2020 AWP Conference Schedule

The #AWP20 Conference & Bookfair in San Antonio, Texas, schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. Visit the offsite event schedule for a listing of literary events taking place throughout the San Antonio area during our conference.

A version of the schedule accessible to screen readers is also available.

Please note that your personalized schedule on the AWP website can be saved and printed, but it cannot be transferred to the digital conference app because the two systems are independent.

 

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Wednesday, March 4, 2020

12:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

W100. AWP Bookfair Setup, Sponsored by Trinity University Press. The exhibit hall at the Henry B. González Convention Center will be open for Bookfair setup. For safety and security reasons, only those holding a Bookfair Setup Access (BSA) registration, or those accompanied by an individual wearing a BSA registration, will be permitted inside the Bookfair during setup hours. Bookfair exhibitors are welcome to pick up their registration materials in AWP’s registration area in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level.

Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

W101. Conference Registration, Sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level. Please consult the Bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

2:00 pm to 2:30 pm

Accessibility Desk, Registration Area, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Street Level

W101A. Accessibility Tour. Join the AWP conference staff for a tour of the Henry B. González Convention Center. This tour will cover main event areas of the Henry B. González Convention Center and will be an opportunity to ask questions about conference accessibility. This tour is great for someone who would like to get a sense for the distances between meeting rooms and to plan easiest routes. If you are unable to make it to this 2:00 p.m. tour, please email colleen@awpwriter.org to arrange for a different time.

2:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Room 221D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

W102. Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography. () Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a fourth year at AWP, photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high res for $85. (Conference discount: sessions usually priced at $375.) Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required: am-photography.ticketleap.com/author-portraits-at-awp-2020

Adrianne Mathiowetz is a portrait photographer who has photographed over 200 writers, in her studio and at AWP. She is a graduate of The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Fast Company, Wired, and Entertainment Weekly.

5:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

W103. CANCELLED: CLMP Membership Meeting. (, , ) This event is for all independent literary publishers: seasoned professionals, those just starting out, and all in between. Learn what we're planning for the year and share your thoughts on how we can best ensure that our community thrives. Even if you're not yet a member of CLMP, but would like to find out more, please feel welcome to join us.

Mary Gannon is the Executive Director of the Community of Literary Magazines & Presses, a 50-year-old nonprofit organization that works to ensure a vibrant, diverse literary landscape by supporting and advocating for small literary publishers and their authors.
Twitter Username: gannonme
David Gibbs is the Director of Programs at CLMP. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from The New School and a BA from Ohio State University. In addition to his responsibilities at CLMP, David is a part-time instructor at the Parsons School of Design at The New School.
Montana Agte-Studier is the Director of Membership and NYSCA NYTAP at CLMP. Montana holds a BFA in Jazz Flute and a BA in Literature/Arts in Context from The New School University. She lives in NYC, is Associate Publisher at The Mantle, and is currently working on a novel.

6:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

W104. SPD Membership Meeting. (, ) This event is for all independent literary publishers: seasoned professionals, those just starting out, and all in between. Learn what we're planning for the year and share your thoughts on how we can best ensure that our community thrives. Even if you're not yet a member of SPD, but would like to find out more, please feel welcome to join us.

Jeffrey Lependorf serves as the shared Executive Director of Small Press Distribution (SPD), our nation's only nonprofit literary book distributor, and The Flow Chart Foundation, dedicated to exploring the interrelationships of various art forms as guided by the legacy of John Ashbery.
Twitter Username: jefflependorf

Website: http://www.jeffreylependorf.com
Brent Cunningham is the Managing Director at Small Press Distribution, where he has worked since 1999. Along with SPD’s other directors, he has helped more than double sales at the organization over the past decade. He is the author of two books of poetry, Journey to the Sun and Bird & Forest.
Thursday, March 5, 2020

7:30 am to 8:45 am

Room 225C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R100. Sober AWP. Daily 12-Step Meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

8:00 am to 8:45 am

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R101. CANCELLED: Narrative Healing: Meditation with Lisa Weinert. () Open to all! Start the day tapping inward to open up your senses and attune your attention for the day ahead. This mindfulness meditation series will focus on breath and body awareness. Comfortable clothing encouraged. Featuring publishing professional and mindfulness meditation teacher Lisa Weinert and others. www.lisaweinert.com @lisaweinert www.narrativehealing.com

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, walk straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Lisa Weinert is passionate about the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She is the founder of Narrative Healing, a program that combines meditation, yoga, and writing to help writers (re)connect to their bodies and feel empowered to launch their work into the world.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

8:00 am to 6:00 pm

Room 221C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R102. Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography. () Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a fourth year at AWP, photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high res for $85. (Conference discount: sessions usually priced at $375.) Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required: am-photography.ticketleap.com/author-portraits-at-awp-2020

Adrianne Mathiowetz is a portrait photographer who has photographed over 200 writers, in her studio and at AWP. She is a graduate of The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Fast Company, Wired, and Entertainment Weekly.

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

R103. Conference Registration, Sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level. Please consult the Bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

Room 221D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R104. Dickinson Quiet Space, Meeting Room Level. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." –Emily Dickinson

Room 007D, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R105. Dickinson Quiet Space, River Level. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." –Emily Dickinson.

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R105A. Non-Fluorescent Quiet Space. A quiet space free of fluorescent lighting, with windows looking out to the River Walk and plenty of natural lighting. Please note that yoga sessions will also occur in this room throughout the day, but that attendees may use this room at any time to take a break.

Directions from the Main Lobby: Walk past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and walk past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, walk past rooms 007-006 and exit the building, keep walking towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theatre on your right, walk straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Room 208, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R106. Nursing Mothers' Room 1. This nursing mother’s room is located in room 208 on the Meeting Room Level, and is available for any nursing mother to use. Using this room will require a key from the AWP Help Desk, which is located in the registration area in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level. A refrigerator will also be available at the AWP Help Desk for your convenience.

Next to Room 215, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R107. Nursing Mothers' Room 2. This nursing mothers' room is located next to room 215 on the Meeting Room Level and is available for any nursing mother to use. This space is a single room that can be locked from the inside. A refrigerator will be available for your convenience at the AWP Help Desk, which is located in the registration area in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level.

Next to restrooms outside of Exhibit Hall 4A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

R108. Nursing Mothers' Room 3. This nursing mothers' room is located next to the Grab & Go food area in the lobby corridor between the Main and West lobbies and is available for any nursing mother to use. This space has two stalls which can both be locked from the inside. A refrigerator will be available for your convenience at the AWP Help Desk, which is located in the registration area in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level.

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall 3 & 4, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

R109. Bookfair Concessions, Bar, & Lounge. Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Henry B. González Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference planner or mobile app for location details.

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

R110. AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Trinity University Press. With more than 700 literary exhibitors, the AWP Bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the Bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the Bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

Booth 1447, Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

R110B. Writer to Writer Mentorship Program Booth. AWP's Writer to Writer Mentorship Program matches new writers with published authors for a three-month series on the writing life. Now in its sixth year, Writer to Writer is open to all members, but we particularly encourage applications from those writers who have never been associated with an MFA program and those writing from regions, backgrounds, and cultures that are typically underrepresented in the literary world. To learn more, visit AWP’s Bookfair booth, where you will be able to talk with past program mentors and mentees. Diane Zinna, the program’s director, will also be there to answer your questions.

Room 216B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R111. Traveling Stanzas: Armed With Our Voices. In May 1970 at Kent State University, four students were killed and nine were wounded during a non-violent protest against the Vietnam War. The tragedy revealed the grave consequences that result when communication collapses. Today, polarized perspectives, divided communities, and school violence are commonplace. As we approach the 50th anniversary of the May 4 tragedy, the Wick Poetry Center, with its partners, has developed this interactive exhibit, encouraging visitors to explore the history of student protest and the timely themes of peace and conflict transformation. www.armedwithourvoices.org

Room 220, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R111A. First Timer’s Lounge. Welcome to AWP! Please enjoy this unique space in the Henry B. González Convention Center to unwind away from conference events and connect with other first-time conference goers. Past Writer to Writer participants will be there to answer questions and provide useful conference tips.

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R112. CANCELLED: Yoga for Writers. (Manisha Sharma) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, go straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R113. Havoc and Healing: Intersections of Creative Writing and Science. (, , , , ) Health care and literature have a long history of interconnection—William Carlos Williams famously delivered babies and wrote poems on prescription pads. What can writers learn from scientists and vice versa? What do literary craft and clinical practice have in common? How are biomedical and literary ethics related? In this panel, two physicians, a clinical pharmacist, a biomedical researcher, and a former medical editor discuss how their biomedical work troubles and informs their writing. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Dr. Irène P. Mathieu is a writer, pediatrician, and public health researcher at University of Virginia. Author of three poetry collections, Grand Marronage, orogeny, and the galaxy of origins, she is on Jack Jones Literary Arts' speakers’ bureau. She has been a Fulbright, Callaloo, and VCCA fellow.


Twitter Username: gumbo_amando

Website: www.irenemathieu.com

Seema Yasmin is a doctor, Emmy Award-winning journalist, poet, and author. She is the author of three books including a biography, a popular science book debunking medical myths, and a book about phenomenal Muslim women. She is Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.


Twitter Username: DoctorYasmin

Joseph Osmundson is a scientist and writer. He is originally from Washington State, and his writing has been published in The Queer South, The LA Review of Books, The LA Review, Gawker, The Rumpus, and The Feminist Wire, where he is an associate editor.


Twitter Username: reluctantlyjoe

Website: www.josephosmundson.com

Hadara Bar-Nadav is the author of several poetry collections, most recently The New Nudity, Lullaby (with Exit Sign), The Frame Called Ruin, and Fountain and Furnace. She is also coauthor of Writing Poems, 8th ed. Bar-Nadav is a professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.


Twitter Username: Hadarabar

Website: www.Hadarabar.com

Ruth Madievsky is the author of a poetry collection, Emergency Brake. She has received awards from Tin House, The American Poetry Review, Iowa Review, and elsewhere. Her work appears widely in literary journals. When she is not writing, she works as an HIV and oncology clinical pharmacist in Boston.


Twitter Username: ruthmadievsky

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R115. CANCELLED: Teaching the Tenth Draft: Centring Revision in the Classroom. (, , , ) As writers, we know that revision is 90% of our job. So why isn’t revision 90% of the workshop? It’s all too easy to prioritize new writing over seeing the same piece again and again. We take the "revision as afterthought" model down to the studs and rebuild a robust, integrated approach to revision. Hear from writers across multiple genres about what works and what doesn’t, and how centring revision is actually a radical revisioning of what it means to teach writing. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

John Vigna’s first book of fiction, Bull Head, was selected by Quill & Quire as an editor’s pick of the year and was a finalist for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. Named one of 10 writers to watch by CBC Books, John is a fiction instructor and pedagogy chair in the UBC creative writing program.


Twitter Username: john_vigna

Eleanor Panno is a writer and student focused on magic realism and grey areas in relationships. She has a BFA in creative writing and will begin her graduate studies at Columbia University in 2019.

Billy-Ray Belcourt is from the Driftpile Cree Nation. He is a PhD candidate in the Department of English & Film Studies at the University of Alberta. His books are This Wound Is a World, winner of the 2018 Griffin Poetry Prize, NDN Coping Mechanisms, and A History of My Brief Body. 


Twitter Username: billyrayb

Annabel Lyon is the author of seven books, most recently The Sweet Girl and Imagining Ancient Women. Her previous novel, The Golden Mean, was a Canadian bestseller and was published in fourteen languages. She teaches creative writing at the University of British Columbia.

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R116. CANCELLED: Spoken Identities: Crafting Character through Slang and Multilingualism. (, , , , ) Writers consider how both spoken and internal dialogue is used to create character, as well as illustrate relationships and dynamics between individuals and society at large. Through use of slang, multilingualism, and culturally specific syntax and vocabulary, writers situate characters in a particular time and place. Dialogue allows one to show characters' lives rather than tell about them, making it a powerful tool to avoid tokenism, while exploring the full diversity of people's experiences. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Juliana Delgado Lopera is an award-winning writer/oral historian. She’s the author of ¡Cuéntamelo!, an illustrated bilingual collection of oral histories by LGBT Latino immigrants, awarded the Regen Ginaa Grant, and the executive director of RADAR Productions.


Twitter Username: julianadlopera

Website: julianadlopera.com

Emma Ramadan is a translator based in Providence, RI, where she co-owns Riffraff bookstore and bar. She's received an NEA Fellowship, a Fulbright, and a PEN/Heim grant. Her translations include Sphinx by Anne Garréta, Pretty Things by Virginie Despentes, and Me and Other Writing by Marguerite Duras.


Twitter Username: emkateram

Ivelisse Rodriguez is the author of Love War Stories, a 2019 PEN/Faulkner finalist and a 2018 Foreword Reviews INDIES finalist. She curates an interview series focused on contemporary Puerto Rican writers. She has taught creative writing at various universities.


Twitter Username: IvelisseWrites

Joseph Cassara is the author of The House of Impossible Beauties, which won the Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction, and is a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. He is a graduate of Columbia and the Iowa Writers' Workshop and has received fellowships from MacDowell and the Fine Arts Work Center.


Twitter Username: josephbcassara

Website: www.josephcassara.com

Wayétu Moore is the founder of One Moore Book and is a graduate of Howard University, Columbia University, and the University of Southern California. She teaches at the City University of New York’s John Jay College.

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R118. CANCELLED: Who Are Adoptees and Who Has the Right to Write about Them?. (, , , ) Books featuring adoption have garnered attention in recent years, and yet, many portrayals of adoptees in literature continue to be one-dimensional. This panel will take a critical look at adoptee representations in several examples of contemporary literature in order to interrogate the ways in which adoptee narratives reflect broader understandings of adoptee identity. We will also examine the consequences that such problematic depictions can have on US-international relations and policy-making Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello is the author of Hour of the Ox, winner of the Donald Hall Poetry Prize and a Florida Book Award Bronze Medal. She has received fellowships from Kundiman and the American Literary Translators Association and serves as a program coordinator for Miami Book Fair.


Twitter Username: marcicalabretta

Website: www.marcicalabretta.com

Tiana Nobile is a Pushcart Prize nominee, a Kundiman fellow, and a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award. A finalist of the National Poetry Series and Kundiman Poetry Prize, she is the author of the chapbook, The Spirit of the Staircase.


Twitter Username: tiananob

Website: tiananobile.com

Leah Silvieus is a Kundiman fellow and books editor at Hyphen. She is also the author of three poetry collections: Anemochory, Season of Dares, and Arabilis. She is also the coeditor, with Lee Herrick, of the anthology, The World I Leave You: Asian American Poets on Faith and Spirit.


Twitter Username: le_mot_au_jus

Ansley Moon is the author of the poetry collection How to Bury the Dead. She has received awards and fellowships from Kundiman an Barbara Deming Memorial Fund among others. She was a finalist for the Jake Adam York Poetry Prize and the Emerging Poets Prize from the Great Indian Poetry Collective.


Twitter Username: ansleymoon

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R119. The Nuts and Bolts of Student Editors: Including, Engaging, and Challenging Them. (, , , , ) Student editors' efforts can reach beyond slogging through the slush pile, but they need an intentional system in which to work. How do small journals include students efficiently? How do large journals engage students effectively? How do all of us challenge students without overwhelming them? Our panel of editors will share a few methods of working with student editors, explain what went well/what flopped, and respond to your journal's challenges (or help you process your new, wild ideas!) Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lisa Lewis's books of poetry include The Unbeliever, Silent Treatment, Vivisect, Burned House with Swimming Pool, The Body Double, and Taxonomy of the Missing. She teaches in the creative writing program at Oklahoma State University and serves as editor of the Cimarron Review.

Caitlin Rae Taylor is the managing editor of Southern Humanities Review. She has an MFA in fiction from UNCW and has worked for Ecotone, Lookout Books, and Milkweed Editions. Her work can be found in Germ magazine, the Alabama Writers Forum, and is forthcoming from Moon City Review.

Katherine Abrams is the managing editor for Cold Mountain Review, former assistant editor of the Stylus, and former nonfiction and poetry editor of the Pitkin Review. She teaches rhetoric and composition with a service learning focus at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC.


Twitter Username: ColdMtnReview

Website: https://www.coldmountainreview.org/

Jonathan Bohr Heinen is the Managing Editor for Crazyhorse. His writing has appeared in Cimarron Review, Arroyo, Tusculum Review, and elsewhere, and has received special mention in the Pushcart anthology. He teaches at the College of Charleston and is on the staff of the Sewanee Writers' Conference.

Aimée Baker is a multigenre writer and the author of Doe, winner of the Akron Prize and Eugene Paul Nassar Award. She teaches professional writing at the State University of New York Plattsburgh, where she is also the executive editor of Saranac Review.


Twitter Username: Aimee_Baker

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R120. Two Decades of Arab Lit: Making Space for Complexity. (, , , ) Since 1999, the multidisciplinary Arab arts organization, Mizna, has published an eponymous literature and art journal dedicated to centering work from Arab American writers, which, twenty years later, remains the only such printed space. Mizna has long prioritized the authentic reflection of our community’s complexities while inviting a non-Arab readership to meet the writing on its own terms. An acclaimed literary cadre will read and reflect on the history and current state of Arab American literature.

Lana Salah Barkawi is the executive and artistic director of Mizna, a Twin Cities-based Arab arts organization that publishes Mizna: Prose, Poetry, & Art Exploring Arab America and produces the Twin Cities Arab Film Festival. She serves on the board of Pangea World Theater.


Twitter Username: lanabarkawi

Elmaz Abinader is the author of two books of poetry, This House, My Bones and In the Country of My Dreams..., the memoir Children of the Roojme, and several one-woman shows, including Country of Origin. Cofounder of VONA, she teaches at Mills College.


Twitter Username: elmazwrites

Website: www.elmazabinader.com

Joe Kadi lives and works in the traditional territories of the people of the Treaty 7 region of southern Alberta. He is a teacher in the Women's Studies/Gender Studies Program at University of Calgary, and a writer.

Mohja Kahf’s books of poetry are Hagar Poems and E-mails from Scheherazad. She is the author of a novel, The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf. Kahf, who teaches at the University of Arkansas, has a poetry manuscript ready for publishing.


Twitter Username: profkahf

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R121. Beyond the Classroom Walls: Teaching Online Creative Writing. (, , , ) Five accomplished, diverse writers who teach creative writing online confront the challenges of remote courses and programs, offering experiences, assignments, and best practices that meet the specific needs of online writing students and help these learners to succeed and soar. Panelists provide valuable takeaways for writers considering remote education, for curriculum designers, and for the growing number of faculty who will choose or need (for the same reasons as students) to teach online. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Silas Hansen teaches creative writing at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, and is the nonfiction editor for Waxwing. His essays have appeared in Slate, Colorado Review, the Normal School, Hayden's Ferry Review, Redivider, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: silas_hansen

Website: www.silashansen.net

Elane Johnson, recipient of the Excellence in Teaching award for Southern New Hampshire University, teaches for Gotham Writers’ Workshop. Her nonfiction appears in the Writer, Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, other journals and anthologies, and college creative writing curricula across the US.


Twitter Username: elanejohnson

Oindrila Mukherjee teaches at Grand Valley State University. She has a PhD in literature and creative writing from the University of Houston. Her work has appeared in KROnline, Salon, LARB, Arts & Letters, The Greensboro Review, and others. She is associate editor of Aster(ix.)


Twitter Username: oinkness

Jason McCall holds an MFA from the University of Miami. His poetry collections include Two-Face God; Silver; and Dear Hero. He is coeditor of It Was Written: Poetry Inspired by Hip-Hop, and he teaches at the University of North Alabama.


Twitter Username: JasonMcCall4

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R122. Expat Writers in and from Asia: Questioning the Term "Expatriate". (, , , , Robin Hemley) White writers living overseas are called “expatriate” writers, whereas writers of color are often described as “immigrants,” which raises the question of how privilege informs a writer's experience in a new country. This panel interrogates the nature of the expatriate writer today and whether the term “expatriate” is meaningful or misleading. Five writers from the U.S., Thailand, and the Philippines share their experiences living overseas and wrestling with their position in their newfound home. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sybil Baker's most recent works are Immigration Essays and While You Were Gone (novel). She teaches at UT Chattanooga (A&S Teaching Award), VCFA's low-residency International MFA, and the Yale Writer's Workshop. She is on the editorial board of UT Press. 


Twitter Username: sybilbaker

Website: www.sybilbaker.net

Collier Nogues's poetry collections are The Ground I Stand On Is Not My Ground and On the Other Side, Blue. She is a PhD fellow at the University of Hong Kong and curates Hong Kong's English-medium poetry craft talk series. She edits poetry for Juked and Tongue magazines.


Twitter Username: colliernogues

Website: www.colliernogues.com

Lawrence Lacambra Ypil is author of The Experiment of the Troipcs (winner of the Gaudy Boy Poetry Prize) and The Highest HIding Place. He received an MFA in nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa and an MFA in poetry from Washington University in St Louis. He teaches at Yale-NUS College.

Ploi Pirapokin's work is featured in Tor.com, Apogee Journal, The Offing, The Bellingham Review, and more. She teaches at the writer's program at UCLA Extension, Creative Nonfiction Foundation, University of Hong Kong, and is assistant director at the School of the Arts' creative writing department.


Twitter Username: ppirapokin

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R123. Poems Go Pop: How TV, Film, and Music Are Vital to Contemporary Poetry Practices. (, , , , Christina Beasley) What topics are considered worthy of poetry? Poets and editors discuss how pop culture poems are essential contributions to the broader landscape of contemporary poetry. From found poetry to odes and confessional work, the panelists will share how they’ve incorporated topics ranging from David Bowie and Star Wars to Saved by the Bell and Stevie Nicks into their poetry and they’ll discuss ways for writers to both embrace pop culture and place pop poems with literary journals and presses. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Samantha Duncan is the author of four poetry chapbooks, including Playing One on TV and The Birth Creatures, and her work has appeared in BOAAT, Meridian, Glass, and the Pinch. She is a prose editor for Storyscape Journal.

Nicole Oquendo is a nonbinary, Latinx writer, artist, editor, and educator specializing in multimodal composition. They are the author of five chapbooks, a hybrid memoir, and a visual poetry collection. They serve the writing community by editing for a small press and literary journal.


Twitter Username: nicoleoq

Website: nicoleoquendo.com

Katie Darby Mullins is a professor of creative writing at the University of Evansville. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has work in journals like Hawaii Pacific Review, BOAAT, Harpur Palate, and Prime Number, and she was a semifinalist in the Ropewalk Press Chapbook competition.


Twitter Username: kwdarby

E. Kristin Anderson is an Austin, TX-based poet and author. She’s the author of nine chapbooks, including 17 seventeen XVII and Pray, Pray, Pray: poems I wrote to Prince in the middle of the night. Kristin is an assistant poetry editor at The Boiler; once upon a time she worked at the New Yorker.


