Western Washington University

Washington, United States

Residential program

The English department at WWU offers an MFA in Creative Writing and a BA with a Creative Writing concentration. The MFA in Creative Writing degree focuses particularly on multi-genre or cross-genre writing, with the philosophy that MFA students now need to be more versatile in their skills, their comprehension of genre conventions, and the way diverse genres can inform one another. The program also offers in-depth literary study grounded in theory as a strong foundation for future writers and teachers. The undergraduate program offers pre-professional coursework in Editing and Publishing, which can also be taken by graduate students. WWU’s program also offers experience in editing and publishing at all levels, with graduate students given the opportunity to work on nationally acclaimed literary journal The Bellingham Review and undergraduates editing CCLM-award winning journal Jeopardy. Students may earn degree credits working as writing or editing interns for agencies or departments on campus or and off campus.

The MFA program in English is designed for those who desire to prepare for:

• Life as a serious author, with an understanding of the literary marketplace and publication

• PhD programs, as well as other advanced degrees in fields such as law or teaching

• Teaching at both two- and four-year colleges and universities

• Public or private teaching (elementary, middle, secondary)

• Careers in technical writing and communication

• Careers in editing and publishing

• Careers in nonprofit and other business organizations

Teaching assistantships are offered in composition on a competitive basis, and may also include opportunities to work alongside faculty teaching classes in Asian American literature, Latina/o literature, Queer literature, Women’s Literature and the Literature of War. For information concerning financial aid and admission to the graduate program, write to Graduate Director, Dept. of English.


Contact Information

516 High St
Department of English
Bellingham
Washington, United States
98225-5996
Phone: (360) 650-3214
Email: Kathryn.Vulic@wwu.edu
https://chss.wwu.edu/english



DEGREE PROGRAMS

Undergraduate Program Director

Kelly Magee
Assistant Professor of English
516 High St
Dept. of English
Bellingham
Washington, United States
98225-5996
Email: Kelly.Magee@wwu.edu

Two programs lead to the Bachelor of Arts in English. One focuses on the study of literature and culture in an historical context and then, through a large number of elective credits, allows students to select English courses of their choice. The other program is a creative writing concentration. Here, courses in literature supplement a focus on writing courses in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction.

Courses in literature complement courses in the writing of fiction, drama, poetry, or nonfiction prose. Workshop courses in these genres are offered along with special topics courses such as the lyrical essay, flash fiction, travelogue, performance poetry, and editing and publishing. Emphasis is placed on revising and polishing as well as on generating new material. A limited number of work/ study appointments are available to qualified students.

Genres: Fiction, Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Playwriting
Unit of Measure: Credits

Undergraduate Program Director

Kelly Magee
Assistant Professor of English
516 High St
Dept. of English
Bellingham
Washington, United States
98225-5996
Email: Kelly.Magee@wwu.edu

Creative Writing Emphasis (58-60 Credits)

The creative writing emphasis offers students the opportunity to develop their writing skills in the genres of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry and drama. Introductory and advanced genre courses form the core of the major, giving students an opportunity to develop their craft and aesthetics through intensive writing, reading and workshops.

Type of Program: Studio/Research
Largest Class Size: 35
Smallest Class Size: 20
Genres: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry
Duration of Study: 4 years
Unit of Measure: Credits
Criticism and Theory: 5
Workshop: 30
Literature: 25
Other: 5 in Linguistics
Total Units for Degree: 58-60
Other Requirements: 25 credits in literature May include literary/cultural theory and film studies at the 300 or 400 level, including a writing proficiency course Two of the following: ENG 351, 353, 354, THTR 384, FAIR 354v ENG 370 Students who earn a 3.0 or better in LING 201 may substitute a 300 or 400-level English course for ENG 370 with approval of a major advisor Four of the following: ENG 451*, 453*, 454*, 455, 456, 457, 458, 459, 460; THTR 485**; FAIR 454y. *One from 451, 453, and 454 may be repeated once with a different instructor ENG 460 may be repeated once with a different instructor Beginning Fall 2013, these courses are also repeatable once with a different instructor: ENG 455, 456, 475, 458. ENG 459 is not repeatable. **THTR 485 may be repeated under separate topics to a maximum of 12 credits Creative writing courses offered by Canadian-American Studies may also be counted with approval of a major advisor

Graduate Program Director

Brenda Miller
Professor & Director of Graduate Studies
516 High St
Department of English
Bellingham
Washington, United States
98225-5996
Email: Brenda.Miller@wwu.edu
URL: http://www.brendamillerwriter.com/

Introduction

Western Washington University’s English Department offers a 2-year MFA program in Creative Writing within a community that values creative development and intellectual versatility. We encourage a focus on multigenre or cross-genre writing, based on our view that creative writing graduates need to be versatile in their comprehension of genre conventions and conversant in the way diverse genres inform one another. A variety of courses we offer stress either a multigenre focus or encourage experimental works that blur genre boundaries.

