March/April 2011 Cover Image

Navigating Family Sensitivities: Serving the Product or the People Who Look Like You?

Article Image

Andy Nash
A memoirist who chooses the safety of others is making the right choice. And when key portions are left out, it's the right decision to at least alert the audience.
Read more...


I Believe in Imagination: An Interview with Aleksandar Hemon

Article Image

Jeanie Chung
Aleksandar Hemon came to the United States from Bosnia in 1992 and ended up staying to build his literary career here.
Read more...


The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation of Identity in Fiction: A Writer's Choices in Cross-Cultural Writing

Article Image

Stephen J. Quigley
Complete cultural appropriation of identity occurs when the author uses a culturally heterogeneous character with a first-person point of view. In this instance there is the least amount of psychic distance between the reader and the main character.
Read more...


Novel Anxiety: Notes from the Genre War Trenches

Article Image

Martha Cooley
Devotees of literary fiction have reason to think that contemporary novels are too often replete with the trivial and the inessential.

Read more...


A Conversation with Nikki Giovanni

Article Image

Chapman Hood Frazier
When Nikki Giovanni read her poem "We are Virginia Tech" at the memorial service for the thirty-two slain students and faculty after the campus shootings in 2007, the poem brought the mourners to their feet because it spoke not only about the loss and suffering of those students, faculty, staff, and parents who survived the tragedy, but also about the ability of the human spirit to endure.
Read more...


An Interview with Tom Grimes

Article Image

Joe O'Connell
Even though we've been in workshop situations, we understand that people can talk about the work but ultimately you're in the room by yourself looking at that blank page.
Read more...


Recent Trends in South Asian American Poetry

Article Image

Pramila Venkateswaran
For the Indian American poet, while the marginal status of the immigrant can be a place of discovery, it is also a double-edged sword; as the writer's marginal status sharpens perception, it also stereotypes the writer as "immigrant" thus making him/her feel boxed in.
Read more...