Twitter Username: ek_anderson

Website: http://www.ekristinanderson.com

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R124. CANCELLED: Photography and Poetry | Dynamics of Word and Image. (, , , ) This panel unites artists from diverse cultural backgrounds and disciplines, including photography, poetry, painting, translation, and the performing arts. Each participant has collaborated in one way or another to push the boundaries of those disciplines by juxtaposing photographic image and poetic text. In this panel, we will focus on this specific dynamic between photography and poetry, addressing issues such as the processes involved in their making, juxtaposition, and interpretation.

Anna Deeny Morales is a translator, dramatist, and literary critic. She is currently writing the libretto for a new opera in collaboration with composer Brian Arreola. An NEA fellowship recipient for the translation of TALA by Gabriela Mistral, Deeny teaches at Georgetown University.

Forrest Gander’s Be With won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. Core Samples from the World was a finalist for the Pulitzer and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Gander's translations include Alice Iris Red Horse, Poems by Gozo Yoshimasu and Then Come Back: The Lost Neruda Poems.

Valerie Mejer Caso is a Mexican poet, Her books in English translation are Rain of the Future and This Blue Novel (translated by Michelle Gil Montero won the Penheim 2017). Her "Untamable Light" was part of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2016.


Twitter Username: mejercaso

Website: www.valeriemejer.com

DS Borris’s images have appeared in Rolling Stone, the New York Times, and Smithsonian, among others. His series Las Canchas, images of empty, rural Mexican soccer fields, is paralleled by the poetry of Forrest Gander and Valerie Mejer. Echoed by Mejer’s words is his series Kudzu, the South’s Disguise.

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R125. CANCELLED: Escape into Truth: Craft and Catharsis in the Creative Nonfiction Workshop. (, , , ) This panel discussion will address best practices for the creative nonfiction workshop on the graduate and undergraduate levels, focusing on craft, pedagogy and experimentation. Alexander Chee wrote, "To write is to sell a ticket to escape, not from the truth, but into it." The CNF workshop can be the best vehicle for this work, and panelists will supply models for success, pitfalls to avoid, and recommended practices. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lisa Page is coeditor of We Wear The Mask: 15 True Stories of Passing. Her work has appeared in VQR, Playboy, The Washington Post Bookworld, The Crisis, Origins, and American Short Fiction, and in several anthologies. She directs the creative writing program at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: LisaPag39212124

Brando Skyhorse is the author of The Madonnas of Echo Park, winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award; Take This Man: A Memoir; and coeditor of the anthology We Wear The Mask. Skyhorse is an associate professor at Indiana University, where he teaches in the creative writing MFA program.


Twitter Username: brandoskyhorse

Christa Parravani' s Her: A Memoir was a Wall Street Journal, Salon, and Library Journal best book of 2013. Parravani's work has appeared in The Washington Post, Salon, Guernica, Daily Beast, The Guardian, and Catapult, among other places. She is assistant professor of creative writing at WVU.


Twitter Username: cparravani

Website: www.christaparravani.com

Annie Liontas' novel, Let Me Explain You, was featured in The New York Times Book Review as Editor's Choice. She is the coeditor of the anthology A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors. She teaches at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: aliontas

Website: www.annieliontas.com

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R126. Lit & Luz: MAKE-ing Interdisciplinary Partnerships On and Off the Page. (, , , , ) MAKE Literary Productions promotes writing, translation, and visual art through an annual print publication and multimedia events, including the yearly Lit & Luz Festival, a collaboration between Mexican and American artists held in both Chicago and Mexico City. Editors discuss concrete methods for creating and sharing innovative, inclusive, and heterogeneous work in print and in person. Strategies for cultivating diverse audiences and community engagement will be put forth. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kathleen Rooney is a founding editor of Rose Metal Press and a founding member of Poems While You Wait. The coeditor of Rene Magritte: Selected Writings, she is the author of Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk and The Listening Room: A Novel of Georgette & Loulou Magritte. She teaches at DePaul.


Twitter Username: KathleenMRooney

Website: http://kathleenrooney.com/

Kamilah Foreman is the fiction editor of MAKE magazine and the director of publications at Dia Art Foundation.

Sarah Dodson is co-founder and executive director of MAKE Literary Productions, NFP—publisher of MAKE and producer of the Lit & Luz Festival of Language, Literature, and Art.

Miguel Jimenez is a writer and professor of English. He serves as the Literary Arts and Community Coordinator for the Lit & Luz Festival.

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R127. Prayers on the Page: Faith as the Last Taboo in Children’s Literature. (, , , Mark Oshiro) Early U.S. children’s literature was Christian-themed and heavily moralistic, but today mainstream houses, and therefore writers, avoid the personal, emotional, and dangerous subject of religion. This despite the fact that 75% of Americans identify with one, 90% believe in God or a higher power, and teens ever seek to make sense of the world and understand their own spiritual identity. Should we be depicting religion/spirituality as a normal part of our character’s lives? Why not or why and how? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ann Jacobus is the author of YA novel, Romancing the Dark in the City of Light. She earned her MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from Vermont College of Fine Arts and writes fiction for younger readers, essays, and poems.


Twitter Username: AnnJacobusSF

Website: www.annjacobus.com

Katie Henry is the author of the young adult novels Heretics Anonymous and Let's Call It a Doomsday and a playwright specializing in theatre for young audiences. Her novels have received starred reviews from Kirkus Reviews, Booklist, Publishers Weekly, and School Library Journal.


Twitter Username: kt_nre

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R128. CANCELLED: Translating the Untranslatable: A Reading of International Experimental Poetry. (, , , , ) From the manifestos of Breton to the wordplay of Stein to the fantastical lines of Borges, avant garde movements have always driven poetry into revolutionary directions. This panel offers a panoramic view of international experimental poetries by noted world translators from French, German, Korean, Russian, and Spanish (Latin American) poets of the 20th and 21st centuries. Intercultural and intersectional issues in translation will be discussed as panelists read from a range of avant poetries. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Larissa Shmailo is a poet, novelist, translator, and critic. Her latest hybrid novel is Sly Bang and latest experimental poetry collection is #specialcharacters. She is an anthologist of contemporary Russian poetry and the original English translator of the avant-garde opera, Victory over the Sun.


Twitter Username: larissashmailo

Website: www.larissashmailo.com

Marc Vincenz’s tenth collection of poetry is Leaning into the Infinite. He has translated many Romanian-, French- and German-language poets, including Herman Hesse Prize–winner, Klaus Merz. He is executive editor of MadHat Press and serves on the editorial boards of Plume and Fulcrum.

Hélène Cardona’s third bilingual collection is Life in Suspension. Her translations include Hemingway Grant winner Beyond Elsewhere (Arnou-Laujeac), José Manuel Cardona's Birnam Wood, Walt Whitman, and Dorianne Laux. A Goethe-Institut and Andalucía University Fellow, she coedits Plume and Levure Littéraire.


Twitter Username: helenecardona

Website: http://helenecardona.com

Michelle Gil-Montero is a poet and translator. She has translated several books by contemporary Latin American writers, including Maria Negroni, Valerie Mejer Caso, and Andres Ajens. Her work has been supported by the NEA, Howard Foundation, and Fulbright.

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs is the author of Paper Pavilion, winner of the White Pine Press Poetry Prize, Interrogation Room, and Necro Citizens (in German, English). A cotranslator of Sami and Korean poetries, she is associate professor of English and directs race and ethnic studies at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: jkwondobbs

Website: www.jkwondobbs.com

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R129. CANCELLED: Beyond Academia: Teaching Strategies for the Community Classroom. (, , , , ) Five teachers of creative writing share their pedagogical approaches to teaching incarcerated people, disenfranchised youth, continuing education adults, and working professionals. Each panelist will respond to the questions: what are the similarities and differences between teaching academic and community workshops? How do you best fulfill your community’s writing needs? What challenges have you faced, successes have you celebrated? How can we make the writing workshop accessible to all? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kimberly Grey is the author of Systems for the Future of Feeling (forthcoming) and The Opposite of Light. She's the recipient of a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and a Civitella Ranieri Fellowship. She teaches for the Stanford Online High School and Stanford's Continuing Education Program.


Twitter Username: kimmygrey

Mitchell L. H. Douglas is the author of dying in the scarecrow's arms, \blak\ \al-fə bet\, and Cooling Board: A Long-Playing Poem. An associate professor of English at IUPUI, he offers community workshops through the Indiana Writers Center, Flanner House, and Brick Street Poetry.


Twitter Username: MLHDouglas

Website: mitchelldouglaspoetry.com

Jill McDonough is the recipient of three Pushcart prizes as well as Lannan, NEA, Cullman Center, and Stegner fellowships. Her latest collection is Here All Night. She teaches in the MFA program at UMass Boston and with incarcerated men, women, and boys.


Twitter Username: jilljillmcd

Website: jillmcdonough.com

Rebecca Lindenberg is the author of Love, an Index and The Logan Notebooks. She is on the poetry faculty at the University of Cincinnati and is poetry editor of The Cincinnati Review. She's the recipient of many awards, including an Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Fellowship and an NEA fellowship.


Twitter Username: bexlindenberg

Jason Koo is the author, most recently, of More Than Mere Light and Sunset Park and coeditor of the Brooklyn Poets Anthology. He is the founder and executive director of Brooklyn Poets and an associate teaching professor of English at Quinnipiac University.

 


Twitter Username: jasonykoo

Website: http://jasonykoo.com

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R130. CANCELLED: What’s Poetry Got to Do with It?: Creative Writing in the Wider World. (, , , Annie Finch) Poetry is a practice of introspection and transformation. How can poetry help us to be more introspective and transformative in our nonpoetic lives? Four panelists discuss the uses and effects of poetic engagement in four different contexts: a psychology study, a prison justice organization, a religious studies classroom, and a printmaking workshop. Panelists will share techniques for bringing poetry into nonpoetic settings in productive ways. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Samantha Fain is an undergraduate student at Franklin College studying creative writing, psychology, and Spanish.


Twitter Username: samcanliftacar

Chloe Martinez is the program coordinator for the Center for Writing and Public Discourse at Claremont McKenna College, as well as lecturer in religious studies. Her poems have appeared in publications including Waxwing, The Normal School, The Collagist, PANK, and The Common.


Twitter Username: chloepoet

Helena Mesa is the author of Horse Dance Underwater and a coeditor for Mentor and Muse: Essays from Poets to Poets. She teaches at Albion College.

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R131. CANCELLED: Black Voice—Cultivating Authentic Voice in Black Writers . (, , , ) Does it smack of racism or classism to demand that these students [black students] put aside the language of their homes and communities to adopt a discourse that is not only alien, but that has often been instrumental in furthering their oppression? How can we teach students of color the art of writing while also encouraging the use of their native discourse, their native voice? How do we foster voice if students aren't invited to the table? Using Whitman, Hughes, and Kendrick Lamar, we discuss. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Brendan Kiely is the New York Times bestselling author of Tradition, All American Boys (with Jason Reynolds), and other titles. His work has been published in ten languages and received awards including a Coretta Scott King Author Honor, YALSA Top Ten Best Fiction, and Kirkus Reviews Best of 2014.


Twitter Username: KielyBrendan

Website: www.brendankiely.com

Daniel B. Summerhill is an assistant professor of poetry/social action and composition studies at California State University Monterey Bay. He is the author of Divine, Devine, Devine (forthcoming), a semifinalist for the Charles B. Wheeler poetry prize.


Twitter Username: bennysummerhill

Quintin Collins is a writer, editor, and Solstice Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program at Pine Manor College alum and assistant director. His poems and other writing appear in various print and digital publications, and his achievements include a 2019 Pushcart Prize nomination.


Twitter Username: qcollinswriter

Rachel “Raych” Jackson is a writer and educator. She is the 2017 NUPIC Champion. Jackson’s work has been published by many, including Poetry, The Rumpus, and Washington Square Review. Her debut collection is Even the Saints Audition.


Twitter Username: RaychJackson

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R132. CANCELLED: Writing Beyond the Gate: Reaching Voices from Outside the Academy. (, , , Tessa Hulls, ) Systemically, the academy controls access to literary voices and platforms through an infrastructure that includes publishing, networking, course adoption, and financial and other institutional support. Writers from outside academia discuss how to disrupt this power dynamic, navigate nontraditional paths, promote access to under-heard voices, and otherwise destabilize a system that co-opts and restricts the spirit of resistance and revolution historically characterized by creative writing. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Julia Bouwsma is the author of two poetry collections, Midden and Work by Bloodlight. She serves as book review editor for Connotation Press: An Online Artifact and library director for Webster Library in Kingfield, Maine.

Michelle Peñaloza is the author of Former Possessions of the Spanish Empire, winner the 2018 Hillary Gravendyk National Poetry Prize, and two chapbooks, landscape/heartbreak, and Last Night I Dreamt of Volcanoes.


Twitter Username: pennyzola

Nikki Zielinski’s poems appear in Best New Poets, Cincinnati Review, Ecotone, Vinyl, and PANK. Since earning an MFA in poetry from the University of Oregon, she has received residencies from Djerassi, Vermont Studio Center, and the Rasmuson Foundation, and an Individual Excellence Award from the Ohio Arts Council.

Cynthia Dewi Oka is author of two books of poems, Salvage and Nomad of Salt and Hard Water. A Pushcart Prize nominee, she has received the Fifth Wednesday Journal Editor's Prize in Poetry, and grants from the Leeway Foundation, Vermont Studio Center, and VONA. She studies poetry at Warren Wilson.


Twitter Username: freedewi

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R133. CANCELLED: Interrogating the Racial Past Through Research-Based Poetry . (, , , ) Confederate monuments fall, on the one hand. Klansmen march openly, on the other. As we’re gripped again by tensions we haven’t yet outgrown—as nation, as world—interrogating the racial past seems key to understanding and withstanding our present circumstance. Five poets of varied backgrounds explore their strategies to expose old debts, revivify forgotten voices, question motivations, and fracture and reset the broken language of the culture, to find within the past a way forward. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

M. Nzadi Keita's most recent collection, Brief Evidence of Heaven, sheds light on Anna Murray Douglass, Frederick Douglass’s first wife. Keita was a 2017 Pew Fellow. Publications including Poet Lore and The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South have featured her poems. Keita teaches at Ursinus College.


Twitter Username: zee_keita

Herman Beavers is a professor of English and Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has taught since 1989. He teaches courses in African American literature and creative writing. In addition to literary criticism, he has published two chapbooks and has a third coming out later this year.

Len Lawson is author of the debut poetry collection Chime and coeditor of Hand in Hand: Poets Respond to Race. He is a PhD student in literature and criticism at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses are African American South Carolina native poets and afrofuturism theory.


Twitter Username: Lenvillelaws

Henk Rossouw is the author of Xamissa, which won the Poets Out Loud Editor's Prize. New-Generation African Poets: Tano and Best American Experimental Writing 2018 both include excerpts. An assistant professor, he teaches creative writing at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


Twitter Username: henkross

Website: henkrossouw.com

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R134. AWP Program Directors' Plenary Assembly. All AWP program directors should attend this meeting to represent their programs. Kim Chinquee and Stephanie Vanderslice, Co-Chairs of Chair of the Professional Standards Committee, will lead a discussion on AWP’s plans for the year ahead. In plenary and in the breakout sessions that follow immediately, Directors will also discuss the ongoing revision of the Hallmarks and the increasing funding challenges facing writing programs at every level.

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R135. CANCELLED: Not So Foreign: Writing in More Than One Language. (, , , , ) For writers who publish primarily in English, reflecting a multilingual world can be a fraught process, traditionally involving the accommodation of English-only speakers. How are writers of English-language fiction and nonfiction today centering characters who speak and think in languages other than English? Drawing from questions of not only craft but also the personal and political, five panelists discuss their innovative approaches to incorporating multiple languages in their work. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Simon Han's debut novel is forthcoming. His writing has appeared in the Atlantic, the Iowa Review, Guernica, Fence, Electric Literature, and elsewhere. A MacDowell and Tulsa Artist Fellow, he teaches at the University of Tulsa.


Twitter Username: simonxinhan

Meng Jin’s debut novel Little Gods is forthcoming. Her short fiction appears or is forthcoming in the Threepenny Review, Ploughshares, the Masters Review, and elsewhere. She is a Kundiman Fellow, David TK Wong Fellow, Elizabeth George Grantee, and Steinbeck Fellow.


Twitter Username: jinittowinit

Antonio Ruiz-Camacho's debut collection Barefoot Dogs won the Jesse H. Jones Award, and was a Kirkus Reviews Best Book and a San Francisco Chronicle Recommended Book of 2015. He's a former Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University and holds an MFA from The New Writers Project at UT Austin.


Twitter Username: aruizcamacho

Website: antonioruizcamacho.com

Novuyo Rosa Tshuma is the author of the novel House of Stone, shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize. Her collection Shadows won the Herman Charles Bosman Prize. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, her work has appeared in McSweeney's and The Displaced, an anthology edited by Viet Thanh Nguyen.


Twitter Username: NovuyoRTshuma

Xavier Navarro Aquino’s fiction has appeared in Tin House, McSweeney’s Quarterly, and Guernica, among others. He’s received support from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, the MacDowell Colony, and is currently the fiction editor for Prairie Schooner.

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R136. CANCELLED: How to Pitch, Land, and Deliver a Successful Interview to Market Your Work. (, , , ) These days, writers must promote their own work. Interviews can be as critical to this process as a positive review or a robust social media following. What can writers do to improve their odds of being noticed by an interviewer and help along an effective and memorable interview? A diverse panel of interviewers from a variety of contexts, including public radio, book festivals, and review publications will discuss the how-to’s of successful interviews that spur a writer’s marketing platform. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Yvette Benavides is a professor of creative at Our Lady of the Lake University. She is a commentator on Texas Public Radio and a book critic for the San Antonio Express News. She is the editor of EQ, a nonfiction anthology series from Trinity University Press.


Twitter Username: borderworldgirl

David Martin Davies is an award-winning journalist. Davies is the host of the Source, a daily news call-in program on Texas Public Radio. He is also the host of Texas Matters, a syndicated weekly radio news magazine. He has interviewed authors on public radio and C-SPAN Book TV.


Twitter Username: DavidMartinDavi

Lilly Gonzalez is the executive director of the San Antonio Book Festival. Born and raised in the Texas Rio Grande Valley, she earned both her MFA in creative writing and BS in journalism from Northwestern University.


Twitter Username: mynameisyliana

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R137. CANCELLED: A Place at the Table: Nurturing an Inclusive Literary Ecosystem. (, , , , ) How do we ensure that our literary communities reflect the diversity of our towns and that everyone has a place at the table? In this panel, writers connected with Inprint—a Houston-based literary arts nonprofit—will discuss the various Inprint community writing activities they lead for senior citizens, the incarcerated, healthcare providers, the Latinx community, and more, expanding the notion of who is a writer and nurturing an inclusive literary ecosystem. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Rich Levy is a poet and, since 1995, executive director of Inprint, a literary nonprofit organization in Houston, Texas. His collections include Why Me? and the letterpress chapbook One or Two Lights. He holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers Workshop and is a member of the Texas Institute of Letters.


Twitter Username: inprintguy

Niki Herd is the author of The Language of Shedding Skin. Her work has been supported by the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and Cave Canem and has appeared in a number of journals. She is completing her PhD in literature and creative writing at the University of Houston.

Kaj Tanaka is a PhD candidate in creative writing at the University of Houston. Since 2014, Kaj has developed writing workshops for incarcerated people in jails and prisons across the country. Currently Kaj runs a poetry workshop for recovering drug users at Houston's Harris County Jail.


Twitter Username: kajtanaka

Ricardo Nuila is a practicing doctor, teacher, and writer. His nonfiction has appeared in The New Yorker and VQR, and his fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories. A former Yaddo, MacDowell, and Dobie Ranch fellow, his first book is on safety net hospitals.


Twitter Username: riconuila

Website: ricardonuila.com

Lupe Mendez (educator/writer/activist) has prose work in the Kenyon Review and Sudden Fiction Latino as well as poetry that appears in Huizache, Luna, The Texas Review, Tinderbox, Hunger Mountain, Glass Poetry, and Gulf Coast. His book is Why I Am Like Tequila.


Twitter Username: thepoetmendez

Website: www.thepoetmendez.org

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R138. CANCELLED: I’d Rather Break Your Heart: A Tribute to Poet James Tate. (, , , , ) “I love my funny poems, but I’d rather break your heart. And if I can do both in the same poem, that’s the best.” —James Tate, 1943–2015. Five poets read and explore the work, life, and craft of James Tate, whose funny, heartbreaking, and chilling poems thwarted expectations of what poetry is and does. As Tate’s distinctive style made imitation impossible and even embarrassing, our panelist discuss the influence of one of America’s most celebrated surrealists on their widely diverse styles. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Dorothea Lasky is the author of six books of poetry and prose, including most recently, Milk, and the forthcoming, Animal. She is an associate professor of poetry and director of the undergraduate creative writing program at Columbia University's School of the Arts.


Twitter Username: dorothealasky

Jaswinder Bolina is author of the poetry collections The 44th of July, Phantom Camera, Carrier Wave, and the digital chapbook The Tallest Building in America. He teaches on the faculty of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Miami.

Nikki Wallschlaeger is the author of two full-length collections of poetry as well as two artist book projects and several chapbooks. She attended University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. Her work is feminist, Black-centered, and interrogates class and intersectionality.


Twitter Username: nikkimwalls

Jennifer L. Knox's fifth book of poems, Crushing It, is forthcoming. Her poems have appeared four times in the Best American Poetry series, the New Yorker, the New York Times, and American Poetry Review.


Twitter Username: jenniferlknox

Website: www.jenniferlknox.com

Matthew Zapruder is editor at large for Wave Books, and teaches poetry in the Saint Mary's College of California MFA. His most recent book of poems is Sun Bear. Why Poetry, a book of prose, was published in summer 2017.


Twitter Username: matthewzapruder

Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R139. When Your Homeland Is Called a Crisis: Tejanas on Zero Tolerance. (, , , ) What happens when your homeland—and muse—becomes a major international news story? What issues of power and agency come into play when politicians push for headlines and outside journalists claim authority to the narrative? Using the so-called “crisis” in the borderlands as a case study, four acclaimed Tejana essayists will discuss the intersection of journalism and memoir that emerges when you are both an observer and a native of a place—and how to do justice to its complexities.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Cecilia Ballí has written for longform magazines for twenty years, including Texas Monthly and Harper’s Magazine. She has chronicled violence along the US-Mexico border since 2003, and held various writing residencies including the Texas Institute of Letter's Dobie Paisano Fellowship.


Twitter Username: ceciliaballi

Michelle Garcia is a Soros Equality Fellow and the Dobie Paisano fellow. She is the former Texas correspondent for the Columbia Journalism Review and a former Texas Observer columnist. She reported from the Washington Post’s New York bureau and frequently contributes to the Oxford American and Guernica.

Macarena Hernández is a multimedia journalist and professor. Her work has been published in the New York Times, the Dallas Morning News, San Antonio Express-News, the Los Angeles Times, PBS, and other media outlets. A former editorial columnist, she has been writing about the border for twenty years.

Stephanie Elizondo Griest is the author of Around the Bloc, Mexican Enough, and All the Agents & Saints. Associate professor of creative nonfiction at UNC-Chapel Hill, she lectures globally, including as a Moth storyteller, and won a Margolis Award for Social Justice Reporting at the US border.


