My 2015 AWP Conference Schedule

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Thursday, April 9, 2015 View Full Schedule

8:00 am to 5:30 pm

Registration Area, Level 1

R100. Conference Registration. Attendees who have registered in advance may pick up their registration materials in AWP’s preregistered check-in area, located in the registration area on level 1 of the Minneapolis Convention Center. If you have not yet registered for the conference, please visit the unpaid registration area, also in the registration area on level 1. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Room M100 B&C, Mezzanine Level

R119. Plot IS Character, Character IS Plot. ( ,  ,  ,  ) Plot tests characters and forces them to make choices that define them. Plot provides characters with the things they are hard-wired to repeat and avoid, driven by physical, social, and emotional motivation. Successful authors of young adult and middle grade fiction explore how plot can deepen your characters as they tackle issues pertaining to social justice, diversity, environmental issues, cultural trends, and upheavals.

Jewell Parker Rhodes is the director of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing. Her books for youth include: Ninth Ward, which received the Coretta Scott King Honor Author Award; Sugar, a Kirkus Best Children’s Book and Junior Library Guild Selection; and Fireflies, forthcoming in 2015.

Bill Konigsberg is the award-winning author of Openly Straight and Out of the Pocket. Openly Straight won the Sid Fleischman Humor Award in 2014, and Out of the Pocket won the Lambda Literary Award in 2009.

Varian Johnson is the author of four novels for young people, including My Life As A Rhombus and The Great Greene Heist. He has taught at the Highlights Foundation Workshop and St. Edwards University.

Nova Ren Suma is the author of the YA novels Imaginary Girls and 17 & Gone. She has an MFA in fiction from Columbia University and she has been awarded fellowships from NYFA, the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Djerassi, the Millay Colony, and the Hambidge Center. She teaches YA writing workshops.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Room M100 J, Mezzanine Level

R216. Young Adult and New Adult Content: Developing Themes of Substance for Readers. (,  ,  ,  ) Within children's writing, middle grade and young adult genres are well-defined. What about the new adult label? This genre was developed to delineate markets, but authors who write new adult and YA genres consciously work to develop themes that bring substantive and high quality experiences to readers. Writers on this panel will consider how NA and YA themes can move beyond expected issues of sexuality and independence to include family relationships, cultural, and world-issue perspectives.

Ann Angel's publications include books, essays, and short stories, including the critically acclaimed biography Janis Joplin: Rise Up Singing and Such a Pretty Face: Short Stories about Beauty. She serves as the English Graduate Program Director at Mount Mary University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Ricki Thompson is a graduate of the Vermont College program in writing for children and young adults. Her young adult historical novel, City of Cannibals, was included on the Bank Street list of best books for children. 

Ann Matzke is the co-author of Today’s Picture Book Biographies: Back Matter Matters published in the Horn Book Magazine. She received her MFA from Hamline University. She has published nonfiction books for children and she is the youth services director at Wilson Public Library in Cozad, Nebraska.

Kekla Magoon is the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award-winning author of the YA novels The Rock and the River, Camo Girl, and How it Went Down. She also writes historical nonfiction. She is a three-time NAACP Image Award nominee, and serves on the Writers Council for the National Writing Project.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Room M100 H&I, Mezzanine Level

R247. Writing Biography for Young Readers: Creating the Gallery of the Good and Great. (,  ,  ,  ) Those who write nonfiction for children are often drawn to the stories of real people. We work to translate the facts of actual lives into works that will captivate our audience. This panel of award-winning writers considers the issues of writing biography: choosing the subject, knowing the audience, conducting research, framing and structuring the stories, and using appropriate fictional techniques.

 

Tracy Nelson Maurer has written more than 100 nonfiction books and co-authored an article about back matter. A recipient of the Rudolf Nonfiction Award and an SCBWI Work-In-Progress Grant, she has two forthcoming picture-book biographies and other titles under contract. She holds an MFA from Hamline University.

Phyllis Root has been writing books for children for over thirty years and has published more than forty books for children. She is currently an instructor in the Hamline University MFA program in writing for children and young adults.

