30 pm

Velocity Dance Center, 1621 12th Ave. Seattle WA, 98122

StoryQuarterly, MEAD Joint & Tran(s)tudies Reading
Cost: Free
Url: https://www.facebook.com/events/204965466376615/

A celebratory group reading to launch StoryQuartery's special double issue 46/47! Readers: Rosebud Ben-Oni, Mark Doty, Ru Freeman, Kathleen Graber, Jason Koo, Paul Lisicky, Deborah Anne Lott, Laura McCullough, Kamilah Aisha Moon, and Antonio Ruiz-Camacho.

8:00 pm to 11:45 pm

Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122

VIDA: Women In Literary Arts Leave it to VIDA!
Cost: $10 minimum donation
Url: http://hugohouse.org/event/2014/feb/awp-offsite-event-vida-reading

Join us for readings by VIDA supporters Cheryl Strayed, Nick Flynn, Pam Houston, Natalie Diaz, Melissa Febos, Kate Lebo and Alexander Chee, come help VIDA lampoon the bad ol' days of the post war domestic. Readings start at 10pm. http://www.vidaweb.org/

Saturday, March 1, 2014 View Full Schedule

10:30 am to 11:45 am

Room 304, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

S164. The Short Story is Dead, Long Live the Short Story: A Reading from Prize-Winning Story Collections. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Join the winners of three prestigious short story awards, The Iowa Short Fiction Award, the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Fiction, as they read selections from their debut collections and discuss publishing via the contest circuit rather than through traditional publishing channels.

Xhenet Aliu, author of the short story collection Domesticated Wild Things, has worked as a secretary, waitress, entertainment journalist, private investigator, and librarian/archivist. Her fiction has appeared in various literary journals and was awarded the 2012 Prairie Schooner Book Prize.

Marie-Helene Bertino's debut collection of stories Safe as Houses was the winner of the Iowa Short Fiction award and long-listed for the 2013 Story Prize and Frank O'Connor International Short Story Prize. Her debut novel 2 A.M. At the Cat's Pajamas will be published in August 2014.

EJ Levy’s debut story collection, Love, In Theory, won the 2012 Flannery O’Connor Award. Her essays & fiction have appeared in Best American Essays, The New York Times, Orion, and Paris Review, and received a Pushcart Prize. Her anthology, Tasting Life Twice, won a Lambda Award.

Hugh Sheehy is the author of The Invisibles, which won the 2012 Flannery O'Connor Award. He teaches at Ramapo College, in Mahwah, New Jersey.

Chad Simpson is the author of the story collection Tell Everyone I Said Hi. His work has appeared in McSweeney's, Esquire, the Sun, American Short Fiction, and New Stories from the Midwest 2012. He teaches at Knox College.

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Room 400, Washington State Convention Center, Level 4

S174. Profile Writing: Telling Other Peoples' Stories . (,  ,  ,  ,  ) This panel will explore the art of the nonfiction profile across a range of genres, from the journalistic article to the essayistic portrait. In addition to tackling questions of craft, the excitement of sculpting fully realized characters, we will address aspects of the profiling process (researching and interviewing) as well as its emotional challenges and rewards.

Leslie Jamison's first collection of essays, The Empathy Exams, won the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize. Her work has appeared in publications including Harper's, Oxford American, the Believer, and A Public Space, and her debut novel Gin Closet, was a finalist for the LA Times First Fiction Prize.

Julia Cooke's essays, profiles, and cultural criticism have appeared in the Virginia Quarterly Review, the Village Voice, the Paris Review Daily, and the Atlantic. Her book, All the Young Punks: Grandchildren of the Cuban Revolution in Post-Fidel Havana, is forthcoming.

Mark Sundeen is the author of the books The Man Who Quit Money, The Making of Toro, and Car Camping. A correspondent for Outside magazine, his nonfiction appears in The New York Times magazine, the Believer, and McSweeney's. He teaches at the MFA program at Southern New Hampshire University.

Jennifer Percy is the author of the nonfiction book Demon Camp: A Soldier's Exorcism. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant, a Pushcart Prize, and an Iowa Arts Fellowship.

Room LL5, Western New England MFA Annex, Lower Level

S189. The Latino Short Story: Continuity, Innovation, and the Voices of Story Writing. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) The short story is a vital American literary form. Through its continuity and innovation, the short story hears and reflects the individual and collective voices of culture and history. This panel of Latin@ short story writers, who have recently published collections, will consider the problems and possibilities—aesthetically, traditionally, ideologically, and culturally—of publishing short story collections, while also exploring the tensions and joys of publishing with smaller presses.