Twitter Username: SElizondoGriest

Website: www.MexicanEnough.com

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R140. CANCELLED: “This Possibility of You": Bi+ Visibility in Poetry. (, , , , ) June Jordan’s “Poem for My Love” marvels in “this possibility of you,” the ungendered beloved. This panel will explore the complex possibilities for the ways that bi+ sexualities—that is, any nonmonosexuality—are rendered and/or erased in poetry and the literary community. What defines a bi+ poetics? We will look at historic and contemporary examples, and participants will discuss the ways they intersectionally engage bi+ desire, identity, and experiences in their own writings. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Emilia Phillips (she/her/hers) is the author of three books, including Empty Clip. Her poetry appears in AGNI, Boston Review, The Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, and elsewhere. She's an assistant professor of poetry in the MFA writing program at UNC-Greensboro.


Twitter Username: emiliapoet

Website: http://emiliaphillips.com

Ruth Awad is a Lebanese American poet and the author of Set to Music a Wildfire, which won the 2016 Michael Waters Poetry Prize from SIR Press. She is the recipient of a 2016 Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Award, and she won the 2012 and 2013 Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Prize.


Twitter Username: RuthAwad

Marcelo Hernandez Castillo is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the author of Cenzontle, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Prize, Dulce, and Children of the Land. A CantoMundo Fellow, he cofounded the Undocupoets campaign.


Twitter Username: marcelo_H_

Trace Peterson is a trans woman poet critic. Author of the poetry collection Since I Moved In, she is also founding editor/publisher of EOAGH Books which has won two Lambda Literary Awards, and coeditor of the anthology Troubling the Line, which was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in 2014.


Twitter Username: tracepeterson

Website: http://eoagh.com

Rosebud Ben-Oni received a 2014 NYFA Fellowship in Poetry and a CantoMundo Fellowship in 2013. She is the author of Solecism, a poetry collection, and an editorial advisor for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: RosebudBenOni

Website: 7TrainLove.org

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R141. Worry about It Later: Strategies to Finish What You Start. (, , , , ) Starting is often the easy part—it’s what comes after that’s so difficult for many writers. In this panel, we’ll discuss strategies for completing the first draft, along with our experiences of sending out and eventually publishing work that in some cases went through many drafts. We’ll also discuss how to deal with self-doubt and how to write through potential problems. Lastly, we’ll share advice about when to set a project aside. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Juan Martinez is an assistant professor at Northwestern University. Best Worst American, his story collection, was released in 2017, and his work has appeared in Huizache, Glimmer Train, McSweeney's, Ecotone, Selected Shorts, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: fulmerford

Website: http://www.fulmerford.com

Christine Sneed is the faculty director of Northwestern University's graduate writing program; she also teaches for Regis University's low-residency MFA program and was an AWP W2W mentor. She has published four books; her first, Portraits of a Few of the People I've Made Cry, won the Grace Paley Prize.


Twitter Username: ChristineSneed

Website: http://www.christinesneed.com

Sarah Kokernot’s fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in The Best American Short Stories, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crazyhorse, Front Porch, West Branch, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, decomP, and PANK. She is the program curator at StoryStudio.

Kendra Fortmeyer is the prose editor for Broad! magazine with an MFA in fiction from the New Writers Project at UT Austin. Her stories have appeared in One Story, Black Warrior Review, the Literary Review, the Toast, and elsewhere, and her debut novel is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: kendraffe

Amy Gentry is the author of thrillers Good as Gone and Last Woman Standing, as well as Boys for Pele, a book on the gendered experience of taste. She has a PhD in English from the University of Chicago, and her criticism has appeared in the Paris Review, Chicago Tribune, and LA Review of Books.


Twitter Username: unlandedgentry

Room 304, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R142. Westward, Ho! Manifest Destiny Reconfigured. (, , , , ) By examining the post-Civil War Cherokee Nation West, the Battle of Santiago Bay, the Spanish conquest of California, and the Alamo in their fiction, panelists place women in these violent narratives of westward expansion and conquest, upending the traditional view of women as victims or ciphers. Additionally, the novelists describe the liberties, opportunities, obligations and pitfalls of writing, researching, and publishing historical fiction. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Emma Pérez has published an academic monograph, feminist/queer essays, and three novels. Gulf Dreams is a Chicana lesbian coming-out tale. Forgetting the Alamo, Or, Blood Memory, an historical novel, received five awards/recognition, and recently she published Electra's Complex, an erotic mystery.


Twitter Username: EmmaPerez08

Website: https://swc.arizona.edu/users/emma-perez

Lorraine M. López, Gertrude Conaway Chair, teaches in the MFA program at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of seven books of fiction, editor of three essay collections, and associate editor of the Afro-Hispanic Review. Her most recent publication is Postcards from the Gerund State, Stories.

Lynn Pruett has published a novel, and stories and essays in Michigan Quarterly Review, Border Crossing, Southern Exposure, Arts & Letters, and Farmer's Pride. She's received the Al Smith Fellowship, the Joanna Scott Award, and had a residency at Yaddo.


Twitter Username: julep_pruett

Margaret Verble's first novel, Maud's Line, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2016. Her second novel, Cherokee America is a prequel set in Indian Territory 1875. Margaret is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

Kathryn Locey is professor of English at Brenau University in Gainesville, Georgia. Her short fiction and poetry have appeared in such places as Copperfield Review, Staccato, Able Muse, Paper Nautilus, and the Christian Science Monitor.

Room 305, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R143. CANCELLED: Demystifying Distribution and the Publishing Process: Tips and Tricks for Small Press Authors, Sponsored by SPD and CLMP. (, ) Distribution might seem to be corollary to more forward-facing publishing tasks such as marketing and publicity, but is in fact a crucial part of any book's life. In this panel, learn simple tips and tricks to best situate your book from prepublication to print, and to expand its reach to booksellers, readers, and other writers to get it into the hands of those who would love to read it!

Trisha Low is the publicity manager at Small Press Distribution. She has previously served at other feminist and arts organizations including The Feminist Press and the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses. She is the author of The Compleat Purge.

Andrea Abi-Karam is an Arab American genderqueer punk poet-performer cyborg. Their debut EXTRATRANSMISSION is a poetic critique of the US military's role in the War on Terror. Simone White selected their second assemblage, Villainy, for forthcoming publication.


Twitter Username: wolf_hour

Website: andreaak.com

10:35 am to 11:50 am

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R144. CANCELLED: Intentionally Inclusive: Growing Your Independent Press, Journal, and Organization. (, , , Sheila Squillante, Mallory Soto) The indie lit scene is stronger than ever, but many journals, presses, and organizations start strong, then fade away. The editors of Barrelhouse, The Rumpus, and Split Lip magazine discuss growing an organization with purpose, especially in terms of diversity, inclusion, and community-building. These goals are smart business models not obligations. For example, are submission fees an access issue? How can an editorial board be introspective when reflecting on diversity and inclusivity?

Cortney Lamar Charleston is the author of Telepathologies. He has received a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation as well as fellowships from Cave Canem, the Conversation Literary Festival, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.


Twitter Username: bardsbesidebars

Karissa Chen is the editor-in-chief at Hyphen magazine, fiction editor at The Rumpus, and a contributing editor at Catapult. She has published prose in numerous publications including Longreads, Gulf Coast, PEN America, and Guernica. She was awarded a Fulbright research grant to Taiwan in 2015–16.


Twitter Username: karissachen

Christopher Gonzalez serves as a fiction editor at Barrelhouse and a contributing editor at Split Lip. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Lunch Ticket, Wasafiri, Third Point Press, Cosmonauts Avenue, JMWW, and elsewhere. He currently works in book publishing.


Twitter Username: livesinpages

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R145. CANCELLED: On Grading Creative Writing: Process, Product, and Talent . (, , , , ) Creative writing is a serious art that demands the study of craft, close reading, thoughtful discussion of literature, and much practice, all of which are dependent upon the time to learn one’s own creative process. Grading this work is an especially difficult task. The practicing writers and teachers on this panel will discuss their approaches to grading creative writing in ways that rewards students’ processes and talent, while maintaining high standards for the art of creative writing. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Rachel M. Hanson is a visiting assistant professor of English and creative writing at UNC-Asheville. She's a former Olive B. O'Connor fellow in nonfiction at Colgate University, and she holds an MFA from the University of Utah and a PhD in literature and creative writing from the University of Missouri.

Bryn Chancellor is the author of the novel Sycamore and the story collection When Are You Coming Home?, which won the Prairie Schooner Book Prize; she also received the Poets & Writers Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Award. She is associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

Susan McCarty has an MFA in fiction from Vermont College and a PhD in literature and creative writing from the University of Utah. She is an assistant professor of English at Oakland University.

Ye Chun/叶春 is the author of two books of poetry, Lantern Puzzle and Travel over Water, a novel in Chinese, and two books of translations, Ripened Wheat and Long River. A recipient of an NEA fellowship and two Pushcart Prizes, she is an assistant professor at Providence College.

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R146. He Done Her Wrong: The Redemptive Value of Reframing Violence in Story. (, , , ) Panelists discuss how they flip violence to reframe the narrative of victimhood and empower women in marginalized communities. In Nadie Me Verá Llorar Cristina R. Garza reveals how popular language defined insanity in 1920s Mexico. Interpreting domestic violence (DV) calls spurs Marivi Soliven to write The Mango Bride and advocate for immigrant DV survivors. Ari Honarvar eases Iraqis' PTSD in her Refugee Women's Drum Circle and Carolyne Ouya empowers African DV survivors via spoken word. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Marivi has authored seventeen books. Her debut novel The Mango Bride won Grand Prize at the Palanca Awards, the Philippine counterpart of the Pulitzer Prize, and has been translated into Spanish and Tagalog. The film adaptation is in production and will premiere in 2020.


Twitter Username: marivisoliven

Ari Honarvar is the founder of Rumi With A View, dedicated to building music and poetry bridges across war-torn borders. She is the author of Rumi’s Gift, and her writing is featured on the Guardian and WaPost. She facilitates drum/dance gatherings for refugees in Mexico to mitigate effects of PTSD.


Twitter Username: rumiwithview

Carolyne Ouya serves as outreach and recruitment specialist, executive coaching program coordinator, and African victim advocate for Access Inc. Within these roles, Carolyne uses writing and creative expression to explore diverse mental health, public health, and holistic wellness initiatives.


Twitter Username: care_note

Anne S. Bautista is the legal program director of the Access, Inc.,  VAWA Legal Program and SAVE Legal Network of San Diego County. She is an immigration attorney specializing in representing immigrant victims of domestic violence and sexual assault under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R147. CANCELLED: Difficult Muses and Damaged Gods: On Writing Birthed from Darkness. (, , , , ) This panel of women writers will consider the power of archetypal voices from our childhoods. How do those voices inform who we are and who we become on the page? With what alchemy do writers transform these voices into art when they are also sources of trauma? What happens to our work when remembered voices—sources of both inspiration and hurt—pass from our lives? As artists, is it even possible for us to (and should we even try to) transcend our most difficult muses and damaged gods?

Lee Ann Roripaugh is the author of five volumes of poetry. She directs the creative writing program at The University of South Dakota, and is editor in chief of South Dakota Review. Roripaugh currently serves as the State Poet Laureate for South Dakota.


Twitter Username: artichokeheart

Website: http://southdakota.academia.edu/LeeAnnRoripaugh

Karen Salyer McElmurray’s Surrendered Child was an AWP Award winner. Her novels are The Motel of the Stars, Strange Birds in the Tree of Heaven, and she has coedited an essay collection, Walk Till the Dogs Get Mean. The novel Wanting Radiance is forthcoming in April 2020.


Twitter Username: mcelmurraykaren

Website: www.karenmcelmurray.com

Luisa A. Igloria’s books include The Buddha Wonders if She is Having a Mid-Life Crisis and Ode to the Heart Smaller than a Pencil Eraser (2014 May Swenson Prize). She teaches at Old Dominion University, where from 2009–15 she directed the MFA Creative Writing Program.


Twitter Username: thepoetslizard

Website: www.luisaigloria.com

Lisa D. Chavez has published two books of poetry, Destruction Bay and In an Angry Season, and has had essays included in several anthologies, including The Other Latin@: Writing against a Singular Identity, and An Angle of Vision: Women Writers on Their Poor and Working Class Roots.

Natanya Pulley's short story collection is With Teeth. She writes fiction and nonfiction and has numerous journal and anthologized publications. She is an assistant professor at Colorado College and the editor of the Hairstreak Butterfly Review. She is Diné.

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R148. The Role of Women Editors with Small Presses and Literary Journals. (, , , , ) Small presses and literary journals offer women editors democratization of publishing, roles as female gatekeepers, and greater control over product. Four women editors at small presses and literary journals will discuss their own experiences, focusing on their roles in promoting and supporting feminist and underrepresented voices. They will also discuss the type of submissions they are looking for, their editorial process, and best practices for editors and writers. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Pam Uschuk’s six books include Blood Flower, translated into 12 languages. Her prizes include the American Book Award, Best of the Web, and Dorothy Daniels Writing Award from the National League of American PEN Women. She’s finishing Of Thunderlight and Moon: An Odyssey Through Ovarian Cancer. Refugee is due out from Red Hen.


Twitter Username: pamuschuk1

Website: www.cutthroatmag.com and www.pamelauschuk.com

Kristina Marie Darling is author of thirty books, including Dark Horse and Look to Your Left: The Poetics of Spectacle. She currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of Tupelo Press and Tupelo Quarterly, a columnist at the Los Angeles Review of Books, and a contributing writer at Publishers Weekly.

Jennifer Franklin (Brown AB, Columbia MFA) is the author of No Small Gift and Looming. Her poetry has been published in the Paris Review, the Nation, and Boston Review and on poets.org. She is co-editor of Slapering Hol Press and teaches at the Hudson Valley Writers' Center.

Patricia Killelea is the author of Counterglow and Other Suns. She is an assistant professor of English at Northern Michigan University and poetry editor at Passages North. She holds a PhD in Native American studies and an MA in creative writing from UC Davis. She also produces video poems.

Mimi Khúc is a writer, scholar, and teacher of things unwell. She is the managing editor of the Asian American Literary Review and guest editor of Open in Emergency: A Special Issue on Asian American Mental Health. She is also an adjunct professor of Asian American studies.

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R149. Saying the A Word: The Rewards and Challenges of Writing about Abortion. (, , , Adrienne Christian, Sonja Livingston) Have you or someone you know experienced abortion and wanted to write about it, but stopped yourself? This panel will discuss the fact that writers even in 2019 face silencing and stigma on this topic and address the benefits of breaking barriers to tell true, nuanced stories. Writers of varying ages and races discuss what it was like to write, pitch, and publish memoir, essay, and articles about abortion; the walls they hit in the process; and the upside of writing their tales without fear. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Rajpreet Heir is a writer based in New York who works for TED Conferences. Her work has appeared in the Atlantic, Brevity, Cosmopolitan, the Washington Post, the Collagist, Lit Hub, the Normal School, and the New York Times. She has an MFA in creative nonfiction from George Mason University.


Twitter Username: rajtweet_edu

Emily Heiden's work has appeared in the Washington Post, Brevity magazine, and Literary Hub. She will be published in the anthology Don't Look Now: Essays on What We Wish We Hadn't Seen. She holds an MFA in nonfiction from George Mason University.


Twitter Username: _Emily_Heiden_

Kassi Underwood is the author of May Cause Love: An Unexpected Journey of Enlightenment After Abortion. Her work appears in The New York Times, Women's Health, Marie Claire, and elsewhere. She is the founder of The Practice and Revolution After Abortion, with members in three countries.


Twitter Username: kassiunderwood

Website: www.kassiunderwood.com

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R150. CANCELLED: A Tribute to David Baker in his 25th Year as Poetry Editor for Kenyon Review. (, , , , ) On the 25th anniversary of his appointment as Poetry Editor of Kenyon Review, and in recognition of his broad contribution to the world of letters, this panel celebrates the writing, teaching, and mentorship of David Baker. A renowned poet and gifted editor, Baker is the author of seventeen books, most recently Swift: New and Selected Poems. These five poets reflect the wide range of aesthetics published in Kenyon Review during Baker’s storied editorial career. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

TR Hummer has published 13 books of poetry and two of essays. Former editor-in-chief of the Kenyon Review, the New England Review, and the Georgia Review, he has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an NEA Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, and other honors.


Twitter Username: trhummer

Linda Gregerson is the author of six books of poetry, most recently Prodigal, and two books of criticism. Among her honors are an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature and the Kingsley Tufts Award. She is a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Michigan.

Cintia Santana teaches poetry and fiction workshops in Spanish, and literary translation courses at Stanford University. Her work has appeared in Beloit Poetry Journal, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Missouri Review, Pleiades, RHINO, Spillway, The Threepenny Review, and other journals.

Meghan O’Rourke is the editor of The Yale Review and the author of The Long Goodbye, as well as the poetry collections Sun In Days, Once, and Halflife. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, among other prizes, she is working on a book about chronic illness.


Twitter Username: meghanor

Website: http://www.meghanorourke.net

Reginald Dwayne Betts is a writer and poet. His latest collection of poems is Felon.

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R151. CANCELLED: The Evolution of Truth: How Nonfiction Has Changed over Time. (, , , ) Due to its unconventional evolution, many words get tossed around when talking about creation nonfiction, including essay, memoir, narrative, and reportage. In this panel, attendees will hear from creative nonfiction writers and editors as they recall their first encounters with the genre and reflect on how it has changed over time, thereby enriching our understanding of the genre’s complicated history and how that history informs our writing today. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Mia Herman is the outreach director and creative nonfiction editor for F(r)iction. She holds an MFA in creative writing from Hofstra University, and her poems and essays have appeared in numerous publications.


Twitter Username: MiaMHerman

Patricia Horvath is the author of the memoir All the Difference. Her stories and essays have been published widely in literary journals, and she is the recipient of New York Foundation for the Arts fellowships in both fiction and nonfiction.

Phillip Lopate has written over twenty books, most recently, Portrait Inside My Head, To Show and to Tell: The Craft of Literary Nonfiction, and A Mother's Tale. He has also edited the anthology Art of the Personal Essay, and is a MFA nonfiction professor at Columbia University.

Lee Gutkind, recognized by Vanity Fair as the godfather behind creative nonfiction, is the author or editor of more than thirty books and the founding and current editor of Creative Nonfiction magazine. He is Distinguished Writer in Residence at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: leegutkind

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R152. Adaptation: Transform Your Novel into a Marketable Screenplay. (, , , ) This panel will show novelists exactly what they need to do when translating their work into a script for screen. Writers will leave with concrete strategies such as telescoping plot as well as sharpening theme and character arc in order to transform their fiction into a fantastic film. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Leslie Kreiner Wilson, PhD, is a produced screenwriter and directs the MFA Program in Writing for Screen and Television at Pepperdine University. Her recent publications include fiction as well as essays on early screenwriters Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and Mae West in various academic journals.

Andrea Baltazar is an assistant professor of communication at Weber State University, where she teaches audio production, editing, and documentary filmmaking. She’s also a writer/director of a short film entitled Urban Uber. She graduated from Pepperdine University with an MFA in screenwriting.

Andrés Orozco is the writer/director of various award winning films, including Yo Soy Tu Niña, God Speaks Spanish, and 16 Summers. He is an assistant professor at Weber State University, where he teaches digital media, screenwriting, and oversees film production. He's also a working SAG actor.


Twitter Username: orozcofilms

Tom Provost wrote Under Suspicion starring Oscar winners Morgan Freeman and Gene Hackman. It was nominated for an Edgar Award. He wrote and directed The Presence starring Oscar winner Mira Sorvino. The film won numerous best picture and best director awards. He is an honors graduate from UT Austin.


Twitter Username: provostom

Website: cinemalanguage.org

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R154. Finding Your Home at a University Press: What Literary Authors Need to Know. (, , , , ) Finding a publisher often seems like a daunting task. A university press may be the perfect fit. Many publish and promote creative work—including novels, poetry, and memoir—that larger presses might pass on. Because of their size and focus, university presses can take more risks and give more attention to authors than larger houses can. This panel, featuring editors, marketers, and authors, will answer questions about publishing with a university press and what to expect when working with one. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Elise McHugh is an acquisitions editor at the University of New Mexico Press. Her acquisition subjects include poetry, fiction, and literary nonfiction. She also serves as the in-house editor for the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize and the Mary Burritt Christiansen Poetry Series.


Twitter Username: EliseMcHugh

Tiffany Midge is a citizen of the Standing Rock Sioux, a former humor columnist for Indian Country Today, and author of the memoir Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese's. Midge won the Kenyon Review Earthworks Indigenous Poetry Prize for The Woman Who Married a Bear.


Twitter Username: TiffanyMidge

Adelia Humme is the publicist at the University of New Mexico Press, where she works with about twenty-five scholarly and trade titles per season. She holds an MA in publishing from Emerson College and a BA in English from Texas A&M University.

Norma E. Cantú currently serves as the Murchison Professor of the Humanities at Trinity University. An award-winning novelist and poet, her work centers on the border and social justice issues. She is cofounder of CantoMundo and a member of the Macondo Writers Workshop.


Twitter Username: normaelia

Anna Weir has worked as a publicist at the University of Nebraska Press since 2016. In addition to scholarly titles and a strange amount of baseball biographies, Anna connects writers of fiction and creative nonfiction to journalists, reviewers, and other media.


Twitter Username: Anna_Bee_94

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R155. Applying for an Individual NEA Creative Writing Fellowship. (, , ) Want to know what the National Endowment for the Arts fellowships are all about? Staff members from the NEA’s Literature Division discuss and advise on all aspects of the program, including how to submit an application, how winning poets and prose writers are selected, and the ways in which the NEA supports writers through its other initiatives and grantmaking. Plenty of time will be allotted for questions.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Katy Day is a literature specialist at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Jessica Flynn is a literature specialist at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Amy Stolls is the director of literary arts at the National Endowment for the Arts.


Twitter Username: amystolls

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R156. The Evolution of Sudden to Microfiction: The Anthologies That Got It Started. (, , , , ) Sudden, flash, micro. Panelists discuss how these structural changes came to be, in successive anthologies, over 30 years. Now “flash fiction” is a generic term, respected for what can be done in a thousand words. Panelists include the coeditor of all three Norton anthologies, anthology contributors, an associate editor, and the editor of Flash!: Writing the Very Short Story. The panel will read from the anthologies and provide oversight and insight into a small part of a big literary history. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

James Thomas has coedited all of the Sudden and Flash Fiction anthologies, and authored Pictures, Moving. He has received two NEA grants, a Stegner Fellowship, founded Quarterly West, and started the Writers At Work conference. He has taught at Wright State Univesity and the University of Utah.

Marcela Fuentes is an assistant professor of creative writing and Latinx literature at Texas A&M University. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she was the 2016–2017 McCreight Fellow in Fiction at the WICW. Selected work appears in Flash Fiction International and Best of the Web.