Creative writing practice and literary study are synergistic in our program. Students take seminars in creative writing and literature, as well as courses in rhetorical thinking and composition, digital and technical writing, film studies, and linguistics. We offer Graduate Assistantships that provide quality teacher training, as well as opportunities to gain editorial experience with the award-winning journal Bellingham Review.

Goals

The MFA program in English is designed for those who desire to prepare for:

• Life as a serious author, with an understanding of the literary marketplace and publication

• PhD programs, as well as other advanced degrees in fields such as law or teaching

• Teaching at both two- and four-year colleges and universities

• Public or private teaching (elementary, middle, secondary)

• Careers in technical writing and communication

• Careers in editing and publishing

• Careers in nonprofit and other business organizations

Students will attain the following skills:

• Fluency in multigenre or cross-genre writing and comprehension of genre conventions, as well as the way diverse genres can inform one another

• Professionalism in creative writing, along with in-depth literary study in areas that might include national and global literatures and cultures, critical and cultural theory, film and media, pedagogy, composition and rhetoric, technical writing, professional writing, editing and publishing, and linguistics

• Teaching experience (if awarded a teaching assistantship or internship)

• Professional editing with scholarly and creative writing journals, such as the Bellingham Review

• Professional communication, oral and written

• Competency in the use of classroom and communications technologies

• Awareness of diversity, educational equity, and social justice issues

• Awareness of ethical and reflective pedagogical practices

Prerequisites

Undergraduate major in English or Creative Writing, or departmental permission. Candidates with an insufficient background in English are normally requested to acquire 30 upper-division credits in creative writing, literature, and/or criticism with a grade of B or better in each course. The department reserves the right to approve a course of study.

Application Information

Deadlines: Applications for the following academic year must be complete — all materials on file — by January 15 for priority consideration. Applications completed after that date may be considered on a space-available basis. Applications completed after June 1 will not be considered. Admission into the program is for fall quarter.

Teaching Assistantship Deadlines: An application for a Teaching Assistantship should be submitted with the application for admission.

The materials submitted for admission must include:

• A statement of purpose: this statement should explain intellectual and/or creative interests, and professional goals. If you are interested in being considered for a funded Teaching Assistantship, please include relevant experience and information that will

aid the department in making funding decisions.

• Two writing samples. Creative Writing: 10 to 15 pages of prose (fiction or creative nonfiction); or 10 to 15 pages of poetry; or a combination of genres, 15 pages total; AND a Critical writing sample: 7 to 12 pages of analytical work in literary study.

• Appropriate admissions forms.

• GRE scores (General Test) with a minimum score of 500 on the verbal section, for exams taken before August 2011. For the GRE ‘Revised’ General Test (beginning August 2011), the expected verbal score on the new scale is at least 153.

Program Requirements

? ENG 501 - Literary Theories and Practices

? 20 credits in creative writing courses, to be taken in at least two different genres from the following:

ENG 502 - Seminar in the Writing of Fiction

ENG 504 - Seminar in the Writing of Poetry

ENG 505 - Seminar in the Writing of Nonfiction

ENG 506 - Seminar in Creative Writing: Multigenre

ENG 520 - Studies in Poetry *

ENG 525 - Studies in Fiction *

ENG 535 - Studies in Nonfiction *

*These courses may be taken as either creative writing or literature credits, depending on the nature of the final project. To use them as part of the creative writing core requirement, students must take them as creative writing courses.