Fred Arroyo is the author of Western Avenue and Other Fictions, and the novel The Region of Lost Names. A recipient of an Individual Artist Grant from the Indiana Arts Commission, he lives in South Dakota and teaches at the University of South Dakota.

Lorraine López teaches in Vanderbilt’s MFA program. She’s published three essay collections and five books of fiction, including Homicide Survivors Picnic. Recent publications include a novel, The Realm of Hungry Spirits and two coedited collections, The Other Latin@ and Rituals of Movement.

Benjamin Alire Saenz is a poet, fiction writer, and young adult novelist. He is a former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University and an American Book Award winner. His latest offering, a collection of short stories: Everything Begins and Ends at the Kentucky Club was the recipient of the 2013 PEN Faulkner Award for fiction. He is the chair of the Creative Writing Department at the University of Texas at El Paso.

Jennine Capó Crucet is the author of How to Leave Hialeah, which won the John Gardner Book Prize, the Iowa Short Fiction Award, and the Devil’s Kitchen Award. Winner of a PEN/O. Henry Prize and a recent Picador Fellow at the University of Leipzig, she is an assistant professor at Florida State.

Daniel Chacón is author of Hotel Juárez: Stories, Rooms, and Loops; Unending Rooms; and the shadows took him; and Chicano Chicanery. His awards include the Hudson Prize and an American Book Award. He is co-host of Words on a Wire and is a photographer. www.soychaconblogspot.com

Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

S192. Intense/Beautiful/Devoted: Poems of Provocation & Witness. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Leonard Bernstein wrote, “This will be our reply to violence: to make music more intensely, more beautifully, more devotedly than ever before.” Poets today are looking without flinching at our world of drones, evictions, gun shows, and violence to the earth, as they tell the many stories of our lives. Happily, too, they are imagining alternatives and provoking change. A reading of intense and striking music, in the spirit of Split This Rock, with Patricia Smith providing opening remarks.

Sarah Browning is Executive Director of Split This Rock: Poetry of Provocation & Witness. Author of Whiskey in the Garden of Eden and co-editor of DC Poets Against the War, she is an Institute for Policy Studies Associate Fellow and cohosts Sunday Kind of Love at Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC.

Natalie Diaz is Mojave and Pima. She was awarded 2012 Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Literature Fellowship, a 2012 Lannan Residency, and a 2012 Lannan Literary Fellowship. Her first book, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published in June 2012.

Danez Smith, a Cave Canem Fellow and two-time Pushcart Nominee, works as a Student Advisor for the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His recent work appears or is forthcoming in journals such as decomP, the Cortland Review, Anti-, Southern Indiana Review, and Muzzle.

Patricia Smith's six books of poetry include Blood Dazzler, National Book Award finalist, and Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah. She is featured in Best American Poetry, Best American Essays, and Best American Mystery Stories. She teaches at the College of Staten Island and Sierra Nevada College.

Ping Wang has published eleven books of poetry and prose, including American Visa, Foreign Devil, Of Flesh and Spirit, New Generation, and Aching for Beauty. Recipient of NEA, Bush, Lannan, and McKnight fellowships, she founded and directs the Kinship of Rivers project.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Room 607, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

S210. Rethinking Linking: Stories and Novels, Structure and Beyond. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Linked stories and novels in stories continue to grow in popularity, and they have opened up new possibilities in terms of considering how connections and structure work within and across not only what we might traditionally consider stories, but chapters and novel sections, too. Join us for a discussion of linking through character, setting, language, and more. Beyond the basics, we’ll address ways to consider what kind of structural form your links call for and offer tips for experimentation.

Anne Sanow is the author of the story collection Triple Time. Her awards include the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, the L. L. Winship/PEN New England Award for Fiction, and an NEA fellowship in prose. She currently teaches fiction at Texas Tech University.

Dylan Landis is the author of two linked story collections, Normal People Don't Live Like This, one of Newsday's Ten Best Books of 2009, and the forthcoming Rainey Royal. She has won a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and other awards.

Clifford Garstang is the author of In an Uncharted Country, a collection of linked short stories, and the novel What the Zhang Boys Know. He is the co-founder and editor of Prime Number magazine.

Imad Rahman is the author of I Dream Of Microwaves, a collection of connected stories. He is currently working on a novel and teaches creative writing at Cleveland State University, where he also directs the annual Imagination Writers Conference.

Mary Akers is the author of the short story collections Bones of an Inland Sea (forthcoming) and Women up on Blocks. She co-authored the nonfiction book One Life to Give: A Path to Finding Yourself by Helping Others and is editor of the online journal r.kv.r.y.