Venita Blackburn received the Prairie Schooner book prize in fiction 2016 for her collected stories, Black Jesus and Other Superheroes. She was a finalist for the PEN/Bingham and Young Lions Awards in 2018. She is an assistant professor of fiction at California State University, Fresno.


Twitter Username: venitablackburn

Sherrie Flick is the author of a novel and two story collections, most recently Thank Your Lucky Stars. Her work appears in Ploughshares, Flash Fiction Forward, New Sudden Fiction, and New Micro. She Is series editor for the Best Small Fictions 2018 and teaches in Chatham University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: sherrieflick

Website: http://www.sherrieflick.com/

John Dufresne is the author of two story collections, six novels, and four books on craft, including Flash! A Guide to Writing Very Short Fiction and Storyville: An Illustrated Guide to Writing Fiction. He teaches creative writing at Florida International University and is at work on a novel.

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R157. AWP Program Directors' Southwest Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Utah. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Ryan Stone, will conduct this meeting.

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R158. Tone, Voice, and Mood: Not Just for Angsty Teens. (, , , , Jenn Bailey) So often, agents, editors, and well-meaning critique partners or beta readers provide vague feedback along the lines of “the voice on this piece doesn’t feel genuine” or “this doesn’t strike the right tone,” without any specifics to back up their statements, as if knowledge of tone, mood, and voice is built into a writer’s DNA. In this craft-based session, the panelists define these ambiguous concepts using concrete examples, allowing writers to revise their work in a deeper way.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kyle V. Hiller is an independent author and the co-founder of Angelella Editorial (AE). He freelances as a writing coach and authenticity reader, and serves primarily as AE's project manager.


Twitter Username: KyleLiterally

Suma Subramaniam is the contributing author of The Hero Next Door anthology. She contributes to fromthemixedupfiles.com. She is also the mentorship coordinator of SCBWI WWA and internship grants team member at WNDB. She has an MFA from VCFA and a certificate in popular fiction from UW.


Twitter Username: suma_v_s

Diane Telgen holds an MFA in writing for children and young adults from VCFA and served as managing editor for Foreshadow: A Serial Anthology. Now an editor with Angelella Editorial, she previously worked as a writer/editor of reference book series, including Authors and Artists for Young Adults.


Twitter Username: originalneglet

Jay Whistler holds an MFA in writing and an MA in tech writing. She worked as a university writing instructor for over sixteen years, and she is currently a submissions editor for Hunger Mountain, an acquisitions reader for a literary agency, and a freelance editor with Angelella Editorial.


Twitter Username: JayWhistler

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R159. CANCELLED: High Style and Misdemeanors: The Virtues and Vices of Elevated Prose. (, , , , ) The hallmarks of high style—elevated voice, obsession with the pictorial, self-consciousness, and poetic devices—are rooted in Flaubert and European realism. Can writers whose work concerns immigration and displacement embrace a stylistic approach that has historically been disengaged and apolitical? Authors of fiction that centers on immigration, intergenerational stories, and belonging, read their work and discuss the intersection of elevated prose and socially and politically engaged work. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lauren Alwan’s fiction and essays have appeared in the O. Henry Prize Stories, the Southern Review, Zyzzyva, Nimrod, and Catapult, among others, and have been cited as notable in Best American Essays. She is a staff contributor at LitStack and a prose editor at the museum of americana.


Twitter Username: lauren_alwan

Website: www.laurenalwan.com

Anita Felicelli is the author of Chimerica: A Novel and the short story collection Love Songs for a Lost Continent, which won the 2016 Mary Roberts Rinehart Fiction contest.


Twitter Username: anitafelicelli

Olga Zilberbourg’s English-language debut, Like Water and Other Stories, will be published in 2019 from WTAW Press. She’s the author of three Russian-language collections of stories and has published fiction and criticism in Alaska Quarterly Review, Confrontation, Electric Literature, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: bowlga

Website: www.zilberbourg.com

Lillian Howan is the author of The Charm Buyers. Her writings have appeared in Asian American Literary Review, Cafe Irreal, Calyx, Jellyfish Review, New England Review, and the anthologies Ms Aligned 2 and Under Western Eyes. She is the editor of Rosebud and Other Stories by Wakako Yamauchi.


Twitter Username: LillianHowan

Aatif Rashid is the author of the novel Portrait of Sebastian Khan. He's published stories in The Massachusetts Review and Arcturus, among other places, and nonfiction in The Los Angeles Review of Books. He currently writes regularly for The Kenyon Review blog.


Twitter Username: Aatif_Rashid

Website: aatifrashid.com

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R160. CANCELLED: Cripping/Deafing the Book Tour. (, , , ) Many of us have been taught that in order to tour and promote our work we must be on the road for weeks, saying yes to every opportunity. This model is inaccessible for many disabled, chronically ill, Deaf, and neurodivergent writers (as well as other writers who parent, work, or just get tired). On this panel, four disabled and Deaf writers share the ways we've cripped and Deafed the book tour, innovatively publicizing without destroying our bodies or submitting to a lack of access.

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer disabled nonbinary femme writer of Burgher/Tamil Sri Lankan and Irish/Roma ascent. They are the author of Tonguebreaker, Care Work, Dirty River, Bodymap, Love Cake, and Consensual Genocide, and coeditor of Beyond Survival and The Revolution Starts at Home.

Aurora Levins Morales is an internationally known Puerto Rican Ashkenazi poet, essayist, and fiction writer. She's the author of seven books and her work appears in dozens of anthologies. Her writing is widely taught in many disciplines including disability studies.


Twitter Username: AuLevinsMorales

Naomi Ortiz is a writer, poet, visual artist, facilitator, and the author of Sustaining Spirit: Self-Care for Social Justice, a guide on self-care for diverse communities. She is disabled, Mestiza (Latina/Indigenous/White), raised in Latinx culture, and living in the U.S./Mexico borderlands.


Twitter Username: ThinkFreestyle

Meg Day is the 2015–2016 recipient of the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship, a 2013 recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Poetry, and the author of Last Psalm at Sea Level. Day is assistant professor of English & creative writing at Franklin & Marshall College.


Twitter Username: themegdaystory

Website: www.megday.com

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R161. AWP Program Directors' Western Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Manitoba, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, Saskatchewan, South Dakota, Washington, Wyoming, and the Pacific Rim. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Susan Rodgers, will conduct this meeting.

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R162. AWP Program Directors' Northeast Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Europe. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Kim Chinquee, will conduct this meeting.

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R163. AWP Program Directors' Southern Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Alabama, Arkansas, Caribbean Islands, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Stephanie Vanderslice, will conduct this meeting.

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R164. AWP Program Directors' Midwest Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Ontario, and Wisconsin. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Kris Bigalk, will conduct this meeting.

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R165. AWP Program Directors' Mid-Atlantic Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Kathleen Driskell, will conduct this meeting.

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R166. CANCELLED: Making Place in Hybrid Tongues. (, , , , ) This panel highlights the work of writers who explore remembered and imagined attachments with place. Featuring five women of color whose living and writing transcend national borders and literary genres, the panel asks whether the places we navigate demand their own hybrid literary forms. Writers who wear multiple tags—novelist, memoirist, poet, translator, critic—read from new work. These works embody aesthetic and political choices involved in representing locales across genres. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Nadia Misir’s writing has been published or is forthcoming in Kweli Journal, Papercuts, Poetry, and elsewhere. She is a former Asian American Writers’ Workshop Open City fellow and MFA candidate at Queens College, CUNY.


Twitter Username: marigoldtief

Minerva Laveaga Luna is a Mexican writer living in the US. She holds an MFA in creative writing from UTEP. She is a cofounding editor and publisher of Veliz Books and she is an associate professor at El Paso Community College. Her fiction and creative nonfiction is anthologized in Argentina and the U.S.

Sehba Sarwar's essays, short stories, and poems have appeared in The New York Times Sunday Magazine, Creative Times Report, Callaloo, and elsewhere. A second edition of her novel Black Wings was released in 2019. Sarwar tackles border/immigration issues through longterm writing and art projects.


Twitter Username: sehbasarwar

Sorayya Khan is the author of the novels Noor, Five Queen’s Road, and City of Spies, winner of Best Fiction Book at the Sharjah Book Fair. A recipient of a Fulbright Research Grant, her personal essays have appeared in Guernica and Longreads. She is working on a memoir.


Twitter Username: SorayyaKhan

Torsa Ghosal is the author of an experimental novel, Open Couplets. Her personal essays have appeared in Literary Hub, Catapult, and Entropy. Her fiction was shortlisted for the 2017 DNA-Out of Print Prize. She is a professor of English at California State University and is at work on a second novel.


Twitter Username: TorsaG

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R167. CANCELLED: A Foot in the Door: How to Break into the Book Industry Post-MFA. (, , , , ) This panel will bring together recent graduates of creative writing MFA programs who are now beginning careers within the book industry—at Tin House, Open Letter, Jack Jones Literary Arts, and Adroit Journal. We’ll discuss what drew us towards this industry, and outline steps you can take within MFA programs (lit mag work, internships, publishing reviews/interviews) to prepare. We’ll also discuss how to market yourself for a publishing job, and what it’s like to work in publishing with an MFA. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Elizabeth DeMeo is an assistant editor at Tin House Books. The former managing editor of the Arkansas International, she is also the former director of the Arkansas Writers in the Schools program. She holds an MFA in fiction from the University of Arkansas Program in Creative Writing & Translation.

Anthony Blake is the marketing director for Open Letter Books and holds an MFA in poetry from the University of Arkansas, where he cofounded and edited the Arkansas International.


Twitter Username: anthonyjblake

Allison Conner's writing has appeared in Bitch, Jacket2, and The Rumpus and in the anthologies Forward: 21st Century Flash Fiction and Rockhaven: A History of Interiors. She is the reviews editor at Full Stop and manages the Speakers Bureau at Jack Jones Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: al_noellec

Jenny Tinghui Zhang is a Chinese American writer from Austin. A VONA/Voices alumna and graduate of the University of Wyoming's MFA program, she serves as a prose editor for The Adroit Journal.


Twitter Username: pantaloonies

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R168. CANCELLED: The Futures of Documentary and Investigative Poetries. (, , , , ) Investigative or documentary poetry situates itself at the nexus between literary production and journalism, where the mythic and factual, the visionary and political, and past and future all meet. From doing recovery projects to performing rituals of healing to inventing forms, panelists will share work (their own and others') and discuss challenges in docupoetic writing and its futures: the ethics of positionality, appropriation, fictionalizing, collaboration, and political engagement. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Solmaz Sharif is the author of Look, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her poems have appeared in Granta, The New Republic, Poetry, and elsewhere. She is currently a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: nsabugsme

Website: solmazsharif.com

Erika Meitner is the author of five books of poems, including Holy Moly Carry Me, which won the 2018 National Jewish Book award, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award. She is an associate professor of English and creative writing program director at Virginia Tech.


Twitter Username: rikam99

Website: erikameitner.com

Dr. Craig Santos Perez is a native Chamoru from the Pacific Island of Guam. He is the author of four poetry books and the coeditor of four anthologies. He is an associate professor and director of the creative writing program in the English department at the University of Hawai’i, Mānoa.


Twitter Username: craigsperez

Website: www.craigsantosperez.wordpress.com

Tyehimba Jess' Olio won the Pulitzer Prize, Anisfield-Wolf, Society of Midland Authors Poetry Award and recognition from the BCALA. His first book, Leadbelly, won the National Poetry Series. A NEA, Whiting, Guggenheim and Lannan Foundation Award winner, he teaches at College of Staten Island.


Twitter Username: TyehimbaJess

Philip Metres is the author and translator of a number of books, including Shrapnel Maps, Sand Opera, Pictures at an Exhibition, and To See the Earth. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry, has garnered a Lannan Fellowship, two NEAs, two Arab American book awards, and the Hunt Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R169. "Girlness" as Stance in the Work of Five Contemporary Authors. (, , , , ) Join a panel of four poets and one fiction writer, each with a distinct stylistic approach, as they discuss how their work is taking “girlness” by storm, expanding it as a stance in bold ways. These writers, from a debut poet to seasoned authors and literary arts activists, push against the expected "girl/women/gurl/hood,” re-examining vulnerability, power, and the sources of power in breakthrough ways, using craft, subject matter, style, visual, and linguistic choices. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Alexandra van de Kamp is the Executive Director of Gemini Ink, a literary arts nonprofit. She has published widely and is the author of two full-length poetry collections, the most recent of which is Kiss/Hierarchy. She teaches poetry workshops at Gemini Ink and online at the Poetry Barn.


Twitter Username: alexvandekamp

Website: www.alexandravandekamp.blogspot.com

Patricia Spears Jones, author of A Lucent Fire: New and Selected Poems, and two plays for Mabou Mines. Anthologized in BAX: Best American Experimental Writing and Renga for Obama. She is the recipient of the 2017 Jackson Poetry Prize and has taught at Barnard, Adelphi University, and CUNY.


Twitter Username: pksjones1

Website: www.psjones.com

Megan Peak received her MFA in poetry from The Ohio State University Her first book of poetry, Girldom, won the 2018 Perugia Press Prize from Perugia Press and 2019 The John A. Robertson Award for Best First Book of Poetry from the Texas Institute of Letters.


Twitter Username: megan_peak

Veronica Golos is the author of four poetry books: Rootwork, Vocabulary of Silence (translated into Arabic), A Bell Buried Deep, and the newly published Girl. She's co-editor of Taos Journal of International Poetry & Art and former poetry editor of the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion

Marisela Barrera is a single working-class mother, Tejana writer, and teatrista with published works in Latina Critical Feminism, Out in SA, Texas Matters, the San Antonio Current, the Brooklyn Rail, HowlRound, the Rivard Report, Concho River Review, Radio Esperanza, and TheaterJones, among others.

Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R170. CANCELLED: That’s Hot: Women Poets Take Back the Sonnet . (, , , ) For centuries, the sonnet has been championed as a masculine poetic form. From Petrarch’s Laura to Shakespeare’s Dark Lady, women have been situated as objects of desire not artistes of innovation. Female poets largely wrote under the shadow of tradition. Recently, the sonnet has become a hotbox of modernization, and women are at the center. In this panel, five award-winning female poets explore the sonnet and its radical prospects.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sara Henning is the author of View from True North, winner of the 2017 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Competition Award. Winner of the Crazyhorse Lynda Hull Memorial Poetry Prize and the Poetry Society of America's George Bogin Memorial Award, she teaches at Stephen F. Austin State University.


Twitter Username: SaraDHenning

Website: https://www.sarahenningpoet.com/

Kim Addonizio's latest books are a collection of poems, Mortal Trash, and a memoir, Bukowski in a Sundress. She is the author of six other poetry collections, two novels, and two books on writing poetry: The Poet's Companion (with Dorianne Laux) and Ordinary Genius.


Twitter Username: kim_addonizio

Website: www.kimaddonizio.com

Moira Egan’s seventh poetry collection, Synæsthesium, won the New Criterion Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in anthologies and journals on four continents. With Damiano Abeni, she has published volumes in Italian by Ashbery, Bender, Ferlinghetti, Lerner, Simic, Strand, Charles Wright, and Ocean Vuong.

Patricia Smith's books include Incendiary Art (2018 Kingsley Tufts, 2018 Pulitzer finalist, LA Times Book Prize), Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah (2013 Lenore Marshall), and Blood Dazzler (2008 National Book Award finalist). She is a Guggenheim fellow, twice a Pushcart winner, and a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada's MFA program.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R171. CANCELLED: Poetry of the Extreme and the Elemental. (, , , , ) William Carlos Williams described the writing of Marianne Moore as encompassing the vastness of the particular: "So that in looking at some apparently small object, one feels the swirl of great events." In this panel, five poets will examine intersections of the Extreme with the five classical elements (water, fire, air, earth, ether). With an aim toward environment and the cosmic/microcosmic, they will show and discuss the ways these two forces intertwine in their work. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Beth Bachmann is the author of three collections of poetry: Temper, winner of the AWP Donald Hall Prize and Kate Tufts Discovery Award, Do Not Rise, winner of the PSA Alice Fay di Castagnola Award, and CEASE, winner of the VQR Emily Clark Balch Prize. She teaches at Vanderbilt University.


Twitter Username: bethbachmann

Website: www.bethbachmann.com

Nick Flynn is a poet, playwright, and memoirist. His most recent book is Stay, a collection of collaborations and writings. I Will Destroy You, a collection of poems, is forthcoming. His work has been translated into fifteen languages.


Twitter Username: _nick_flynn_

Website: www.nickflynn.org

Brenda Hillman is the author of ten collections of poetry, including Practical Water, Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire, and Extra Hidden Life, among the Days, and has co-translated At Your Feet by Ana Cristina Cesar. Hillman is the Filippi Professor of Poetry at St. Mary’s College of California.


Twitter Username: brendalhillman

Website: brendahillman.net

Deborah A. Miranda (Ohlone-Costanoan Esselen Nation) is author of Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir; poetry collections Indian Cartography, The Zen of La Llorona, Raised by Humans, and Altar to Broken Things (forthcoming). She is Thomas H. Broadus Professor of English at Washington and Lee University.


Twitter Username: badndns

Website: www.badndns.blogspot.com

Major Jackson is the author of five collections, most recently The Absurd Man. A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Jackson is the Richard A. Dennis Professor of English at University of Vermont. He is the editor of Best American Poetry 2019.


Twitter Username: Poet_Major

Website: majorjackson.com

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R172. The Poetics of Anzaldúa in Contemporary Poetry. (, , , , ) Gloria Anzaldúa's work in Borderlands/La Frontera considers hyphenated identities and experience by engaging ancestral histories, violence, and the impetus behind crossing/transcending these borders of identity/experience. What does it mean to risk joy in pursuit of happiness and write into the red ink? Our panelists include writers who engage with Anzaldúa’s poetics and how it informs their own respective crafts.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sebastian Hasani Paramo is a doctoral candidate at the University of North Texas. He edits The Boiler and the Rossetti Broadside Prize for American Literary Review. His poems have appeared in Southwest Review, North American Review, Salt Hill, Huizache, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: sebastianparamo

Natalie Scenters-Zapico is the author of Lima :: Limón and The Verging Cities. A professor at University of Puget Sound, she's won awards and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, PEN America, CantoMundo, and a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sergeant Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation.


Twitter Username: Nascenters

Website: nataliescenterszapico.net

Ángel García is the author of Teeth Never Sleep, winner of the 2018 CantoMundo Poetry Prize. A CantoMundo fellow and a recipient of the Lukas Riveros Amani Fellowship from Vermont Studio Center, his poems have been included in American Poetry Review, McSweeney's, Crab Orchard Review, and Huizache.


Twitter Username: buffalopoet11

Casandra Lopez, a Chicana/Cahuilla/Tongva/Luiseño writer is the author of the poetry collection Brother Bullet and cofounder and editor in chief of As/Us. A CantoMundo and Jack Straw fellow, and Santa Fe Art Institute, SAR, and Hedgebrook resident, she teaches at Northwest Indian College.


Twitter Username: casandramlopez

Joseph Rios is a poet and the author of Shadowboxing: Poems and Impersonations, winner of the Before Columbus American Book Award and named a notable debut by Poets and Writers. He has been published in the Rumpus, San Francisco Chronicle, The Normal School, Southern Humanities Review, and elsewhere.

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R173. Unmasking the Masked Self: The Complex Role of Persona in Memoir. (, , , , ) The use of a constructed persona in the essay hails from Montaigne, but persona in memoir is more complicated. If memoirists are telling the honest truth of ourselves, is it ever truthful to hide behind a mask? How can a memoirist be honest and artful at the same time? This panel of award-winning memoirists will explore the intricate braid of voice, style, point-of-view, emotional authenticity, and narrative design to see if we really can tell the truths about ourselves, and if so, how.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Daisy Hernández is the author of A Cup of Water Under My Bed: A Memoir and coeditor of Colonize This! Her work has been published in National Geographic, Dogwood, The Rumpus, and many literary journals. She’s an assistant professor at Miami University in Ohio.


Twitter Username: daisyhernandez

Website: daisyhernandez.com

Sue William Silverman’s books include How to Survive Death and Other Inconveniences; The Pat Boone Fan Club: My Life as a White Anglo-Saxon Jew; Love Sick: One Woman’s Journey through Sexual Addiction; and Fearless Confessions: A Writer’s Guide to Memoir. She teaches at Vermont College of Fine Arts.


Twitter Username: SueSilverman

Website: www.SueWilliamSilverman.com

Dinty W. Moore is author of Crafting the Personal Essay: A Guide for Writing and Publishing Creative Nonfiction, the memoir Between Panic & Desire, and numerous other books of nonfiction.


Twitter Username: brevitymag

Website: www.dintywmoore.com

Ira Sukrungruang is the author of the nonfiction books Buddha’s Dog & Other Meditations, Southside Buddhist, and Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy. He is the Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College and the editor of Sweet: A Literary Confection.


Twitter Username: sukrungruang

Website: www,sukrungruang.com

Jill Christman is the author of two memoirs, Darkroom: A Family Exposure (AWP Award Series in CNF winner) and Borrowed Babies: Apprenticing for Motherhood. A senior editor of River Teeth, she teaches creative nonfiction writing at Ball State University.


Twitter Username: jill_christman

Website: www.jillchristman.com

Room 304, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R174. CANCELLED: Beyond Research: Creative Writing Practices in the Composition Classroom. (, , , , ) As composition continues to push for a STEM-oriented curriculum rooting the writing practice in research and hard sciences, we are under-preparing our college students for the many rhetorical and genre challenges to come. This interactive panel will provide narrative and poetic activities that center a more inclusive rhetoric and expand the compositional toolbox. We will model the critical reflection on positionality and power that is integral to transferable genre awareness.

Dan Lau, a Kundiman fellow, has received grants and scholarships from APICC, GAPA, Queer Cultural Center, San Francisco Arts Commission, and FAWC. His poetry has appeared in Red Light Lit, Crate, Gesture, Rhino, The Collagist, the anthology, Flicker and Spark, and Colorado Review.

Frankie Rollins is a fiction writer. She’s authored a collection of stories, The Sin Eater & Other Stories, and published in Feminist Wire, Fairy Tale Review, Conjunctions, and New England Review. She is part of the writing faculty at Pima Community College, teaching creative writing.


Twitter Username: frankie_rollins

Website: www.frankierollins.com

Addie Tsai has an MFA from Warren Wilson College and a PhD in dance from Texas Woman's University. Addie teaches creative writing, dance, literature, and humanities at Houston Community College. Her queer, Asian, young adult novel, Dear Twin, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: addiebrook

Sam Campbell teaches literature, creative writing, and rhetoric and composition courses at Western Nevada College and Lake Tahoe Community College. He co-edits Wend Poetry and holds an MFA from Boise State University. His work can be found in Sierra Nevada Review, Poetry City USA, and elsewhere.

TC Tolbert’s works of poetry include Gephyromania, I: Not He: Not I, and territories of folding. S/he is coeditor of Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics. Tucson's Poet Laureate, s/he has been a member of Movement Salon, a compositional improvisation ensemble, since 2007.