? 20 credits in literature, composition/rhetoric, pedagogy, or critical theory, to be taken from the following:

ENG 500 - Directed Independent Study

ENG 509 - Internship in Writing, Editing and Production

ENG 510 - Seminar: Topics in Rhetoric

ENG 513 - Seminar in Teaching College Composition (required for Graduate Teaching Assistants in the Freshman Composition program)

ENG 515 - Studies in Literary and Critical Theory

ENG 540 - Studies in Global Literatures

ENG 550 - Studies in American Literatures

ENG 560 - Studies in British Literature

ENG 570 - Topics in Cultural Studies

ENG 575 - Studies in Women's Literature

ENG 580 - Studies in Film

ENG 594 - Practicum in Teaching

ENG 598 - Research in the Teaching of English

ENG 520, 525, and 535 (see creative writing courses) may also be used for literature credit, depending on the nature of the final project. The same course may not be used for both literature and creative writing credit.

? ENG 690 - Thesis Writing

NOTE: A student may, with permission, take up to 5 credits in approved 400-level courses. A student may have only 10 credits TOTAL of 400-level and/or 500 (Independent Study) credits.

Students are encouraged to fill out their two years of study with electives that stress creative writing, pedagogy, editing/publishing, literature, or rhetoric, as dictated by the student’s interests and career goals.

Additional Requirements:

Fulfillment of the English Graduate Program Language Requirement

Successful completion of the Creative Writing Graduate Exam

A successful creative thesis, with a critical preface, approved by the student’s Creative Writing Thesis Committee and the Graduate School

Teaching assistantships and work/study appointments are available to graduate students on a competitive basis. For information concerning financial aid and admission to the graduate program, write to Graduate Director, Dept. of English.

Type of Program: Studio/Research
Largest Class Size: 20
Smallest Class Size: 5
Genres: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry
In State Tuition 9582
Out of State Tuition 19752
Duration of Study: 2 years
Unit of Measure: Credits
Criticism and Theory: 5
Workshop: 20
Literature: 15
Thesis: 5
Total Units for Degree: 45
Other Requirements: Additional Requirements: 1. Fulfillment of the English Graduate Program Language Requirement 2.Successful completion of the Creative Writing Graduate Exam 3. A successful creative thesis, with a critical preface, approved by the student’s Creative Writing Thesis Committee and the Graduate School
Application Deadline Fall: 01/15/2013
Application Requirements: Transcripts, Writing Sample, Application Form, Letters of Recommendation, GRE, Cover Letter, Other

Graduate Program Director

Brenda Miller
Professor & Director of Graduate Studies
516 High St
Department of English
Bellingham
Washington, United States
98225-5996
Email: Brenda.Miller@wwu.edu
URL: http://www.brendamillerwriter.com/




FACULTY

Bruce Beasley

Bruce Beasley is the author of seven collections of poems, most recently Theophobia, just published by BOA Editions. The Corpse Flower: New and Selected Poems was published by The University of Washington Press, in 2007. His previous collection, Lord Brain, an extended meditation on neuroscience, cosmology, theology, and language, won the University of Georgia Press Contemporary Poetry Series Award and was published in 2005. Beasley won the 1996 Colorado Prize for Poetry in 1996 for Summer Mystagogia, selected by Charles Wright, and the 1994 Ohio State University Press/Journal Award for The Creation. Wesleyan University Press published his books Spirituals (1988) and Signs and Abominations (2000). He has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Artist Trust of Washington and three Pushcart Prizes in poetry. His work also appears in The Pushcart Book of Poetry: The Best Poems from the First Thirty Years of the Pushcart Prize, as well as other anthologies including Lyric Postmodernisms: An Anthology of Contemporary Innovative Poetries; Under 35: The New Generation of American Poets; Under the Rock Umbrella: Contemporary Poets from 1951-1977; and American Alphabets: 25 Contemporary Poets. His poems appear widely in such journals as The Kenyon Review, Southern Review, New American Writing, Field, and Virginia Quarterly Review.

http://www.brucebeasley.net/


Carol Guess

Carol Guess is the author of eleven books of poetry and prose, including Switch, Tinderbox Lawn, Doll Studies: Forensics, and Darling Endangered. Forthcoming books include How To Feel Confident With Your Special Talents (a poetry collaboration with Daniela Olszewska) and X Marks The Dress: A Registry (a hybrid collaboration with Kristina Marie Darling). Guess specializes in hybrid genres, including prose poetry and flash fiction, as well as Queer Studies. She earned her MFA and MA from Indiana University and her BA from Columbia University, where she also studied Dance Criticism.