Room 618/619/620, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

S217. Celebrating 20 Years of Extraordinary Fiction at Riverhead Books . (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Since its founding, Riverhead Books has published the freshest, most memorable and diverse new voices in literary fiction. Riverhead authors have won Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Critics Circle Awards, Story Prizes, and been named to Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists, the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35, and the New Yorker’s 20 Under 40, among many other distinctions. Four of Riverhead’s acclaimed writers will read and discuss their work with Riverhead’s director of publicity.

Jynne Dilling Martin is publicity director at Riverhead Books. Her poetry has appeared widely including in Granta, Ploughshares, and on the "PBS Newshour" with Jim Lehrer. She is a Yaddo fellow, winner of the Boston Review/92nd Street Y Discovery Prize, and the 2013 Antarctica Artist in Residence.

Manuel Gonzales is the executive director of Austin Bat Cave a nonprofit writing and tutoring center for kids in Austin, Texas. His debut collection, The Miniature Wife and Other Stories, was published January 2013 by Riverhead Books. He's currently at work on a novel.

Jess Row is the author of two collections of short stories, The Train to Lo Wu and Nobody Ever Gets Lost. His novel Your Face in Mine will appear in 2014. Recipient of a Whiting Writers Award, she was named a "Best Young American Novelist" by Granta. He teaches at the College of New Jersey.

Danielle Evans is the author of the short-story collection Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self, a co-winner of the 2011 PEN American Robert W. Bingham Prize for a first book and a National Book Foundation 5 under 35 selection. She teaches in the MFA program at American University.

Nami Mun’s Miles from Nowhere garnered a Whiting award, a Pushcart prize, and the Chicago Public Library’s 21st Century Award. Miles was also shortlisted for the Orange Prize for New Writers and the Asian American Literary Award. http://www.namimun.com.

Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3

S222. Comedy, and Errors. (,  ,  ,  ) Comedy isn’t easy, and characters conceived in comedy often have the dual task of being both amusing and serious, either alternately or simultaneously. Their stories often achieve sharpest focus at the intersection of the comic and the solemn, and it’s the author’s job to make sure one quality works in tandem with the other. The panel will discuss how a variety of such characters come to reach their fullest serio-comic potential.

Peter Turchi is the author and editor of books of fiction and nonfiction including Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer, and the forthcoming A Muse and A Maze: Writing as Puzzle, Mystery, and Magic. He has been both an NEA and a Guggenheim Fellow.

Antonya Nelson is the author of four novels and seven short story collections, including the forthcoming Soldiers Joy. She teaches creative writing at the University of Houston and in the Warren Wilson MFA program.

Steven Schwartz is the author of five books, including most recently Little Raw Souls, a collection of stories. He teaches in the Warren Wilson low-residencey MFA Program and in the MFA Writing Program at Colorado State University, where he also serves as fiction editor for Colorado Review.

C.J. Hribal is the author of two novels and two short fiction collections, including The Company Car and The Clouds in Memphis, which won the AWP Award for Short Fiction. An NEA and Guggenheim Fellow, he teaches at Marquette University and for the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Redwood Room, Sheraton Seattle, 2nd Floor

S229. Beyond Kimchi: Writing Through Ethnicity. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Four novelists and a poet, all of Korean descent, will read from current work, followed by a discussion of how their work has evolved with respect to ethnicity, theme, and aesthetic vision. With changing publishing trends and readers’ attitudes toward “ethnic” writing, panelists will also discuss various perspectives of writing toward ethnicity, of writing "beyond" it, and of other ways to approach the gift/challenge of “double consciousness."

Katherine Min’s novel Secondhand World was published in 2006. Her stories have been widely published and anthologized, including in the 25th Pushcart Prize anthology. She is currently working on her second novel, The Fetishist. She teaches at the University of North Carolina, Asheville.

Marie Myung-Ok Lee is the author of the novel Somebody's Daughter and one forthcoming in 2015. Fiction has appeared the Kenyon Review, FiveChapters, TriQuarterly, Witness, and Guernica. His nonfiction has appeared in the Atlantic, Salon, and The New York Times. She teaches creative writing at Brown and Columbia.

Catherine Chung is the author of the novel Forgotten Country and an assistant professor at Adelphi University. Her work has been published in The New York Times, Granta.com, and The Rumpus, and she is fiction editor at Guernica magazine.

Matthew Salesses is the author of I'm Not Saying, I'm Just Saying and The Last Repatriate. His essays and fiction have or will appear in The New York Times parenting blog, NPR, The Good Men Project, Hyphen, The Rumpus, Glimmer Train, Witness, and American Short Fiction.

