March/April 2012

Cather's World & the Future of Narrative

Douglas Bauer
Last fall, I taught an undergraduate class that included, besides The Song of the Lark, three other Cather novels: A Lost Lady, The Professor's House, and My Mortal Enemy. Many of my students were juniors and seniors concentrating in Literature. Some of them were also aspiring writers. But except for a few who had read O Pioneers! or My Antonia in high school, all were unfamiliar with Cather's fiction.
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The Periodic Table of Poetic Elements

Jeffrey Skinner

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A Sexy New Animal: The DNA of the Prose Poem

Natasha Sajé
He had been writing a prose poem, and had succeeded in mating a giraffe with an elephant. Scientists from all over the world came to see the product: The body looked like an elephant's, but it had the neck of a giraffe with a small elephant's head and a short trunk that wiggled like a wet noodle.
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The Postmodern Memoir

Hugh Ryan
As the children raised in this chaotic literary moment begin to write their memoirs, it is not surprising that they are looking to recreate this sense of confusion.

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An Interview with Paul Harding

Varley O'Connor

EXCERPT


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The Geography of Sentences

Emily Brisse
It's no wonder that a garbled sentence feels ungainly and confusing to a reader. Reading it would be something like a child navigating her way through a dense forest...
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A Conversation with Biographer Penelope Niven

Sheryl Monks
.challenges probably come down to the fact that it truly is an act of audacity, at one level, to write a biography, to endeavor to write about someone else's life.
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