Jacqueline Briggs Martin is the author of eighteen picture books for children, including Snowflake Bentley, which received the Caldecott Award in 1999. Her most recent book is Alice Waters and the Trip to Delicious. She is a faculty member in Hamline University's low-residency MFAC program.

Liza Ketchum’s sixteen books for young readers include the novels Out of Left Field, Newsgirl, and Where the Great Hawk Flies, winner of the Massachusetts Book Award. Nonfiction titles include Into a New Country and The Gold Rush. She was a founding member of Hamline University's MFAC program.

4:30 pm to 5:45 pm

Room 211 A&B, Level 2

R273. How to Craft True-to-Life Queer YA Characters—Writing Beyond Stereotypes. (,  ,  ,  ) Creating LGBTQ characters for a YA audience can be daunting. Many writers have limited experience with queer subject matter yet seek inclusivity. So where does one begin when crafting a young LGBTQ character? These YA authors will provide concrete methods for avoiding tropes, writing beyond stereotypes, and improving queer character veracity. This panel will give writers the tools needed to enhance the diversity within their work.

Kirstin Cronn-Mills writes young adult fiction (The Sky Always Hears Me and the Hills Don’t Mind; Beautiful Music for Ugly Children; Original Fake), poetry, nonfiction for middle and high school libraries, and academic articles. 

Molly Beth Griffin is a graduate of Hamline University's MFA program in writing for children and young adults and a teaching artist at the Loft Literary Center. She is the author of the YA novel Silhouette of a Sparrow, and the picture books Loon Baby and Rhoda's Rock Hunt.

Lauren Myracle is a New York Times best-seller. Her YA works Kissing Kate and Shine have diverse story lines with queer characters as a focus. As a bold and passionate writer, her refusal to shy away from difficult subject matter has positioned her as on of the ALA’s most challenged authors.

Judi Marcin is currently a graduate student in the MFA program for writing for children and young adults at Hamline University. Her passion is to improve queer, gender nonconforming, and diverse character visibility within the world of children's literature.

Friday, April 10, 2015 View Full Schedule

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Room 205 A&B, Level 2

F115. Representing Responsibly: We Need Diverse Books—Authors on the Challenges of Writing Diversity for Kids and Teens. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) How do you change the (very white) face of children's literature? Through great storytelling. Because if there's one thing kids and teens hate, it's a lecture. The writers here are integrating issues of race, class, sexuality, gender, and/or ability, while still emphasizing the importance of narrative. This discussion, lead by #WeNeedDiverseBooks team members, will center on how to include diverse elements while putting the focus squarely on quality storytelling.

Sona Charaipotra is an entertainment journalist and the co-founder of CAKE Literary, a diversity-driven boutique book packaging company whose first project, Tiny Pretty Things, is her debut novel with writing partner Dhonielle Clayton.

Sarah is a YA author, mentor to teen writers, and a mod for DiversifYA.com. Her debut, The Last Leaves Falling, is set in contemporary Japan.

Bryce Leung is a computer engineer and novelist. Little Miss Evil is his debut middle-grade super-villain thriller, which is co-authored with his wife Kristy Shen. He attained his BASc at the University of Waterloo, his MEng at University of Toronto, and is a proud member of #WeNeedDiverseBooks.

Renee Ahdieh is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of the young adult novel The Wrath and the Dawn. In her spare time, she likes to cook, travel, and dance salsa.

Kristy Shen is a practicing computer engineer at a major Canadian bank by day and a children's author by night. She is also a proud senior contributor to the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign. She just debuted her first novel Little Miss Evil.

10:30 am to 11:45 am

Room 211 A&B, Level 2

F151. YA and Middle Grade Speculative Fiction: What's at Stake?. (,  ,  ,  ,  Anne Ursu) The world of speculative fiction for kid and teen readers is diverse and deep. This moderated panel, composed of middle grade and young adult fantasy and science fiction authors, will discuss the special craft and genre concerns of MG and YA speculative fiction and the direction(s) in which they see the field headed.

Heather Bouwman is the author of the children’s middle-grade novel The Remarkable & Very True Story of Lucy & Snowcap, and she is the recipient of a McKnight fellowship in writing for children. She teaches at the University of St. Thomas.