Room 305, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R175. Love Poems in Place: Ecotone Poets in Fourteen Lines. (, , , , ) Ecotone's Fall 2019 Love Issue features poems in 14-line forms, including sonnets, rondels prime, and brefs double. In this reading and conversation, contributors will share poems and will speak to the enduring nature of these forms and the transformations they and others have worked upon them. What does it mean to write a love poem in place, or to place? How do such forms allow us to reimagine place—our home landscapes, regions in ecological crisis? What might poets do with these forms next? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Anna Maria Hong is the author of Age of Glass, winner of the Poetry Society of America’s 2019 Norma Farber First Book Award, the novella H & G, and the forthcoming Fablesque, winner of Tupelo Press’s Berkshire Prize.

Maryann Corbett's poems, translations, and essays appear widely, in journals such as Southwest Review, Barrow Street, River Styx, 32 Poems, and Measure. She has served as an administrator at the formal poetry forum Eratosphere and is a contributor to the Mezzo Cammin Women Poets Timeline project.


Twitter Username: MaryannCorbett

Website: maryanncorbett.com

V. Penelope Pelizzon’s second poetry collection is Whose Flesh Is Flame, Whose Bone Is Time. Her first book, Nostos, won the Hollis Summers Prize and the Poetry Society of America’s Norma Farber First Book Award. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, The Kenyon Review, The Nation, and elsewhere.

Chad Abushanab is the author of The Last Visit, winner of the Donald Justice Poetry Prize. His poems appear in the New York Times Magazine, The Believer, Best New Poets, Southern Poetry Review, Ecotone, and others. He holds a PhD in English and creative writing from Texas Tech University.


Twitter Username: chadabushanab

The Michener Center for Writers Stage, Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center

R175A. Wordpeace and Naugatuck River Review Reading. (, , , ) Wordpeace.co will be publishing its fall/winter 2019/20 issue, which contains poetry, prose, and artwork in conversation with current issues. Wordpeace is an online journal dedicated to the promotion of peace and social justice. Naugatuck River Review's 11th annual narrative poetry contest is being judged by Lauren K. Alleyne. Lauren K. Alleyne will be reading, as well as editors Monica Barron, Lisa Taylor, Ciona Rouse, and contest winners and writers from both journals.

Lori Desrosiers' recent poetry books include typing with e.e. cummings and Sometimes I Hear the Clock Speak. She teaches poetry in the Lesley University MFA program. A new book, Keeping Planes in the Air, is forthcoming. She is editor of two journals, Naugatuck River Review and Wordpeace.co.


Twitter Username: lorides

Website: http://loridesrosierspoetry.com

Lauren K. Alleyne is an award-winning poet. She is the author of Difficult Fruit and Honeyfish and has published her work widely. She is assistant director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center and associate professor of English at James Madison University.


Twitter Username: poetlka

Lisa C. Taylor, MFA, is the author of two collections of fiction, Impossibly Small Spaces and Growing a New Tail, and four poetry collections, most recently Necessary Silence. She received a Hugo House New Fiction Prize and the Elizabeth Shanley Gerson Lecture at UConn with Geraldine Mills.


Twitter Username: dreamingchange

Website: www.lisactaylor.com

Ciona Rouse is the cohost (along with Kendra DeColo) of Re/Verb, a podcast where literature, music, and pop culture collide. Rouse is a poet and the author of the chapbook Vantablack.


Twitter Username: cionar

The University of Texas at Austin Stage, Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center

R175B. Book Launch Reading for Madville's New Anthology, Runaway. (Luanne Smith, Michael Gills, Lee Zacharias) Introducing Madville's 2020 prose anthology, Runaway. Editors Luanne Smith, Lee Zacharias, and Michael Gills talk about their favorite stories from the anthology followed by readings from some of the authors included in the collection. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

12:10 pm to 1:25 pm

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R176. Yoga for Writers. (Alysia Sawchyn) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, go straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R177. Don’t Call It a Call Out: Literary Citizenship in the Digital Age. (, , , , ) This panel explores social media as a political space critical to writers today. Panelists will discuss digital citizenship; the fight for inclusivity, vulnerability, accountability, allyship, discourse, and understanding in writing and publishing; and the effects of that fight on personal and professional lives. The panel affirms the transformative nature of social media within the literary community. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Levis Keltner is the author of the novel Into That Good Night. He has an MFA in creative writing and teaches writing at Texas State University. He is the cofounder and editor-in-chief of Newfound.


Twitter Username: levis_gravis

Su Hwang is the recipient of the inaugural Jerome Hill Fellowship in Literature and is the author of the poetry collection Bodega. She teaches creative writing with the MN Prison Writing Workshop and is the cofounder of Poetry Asylum with poet Sun Yung Shin.


Twitter Username: su_hwangster

Gala Mukomolova is a poet and essayist. She received an MFA from University of Michigan and is the author of Without Protection and One Above One Below. In 2016, Mukomolova received the 92nd Street Y Discovery/Boston Review Poetry Prize. She is an astrology writer.


Twitter Username: Galactic_Rabbit

Sun Yung Shin is the author of Unbearable Splendor; Rough, and Savage; and Skirt Full of Black. She co-directs Poetry Asylum in Minneapolis. The editor of A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota and Outsiders Within, and author of Cooper's Lesson, she is widely published in multiple genres.


Twitter Username: sunyungshin

Website: www.sunyungshin.com

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R178. CANCELLED: Queering the Essay/Queer Essayists Consider Genre. (, , , , ) The essay is a queer genre, flexible and strange among its siblings, fiction, poetry, and drama. However, the essay’s roots herald back to (mostly) white, cis-het men. In this panel five queer essayists consider genre, what the essay can really do for us, and if queering the essay has anything to do with the surging popularity of the genre for BIPOC, QT2S, and other marginalized writers. We'll talk personal, flash, and lyric essays, plus hybrids, and ultimately what it says to queer the essay. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jenny Ferguson is Métis, an activist, a feminist, an auntie, and an accomplice with a PhD. She believes writing and teaching are political acts. Border Markers is her collection of linked flash fiction narratives. She is a visiting assistant professor at Loyola Marymount University.


Twitter Username: jennyleesd

Website: www.jennyferguson.ca

Marcos Gonsalez is a queer MexiRican writer. He writes on fat, queer of color erotics and embodiment, the role of literature in society, and the experimental possibilities of the essay genre. He and his agent are currently on submission with his first essay collection/memoir.


Twitter Username: MarcosSGonsalez

Kayla Whaley holds an MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Tampa. Her work has appeared in print and online, and is primarily focused on disability, sexuality, and the body.


Twitter Username: PunkinOnWheels

Ahmad Danny Ramadan is a Syrian Canadian author, public speaker, storyteller, and an LGBTQ-refugee activist. His English debut novel, The Clothesline Swing, continues to receive raving reviews and win multiple awards. His visit is supported by the creative writing department at UBC.


Twitter Username: dannyseesit

Tania De Rozario is a writer and visual artist. She is the author of Tender Delirium, And the Walls Come Crumbling Down, and Somewhere Else Another You. She is currently pursuing her MFA in creative writing at the University of British Columbia.


Twitter Username: TaniaDeRozario

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R179. CANCELLED: Give It a Name: Mental Health and the Writing Life. (, , , , ) The writing life is one of solitude and struggle, and for some writers who deal with mental illness it can seem insurmountable. Panelists will discuss how identifying and naming their mental health concerns informs their work and opens avenues to successfully navigating the challenging paths towards publication and participating in literary culture. From cultivating a consistent writing practice through marketing and publicity, panelists will share their experiences with coping while working. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Bruce Owens Grimm is a queer nonfiction writer who examines how fatness, mental health, family, and/or the supernatural can impact life. He has attended residencies and workshops at The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Vermont Studio Center, and VCCA. He holds an MFA in creative writing.


Twitter Username: bruceowensgrimm

Sarah Fawn Montgomery is the author of Quite Mad: An American Pharma Memoir and three poetry chapbooks. She is an assistant professor at Bridgewater State University.


Twitter Username: SF_Montgomery

Katie Darby Mullins is a professor of creative writing at the University of Evansville. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has work in journals like Hawaii Pacific Review, BOAAT, Harpur Palate, and Prime Number, and she was a semifinalist in the Ropewalk Press Chapbook competition.


Twitter Username: kwdarby

Paul Pedroza is the author of the story collection, The Dead Will Rise and Save Us. His poetry and fiction have appeared in Rattle and MAKE: A Chicago Magazine. Currently, he is completing his first novel.


Twitter Username: paulsilence

Website: http://www.paulpedroza.com

Sean Karns is the author of The Premise of My Confession: A Dramatis Personae and Jar of Pennies. His poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Lit, Birmingham Poetry Review, Hobart, Rattle, Pleiades, and elsewhere.

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R180. Representation | Responsibility: Who Are We Responsible For?. (, , , , ) When writing from a marginalized position, who does the writer have a responsibility toward? Whether it be from positions of race, queerness, religion, immigration, or illness, does the writer carry the responsibility to represent their communities? Is it possible to “represent” while maintaining agency and autonomy? If the writer occupies a space of hybridity, between worlds, what then? A cross-genre panel explores the implications of carrying community while writing from the margins. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Virginia Lee Wood is a Korean American writer and former assistant fiction editor at the American Literary Review. A PhD candidate and dissertation fellow in literature and creative writing at the University of North Texas, her work appears in The Minnesota Review, online at Cutbank, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: TheWoodJung

Miroslav Penkov is the author of the collection East of the West and the novel Stork Mountain. Translated into two dozen languages, his fiction has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Best American Nonrequired Reading, and The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories. He is an associate professor at UNT.

Priscilla Solis Ybarra is associate professor in the Department of English at the University of North Texas. She is author of Writing the Goodlife: Mexican American Literature and the Environment and coeditor of Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial.

Kimberly Garza's stories and essays can be found in Creative Nonfiction, Copper Nickel, TriQuarterly, CutBank, and elsewhere. She is an assistant professor at the University of Texas-San Antonio and a graduate of the Creative Writing Program at the University of North Texas.


Twitter Username: kimrgarza

Spencer Hyde is the author of Waiting for Fitz, and his short fiction and nonfiction have recently appeared in Glimmer Train, Bellevue Literary Review, and Five Points. He is a founding editor of elsewhere, and an assistant professor of creative writing at Brigham Young University.


Twitter Username: Spencer_Hyde

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R181. Unsilencing the Undergraduate Workshop. (, , , , ) Undergraduate workshops involve students from diverse backgrounds. Because of this, the traditional workshop model does not always work effectively. As Beth Nguyen states in “Unsilencing the Workshop”: “a system that relies on silencing and skewed power and endurance is a terrible system.” In this panel, experienced teachers will discuss their approaches to teaching undergraduate creative writing, and attendees will leave with practical models and practices to initiate in their classes. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lisa Page is coeditor of We Wear The Mask: 15 True Stories of Passing. Her work has appeared in VQR, Playboy, The Washington Post Bookworld, The Crisis, Origins, and American Short Fiction, and in several anthologies. She directs the creative writing program at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: LisaPag39212124

Sybil Baker's most recent works are Immigration Essays and While You Were Gone (novel). She teaches at UT Chattanooga (A&S Teaching Award), VCFA's low-residency International MFA, and the Yale Writer's Workshop. She is on the editorial board of UT Press. 


Twitter Username: sybilbaker

Website: www.sybilbaker.net

Ira Sukrungruang is the author of the nonfiction books Buddha’s Dog & Other Meditations, Southside Buddhist, and Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy. He is the Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College and the editor of Sweet: A Literary Confection.


Twitter Username: sukrungruang

Website: www,sukrungruang.com

Robin Hemley is the founder of the NonfictioNow Conference and the author of fourteen books of fiction and nonfiction, including the forthcoming Borderline Citizen: Dispatches from the Outskirts of Nationhood. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Guggenheim Fellowship and three Pushcarts.


Twitter Username: Robinhemley

Leah Huizar is the author of Inland Empire, a forthcoming book of poems. Her writing and research interests draw on the cultural history of the west, Latinidad, and book culture. She is an assistant professor of poetry at Drake University.


Twitter Username: LHuizar

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R182. CANCELLED: The End of the World as We Know It: The Nonfiction of Apocalypse. (, , , ) What happens when nuclear bombs, religious visions, wiped-out species, and political shifts rocking nations—the classic stuff of haunted dream-worlds—edge beyond science fiction and into reality? In this panel, four creative nonfiction writers will talk about the ways they’ve written into apocalyptic subjects, whether detailing the ends of worlds past—ones experienced or ones reconstructed—or using the tools of creative nonfiction to speculate forward, into doomsday futures. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Beth Peterson is a nonfiction writer and assistant professor of writing at Grand Valley State University. A wilderness guide before she began writing, Beth's first book of essays, about glaciers, volcanoes, disappearing people and places, was published in 2019.


Twitter Username: BethLPeterson

Website: https://www.bethlpeterson.com

Joni Tevis is the author of two books of essays, most recently The World Is On Fire: Scrap, Treasure, and Songs of Apocalypse. Her essays have appeared in Orion, Oxford American, Poets & Writers, the Pushcart Prize anthology, and elsewhere. She teaches at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina.


Twitter Username: JoniTevis

Website: www.jonitevis.com

Matt Donovan is the author of a collection of lyric essays, A Cloud of Unusual Size and Shape, as well as two collections of poetry, Rapture & the Big Bam and Vellum. Donovan is the recipient of a Rome Prize, a Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, and an NEA fellowship.

Desirae Matherly teaches writing at Tusculum College, and serves as nonfiction editor for The Tusculum Review. Desirae earned a PhD in creative nonfiction from Ohio University in 2004 and is a former Harper Fellow at the University of Chicago.

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R183. CANCELLED: Teaching in the Confederacy. (, , , , ) Creative writing professors from southern schools discuss how politics—such as schools removing Confederate markers and coming to terms with histories of slavery, or failing to—affect the classroom. Inclusive pedagogy, questioning appropriation, and redressing ignorance about race and history are always part of the job description for good writing professors, but this moment in the US presents particular challenges and opportunities. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Chris Gavaler is an associate professor of English at Washington & Lee University, where he teaches creative writing and serves as comics editor of Shenandoah. He has published two novels and four books of comics scholarship.

Lesley Wheeler’s forthcoming books include Unbecoming, a novel; The State She's In, her fifth poetry collection; and Poetry's Possible Worlds, a suite of hybrid essays. A poetry editor of Shenandoah, her work appears in Ecotone, Poetry, Gettysburg Review, and other magazines.


Twitter Username: LesleyMWheeler

Website: http://lesleywheeler.org/

Gary Dop, poet, playwright, and professor, is the founding director of the Randolph College MFA program. Dop is the author of the poetry collection Father, Child, Water.


Twitter Username: garydopwrites

Tyree Daye is the author of two poetry collections, River Hymns (winner of the APR/Honickman First Book Prize) and Cardinal (forthcoming). A Whiting Award Winner and Amy Clampitt fellow, Daye’s work has been published in Prairie Schooner, New York Times, Nashville Review, and VQR.


Twitter Username: Tyree Daye

Lauren K. Alleyne is an award-winning poet. She is the author of Difficult Fruit and Honeyfish and has published her work widely. She is assistant director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center and associate professor of English at James Madison University.


Twitter Username: poetlka

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R184. CANCELLED: Fierce Lineage, Poetic Agency: Women of Copper Canyon Press. (, , , , ) Reading from their own new and recent poetry collections while paying homage to a powerful lineage of female-identified poets, a diverse lineup of Copper Canyon Press authors will share poems of survival and love, desire and illness, of bodies that move with agency and voices that speak with complexity. Each reader will present, in addition to her own work, one poem by an influential woman author from Copper Canyon's 45+ year catalog.

Leila Chatti is the author of Deluge, Tunsiya/Amrikiya, and Ebb. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and Cleveland State University, where she is the inaugural Anisfield-Wolf Fellow.


Twitter Username: laypay

Ellen Bass celebrates her latest book, Indigo, at this year's AWP. Her poems have often appeared in the New Yorker and American Poetry Review. She is also coauthor of The Courage to Heal. A Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, she teaches in the MFA program at Pacific University.

Traci Brimhall is the author of four collections of poetry: Come the Slumberless to the Land of Nod, Saudade, Our Lady of the Ruins, and Rookery. A recipient of an NEA Fellowship, she is an associate professor at Kansas State University.


Twitter Username: Traci724

Victoria Chang's books are Obit, Barbie Chang, The Boss, Salvinia Molesta, Circle, and Is Mommy? (picture book). She is the program chair of Antioch's low-res MFA program in LA.


Twitter Username: VChangPoet

Website: www.victoriachangpoet.com

Monica Sok is the author of A Nail the Evening Hangs On. She was awarded a 92Y Discovery Prize and fellowships from Kundiman, NEA, and Jerome Foundation. She is a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University and teaches at the Center for Empowering Refugees and Immigrants and Banteay Srei in Oakland.


Twitter Username: monicasokwrites

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R185. Burning the House Down: Mixed Race and Writing. (, , , , ) “What are you mixed with?” When Mixed Race writers turn their gaze on race and writing in America, they might burn the house down. Using writing as activism to confront implicit biases and inherited classification, the need to make sense of well-meaning colleagues, friends and strangers' critique on literary motifs, characterization, and authors' physical appearances have forced some writers to move from navel-gazing to a serious interrogation of colorism, racial formation, and the role of writing. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Shonda Buchanan is the author of Black Indian, a tale of a mixed race Midwest family caught in bi-ethnic and tri-ethnic identity crises, and an award-winning poet and educator. Buchanan is editor of Harriet Tubman Press. She teaches creative writing and composition at Loyola Marymount University and Otis College.


Twitter Username: shondabuchanan

Website: shondabuchanan.com

Chris L. Terry is the author of the novels Black Card and Zero Fade, which received a starred review from Kirkus, which called it, "Original, hilarious, thought provoking, and wicked smart. Not to be missed."


Twitter Username: chrislterry

Website: chrislterry.com

F. Douglas Brown is the author of two poetry collections: ICON and Zero to Three, winner of the 2013 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. He also co-authored Begotten with poet Geffrey Davis. Brown is both a Cave Canem and Kundiman fellow, and he teaches literature at Loyola High School of Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: fdouglasbrown

Website: www.fdouglasbrown.com

Janet Stickmon is a professor of humanities and the author of Crushing Soft Rubies, Midnight Peaches, Two O'Clock Patience, and To Black Parents Visiting Earth. Stickmon’s essay "Blackapina" has been featured in Red and Yellow, Black and Brown: Decentering Whiteness in Mixed Race Studies.


Twitter Username: Blackapina1

Luis J. Rodriguez was named Poet Laureate of Los Angeles in 2014. He is the author of fifteen books across a number of genres. He has been the recipient of a PEN West/Josephine Miles Award and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He serves as founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and cofounder and president of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural and Bookstore in California.


Twitter Username: luisjrodriguez

Website: www.luisjrodriguez.com

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R186. CANCELLED: Taking Up Space: Fat Poets Enlarge the Canon. (, , , , ) This panel of fat poets will outline the aesthetics, concerns, and issues our poetry explores. All bodies carry multiple narratives. Negating one aspect of who we are leads to devaluing us as a whole. Fat identity is being created, in part, by writers who come out of the closet as fat and tell the full stories of their lives. Though widespread fatphobia creates obstacles for writers of size, we will explore how fat writers are overcoming those obstacles and enlarging the canon.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jessica Rae Bergamino is the author of the full-length collection Unmanned, winner of Noemi Press' 2017 Poetry Prize, as well as several chapbooks. She is a doctoral candidate in literature and creative writing at the University of Utah, where she is a Steffenson Cannon scholar.


Twitter Username: jrbergamino

Diamond Forde is a Tin House and Callaloo fellow whose work has appeared in Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, the Offing, and more. She is a recipient of the Margaret Walker prize and a finalist for the GA Poetry Prize, and her debut book, Mother Body, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: PoemsandCake

Claudia Cortese's first book, Wasp Queen, won the Devil's Kitchen Award in Emerging Poetry from Southern Illinois University. Cortese was awarded an OUTstanding faculty ally of the year certificate from Montclair State's LGBTQ+ Center. She is an associate editor at Tupelo Quarterly.


Twitter Username: theclaudster

Jennifer Jackson Berry is the author of The Feeder and the chapbook Bloodfish. Her second full-length collection, a memoir-in-verse, will be published in 2020. 


Twitter Username: jaxnberry

Website: www.jenniferjacksonberry.com

Eduardo C. Corral is the author of the forthcoming Guillotine. He teaches in the MFA program at North Carolina State University.

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R187. Centering Immigrant and Refugee Narratives: A Craft Perspective. (, , , , ) Viet Thanh Nguyen writes, “True justice is creating a world” where displaced persons can “tell their stories and be heard, rather than be dependent on a writer or a representative.” This panel examines representational strategies for writing refugee and immigrant stories as justly as possible. The panelists focus on practical ways to develop a co-writing relationship, interview around trauma, structure narratives, challenge stereotypes, and create essential spaces in a crowded publishing field. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jessica Goudeau is the author of After the Last Border (forthcoming); she's written for Catapult, the Atlantic, Washington Post, Teen Vogue, LA Times, and others. She has a PhD from the University of Texas, co-founded a nonprofit with Burmese refugee artisans, and was a Mellon Writing Fellow.


Twitter Username: jessica_goudeau

Dina Nayeri is the author of The Ungrateful Refugee. She has been published in 20+ countries, and been included in O Henry Prize and Best American Short Stories anthologies. Winner of NEA Literature grant, UNESCO Paul Engle Prize, and Columbia II&I Fellow, she has written for New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Guardian, Granta, and others. She has an MFA from Iowa and an MBA from Harvard.


Twitter Username: dinanayeri

Jenna Krajeski is a journalist and writer most recently covering culture and protest movements in the Middle East, and human trafficking in the U.S. She is the coauthor with Nobel Laureate Nadia Murad of Ms. Murad's memoir of ISIS captivity, The Last Girl, and a reporter at The Fuller Project.


Twitter Username: jenna_krajeski

Megha Majumdar is associate editor at Catapult, where she works on both books and the online magazine. She grew up in India, and studied anthropology at Johns Hopkins and at Harvard. @MeghaMaj.


Twitter Username: MeghaMaj

Krystal Sital is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Secrets We Kept. A PEN Award finalist, her essays are forthcoming in the anthologies A Map Is Only One Story and Fury: Women’s Lived Experiences of the Trump Era. Her work can also be found in Elle, The New York Times, and Catapult.


Twitter Username: krystalAsital

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R188. CANCELLED: The Hustle Life: How to Sustain a Work-Life Balance. (, , , , ) How do we craft a work-life balance when there are no jobs? How do we ensure we don’t face burnout when all we have is the hustle life? Five writers will share how they’ve navigated the struggles of writing, publishing, and paying the bills, as well as tips and tricks they’ve created for themselves to stop burnout. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Autumn Hayes is a freelance writer and poet. She has taught reading, writing, public speaking, math, drama, and vocational welding in Los Angeles, Houston, and the Mississippi Delta. She holds an MFA in poetry from Texas State University, where she is an assistant director at the Writing Center.