Krys Lee’s debut book Drifting House was awarded the 2012 Story Prize Spotlight Award and was shortlisted for the 2012 BBC International Story Prize. She is a professor of creative writing at Yonsei University's Underwood International College in Seoul, Korea.

Ballroom E, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

S237. A Reading and Conversation with Molly Gloss and Ursula K. Le Guin, Sponsored by Literary Arts and the Lyceum Agency. (,  ,  ) Molly Gloss and Ursula Le Guin are two of the greatest living writers and chroniclers of the American West. They will read from their most recent work and discuss craft, the writing life, and the role of place in their work. Moderated by Andrew Proctor.

Andrew Proctor is the executive director of Literary Arts, a nonprofit literary center in Portland, Oregon. Previously, he was the Membership and Operations Director at PEN American Center, an associate editor at HarperCollins publishers, and he worked at the Canadian High Commission in London (UK).

Ursula K. Le Guin has published twenty-one novels, eleven volumes of short stories, four collections of essays, twelve books for children, six volumes of poetry, four of translation, and has received many honors and awards including the Hugo, Nebula, National Book Award, and the PEN/Malamud Award for Short Fiction. Her most recent publications are Finding My Elegy (New and Selected Poems, 1960-2010) and The Unreal and the Real (Selected Short Stories).

Molly Gloss is the author of the novel The Jump-Off Creek, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, and a winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award and the Oregon Book Award; The Dazzle of Day, a New York Times Notable Book, and recipient of the PEN Center West Fiction Prize; Wild Life, winner of the James Tiptree, Jr. Award; and the national best seller, The Hearts of Horses. Other honors include a Whiting Writers’ Award and appearances in The Norton Book of Science Fiction and The Year’s Best Science Fiction.

Room 618/619/620, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

S248. The Business of Literary Publishing in the Twenty-First Century. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Leading industry professionals discuss the business of literary publishing today. A legendary independent publisher, a successful literary agent, and an award-winning executive editor talk about the nuts and bolts of the publishing industry. From conception and submission through editing, production, marketing, and beyond, these four will demystify the process from the inside out.

Elisabeth Schmitz is Vice-President and Editorial Director of Grove/Atlantic Inc. where she has worked for eighteen years as an editor of both fiction and narrative nonfiction.

Morgan Entrekin is currently the president and publisher of Grove/Atlantic, Inc. Grove/Atlantic publishes general nonfiction, current affairs, history, biography, narrative journalism, fiction, drama, and poetry.

Jill Bialosky is the author of three poetry volumes, most recently Intruder, and two novels, House Under Snow and The Life Room. Her recent memoir, History of a Suicide was a New York Times best seller. She is a Vice President and Executive Editor at W. W. Norton & Company.

Dani Shapiro is the author of the memoirs Devotion and Slow Motion, and the novels Family History and Black & White. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Granta, Tin House, One Story, and Ploughshares. Her new book, Still Writing: The Pleasures and Perils of a Creative Life, was published last fall.

Rick Simonson is senior book buyer and co-directs the reading series at Seattle's Elliott Bay Book Company. He is on the boards of Copper Canyon Press and University of Washington Press and has served as juror for the STORY Prize, the DSC South Asian Literature Prize, and the National Book Award.

4:30 pm to 5:45 pm

Ballroom ABC, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

S266. A Reading and Conversation with Gish Jen and Tobias Wolff, Sponsored by the Oregon State University School of Writing, Literature, and Film. (,  ,  ) Gish Jen, author of The Love Wife and Typical American, and Tobias Wolff, author of This Boy’s Life and In Pharaoh’s Army, will present readings of their award-winning work, followed by a discussion moderated by Jess Walter.

Gish Jen is the author of numerous award-winning novels, including World and Town, Mona In the Promised Land, The Love Wife, and Typical American, as well as a collection of stories, Who's Irish? Invited by Harvard University to deliver the Massey lectures in American Civilization, her lectures were recently published in a book entitled Tiger Writing: Art, Culture and the Interdependent Self. She is the recipient of the Lannan Award in Fiction as well as a Strauss Living Award and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Tobias Wolff’s books include the memoirs This Boy’s Life and In Pharaoh’s Army; the novels The Barracks Thief and Old School, and four collections of short stories, including In the Garden of the North American Martyrs, and, most recently, Our Story Begins: New and Selected Stories. His work is translated widely and has received the PEN/Faulkner Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the PEN/Malamud Award. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods Professor in the Humanities at Stanford.

Jess Walter is the author of six novels, most recently The New York Times bestseller Beautiful Ruins. He was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award for The Zero and winner of the 2005 Edgar Allan Poe Award for best novel for Citizen Vince. His short fiction and essays have appeared in Harper’s, McSweeney’s, and Playboy.

 

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