Pete Hautman is the author of eight novels for adults, thirteen novels for young adults, including National Book Award-winner Godless and Los Angeles Times Book Prize-winner The Big Crunch. He is a four-time Minnesota Book Award winner. His most recent novel is The Klaatu Terminus.

Laura Ruby writes fiction for kids, teens, and adults including the YA novels Good GirlsBad Apple, and the forthcoming Bone Gap. She is on the faculty of Hamline University's MFAC program.  

Justina Ireland is the author of Vengeance Bound and Promise of Shadows.

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Room L100 D&E, Lower Level

F192. YA Meets the Real: Young Adult Fiction and Nonfiction that Takes on the World. (,  ,  ,  ) Most think the current boom in young adult is fantasy/dystopian series. Yet there's a flourishing world of YA fiction and nonfiction that grapples with the real—social issues, biography, history. Hear from YA authors about how they create compelling fiction and nonfiction on serious themes: How to invite the young reader into a subject they may not care about? What's the role of narrative literary techniques in nonfiction? How to illuminate issues in fiction without sounding didactic?

Marina Budhos is the author of numerous award-winning adult and young adult novels and nonfiction, including Ask Me No Questions and The Professor of Light. Sugar Changed the World, co-authored with Marc Aronson, was a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist. She is an associate professor at William Paterson University. 

Kekla Magoon is the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award-winning author of the YA novels The Rock and the River, Camo Girl, and How it Went Down. She also writes historical nonfiction. She is a three-time NAACP Image Award nominee, and serves on the Writers Council for the National Writing Project.

Marc Aronson has worked as an award-winning editor of books for children and young adults for more than twenty-five years. He built his career around bringing the fresh insights of the academy to a wide range of younger readers. He teaches at Rutgers and is a frequent speaker on issues in education.

Elizabeth Partridge writes biographies and other nonfiction for young adults. Her honors include National Book Award finalist, Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, LA Times Book Prize, Printz Honor, School Library Journal's Battle of the Books, and the Jane Addams Children's Book Award. She is core faculty at Vermont College of Fine Arts.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Room M100 H&I, Mezzanine Level

F221. Tackling Tragedy in Young Adult with Different Mediums. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) How can children’s writers approach tragedy in an original way without succumbing to cliché? Five young adult authors discuss structural choices in tackling traumatic events (bullying, death, natural disasters) while giving examples of ways these applications break boundaries and add perspective in articulating story. Through graphic novels to pulling story straight from the headlines to writing about disasters, participants will discuss one another’s work and choices that have inspired theirs.

Lilliam Rivera is a 2013 PEN Center USA Emerging Voices Fellow. Her writing has appeared in Midnight Breakfast, Bellevue Literary Review, the Rumpus, Los Angeles Review of Books, Lunch Ticket, and Latina, among others. Lilliam is represented by Eddie Schneider of JABberwocky Literary Agency.

Cecil Castellucci is the award-winning author of books and graphic novels for young adults including Boy Proof, The Plain Janes, The Year of the Beasts, and Odd Duck. She is YA editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books, children’s correspondence coordinator for the Rumpus, and a two time MacDowell fellow. 

Meg Medina writes picture books, middle grade, and young adult fiction that examines how cultures intersect through the eyes of young people. She is the 2014 recipient of the Pura Belpré medal and the 2013 CYBILS fiction award for her young adult novel, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass.

Swati Avasthi is the author of two novels: Split, which received multiple awards, and Chasing Shadows, which made numerous "best of the year" lists. She teaches at Hamline University in the Creative Writing Programs and is co-curator of the Loft Literary Center's Second Story Reading Series.

Matt de la Peña is the author of five critically-acclaimed young adult novels, including Mexican WhiteBoy and The Living.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Room M100 F&G, Mezzanine Level

F254. Young Adults, New Adults, & the Women Who Write Them: Navigating the Politics of Gender & Genre in Young Adult Literature. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) From S.E. Hinton to J.K. Rowling, YA literature is one of the few literary genres dominated by female writers. Success within this genre, however, has not always afforded its writers a place in literary conversations or academic institutions. This panel of authors and editors will discuss the gendered politics that inform the reception of YA literature, the importance of including YA writers in literary conversations, and the strategies by which these writers can advocate for their work.