Twitter Username: autumnatic_daze

Emanuelee Outspoken Bean is a 2017 Houston Mayor's Office of Cultural Affairs resident artist and 2016 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and The Idea Fund recipient. Bean is a performance poet, writer, mentor, entertainer, and educator. 

Sonya Bilocerkowycz is the author of the essay collection On Our Way Home from the Revolution, winner of the 2018 Gournay Prize. She has served as a Fulbright grantee in Belarus, an educational recruiter in the Republic of Georgia, and an instructor at Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv.

Javan Howard is a poet and writer who truly believes that the lived experience is the ultimate teaching tool and uses poetry as a social forum to foster discourse about love, culture, and identity. He has facilitated workshops across NYC.


Twitter Username: Righteoustpoet

Matty Layne Glasgow is the author of deciduous qween, winner of the 2017 Benjamin Saltman Award. He is a PhD candidate in creative writing at the University of Utah, where he is a Vice Presidential Fellow & Coordinator for Writers in the Schools. He has taught with WITS Houston since 2013.


Twitter Username: Matty_Layne

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R189. CANCELLED: Bad Daughters: A Celebration of Unpleasant and Unlikeable Girls. (, , , Ann Dávila Cardinal, Liara Tamani) Oftentimes, writers of books for young people are asked to create female characters who are “strong” and “fearless,” but who also are “relatable” and “likeable.” Is there a place in children’s fiction for girls who are truly unpleasant and make bad choices? Five writers of young adult fiction discuss the ways in which they craft female characters that defy, displease, and disappoint, as well as how they respond (or don’t) to the expectations of their readers. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Nova Ren Suma is The New York Times bestselling author of The Walls Around Us, and more. She has an MFA from Columbia University and is a MacDowell and Yaddo fellow. She is coeditor of Foreshadow: A Serial YA Anthology and teaches at Vermont College of Fine Arts and the University of Pennsylvania.


Twitter Username: novaren

Website: http://novaren.com/

Samantha Mabry is the author of the novels All the Wind in the World, which was longlisted for the National Book Award in 2017, and Tigers, Not Daughters, forthcoming in spring 2020. She teaches English and Latinx literature at El Centro Community College in Dallas, Texas.


Twitter Username: samanthamabry

Website: samanthamabry.com

Jennifer Mathieu is a writer and high school English teacher. She is the author of five young adult novels including The Liars of Mariposa Island, The Truth about Alice, and Moxie, soon to be a film for Netflix directed by Amy Poehler.


Twitter Username: jenmathieu

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R190. CANCELLED: Women Writing War: A Poetics Discussion and Poetry Reading. (, , , , ) "War," Muriel Rukeyser writes, "has been in my writing since I began." This panel showcases five female poets whose work transforms the category of "war poetry." How have their encounters with war and its effects shaped their formal, linguistic, and aesthetic choices? How have they addressed the ethics of representing depictions of violence? Panelists include daughters of Vietnam War refugees and veterans, a mother of a son deployed in Afghanistan, and a feminist scholar of the poetics of war.

Cathy Linh Che is the author of the poetry collection Split, winner of the Kundiman Poetry Prize, the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the Best Poetry Book Award from the Association of Asian American Studies.

Pamela Hart is author of Mothers Over Nangarhar. She is writer-in-residence at the Katonah Museum of Art. She received a poetry fellowship from the NEA. She is a poetry editor for the Afghan Women's Writing Project and As You Were: The Military Review.


Twitter Username: PamelaHart5

Website: https://www.pamelahartpoet.com

Celeste Guzman Mendoza is codirector and cofounder of CantoMundo. Her poetry and essays have been published in various anthologies and journals. Her first collection of poetry is Beneath the Halo.

Deborah Paredez is the author of the poetry volumes, This Side of Skin and Year of the Dog, and the critical study, Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory. She is an associate professor at Columbia University and cofounder of CantoMundo, a national organization for Latinx poets.

Stefania Heim is author of the poetry books Hour Book and A Table That Goes on for Miles and translator of Geometry of Shadows, the Italian poems of Giorgio de Chirico. A scholar of American poetry, she teaches at Western Washington U.

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R191. CANCELLED: The Widening Lens: Going Global in the Creative Writing Classroom. (, , , , ) Global interactions, including study abroad and virtual exchanges and resources, can widen and enrich a creative writer's voice and perspective. Writers across genres will speak to the benefits of developing these opportunities for creative writing students and programs, and review program design, theories, practices, and basic execution, with some focus on marginalized groups. Panelists will discuss their experiences and share some resulting work, with ample time for Q&A.

Annie Nguyen, MFA in creative nonfiction at the University of Montana, is a writing studies lecturer at the University of Washington Tacoma. She teaches first year writing and creative writing. She received a Fulbright in creative writing to Vietnam and focuses her teaching on issues of social justice.

Michael Kula is associate professor of writing studies and chair of the Division of Culture, Arts, and Communications at the University of Washington, Tacoma. He has designed and led study abroad programs and international online collaborations with partner universities in Europe and Africa.

Kathie Bergquist is the editor of Windy City Queer: LGBTQ Dispatches from the Third Coast, and a 2008 Lambda Emerging Writers fellow. Adjunct faculty in the English and Creative Writing Department at Columbia College Chicago, she leads study-abroad programs in Paris and Prague.


Twitter Username: LaKathie

John Poch is professor of English in the creative writing program at Texas Tech University. His most recent collection is Texases. His poems have appeared in Paris Review, Poetry, Yale Review, The Nation, The New Republic, Image, AGNI, and other journals.


Twitter Username: jpoch

Website: https://vimeo.com/114291370

Karen Phillips is the executive director of Words Without Borders.


Twitter Username: Karen_Words

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R192. El Niño as the “Man of the House": Latinx Poets Who Immigrated as Boys. (, , , ) Immigrating as boys from El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, and Nicaragua to the US through varying sets of circumstances, each of these poets learned the meaning of “being the man of the house,” a common saying in Latin America as they transitioned into a new land. Their poetry captures the challenges of internalizing the expectation of acting like an adult, at times being forced to play the role of a patriarch and at other times expected to conform to being a young, disempowered child. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jose B. Gonzalez is the author of Toys Made of Rock and When Love Was Reels; he is the co-editor of Latino Boom: An Anthology of U.S. Latino Literature. His poetry has been anthologized in the Norton Introduction to Literature, The Wandering Song, and Theatre Under my Skin.


Twitter Username: josebgonzalez

Website: josebgonzalez.com

León Salvatierra is the author of Al Norte. In 2014, he received a PhD in Hispanic languages and literatures from University of California, Berkeley. His poetry has been published in Poetry, The Notre Dame Review, and The Wondering Song. León is a second-year poet in the creative writing MFA program at UC Davis.

Javier O. Huerta is the author of the groundbreaking Some Clarifications y otros poemas and the cult classic American Copia. He earned his MFA from the Bilingual Creative Writing Program at the University of Texas at El Paso.

Roy G. Guzmán is pursuing a PhD in cultural studies and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota, where they also received an MFA in creative writing. They are a 2019 NEA fellow and a 2017 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellow.


Twitter Username: catrachxs

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R193. CANCELLED: MFA or PhD vs WOC. (, , , , Soniah Kamal) Five writers of different genres, race, and ethnicity expand the debate sparked by Junot Díaz’s “MFA vs POC” and continued by other writers of color including Viet Nguyen, Mathew Salesses, and David Mura. Since American creative writing programs are 74% white, what are the pros and cons in pursuing an MFA for aspiring writers of color? Can a PhD in writing and/or the arts help or hinder their path? What pedagogical alternatives exist for minority writers serious about their artistic development?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Namrata Poddar writes fiction, nonfiction, and curates a series on race, power and storytelling as interviews editor for Kweli. Her debut collection of stories titled Ladies Special, Homebound was a finalist for Feminist Press's 2018 Louise Meriwether First Book Prize.


Twitter Username: poddar_namrata

Website: www.namratapoddar.com

Raina J. León is cofounder and editor in chief of The Acentos Review, and the author of three poetry books: Canticle of Idols, Boogeyman Dawn, and sombra: (dis)locate. She is a member of the Cave Canem, CantoMundo, Macondo, and Carolina African American Writers Collective communities.


Twitter Username: profesoraleon

Website: http://www.rainaleon.com

Shubha Venugopal holds an MFA in fiction and a PhD in English. She currently teaches at California State University Northridge and her work has appeared in a number of journals and anthologies. She won Southern Indiana Review's fiction award, and was a finalist in Nimrod International fiction competition.

Vanessa Garcia is a multi-media/cross-genre writer working in fiction, nonfiction, and theater. She is a Huffington Post blogger and has written and reported for numerous publications, including the LA Times and the New York Times. She is also the founding artistic director of the Krane (www.thekrane.com).

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R194. Across the Borderline: Healing Narratives for a Wounded Geography. (, , , ) The US-Mexico borderlands are often referred to as a cohesive territory, but the reality is a region of subregional differences, including in literature. Five writers explore the nuances of a vast geography: each of us has written of people and places in one or more of the border states (on both sides of the line). This reading and dialogue addresses the challenge of representing an overdetermined geography, particularly at such a convulsive moment. We seek new pathways across the border.

Raquel Gutiérrez is an Arizona-based poet and essayist who publishes chapbooks with Econo Textual Objects. Her work explores tensions and creates intimate portraits of being a brown, queer child of immigrants. She holds a master's degree in performance studies from New York University.


Twitter Username: raquefella

Website: www.raquelgutierrez.net

Tim Z. Hernandez is an award-winning poet, novelist, research scholar, and performer. He holds an MFA from Bennington College and a BA from Naropa University and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Texas El Paso's Bilingual MFA program in Creative Writing.


Twitter Username: tzhernandez

Website: www.timzhernandez.com

Roberto Tejada is a visual arts writer, translator, and poet whose books include Full Foreground, Exposition Park, and Mirrors for Gold; as well as the art histories National Camera: Photography and Mexico’s Image Environment and A Ver: Celia Alvarez Muñoz.


Twitter Username: fullforeground

Rubén Martínez is an author, journalist, and performer. He books include Crossing Over and Desert America. He holds the Fletcher Jones Chair in Literature and Writing at Loyola Marymount University and is an artist in residence at Stanford University's Institute for Diversity in the Arts.


Twitter Username: ruben6211

Website: www.rubenmartinez.la

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R195. The Dynamic Line: Poets on the Craft of Lineation. (, , , , ) Lineation is one of the most powerful tools in a poet’s toolbox, and also one of the most complex. How can we use the line to influence a poem’s energy, tension, and voice? How can we help our poems out of a lineation rut? And how can a thoughtful engagement with lineation enliven and enrich the composition process? Join five poets with varied approaches to lineation as they discuss these and other questions, and offer concrete strategies for making potent use of the line. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Catherine Pierce's most recent book is The Tornado Is the World; her new book, Danger Days, is forthcoming. Her work has appeared in The Best American Poetry, American Poetry Review, New York Times, and elsewhere. A 2019 NEA Fellow and Pushcart Prize winner, she teaches at Mississippi State.


Twitter Username: katieppierce

Website: www.catherinepierce.net

Kathy Fagan is the author of five books of poems, most recently Sycamore, a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts. Recipient of grants from the NEA, OAC, and Ingram Merrill, Fagan directs the MFA program at Ohio State and serves as series coeditor for the OSU Press/The Journal Wheeler Poetry Prizes.


Twitter Username: KathyFaganPoet

Website: http://www.kathyfagan.net

Raena Shirali is the author of Gilt, winner of the 2018 Milt Kessler Poetry Book Award. Recipient of a Pushcart Prize, Gulf Coast Poetry Prize, and “Discovery”/Boston Review Poetry Prize, her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Academy of American Poets, and The Nation.


Twitter Username: raenashirali

Beth Ann Fennelly, poet laureate of Mississippi, teaches at the University of MS. Winner of a Pushcart, an NEA, a Fulbright, and a USA Artist Grant, she's published six books: three poetry, three prose. Her newest, Heating & Cooling: 52 Micro-Memoirs, was an AJC Best Book of 2017 and a Goodreads favorite.

Jake Skeets is Black Streak Wood, born for Water's Edge. He is Diné from the Navajo Nation. A graduate of the Low-Rez IAIA MFA program, he currently works at Diné College. He is one of the winners of the 2018 "Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Prize.


Twitter Username: blackstreakwood

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R196. The Novella Workshop: Advocating an Alternative MFA Apprenticeship Model . (, , , , ) A frequent misgiving about workshop classes in fiction—whether taught at the undergraduate or graduate level, at writers’ conferences or elsewhere—is the inevitable focus on the short story or, begrudgingly, on single chapters from novels-in-progress. It's time to consider an alternative. Two professors and three graduate students share their experiences teaching, writing, and reading novellas as well as their reasons for embracing a form they find commodious, malleable, and downright subversive. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Douglas Trevor is professor of English and creative writing at the University of Michigan.

Heather Johnson, a Dine woman from the Navajo Nation, is an MFA student at the University of New Mexico's Creative Writing Program. She has written a novella, Jane Smith, and is working on a memoir and a novel, Ash. Her experience as a CPS social worker and victim advocate informs her writing.

Cherline Bazile is enrolled in an MFA in prose at the Helen Zell Writers’ Program. She graduated from Harvard University, where her novella won the Thomas T. Hoopes Prize. Cherline is a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellow. She is at work on her debut novel.

Sharon Oard Warner is professor emerita of English at the University of New Mexico (UNM) and co-chair for the D.H. Lawrence Ranch Initiatives. She has published four books, the most recent being the novel, Sophie's House of Cards. Her craft book, Writing the Novella, is forthcoming from UNM Press.

Clancy McGilligan’s novella History of an Executioner won the 2019 Novella Prize from Miami University Press. His fiction has appeared in Slice magazine, Santa Monica Review, Wigleaf, and elsewhere. He’s a PhD candidate at Florida State University and reviews/interviews editor at Split Lip magazine.


Twitter Username: clancymcg

Website: https://www.clancymcgilligan.com/

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R197. CANCELLED: Live Onstage! Writing Queer Latinx Lives in Plays. (, , , , ) How can we write vibrant, authentic characters who drive or support the narrative of a play who are queer and Latinx, and participate with full complexity and wholehearted representation? The panel explores a diversity of experiences living in an intersectional space, and how they expand the dialogue of American life in theater. Playwrights from different Latinx cultures share creative strategies about character development and the productions in which those characters live on stage.

Ramón H. Rivera-Servera is an award-winning author and professor of performance studies and art theory and practice at Northwestern University. He is author and coeditor of numerous books on Latinx and Black performance.


Twitter Username: rriveraservera

Charles Rice-González is an assistant professor at Hostos Community College/CUNY. His novel, Chulito, received recognitions from ALA and the National Book Critics Circle. His MFA is from Goddard College, he cofounded BAAD! The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance, and he's a published/produced playwright.


Twitter Username: ricegonzalez

Website: www.charlesricegonzalez.com

Virginia Grise is a recipient of the Whiting Writers' Award, Princess Grace Award in Theatre Directing, and the Yale Drama Series Award. Her published work includes Your Healing Is Killing Me, blu, and The Panza Monologues. She earned her MFA from the California Institute of the Arts.


Twitter Username: vgrise

A self-taught Chicano joto playwright, poet, and storyteller, Jesús Alonzo explores issues of identity as they relate to race, culture, class, education, immigration, gender, and sexual orientation. He is the author of Jotos del Barrio, Miss América: A Mexicanito Fairies Tale, and The After-Life.

Christina Quintana (CQ) is a writer with Cuban and Louisiana roots. Her plays include Scissoring, Citizen Scientist, Azul, and Evensong, developed/produced by EST, Southern Rep, INTAR, and The Lark, among others. She is a WP Lab member and staff writer for the ABC series, The Baker and the Beauty.


Twitter Username: cquintanatown

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R198. CANCELLED: Special Problems in Vocabulary: A Tribute to Tony Hoagland. (, , , , Kay Cosgrove) Tony Hoagland was a poet, critic, teacher, and "champion of poetry." His ten books include the poetry collections What Narcissism Means to Me and Sweet Ruin, and craft book The Art of the Voice. He taught at the University of Houston and Warren Wilson MFA program and led free workshops across the country. His poetry and criticism, which scrutinize contemporary culture with humor and empathy, appealed to a wide readership. This panel invites writers and former students to celebrate his legacy. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Adrian Blevins’s third full-length collection of poems, Appalachians Run Amok, is the recipient of the Wilder Prize from Two Sylvias Press and was published in 2018. Blevins is also the author of Live from the Homesick Jamboree, The Brass Girl Brouhaha, and other books.

Hayan Charara is the author of three poetry books, most recently Something Sinister, and a children's book. He edited Inclined to Speak, an anthology of contemporary Arab American poetry, and with Fady Joudah is series editor of the Etel Adnan Poetry Prize. He teaches at the University of Houston.

Reginald Dwayne Betts is a writer and poet. His latest collection of poems is Felon.

Kevin Prufer is the author most recently of How He Loved Them, Churches, In a Beautiful Country, and National Anthem. He is co-director of the Unsung Masters Series, and professor at the University of Houston's Creative Writing Program and the Lesley University Low-Residency MFA Program.

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R199. CANCELLED: Centering Margins: Literary Translation as Social Activism, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , , ) This panel critically examines how literary translation is/can be a form of social activism by echoing voices from the margins. By choosing to translate feminist, Dalit, disability and/or queer writings from around the world, or by translating the literatures of "banned" communities, one can create a common ground to share diverse experiences and demonstrate how people’s struggles are not isolated or insular. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Somrita Ganguly is a professor and literary translator working at Brown University as a Fulbright doctoral researcher. She was selected by the National Centre for Writing UK as an emerging translator in 2016. Her work has been showcased at the London Book Fair. She has published in India, UK, and US.


Twitter Username: blessed_damsel

Eric M. B. Becker is a writer, literary translator, and editor of Words without Borders. He is the recipient of fellowships and residencies from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fulbright Commission, and PEN America. He has translated the work of numerous authors from the Portuguese.


Twitter Username: ericmbbecker

Website: ericmbbecker.com

Larissa Kyzer is a writer and Icelandic-English translator, whose translations include Kristín Eiríksdóttir’s award-winning A Fist or a Heart. Kyzer is a member of the Ós Pressan literary collective, ALTA, and PEN America’s Translation Committee, and was Princeton's fall 2019 translator in residence.

Elina Alter is a writer and translator. Her work appears in BOMB, Guernica, Modern Poetry in Translation, the New England Review, the New York Times, the Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She is the editor of Circumference.

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R200. CANCELLED: From Darkness to Light: Unearthing Family Secrets in Memoir. (, , , , Tova Mirvis) Every family has its secrets. But not every family has a memoirist who decides to uncover those secrets! Five writers who devoted recent works to investigating long-held family secrets—secrets which defined their very identities—will walk you through the highs and lows of the process, from interviewing family members who may have conflicted feelings about your project, to the moral and ethical conundrums that inevitably arise, to the intense self-reflection necessitated by this sort of memoir. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Joanna Rakoff is the author of the bestselling memoir, My Salinger Year, the bestselling novel A Fortunate Age, which won the Goldberg Prize for Fiction, and the forthcoming memoir, The Fifth Passenger. She writes for The New York Times and Vogue, and has taught at Columbia University and Brooklyn College.


Twitter Username: jrakoff

Website: http://joannarakoff.com

Dani Shapiro is the bestselling author of the memoirs Inheritance, Hourglass, Still Writing, Devotion, and Slow Motion, and the novels Black & White and Family History. She is host of the podcast Family Secrets.


Twitter Username: danijshapiro

Website: www.danishapiro.com

Grace Talusan is the Fannie Hurst Writer-in-Residence at Brandeis University and her memoir, The Body Papers, won the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing.


Twitter Username: gracet09

Garrard Conley is the author of the NYT bestselling memoir Boy Erased, translated in a dozen languages and now a major motion picture. Conley is also creator and producer of the podcast UnErased. His work can be found in the New York Times, Time, Vice, Virginia Quarterly Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: gayrodcon

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R201. Writing For Your Ears: The Art of Creating Fictional Podcasts and Audio Dramas. (, , , Michelle Nickolaisen, Coni Kitts) Audio fiction is both white-hot (many of today's 500,000+ podcasts are fictional gems) and steeped in tradition ("The War of the Worlds" just turned 80!). Using text and audio examples, we'll share intel about working in this skyrocketing medium: how does one write stories that demand to be heard? How is scripting a serialized podcast distinct from writing a 1930s radio play...or a Netflix show? How can sound and music support or nuance text? How do these projects get pitched, bought, and produced? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jackson Musker writes and produces all things audio: fiction and non-. For nearly a decade, he produced public radio's national culture show The Dinner Party Download. His words, sounds, and stories have also graced NPR's Weekend Edition, The California Report, and LA's public affairs show Off-Ramp.


Twitter Username: jacksonmusker

Website: jacksonmusker.com

Chris Littler is a writer, composer, and director best known for cowriting and codirecting the podcast musical 36 Questions with his writing partner, Ellen Winter. He was a senior writer for the Limetown podcast and wrote an episode of the upcoming Limetown adaptation for Facebook Watch.


Twitter Username: chrislittlerrrr

Morgan Givens is a storyteller and writer who's been featured on NPRs Invisibilia, Story District's Top Shelf and the Moth Mainstage. He's also the creator of the critically acclaimed and award-winning podcast Flyest Fables and is a graduate of the Transom Storytelling Workshop. MorganGivens.com


Twitter Username: Optimus_Mo

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R202. CANCELLED: Land, Language, Survival: Women Eco-Writers. (, , , , ) Women eco-writers share language, survival, and land practices. Margaret Noodin discusses Anishinaabemowin/English poetry and the power of knowing one place well. Ann Fisher-Wirth writes about chronic illness and meditation in Mississippi. DJ Lee writes about the Selway Wilderness, ghost forests, and her mysterious grandmother. Pam Uschuk discusses Southwestern wild lands, refugee crossings, and healing from cancer. Petra Kuppers, a disabled Michigan settler, moves with insects and mushrooms. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Petra Kuppers is a disability culture activist, a community performance artist, and a professor of English, women's studies, theatre, and art and design at the University of Michigan. She also teaches on the low residency MFA in interdisciplinary arts at Goddard College.


Twitter Username: OlimpiasDance

Website: www.olimpias.org

Pam Uschuk’s six books include Blood Flower, translated into 12 languages. Her prizes include the American Book Award, Best of the Web, and Dorothy Daniels Writing Award from the National League of American PEN Women. She’s finishing Of Thunderlight and Moon: An Odyssey Through Ovarian Cancer. Refugee is due out from Red Hen.


Twitter Username: pamuschuk1

Website: www.cutthroatmag.com and www.pamelauschuk.com

Margaret Noodin is a poet and associate professor at the University of Wisconsin‹Milwaukee. She is the author of Bawaajimo, a book on native literature and Weweni, a collection of bilingual poems in Ojibwe and English. Her poems and essays have been anthologized in numerous journals and collections.


Twitter Username: OjibweNet

Website: www.ojibwe.net

DJ Lee is Regents Professor of English at Washington State University, where she has won teaching awards for her experimental courses. She has published dozens of nonfiction essays and authored seven books on topics such as environmental history, British poetry, and travel literature.


