October/November 2001

Writing About Family: Is It Worth It?

Mimi Schwartz

NOTES


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Two Roads Diverged in a Wood: Character, Metaphor, and Destiny in the Work of William Matthews and Larry Levis

Tony Hoagland

In Chapter 13 of Raymond Chandler's novel The Big Sleep, Phillip Marlowe is being frisked by Eddie Mars's henchmen:


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Two Roads Diverged in a Wood: Character, Metaphor, and Destiny in the Work of William Matthews and Larry Levis

Tony Hoagland

In Chapter 13 of Raymond Chandler's novel The Big Sleep, Phillip Marlowe is being frisked by Eddie Mars's henchmen:


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Interview of T. Coraghessan Boyle

Liam Callanan

T. Coraghessan Boyle is the author of 14 books. His most recent novel, A Friend of the Earth, was published by Viking in fall 2000, and his most recent collection of stories, After the Plague, will appear in fall 2001, also from Viking. He has been honored with numerous prizes, including France's Prix Medicis Étranger for best foreign novel, and the PEN/Faulkner Foundation's award for best novel, as well as its Bernard Malamud Prize in Short Fiction. His short fiction has also appeared in Best American Short Stories and has received a number of O. Henry Awards.
Born in New York in 1948, Boyle attended SUNY Potsdam, where he studied English and history. He then went to the University of Iowa, where he received both an MFA (in fiction) and a PhD (in 19th-century British Literature). He has taught at the University of Southern California (USC) since 1978.



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Who is a Writer?

Ronald Goldfarb

The case of Vanessa Leggett raises an intriguing question: who is a writer? Leggett is a 33- year-old woman in Texas who has been jailed for refusing to turn over her tapes and research notes to a federal grand jury investigating a murder in Houston. She was writing a true crime book about the case in question. Ms. Leggett interviewed one of two men who were accused of murder, while he was in jail. He'd heard her on a radio talk show, called her, and she flew to Las Vegas to interview him in jail there. "The case picked me, I didn't pick it," she was quoted saying. "I'm not a martyr." Later, her interviewee committed suicide. In the investigation of the other accused man, Ms. Leggett's notes were subpoenaed. She refused to comply, arguing that her notes are protected by the reporter's privilege inherent in the state and federal constitutions.


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An Interview with Carl Phillips

Christopher Hennessy

Carl Phillips has been a finalist for both the National Book Award for From the Devotions and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Cortege. His prizes and fellowships include those from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Library of Congress, the Massachusetts Artists Foundation, and the Academy of American Poets. His first volume, In the Blood, won the 1992 Morse Poetry Prize. His most recent works include Pastoral (Graywolf Press, 2000) and The Tether (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2001). He teaches at Washington University in St. Louis, where he directs the writing program.


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Campus Equity Week?

Jennifer Berkshire

The occasion is Campus Equity Week, seven days of coordinated activity on campuses across the U.S. and Canada. From October 28 to November 3, part-time faculty on hundreds of campuses will call for higher pay and better working conditions, condemning a system that they charge is separate and unequal. From tiny community colleges in the Midwest to prestigious research institutions on either Coast, the message will be the same: "teachers' working conditions are students' learning conditions and equal work deserves equal pay."


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Some Epiphanies About Epiphanies

David Jauss

NOTES


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