Sheila O’Connor is the author of four novels including Keeping Safe the Stars, Sparrow Road, and Where No Gods Came. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she teaches fiction at Hamline University and serves as fiction editor for Water~Stone Review. Her work has been honored with the Michigan Prize for Literary Fiction.

Laurel Snyder is the author of five children's novels, six picture books, and two collections of poems. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, she has published essays in such places as Salon, The Boston Globe, and Utne Reader, and she is a commentator for NPR's All Things Considered.

Lynn Melnick is author of If I Should Say I Have Hope, a book of poems, and co-editor, with Brett Fletcher Lauer, of Please Excuse This Poem: 100 New Poets for the Next Generation. She teaches at 92Y and is the social media and outreach director for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.

Marian Crotty is an assistant professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland. Recent writing has appeared in journals such as the Gettysburg Review, Guernica, and the New England Review.

Stephanie Kuehn is the William C. Morris Award-winning author of Charm & Strange, Complicit, and the forthcoming Delicate Monsters. She writes realistic young adult fiction and is currently working toward a doctorate in clinical psychology.

4:30 pm to 5:45 pm

Room 205 C&D, Level 2

F278. Growing Up in a Magical Space: Magical Realism in Contemporary Young Adult/Children's Literature. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Magical realism is a genre in which magical elements occur naturally in a realistic environment—much as they do in childhood. As the popularity of dystopian fiction wanes in young adult/children's literature, other genres take its place, including a blend of the contemporary and the fantastic: magical realism. Five published authors will discuss the unique place of magical realism in young adult/children’s literature and share their reasons and methods for working in this underrepresented genre.

Laura Ruby writes fiction for kids, teens, and adults including the YA novels Good Girls, Bad Apple, and the forthcoming Bone Gap. She is on the faculty of Hamline University's MFAC program.

Janet Fox is the author of books for young readers, including three young adult historical novels: Faithful, Sirens, and Forgiven, a WILLA Literary Award finalist. She has taught high school literature, and her books have been recognized on lists of the ALA and the Junior Library Guild.

Nikki Loftin writes novels for young readers, including The Sinister Sweetness of Splendid Academy, Nightingale’s Nest, and Wish Girl. Her books have received awards and starred reviews. A former teacher, Nikki holds an MA in English/fiction writing from the University of Texas at Austin.

Nova Ren Suma is the author of the YA novels Imaginary Girls and 17 & Gone. She has an MFA in fiction from Columbia University and has been awarded fellowships from NYFA, the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Djerassi, the Millay Colony, and the Hambidge Center. She teaches YA writing workshops.

Samantha Mabry's debut novel Leaves will be published by Algonquin Young Readers in the spring of 2016.

Saturday, April 11, 2015 View Full Schedule

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Room 211 C&D, Level 2

S121. Geography of Nowhere: Suburban Landscape as Stage & Character in Young Adult/Children's Literature. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Contemporary young adult/children’s fiction is largely set in ordinary, often suburban landscapes. Characters experience love, loss, and growth amid the mundane world of sprawling shopping malls, high school football fields, and chain restaurants. Five published authors discuss the extraordinary nature of the everyday in crafting young adult/children’s literature.

Geoff Herbach teaches in the MFA program at Minnesota State University, Mankato and is the author of four young adult titles (Stupid Fast, Nothing Special, I'm With Stupid, and Fat Boy vs. The Cheerleaders) and the literary novel Miracle Letters of T. Rimberg.

Janet Fox is the author of books for young readers, including three young adult historical novels: FaithfulSirens, and Forgiven, a WILLA Literary Award finalist. She has taught high school literature, and her books have been recognized on lists of the ALA and the Junior Library Guild.

Kari Anne Holt is the author of two middle grade novels in verse: Brains for Lunch (a zombie novel in haiku), and Rhyme Schemer. She is also the author of Mike Stellar: Nerves of Steel, a Maud Hart Lovelace nominee and a Nutmeg Book Award finalist. She is a full-time writer in Austin, Texas.