Twitter Username: debbiejeanlee

Website: http://debbiejlee.com

Ann Fisher-Wirth's sixth book is The Bones of Winter Birds. Her fifth book, Mississippi, is a poetry/photography collaboration with Maude Schuyler Clay. Coeditor of The Ecopoetry Anthology, fellow of the Black Earth Institute, Ann teaches English and directs environmental studies at the U of MS.

Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R203. Innovative Contemporary Fiction: New Paths for the Novel and Story. (, , , Marie-Helene Bertino, Rita Bullwinkel) In her influential essay “Two Paths for the Novel" a decade ago, Zadie Smith wrote that the avant-garde novel had languished while lyrical realism had become the dominant path, “most other exits blocked.” But recently, both the novel and story have undergone a renovation; new directions abound. At the same time, fiction increasingly represents diverse experiences. Five writers will discuss recent innovative fiction and forms of experimentation, along with what such innovations make possible.

Cara Blue Adams’s fiction appears in Granta, American Short Fiction, Kenyon Review, and Epoch. A 2018-19 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellow, she has been awarded the Kenyon Review Short Fiction Prize and the Missouri Review Peden Prize. She is an assistant professor at Seton Hall University.


Twitter Username: carablueadams

Website: www.carablue.com

Manuel Gonzales is the author of the collection The Miniature Wife and Other Stories and the novel The Regional Office is Under Attack! He teaches literature at Bennington College and is a full-time faculty member at the Bennington Writing Seminars.

Alexandra Kleeman is the author of You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine, Intimations, and a forthcoming novel. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, the Paris Review, n+1, Zoetrope, Tin House, and Conjunctions. She is an assistant professor at the New School's MFA program.


Twitter Username: alexkleeman

Website: http://www.alexandrakleeman.com

Room 218, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R204. Unconventional Women, Traditional Setting: Fiction by and about Military Women. (, , , , Ryan Leigh Dostie) Author Tanya Biank describes the armed forces as “a curious mix of traditional men and unconventional women.” Most women who served have chosen to tell their stories in the form of nonfiction narratives, but a few have explored war and military service through fiction. Five women veterans read from their own fiction and that of other women who served from World War I to Vietnam—fiction that challenges binary stereotypes of military women as either “she-roes” or victims of the patriarchy.

Jerri Bell, a retired naval officer and instructor/editor for the Veterans Writing Project, has published short fiction and nonfiction. She and Tracy Crow are the authors of It's My Country Too: Women's Military Stories from the American Revolution to Afghanistan.

M.L. Doyle calls on her service in the Army to pen her award-winning military-based mystery, erotica and coauthored memoirs, all of which feature women who wear combat boots. Her latest release, The Bonding Blade, is the second book in her Desert Goddess urban fantasy series.


Twitter Username: mldoyleauthor

Website: www.mldoyleauthor.com

Lauren Kay Johnson is a former Air Force officer and Afghanistan veteran. She holds an MFA from Emerson College and has published nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Her forthcoming memoir chronicles her coming of age against the backdrop of war, through her mother’s Army career and her own service.


Twitter Username: LaurenKayJ

Website: http://uncamouflaged.blogspot.com/

Tracy Crow, president/CEO of MilSpeak Foundation, is the author/editor of six books that include It's My Country Too: Women's Military Stories from the American Revolution to Afghanistan with coauthor Jerri Bell, and the award-winning memoir Eyes Right: Confessions from a Woman Marine.


Twitter Username: tracycrow1

Website: www.writingformercy.blogspot.com

HemisFair Ballroom C1, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R205. CANCELLED: A Reading & Conversation with Shira Erlichman, Hanif Abdurraqib, and Brenda Shaughnessy, Moderated by Cortney Lamar Charleston, Sponsored by Alice James Books. (, , , ) AJB presents three exciting and award-winning writers to share their most recent work. Abdurraqib’s They Don’t Dance No Mo’ is a bracing examination of black performance and race, history, and culture. In Odes to Lithium, Erlichman pens a love letter to lithium, her medication for bipolar disorder. In The Octopus Museum, Shaughnessy expresses fear over survival in a world rife with very real threats: school shootings, climate change, etc. Introduced and moderated by Cortney Lamar Charleston. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His first collection of poems, The Crown Ain't Worth Much, was released in 2016. His first collection of essays, They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, is forthcoming.

Shira Erlichman is an author, visual artist, and musician. She recently released her debut poetry book Odes to Lithium and children's book Be/Hold. She's received fellowships from Vermont Studio Center, Millay Residency, and AIR Serenbe.


Twitter Username: sheer_awe

Brenda Shaughnessy is the author of five poetry books, most recently The Octopus Museum. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry, The Nation, The New Yorker, Poetry, and elsewhere. She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2013 and is associate professor at Rutgers University-Newark.

Cortney Lamar Charleston is the author of Telepathologies. He has received a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation as well as fellowships from Cave Canem, the Conversation Literary Festival, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.


Twitter Username: bardsbesidebars

Lila Cockrell Theatre, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

R206. Donna Hemans, Aimee Liu, and Ellen Meeropol in Conversation with Kristen Young, Sponsored by Red Hen Press. (, , , ) Four powerful female authors read their work and discuss their shared themes of families torn apart by history and war. Each work quests to find lost siblings and daughters and sons, each story a heartwrenching tale of the strength of family against life's cruel obstacles. These four women discuss the importance and necessity of telling these stories, and the impact these stories have on our lives right now, in the real world. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kristen Millares Young is the author of Subduction. A prizewinning journalist, essayist, and book critic, she is Prose Writer-in-Residence of Hugo House. Her work appears in The Washington Post, The Guardian, The New York Times, Hobart, Moss, and Poetry Northwest. She is cofounder and chair of InvestigateWest.


Twitter Username: kristenmillares

Website: www.kristenmyoung.com

Donna Hemans is the author of two novels: River Woman and Tea by the Sea. Her short fiction has appeared in Caribbean Writer, Crab Orchard Review, Witness, and Stories from Blue Latitudes: Caribbean Women Writers at Home and Abroad, among others. She is an editor at Pree, a Caribbean online magazine.


Twitter Username: donna_hemans

Aimee Liu is author of the novels Flash House, Cloud Mountain, and Face, and nonfiction works include Gaining and Solitaire. Her short stories and essays have appeared in more than a dozen anthologies, magazines, and literary journals. She teaches in Goddard College's MFA program in creative writing.


Twitter Username: aimee_liu

Website: www.aimeeliu.net

Ellen Meeropol is the author of four novels: Her Sister's Tattoo (forthcoming), Kinship of Clover, On Hurricane Island, and House Arrest. Recent essay publications include The Boston Globe, The Writer, and Guernica. She is a founder and steering committee member of Straw Dog Writers Guild.


Twitter Username: EllenMeeropol

Website: www.ellenmeeropol.com

Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R207. From First Book Deal to Career as Author: How to Navigate the Publishing World. (, , , , ) There’s a large gap in between being published to developing a career as an author. After you get a book deal, what are dos and don’ts while working with an editor? What’s the role of your agent then? Do you need a website? Should you hire an independent publicist? What can you do to help your book succeed? How do you give a great reading? What’s the difference between publicity and marketing? How do you develop a career as an author? Four seasoned authors and one executive editor offer advice. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jean Kwok is the award-winning, New York Times and international bestselling author of Searching for Sylvie Lee (Today Show Book Pick), Girl in Translation, and Mambo in Chinatown. Her work has been published in twenty countries and is taught in universities, colleges, and high schools across the world.


Twitter Username: jeankwok

Website: https://jeankwok.com/index.shtml

Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel The Residue Years won a Whiting Award and the Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel prize, and the Hurston Wright Legacy award.


Twitter Username: mitchsjackson

Website: www.mitchellsjackson.com

Barbara Jones is an executive editor at Henry Holt & Company, where she acquires and edits fiction, memoir and narrative nonfiction. She was previously the editorial director at Hyperion Books, and previous to that, a longtime magazine editor, at Harper’s, Vogue, Real Simple, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: voicereader

Rebecca Makkai's fourth book, The Great Believers, was a finalist for both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award; it won the LA Times Book Prize, the Carnegie Medal, and the Stonewall Award. She is artistic director of StoryStudio Chicago.


Twitter Username: rebeccamakkai

Website: www.rebeccamakkai.com

Courtney Maum is the author of the novels Costalegre, Touch, I Am Having So Much Fun Here without You, and the forthcoming humor guide for writers Before and After the Book Deal: A Writer's Guide to Finishing, Publishing, Promoting and Surviving Your First Book. Find her online at courtneymaum.com


Twitter Username: cmaum

Website: https://www.courtneymaum.com/

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R208. CANCELLED: Webs, Contrails, Constellations: Form and Structure in Books of Lyric Nonfiction. (, , , ) How do book-length works of lyric nonfiction create worlds marked as much by magnetic cohesion as by boldness of juxtaposition and imaginative leap? This panel explores how form and structure operate not only as navigational devices, but as means of inventing layered emotional terrains and innovative narrative trajectories. Referencing their recent works as case studies, panelists discuss how their books' form and architecture developed and what kind of house it makes for (and of) living. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lisa Olstein is the author of four poetry collections, most recently, Late Empire, and a book-length lyric-essay Pain Studies. She teaches in the New Writers Project and Michener Center for Writers MFA programs at UT Austin.

Paul Lisicky is the author of six books including Later, The Narrow Door, and Unbuilt Projects. A Guggenheim Fellow, he is an associate professor in the MFA program at Rutgers University-Camden and serves on the writing committee of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.


Twitter Username: Paul_Lisicky

Website: http://paullisicky.com

Heather Christle is the author of The Crying Book (a work of nonfiction), and four poetry collections, most recently Heliopause. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Emory University.


Twitter Username: heatherchristle

Website: heatherchristle.tumblr.com

T Kira Madden is a lesbian, APIA writer. She is the author of Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls, and serves as the founding editor in chief of No Tokens.


Twitter Username: tkmadden

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R209. The Long and Short of It: Short Stories That Evolved into Novels . (, , , ) "This should be a novel" is a common form of praise given to a short story in a workshop, but what does this really mean? Many short stories work wonderfully in their smaller containers, brimming with novelistic complexity and scope. But sometimes what begins as a short story begs to be more. Five writers discuss examples of stories that transformed into novels while also illuminating their winding paths from 5,000 words to 80,000+, and how this path changed their relationship with shorter forms. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sequoia Nagamatsu is the author of the story collection, Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone. His stories have appeared in Conjunctions, ZYZZYVA, Black Warrior Review, and Fairy Tale Review, among others. He is an editor of Psychopomp magazine and an assistant professor at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: sequoian

Website: http://sequoianagamatsu.net

Sakinah Hofler is a PhD student and an Alfred C. Yates Fellow at the University of Cincinnati. Her poetry and prose has appeared in multiple literary journals and magazines. She has won the Manchester Fiction Prize and the Sherwood Anderson Fiction Prize.


Twitter Username: blackquisition

Cara Benson has been published in the New York Times, Boston Review, and Electric Literature and anthologized in Best American Poetry. Author of the prose/poem collection (made), she's received a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship and the bpNichol Award. She is an instructor for GrubStreet.


Twitter Username: cbenson67

Ruth Joffre is the author of the story collection Night Beast. She is a graduate of Cornell University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop and now teaches at Hugo House in Seattle.


Twitter Username: Ruth_Joffre

Room 304, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R210. Who Says?. (, , , , ) Some believe that poems with a sociopolitical edge are not poetic, not art but propaganda. Why? At what point does a poet's work become political—or cease to be—and who decides its aesthetic value? Are poets of color perceived to be political "because they are poets of color"? Given this, do white poets hesitate to write poems of protest, particularly where the subject of race is concerned? The answers to these questions have far-reaching implications for the future of American poetry. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Tim Seibles has published several collections of poetry, including Buffalo Head Solos, Fast Animal—a finalist for the National Book Award in 2012—and, most recently, One Turn around The Sun. He is a professor of English at Old Dominion University and the current Poet Laureate of Virginia.


Twitter Username: Timseibles77@gmail.com

Sarah Browning is cofounder and for ten years was executive director of Split this Rock. Author of Killing Summer and Whiskey in the Garden of Eden and co-editor of three special issues of Poetry magazine, she is the 2019 recipient of the Lillian E. Smith Writer-in-Service Award.

Quenton Baker is a poet and educator from Seattle. His current focus is the fact of blackness in American society. He is the recipient of the 2018 Arts Innovator Award from Artist Trust and a two-time Pushcart Prize nominee. He is the author of This Glittering Republic.


Twitter Username: QuentonBaker

Gretchen Primack is the author of three poetry collections, Visiting Days, Kind, and Doris's Red Spaces, and a chapbook, and she is the coauthor of the memoir of Jenny Brown, The Lucky Ones: My Passionate Fight for Farm Animals.

Ailish Hopper is the author of Dark~Sky Society and the chapbook Bird in the Head. Poems have appeared in APR, Ploughshares, Poetry, and Tidal Basin Review; essays on racism in the poetry world in Boston Review, and elsewhere. A MacDowell Fellow and Yaddo grantee, she teaches at Goucher College.


Twitter Username: ailishhopper

Room 305, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R211. Making the Most of It: Best Practices for Working with Volunteers, Interns, and Other Part-Timers, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , , Patricia Colleen Murphy) How can literary magazines and small presses ensure a meaningful experience for paid or unpaid part-time staff, while also protecting their editorial standards? Which kind of written agreements should be in place for which responsibilities and why? Join us for a discussion about making sure this working relationship is mutually beneficial.

Mary Gannon is the executive director of the Community of Literary Magazines and Presses, a 50-year-old nonprofit organization that works to ensure a vibrant, diverse literary landscape by supporting and advocating for small literary publishers and their authors.


Twitter Username: gannonme

Lena Valencia is the managing editor of One Story and teaches writing at the Sackett Street Writers Workshop and Catapult. She has held positions at A Public Space and BOMB. She has an MFA in fiction from The New School and is the recipient of an Elizabeth George Foundation grant.


Twitter Username: lenavee

Stephanie G'Schwind is the editor of Colorado Review and director of the Center for Literary Publishing at Colorado State University, where she directs a publishing internship. She is editor of the anthologies Man in the Moon: Essays on Fathers and Fatherhood and Beautiful Flesh: A Body of Essays.

The University of Texas at Austin Stage, Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center

R211B. Dear America Part 1, Presented by Trinity University Press and Terrain.org. (, , , , ) Trinity University Press and Terrain.org present Dear America. America is at a crossroads. Conflicting political and social perspectives reflect a need to collectively define our moral imperatives, clarify cultural values, and inspire meaningful change. In that patriotic spirit, hundreds of writers, artists, scientists, and political and community leaders have come together since the 2016 presidential election to offer their impassioned letters to America, in a project envisioned by the online journal Terrain.org and collected in Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy. Moderated by Terrain.org editors Simmons Buntin, Elizabeth Dodd, and Derek Sheffield with readings by contributors Alison Hawthorne Deming, Naomi Shihab Nye, Jericho Brown and Camille Dungy.

Simmons Buntin is the editor-in-chief of Terrain.org and a contributing editor of Shenandoah. He is the recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize, the Colorado Artist’s Fellowship for Poetry, and grants from the U.S. Forest Service, the Arizona Commission on the Arts, and the Tucson-Pima Arts Council. He is the author of Unsprawl: Remixing Spaces as Places, with Ken Pirie, and the poetry collections Riverfall and Bloom, and co-editor of the book Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy.
Twitter Username: terrainorg

Website: http://www.simmonsbuntin.com/
Alison Hawthorne Deming is a Regents Professor at the University of Arizona. Her most recent books are Stairway to Heaven and Zoologies: On Animals and the Human Spirit.
Naomi Shihab Nye is the Young People’s Poet Laureate of the United States for 2019–2021.
Jericho Brown is a poet, author of the award-winning books Please, New Testament, and The Tradition, and director of the creative writing program at Emory University.
Camille T. Dungy is a poet, essayist, and editor whose most recent collections are Trophic Cascade and Guidebook to Relative Strangers. She lives in northern Colorado.

1:45 pm to 3:00 pm

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R212. Managing Literary Magazine Editorial Transitions. (, , , , ) Literary magazines undergo constant change, whether it's the expected turnover of editors at student-run publications or the unexpected change of an editor moving on from a place she's been for years. Panelists with a range of experience in print and online journals will explore best practices for managing these transitions, whether expected or unexpected. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Christopher Lowe is the author of Those Like Us: Stories, You're the Tower: Essays, and A Guest of the Program: Stories. His writing has appeared in Greensboro Review, Brevity, Third Coast, and elsewhere. He teaches in the MFA program at McNeese State University and edits The McNeese Review.


Twitter Username: christophlowe

Website: http://www.christopherlowefiction.com

Dorothy Chan is the author of two poetry collections, Revenge of the Asian Woman and Attack of the Fifty-Foot Centerfold. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, the former editor of The Southeast Review, and poetry editor of Hobart.


Twitter Username: dorothykchan

Michael Nye is the author of two books, the story collection Strategies Against Extinction and the novel All the Castles Burned. His work has appeared in Kenyon Review, Cincinnati Review, Epoch, Lit Hub, and Crab Orchard Review, among many others. He is the editor of Story.


Twitter Username: mpnye

Website: mpnye.com

Leslie Jill Patterson's work has appeared in Pushcart XLIII, Prime Number Magazine, Hotel Amerika, and other journals. She teaches at Texas Tech University and serves as editor of Iron Horse. Her awards include a Soros Justice Fellowship and the Richard J. Margolis Award for Social Justice Writing.


Twitter Username: lesliejillp

Maureen Langloss is a lawyer-turned-writer living in New York City. She serves as the flash fiction editor at Split Lip magazine. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Best Small Fictions, Gulf Coast, Little Fiction, Sonora Review, The Journal, Wigleaf, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: MaureenLangloss

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R213. CANCELLED: Betrayed: Writing about Family, Friends, and Loved Ones. (, , , , ) As poets and prose writers, our creative process is complicated by our anticipation of our loved ones' reactions to our work. We risk harming real-life relationships, and may expose ourselves and others to legal liability. How do we address these conflicts in our writing and in our lives, and what choices can we make to protect ourselves, our work, and our loved ones? We'll discuss strategies to mitigate the potential for liability and emotional harm before and after publication. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Helen Fremont, a former public defender, is the author of the new memoir The Escape Artist. Her previous book, After Long Silence, was a national bestseller. Her work has appeared in Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, Ploughshares, Harvard Review, and other publications.


Twitter Username: helenfremont

Website: https://www.helenfremont.com

Annie Kim is a poet and attorney who works at the University of Virginia School of Law as an assistant dean. Her first book, Into the Cyclorama, won the Michael Waters Poetry Prize, and her second, Eros the Contagion, won the Washington Prize. She teaches poetry and legal writing in Charlottesville, VA.

Lynette D'Amico's work has appeared in the Gettysburg Review, the Ocean State Review, Brevity, and Slag Glass City. Her novella Road Trip was shortlisted for the Paris Literary Prize and the first runner-up of the 2014 Quarterly West Novella Contest.


Twitter Username: Mlynettedamico

Lenore Myka is the author of King of the Gypsies: Stories. A recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship, her award-winning writing has appeared in a variety of publications and has been selected as distinguished by the Best American series.

Lisa Van Orman Hadley is the author of Irreversible Things, a semi-autobiographical novel-in-stories. She has received the Larry Levis post-graduate fellowship, a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund grant, and a Millay Colony fellowship. Irreversible Things is the winner of the Howling Bird Book Prize.


Twitter Username: lisavhadley

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R214. Glory, Gripes, and Guile: The Ethics of Reviewing. (, , , ) What is the value of literary reviewing, and what care is necessary when critically handing another writer’s work? How does one enter into the business of reviewing, and is it a business, at all? In this panel, a diverse group of reviewers, editors, and writers from a variety of genres discuss the risk and reward of this type of textual engagement, with a specific focus on future possibilities for more transparent and ethical reviewing. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Leora Fridman is author of My Fault, among other works of prose, poetry, and translation. She holds degrees from Brown University and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has been an editor, critic, and curator of small press, interdisciplinary, and experimental work since 2006.


Twitter Username: ummleora

Chelsea Leu is the book reviews editor at The Rumpus and a writer whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Believer, and others. Formerly, she was an assistant research editor and writer at Wired.


Twitter Username: chelsealeu

Ismail Muhammad is the reviews editor at The Believer, contributing editor at ZYZZYVA, and a PhD candidate in English at University of California, Berkeley. His nonfiction and criticism have appeared in Slate, Paris Review, The Nation, Bookforum, and other venues. He's at work on a novel about the Great Migration.


Twitter Username: trapmotives

Caroline Crew is the author of Pink Museum, as well as several chapbooks. She serves as poetry editor for New South and editorial assistant for Five Points.  Currently, she is pursuing a PhD at Georgia State University, after earning an MA at the University of Oxford and an MFA at UMass-Amherst.


Twitter Username: carolinecrew

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R215. More Than Me: Memoirists Looking Outward. (, , , , Nadia Owusu) Five accomplished authors combine tools of memoir—intimacy, vulnerability, memory—with research to look past the personal journey to bigger questions about the ethics of science and medicine, drug policy, illegal enterprise, religion, marriage, race, and gender. Our books may be listed as memoirs, but our obsessions are external. We’ll discuss the unique challenges and advantages of using a charismatic first-person narrator to propel investigative nonfiction. It’s memoir minus the “me." Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Barrie Jean Borich is the author of Apocalypse, Darling. Her memoir Body Geographic won a Lambda Literary Award, and her book-length essay My Lesbian Husband won a Stonewall Book Award. She’s a professor at DePaul in Chicago, where she edits Slag Glass City, a journal of the urban essay arts.


Twitter Username: BOOKofBJB

Website: barriejeanborich.com

Hasanthika Sirisena's stories have appeared in Glimmer Train, Epoch, StoryQuarterly, Narrative, and other magazines. She is a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writer's Award and the 2015 Juniper Prize for Fiction. Her short story collection is The Other One.


Twitter Username: thinkhasie

Website: http://hasanthikasirisena.com/

Alia Volz is the author of Home Baked: My Mom, Marijuana, and the Stoning of San Francisco, forthcoming in April 2020. You'll find her work in The Best American Essays 2017, The New York Times, Tin House, and Dig If You Will the Picture: Writers Reflect on Prince.


Twitter Username: aliavolz

Website: aliavolz@gmail.com

Jaed Coffin is the author of the memoirs Roughhouse Friday and A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants. His work has been featured in the New York Times, The Sun, Nautilus, and the Moth Radio Hour. Jaed teaches in the MFA and undergraduate nonfiction programs at the University of New Hampshire.

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R216. Somos Writers: A Multigenre, Bilingual Reading from the "Other" Texas . (, , , ) The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is located far west of the Texas people know best, on the borders of Ciudad Juárez, El Paso, and rural New Mexico. We have the only bilingual MFA in creative writing and were the first university in the Americas to offer an MFA in Spanish. We live between two cities divided by a wall. We write on that wall. MFA faculty Rosa Alcalá, Andrea Cote Botero, Daniel Chacón, and Tim Z. Hernandez will share poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and translation in this multigenre, bilingual reading. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Tim Z. Hernandez is an award-winning poet, novelist, research scholar, and performer. He holds an MFA from Bennington College and a BA from Naropa University and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Texas El Paso's Bilingual MFA program in Creative Writing.