http://carolguess.blogspot.com/


Suzanne Paola

Suzanne Paola’s (Susanne Antonetta’s) most recent book, Make Me a Mother, a memoir and study of adoption, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton. Awards for her poetry and prose include a New York Times Notable Book, an American Book Award, a Library Journal Best Science book of the year, a Lenore Marshall Award finalist, a Pushcart prize, and others. She is also coauthor of Tell It Slant: Creating, Refining and Publishing Creative Nonfiction. Her essays and poems have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Orion, Seneca Review and many anthologies, including Short Takes and Lyric Postmodernisms. She lives in Bellingham, Washington, with her husband and son.

http://www.suzannepaola.com/


Brenda Miller

Brenda Miller is the author of Listening Against the Stone (Skinner House Books, 2011), Blessing of the Animals (EWU Press, 2009), Season of the Body (Sarabande Books, 2002), and co-author of Tell It Slant: Creating, Refining and Publishing Creative Nonfiction (McGraw-Hill, 2003, 2004, 2012). Her work has received six Pushcart Prizes and has been published in numerous journals. She is a Professor of English at Western Washington University and serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Bellingham Review. Her latest book The Pen and The Bell: Mindful Writing in a Busy World, co-authored with poet Holly J. Hughes, was released in 2012 from Skinner House Books.

http://www.brendamillerwriter.com/


Kathryn Trueblood

Kathryn Trueblood is the author of The Baby Lottery, a Book Sense Pick in 2007, and The Sperm Donor’s Daughter (The Permanent Press, 1998). In 2013, she was awarded the Goldenberg Prize for Fiction, judged by Jane Smiley and sponsored by the Bellevue Literary Review. In 2011 she won the Red Hen Press Short Story Award and received a grant from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund. Her stories and articles have been published in Poets & Writers Magazine, The Los Angeles Review, The Seattle Review, Glimmer Train, and Zyzzyva, among others. An Associate Professor at W.W.U., she teaches Editing and Publishing, 1960s Literature, and the Literature of War.

http://kathryntrueblood.com/


Oliver de la Paz

Oliver de la Paz is the author of three collections of poetry, Names Above Houses, Furious Lullaby (SIU Press 2001, 2007), and Requiem for the Orchard (U. of Akron Press 2010), winner of the Akron Prize for poetry chosen by Martìn Espada. He is the co-editor with Stacey Lynn Brown of A Face to Meet the Faces: An Anthology of Contemporary Persona Poetry (U. of Akron Press 2012). He co-chairs the advisory board of Kundiman, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of Asian American Poetry and serves on the Association of Writers and Writing Programs Board. A recipient of a NYFA Fellowship Award and a GAP Grant from Artist Trust, his work has appeared in journals like Virginia Quarterly Review, North American Review, Tin House, Chattahoochee Review, and in anthologies such as Asian American Poetry: The Next Generation.

http://www.oliverdelapaz.com/


Kelly Magee

Kelly Magee’s first collection of stories, Body Language (University of North Texas Press) won the Katherine Ann Porter Prize for Short Fiction. Her writing has appeared in Talking Writing, Artful Dodge, Diagram, Ninth Letter, Black Warrior Review, The Journal, Crab Orchard Review, Colorado Review, Cream City Review, Indiana Review, The Pinch, and others. She is currently an Assistant Professor of English at Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington.

http://kellyelizabethmagee.com/


Kristiana Kahakauwila

Kristiana Kahakauwila is the author of This is Paradise: Stories forthcoming from Hogarth Press in 2013. She earned her M.F.A. from the University of Michigan and a B.A. in comparative literature from Princeton University. She has worked as a writer and editor for Wine Spectator, Cigar Aficionado, and Highlights for Children magazines. As an Assistant Professor of creative writing at Western Washington University, she focuses on teaching Magazine Editing and Publishing, Pacific Literature, and Fiction Writing.

http://www.kristianakahakauwila.com/





COMMUNITY

Brian Turner, Albert Goldbarth, Rita Dove, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Don Mee Choi, Janet Holmes, Kate Greenstreet, Tobias Wolff, Robert Wrigley, Adrian Matejka, Ed Pavlic, Brenda Hillman, W.S. Merwin, Stephen Burt, Tobias Wolf.