Nikki Loftin writes novels for young readers, including The Sinister Sweetness of Splendid Academy, Nightingale’s Nest, and Wish Girl. Her books have received awards and starred reviews. A former teacher, Nikki holds an MA in English/fiction writing from the University of Texas at Austin.

Kirstin Cronn-Mills is the author of the YA fiction novels, The Sky Always Hears Me: And the Hills Don’t Mind, Beautiful Music for Ugly Children, and Original Fake. She also writes poetry, nonfiction for middle and high school libraries, and academic articles and chapters.

10:30 am to 11:45 am

Room M100 A, Mezzanine Level

S153. Navigating the Waters of Authentic Voice in YA Native Fiction. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Books by Native writers offer something unique that most non-Native writers don’t have: access to a lived experience as a Native person. This identity shapes and informs the stories they choose to tell. Without deep connections, non-Native writers often recycle problems that characterize the body of literature about Native people. This dialog, with Nambe, Onondaga, Mvskoke, and Norsk panelists, will focus on choices writers make in telling stories that embody the depth and breadth of Native life.

Debbie Reese (Nambe Pueblo) is a published scholar of children's literature and founder of American Indians in Children's Literature, the most widely read blog in her field. Her doctorate is in education; her work is taught in education, English, and library science courses in the US and Canada.

Eric Gansworth (Onondaga Nation) is the author of ten books in multiple genres, including the novels Extra Indians (American Book Award winner) and Mending Skins (PEN Oakland Award winner). His most recent book, If I Ever Get Out of Here, is a YA novel. He is Lowery Writer-in-Residence at Canisius College.

Cynthia Leitich Smith (Mvskoke) is the New York Times best-selling, award-winning author of fourteen books. A Vermont College of Fine Arts faculty member, she has earned YA writing awards from Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers, the Texas Library Association, and the Austin Public Library Friends Foundation.

Tim Tingle, Oklahoma Choctaw, retraced the Trail of Tears in 1992, and he now writes historical fiction reflecting extensive tribal interviews. Featured at the 2014 National Book Festival, his books include Crossing Bok Chitto, Walking the Choctaw Road, How I Became A Ghost, and House of Purple Cedar.

Debby Dahl Edwardson writes from Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost town in the US. Her most recent novel, My Name is Not Easy, was a finalist for the National Book Award. She is an adjunct instructor at Ilisagvik College, Alaska’s only tribal college.

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Room 208 C&D, Level 2

S182. Fascinated or Haunted: Why We Continue to Write & Rewrite Fairy Tales. (,  ,  ,  ) Everyone from Einstein to Bettelheim says fairy tales are vital to children. Whether we believe their impact is deeply and psychologically empowering for the young, or just a good imaginative leaping off point for writers, we cannot deny their durability. This panel explores the reasons for writing a fairy-tale-based work, the transformations that happen, and delves into the writers’ own childhood experiences of this realm. What endures in our deepest imagination, and why?

Sherryl Clark is the author of more than sixty books for young readers, including four verse novels. She teaches at Victoria University in Australia, and is currently undertaking a PhD in fairy tales. Her poems and stories have been widely published in Australian journals.

Ron Koertge is a poet and a novelist for young adults. His latest book of poems is The Ogre's Wife, and his latest novel-in-verse is Coaltown Jesus. He teaches in the low-residency block at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Christine Heppermann is the author of the young adult poetry collection Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty. She regularly reviews children's and young adult books for the Chicago Tribune and was a long-time staff reviewer for the Horn Book magazine.

Phyllis Root has been writing books for children for over thirty years and has published more than forty children's books. She teaches in the Hamline University MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults program.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Room L100 J, Lower Level

S227. Coming of Age: Choosing to Write the Young Adult and Middle Grade Novel. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Novelists have long been interested in conflicts of the young, and many novelists are choosing to write for both adults and younger readers. What are the challenges of moving between two audiences? Does the age of the intended reader, middle grade or young adult, limit the novelist’s ambition or craft? Are there craft demands unique to each audience? Five writers who have published novels for both adults and young people will share the lessons learned from writing for a second audience.

Sheila O’Connor is the author of four novels including Keeping Safe the Stars, Sparrow Road, and Where No Gods Came. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she teaches fiction at Hamline University and serves as fiction editor for Water~Stone Review. Her work has been honored with the Michigan Prize for Literary Fiction.

M. Evelina Galang, author of One TribeHer Wild American Self, and Angel de la Luna and the 5th Glorious Mystery, received the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award Advancing Human Rights, and is an advocate of WWII comfort women. She directs the MFA in creative writing program at the University of Miami.

 

Jewell Parker Rhodes is the director of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing. Her books for youth include: Ninth Ward, which received the Coretta Scott King Honor Author Award; Sugar, a Kirkus Best Children’s Book and Junior Library Guild Selection; and Fireflies, forthcoming in 2015.

Nicole Helget is the author of The Summer of Ordinary Ways, The Turtle Catcher, Stillwater, Horse Camp, and Wonder at the Edge of the World. She teaches in North Mankato, Minnesota.

Mick Cochrane is the author of two novels for adults, Flesh Wounds and Sport, and two novels for young readers, The Girl Who Threw Butterflies and Fitz. He teaches English and directs the creative writing program at Canisius College in Buffalo, NY.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Room M100 D&E, Mezzanine Level

S250. Race in YA Lit: Writing Ourselves, Writing the Other. (,  ,  ,  ) We all know the importance of seeing yourself in a book. But in children’s literature, where diversity is crucial, characters of color (CoCs) are few and far between. This panel will address common questions that arise when writing CoCs: Do I have the authority to tell this story? How do I avoid tokenism? Can I write outside my race authentically? Can I represent my own race? Four diverse authors will discuss the unique challenges and strategies for writing CoCs and navigating the market.

Swati Avasthi is the author of two novels: Split, which received multiple awards, and Chasing Shadows, which made numerous "best of the year" lists. She teaches at Hamline University in the Creative Writing Programs and is co-curator of the Loft Literary Center's Second Story Reading Series.

Justina Ireland is the author of Vengeance Bound and Promise of Shadows.

Matt de la Peña is the author of five critically-acclaimed young adult novels, including Mexican WhiteBoy and The Living.

Varian Johnson is the author of four novels for young people, including My Life As A Rhombus and The Great Greene Heist. He has taught at the Highlights Foundation Workshop and St. Edwards University.

4:30 pm to 5:45 pm

Room 205 A&B, Level 2

S273. The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction for Children and Teens. (,  ,  ,  ,  ) Juvenile nonfiction writers are increasingly breaking free from convention and exploring new ways to convey facts and true stories. They are experimenting with poetry and character-driven narrative. They are creating innovative back matter to enhance their books’ educational value. So how does a writer craft a nonfiction book that’s informative and a joy for kids to read? In this panel, five writers share their approaches to sparking young readers’ curiosity and keeping readers engaged.

Carrie Pomeroy has published short fiction and essays in Literary Mama, Calyx, and Riding Shotgun: Women Write About Their Mothers. She has taught at the Loft Literary Center, Metropolitan State University, and in schools with COMPAS. Pomeroy is writing a book of narrative nonfiction for teens.

Joyce Sidman, author of Newbery Honor book Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night, and Caldecott Honor books Song of the Water Boatman and Red Sings from Treetops, received the 2013 NCTE Award for Excellence in Children's Poetry. She teaches poetry writing in elementary schools.

Tracy Nelson Maurer has written more than 100 nonfiction books and co-authored an article about back matter. A recipient of the Rudolf Nonfiction Award and an SCBWI Work-In-Progress Grant, she has two forthcoming picture-book biographies and other titles under contract. She holds an MFA from Hamline University.

Mary Losure is the author of The Fairy Ring (Booklist Editors’ Choice Youth Nonfiction 2012), Wild Boy: The Real Life of the Savage of Aveyron, and the middle-grade fantasy Backwards Moon. A former public radio reporter, she’s now at work on a new nonfiction children's book, Isaac the Alchemist.

Ann Matzke is the co-author of Today’s Picture Book Biographies: Back Matter Matters published in the Horn Book Magazine. She received her MFA from Hamline University. She has published nonfiction books for children and she is the youth services director at Wilson Public Library in Cozad, Nebraska.

 

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