Twitter Username: tzhernandez

Website: www.timzhernandez.com

Rosa Alcalá is the author of three books of poetry, most recently MyOther Tongue. Recipient of an NEA Translation Fellowship, her translations are included in Cecilia Vicuña: New & Selected Poems, which she also edited. She teaches at the University of Texas-El Paso.


Twitter Username: myothertongue

Andrea Cote Botero is the author of the poetry collections Puerto Calcinado, La Ruina que nombro, and Chinatown 24 hours. She has also published books of prose: A Nude Photographer: A Biography of Tina Modotti and Blanca Varela or Writing From Solitude. She is assistant professor in the bilingual creative writing MFA program at UTEP.


Twitter Username: botero_cote

Daniel Chacón is author of Kafka in a Skirt: Stories from the Wall® as well as five other books of fiction. He won the PEN Oakland, American Book Award, and the Hudson Prize. He hosts Words on a Wire and is currently department chair for creative writing at UTEP.


Twitter Username: deLeonChacon

Website: danielchacon.net

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R217. CANCELLED: Navigating Residencies as a Writer of Color. (, , , , ) We have seen an influx of fellowship support for writers of color, however, the numbers in attendance remain low. How do we navigate residencies as writers of color? What tools or strategies can we take with us to these places where we might feel vulnerable? Panelists who have attended residencies and retreats such as The MacDowell Colony, Ragdale Foundation, Vermont Studio Center, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Macondo, Lambda Literary, VONA, and others will speak to their experiences. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Amanda Galvan Huynh is the author of Songs of Brujería and co-editor of Of Color: Poets' Ways of Making Anthology. She has received support from the MacDowell Colony, Vermont Studio Center, Sewanee Writers' Conference, Sundress Academy for the Arts, and Squaw Valley.


Twitter Username: amghuynh

Website: amandagalvanhuynh.com

Rowena Alegría is chief storyteller for the City of Denver. A 2019 Jack Jones and Vermont Studio Center fellow and a 2018 Writing by Writers Fellow, she’s a Macondista with an MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. A journalist, communications exec, and speech writer, she is writing a novel.


Twitter Username: RowenaAlegria

Website: RowenaAlegria.com

Alyssa Songsiridej's writing can be found at The Offing, Columbia: A Journal of Literature and Art, and QWERTY. Her work has been honored by VCCA, the Ragdale Foundation, and VSC. She is also editor in chief of Storyscape Journal.


Twitter Username: anarasong

Mike Soto is a first generation Mexican American poet. His forthcoming book, A Grave Is Given Supper, takes place along a fictional US-Mexico border town during the Calderon-era drug war.

Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet, performer, and educator. K. has featured on stages globally with offerings in New York Times, PBS News Hour, The Margins, Lambda Literary Review, VIDA Review, RaceForward, F(r)iction, and Apogee. They have two poetry books, When The Chant Comes and More Than Organs.


Twitter Username: brownroundboi

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R218. South Asian Experience in the American South. (, , , , ) What does it mean to be living and writing in the American South as South Asian diasporic authors? In this session, five panelists with South Asian roots will read from their fiction and nonfiction works set in the American South. Their works will showcase not only the experiences of people of South Asian heritage living in the South as depicted in the panelists’ works but also the panelists’ own interpretation of the American South as it pertains to literary production. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Parul Kapur Hinzen is a fiction writer and book critic. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Esquire, Newsday, Guernica, and Slate. Her first novel manuscript was a finalist for the 2013 Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize. She has an MFA from Columbia and is working on a novel set in 1960s India.

Soniah Kamal's novel Unmarriageable received praise from NPR, NYJB, WIRO, People, and more. Her debut, An Isolated Incident, was shortlisted for literary prizes. She has bylines in the New York Times, Guardian, Buzzfeed, Catapult, and Best Asian Short Stories Anthology 2017 and is a Pushcart nominee.


Twitter Username: soniahkamal Insta same

Website: www.soniahkamal.com

Aruni Kashyap is a writer, translator, and poet, author of The House with a Thousand Stories and His Father's Disease. He translates from the Indian language Assamese to English and is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: arunikashyap

Website: http://www.arunikashyap.com/

Padma Viswanathan's novels, The Toss of a Lemon and The Ever After of Ashwin Rao, have been published in eight countries. Her translation of St. Bernardo, a novel by Graciliano Ramos, was published by NYRB in 2019. She teaches creative writing at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville.


Twitter Username: padmav

Website: www.padmaviswanathan.com

Khem K. Aryal writes fiction and poetry. His fiction has appeared in such journals as IsthmusHawaii Pacific ReviewPoydras ReviewNortheast Review, and Warscapes. He is the author of two poetry books, Epic Teashop and Kathmandu Saga, and teaches creative writing at Arkansas State University.


Twitter Username: khemaryal

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R219. Muse, Martyr, Mother, Monarch: Writing Women in History. (, , , , ) Writing female characters that transcend tropes and come alive on the page is a challenging—and crucial—task for any writer. When those women lived decades, centuries, or even millennia ago, the work of the writer becomes even more complex. This panel will explore the process and practices of five women novelists who’ve featured powerful female characters, from a 19th-century astronomer to an 18th-century Russian empress, a midcentury mathematician, and an American slave in antebellum Ohio. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Amy Brill is the author of The Movement of Stars and a 2015 NYFA fiction fellow. Her fiction and essays have been appeared in One Story, The Common, Guernica, and several anthologies, and she's been awarded residencies at Millay Colony, Jentel, the American Antiquarian Society, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: amy_brill

Website: http://www.amybrill.com

Irina Reyn is the author of the novels Mother Country, The Imperial Wife, and What Happened to Anna K, as well as the anthology, Living on the Edge of the World: New Jersey Writers Take on the Garden State. She teaches creative writing at the University of Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: IrinaReyn1

Dolen Perkins-Valdez is the New York Times bestselling author of two novels: Wench and Balm. Her stories have appeared in The Kenyon Review and elsewhere. She is an associate professor in the American University MFA program.


Twitter Username: Dolen

Website: www.DolenPerkinsValdez.com

Rebecca Makkai's fourth book, The Great Believers, was a finalist for both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award; it won the LA Times Book Prize, the Carnegie Medal, and the Stonewall Award. She is artistic director of StoryStudio Chicago.


Twitter Username: rebeccamakkai

Website: www.rebeccamakkai.com

Jasmin Darznik is the author of the novel Song of a Captive Bird and a memoir, The Good Daughter. She is a professor in the MFA and Writing and Literature programs at California College of the Arts in San Francisco.


Twitter Username: jasmindarznik

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R220. CANCELLED: Make It New: Creative Empowerment in Independent Small Press Publishing. (, , , , Ryan Murphy) Often original and groundbreaking work comes from independent small press publishers who take risks. This panel will discuss building a small press from the ground up, the particular aesthetic decisions and commitments these publishers have and where it has lead for writers looking for new markets, book design and development, marketing, and the evolution of publishing. This panel includes editors from Four Way Books, Nightboat Books, Alice James Books, and Barrow Street Press. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Carey Salerno is the executive editor of Alice James Books. She is the editor, along with Anne Marie Macari, of the anthology Lit from Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James Books. Her first book is Shelter. You may find her poems in print and online.

Stephen Motika is the author of the poetry collection Western Practice and the editor of Tiresias: The Collected Poems of Leland Hickman. He is the publisher of Nightboat Books.

Peter Covino, poet, editor, and translator, is associate professor of English at the University of Rhode Island. His poetry collections include The Right Place to Jump and Cut Off the Ears of Winter. He's received an NEA in translation and the PEN/Osterweil Award and is founding editor of Barrow Street Inc.

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R221. Family, Race, and Freedom in the Old and New South. (, , , ) Four Southern authors—three white women and one black man—use the power of fiction to cultivate empathy in three novels and one short story collection. Themes of courage, family, race, faith, freedom, and redemption flow through these stories set in Texas, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Virginia from the Civil War through present day. Their characters overcome obstacles dealt by fate and their own choices. Panelists will discuss the pleasures and problems of being Southern writers. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Susan Cushman is author of Friends of the Library, Tangles and Plaques: A Mother and Daughter Face Alzheimer's, and Cherry Bomb. She is editor of Southern Writers on Writing, A Second Blooming: Becoming the Women We Are Meant to Be, and The Pulpwood Queens Celebrate 20 Years!


Twitter Username: SusanCushman

Website: https://susancushman.com/

Jeffrey Blount is the award-winning author of three novels. He is also an award-winning script writer and op-ed writer, published in the Washington Post, HuffPost, TheGrio.com, and others. He is the Emmy award-winning TV director of NBC's Meet The Press, Nightly News,Today, and The Chris Matthews Show.


Twitter Username: JEBlount

Rebecca Dwight Bruff heard the story of Robert Smalls on a visit to South Carolina and was so captivated that she left her job and moved across the country to research and write his story. Bruff earned her BS in education (Texas A&M) and master and doctorate degrees in theology from SMU.


Twitter Username: RebeccaBruff

Johnnie Bernhard's debut novel, A Good Girl, was shortlisted in the Kindle Book Awards and a nominee for the PEN/Robert Bingham Prize. Her second novel, How We Came to Be was shortlisted for Best Fiction by the MS Institute of Arts and Letters. Sisters of the Undertow is set for publication in 2020.


Twitter Username: JABernhard

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R222. CANCELLED: Trespassing: On Writing Nature. (, , , , ) Writing about nature has traditionally been dominated by patriarchal perspectives that project objectivity onto landscapes marked by histories of racism, market values, and misogyny. Panelists will share how our identities cast histories of ecological disruption into wide relief, especially when writing from and about places prohibited to us. We will discuss how the writer’s subjectivity is necessary for disrupting processes of ahistorization, devastating our connected natural and social worlds.

Kathleen Blackburn’s work has received Pushcart Prize nominations, listed as notable in Best American Essays, and appeared in Bellingham Review, Crazyhorse, DIAGRAM, River Teeth, and elsewhere. She teaches creative nonfiction at the University of Chicago and is a PhD candidate at UIC.

Byron F. Aspaas is Diné. He earned a BFA and MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. His work is scattered throughout various journals and anthologies. His clans are Red Running Water and is born for Bitter Water. 


Twitter Username: ByRad

Cecilia Villarruel was coeditor of IZIT? A Magazine for the Namibian PCV while in the Peace Corps. Her essays have been published in Another Chicago Magazine, Oyez Review, and Blood and Thunder. She is a PhD candidate in the Program for Writers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Joni Tevis is the author of two books of essays, most recently The World Is On Fire: Scrap, Treasure, and Songs of Apocalypse. Her essays have appeared in Orion, Oxford American, Poets & Writers, the Pushcart Prize anthology, and elsewhere. She teaches at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina.


Twitter Username: JoniTevis

Website: www.jonitevis.com

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R223. Everyone's a Critic: Getting Started in Book Reviewing and Why You Should. (, , , , ) Whether you are just emerging from an MFA program or are an established writer and teacher, joining the national literary conversation by reviewing books can boost your career, build your sense of community, and even make you a little money. In this nuts and bolts session, working critics and book editors describe their career paths, discuss how to get galleys, find markets and pitch book editors, and touch on ethical aspects of reviewing. Useful online resources will be shared.  Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Tess Taylor’s work has appeared in The Atlantic, Poetry, The Kenyon Review, and The New Yorker. She is the on-air poetry reviewer for NPR's All Things Considered and has taught at Whittier College, UC Berkeley, and Queen's University Belfast. Her books are The Forage House and Work & Days.


Twitter Username: tessathon

Website: www.tess-taylor.com

Marion Winik is the author of The Glen Rock Book of the Dead and First Comes Love, among others. She is a professor at the University of Baltimore, reviews books for Newsday and Kirkus, writes a column at BaltimoreFishbowl.com, and was a longtime commentator for NPR. More info at marionwinik.com.

Richard Z. Santos is a writer and teacher whose fiction, poetry, essays, and author profiles have appeared in multiple online and print publications. In a previous life, he worked in politics. He has completed two novels and is seeking representation.


Twitter Username: richardzsantos

Website: http://www.richardzsantos.com/

Gregg Barrios is a playwright, poet, and journalist. He is a 2013 USC Annenberg Getty Fellow and serves on the board of directors of the National Book Critics Circle. He was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters in 2015. He is a former books editor of the San Antonio Express-News.


Twitter Username: gregg_barrios

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R224. The Serious Business of Funny Women Poets. (, , , , ) Under the guise of humor, funny women poets have long found it possible to express views unacceptable to polite society. The "light verse" section of last century's ladies' home magazines frequently contained content subversive to those domestic realms. These days, no topic from sex to politics seems to be off limits for humor with line breaks. These five funny women poets will discuss their historical role models and the serious business of making readers laugh. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Grace Bauer has published five books of poems, most recently, Mean/Time and a 20th-anniversary reissue of The Women At The Well. She has also edited two anthologies, including Nasty Women Poets: An Unapologetic Anthology of Subversive Verse. She teaches at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.


Twitter Username: gracebauerpoet

Melissa Balmain edits Light, America’s longest-running journal of comic verse, and teaches at the University of Rochester. Her poetry collection Walking in on People (winner of the Able Muse Book Award) is often assumed by online shoppers to be some kind of porn.

Denise Duhamel’s most recent books of poetry are Scald and Blowout. Her book with Julie Marie Wade is The Unrhymables: Collaborations in Prose. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, Duhamel is a professor at FlU in Miami.

Julie Kane is professor emeritus at Northwestern State U, now teaching in the low-res MFA program at Western Colorado U. Her 5th poetry book is Mothers of Ireland. With Grace Bauer, she co-edited the Nasty Women Poets Anthology. She is a past National Poetry Series winner and Louisiana poet laureate.


Twitter Username: juliekanepoet

Website: http://www.juliekanepoet.com

Julie Marie Wade's most recent collections are Same-Sexy Marriage and The Unrhymables: Collaborations in Prose, coauthored with Denise Duhamel. She teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University in Miami.


Twitter Username: manyplums

Website: www.juliemariewade.net

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R225. The Dancer from the Dance. (, , , , ) How can we, and do we want to, separate the writer from the writing? This panel will investigate how or whether we can separate the work, which we may like and even admire, from the author, who may have been racist, xenophobic, homophobic, anti-semitic, for instance, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and Paul Claudel. We will also look into more recent examples of writers whose lives and political or social views may be problematic or even reprehensible, but whose work we may still want to read, admire, teach, and study. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ralph Adamo is a Professor of English at Xavier University, where he edits Xavier Review and Xavier Review Press. He is the author of seven collections of poetry and the editor of several others, including the selected poems of Everette Maddox. He is past editor of New Orleans Review.

Mong-Lan, poet, writer, educator, author of seven books (Dusk Aflame) and three chapbooks, has won a Stegner Fellowship, Fulbright, Pushcart Prize, Juniper Prize, and more. Former professor with the University of Maryland in Tokyo, she has served as faculty and visiting writer-artist on numerous campuses. www.monglan.com


Twitter Username: monglan11

Website: http://www.monglan.com

Jessica Smith's books of poetry include Life-List  and How to Know the Flowers. She teaches at The University of Alabama at Birmingham.


Twitter Username: looktouch

Website: http://looktouch.wordpress.com

Michelle Taransky is the author of two books of poetry: Sorry Was in the Woods and Barn Burned, Then. Taransky is a critical writing fellow teaching writing at University of Pennsylvania and working as reviews editor for Jacket2.

Bill Lavender is the author of twelve books of poetry, most recently My ID, and The 3 Letters, a trillogy of novellas. He operates Lavender Ink / Dialogos. He is cofounder and codirector of the New Orleans Poetry Festival.


Twitter Username: lavender_ink_pr

Website: http://www.lavenderink.org

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R226. El Amor Sobre Ruedas: The Confessions of a Lover and Father in a Wheelchair. (, , , ) A Mexican American poet, father, and lover gives an intimate reading. Openly addressing in his poems and conversation with the audience the joys and struggles of sex, the constant search and encounter with love, fatherhood, and life in a wheelchair.

El Amor sobre Ruedas was written in English but found an home in Spanish first. His translator will discuss the challenges of rendering the work in Spanish and how audiences in Mexico and the United States receive the poems differently.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ekiwah Adler-Beléndez is from Amatlan, Mexico, a small village an hour from Mexico. He is the author of Soy (I Am), Palabras Inagotables, Weaver, and The Coyote's Trace, the last with an introduction by Mary Oliver.

Kenia Cano lives in Cuernavaca. Some of her poetry books are Acantilado, Oración de Pájaros, and poetry and paintings from the artist, Las Aves de este Dia (Carlos Pellicer Iberoamerican Award in Poetry). She gives poetry workshops and readings in many international festivals.


Twitter Username: keniacano

Greg Josselyn is a writer and theatre-maker with fiction in the Raleigh Review and the Burningword Literary Journal, along with poetry performances presented in Boston and London. He has also hosted over 300 public media episodes on aging and disability.

Beth E. Jörgensen is professor emerita, University of Rochester. Her research and teaching areas include Spanish American literature, disability studies, women writers, the chronicle, theory of nonfiction. Her books include Writing of Elena Poniatowska, Documents in Crisis, and coedited volumes Contemporary Mexican Chronicle and Libre Acceso.

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R227. CANCELLED: From Magnolias to Meth: Place in the Southern Short Story. (, , , , ) The landscape of the South is radically different from the days of Faulkner and O’Connor. Both urban and rural settings have been impacted by immigration, class inequities, and shifting cultural values. In a world where travel and technology have blurred regional differences, what does it even mean to be "Southern"? Five writers seek to define and identify the expanding boundaries of the new south and discuss the impact these global markers have had on their Southern fiction. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Susan Finch is an associate professor of English and creative writing at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee. Her work has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Crab Orchard Review, New Ohio Review, Nimrod, and elsewhere. Currently, she’s at work on a collection of stories and a novel.

Angela Mitchell is the author of the short story collection, Unnatural Habitats & Other Stories. She works in St. Louis, Missouri.


Twitter Username: amitchellSTL

Website: www.angela-mitchell.com

Stephanie Powell Watts, associate professor of English at Lehigh University, is the author of No One Is Coming to Save Us and We Are Taking Only What We Need. She is the winner of the NAACP Literary Prize, the Pushcart prize, and awards from the Ernest J. Gaines and the Whiting foundations.

Crystal Wilkinson is author of The Birds of Opulence (winner of the 2016 Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence), Water Street, and Blackberries, Blackberries. Nominated for both the Orange Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, she is associate professor at the University of Kentucky


Twitter Username: crystalwilki

Michael Croley is the author of Any Other Place: Stories. He is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship and his stories and journalism appear in Lit Hub, the Paris Review Daily, Kenyon Review Online, VQR, Narrative, Blackbird, Bloomberg, and elsewhere. He teaches at Denison University.


Twitter Username: mj_croley

Website: www.michaelcroley.com

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R227A. Spotlight San Antonio and South Texas: “Puro San Antonio”. A reading and performance by some of San Antonio’s most iconic voices, including spoken word performers Christopher “Rooster” Martinez, Andrea “Vocab” Sanderson, and Barbara Renaud Gonzalez, author of Las Naglas de Jlo.

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R228. CANCELLED: (Un)Forgotten Women: Blending Research and Lyricism to Reclaim Lost History. (, , , , ) History remains perpetually incomplete, especially when it comes to the experiences of women. Seeking to restore missing voices and lives to our shared accounts, these writers employ research and imagination to present women of the past in ways that resonate with the issues of today. How best to blend documentary and creative approaches to revive lost figures? These authors will present examples and techniques for reintroducing and focusing on women who’ve been left out of the story. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kathleen Rooney is a founding editor of Rose Metal Press and a founding member of Poems While You Wait. The coeditor of Rene Magritte: Selected Writings, she is the author of Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk and The Listening Room: A Novel of Georgette & Loulou Magritte. She teaches at DePaul.


Twitter Username: KathleenMRooney

Website: http://kathleenrooney.com/

Sally Wen Mao is the author of two poetry collections, Oculus and Mad Honey Symposium. She is the recipient of fellowships from the New York Public Library Cullman Center and the Jenny McKean Moore program at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: sallywenmao

Emily Jungmin Yoon is the author of A Cruelty Special to Our Species and Ordinary Misfortunes, winner of the Sunken Garden Chapbook Prize. She is a PhD student at the University of Chicago and is the poetry editor for the Asian American Writers' Workshop.


Twitter Username: emilyyoon

Website: http://emily-yoon-poetry.tumblr.com/

Juditha Dowd's forthcoming book, Audubon's Sparrow, is a poetic biography in the voice of Lucy Bakewell Audubon, wife of the naturalist. She has also published a full-length poetry collection, Mango in Winter, and three chapbooks, in addition to fiction, lyric essays, and book reviews.


Twitter Username: DowdJuditha

Website: www.judithadowd.org

Danielle Dutton is the author of Margaret the First, Sprawl, and Attempts at a Life, and her work has appeared in Harper's, the Paris Review, Noon, and elsewhere. She's an associate professor at Washington University in St. Louis and co-founder and editor of the feminist press Dorothy, a publishing project.


Twitter Username: DorothyProject

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R229. The Zeno's Paradox of Scene Writing and Other Strategies for Teaching Fiction. (, , , , ) An analogy can convey the craft of fiction better, and quicker, than painstaking analysis. Each of us has our own go-to metaphors for how narrative works, whether we compare the challenge of scene writing to Zeno’s paradox, use Constable’s painting of a river to capture anticipation, compare author and narrator to driving instructor and driver, or ask why our main character wants a ham sandwich. This panel will unspool a cluster of analogies and explore their potential for transmitting craft. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lucy Ferriss is the author of ten books, mostly fiction. Her novel A Sister to Honor was a 2015 WNBA Great Group Read. Recent work appears in Arts & Letters, the American Scholar, and weekly at the Chronicle of Higher Education's Lingua Franca. She is writer-in-residence at Trinity College.


Twitter Username: LucyFerriss1

Eric Goodman is the author of five novels, including Twelfth and Race, Child of My Right Hand, and In Days of Awe. He's the founder of the Low-Residency MFA at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Susan Straight's new memoir is In the Country of Women. She has published eight novels, including A Million Nightingales, Between Heaven and Here, and Highwire Moon. She is critic at large for the Los Angeles Times, and Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at University of California, Riverside.

Michael Jaime-Becerra is the author of Every Night Is Ladies' Night, a collection of stories awarded a California Book Award, and This Time Tomorrow, a novel awarded an International Latino Book Award. He also teaches creative writing at UC Riverside.

Susanne Davis is author of a short story collection, The Appointed Hour. She is a visiting assistant professor of creative writing at Hope College and holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.


Twitter Username: SusanneMDavis

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R230. CANCELLED: Frustrated Pastorals: Burning Fields, Ruined Gardens, Desert Shores. (, , , , ) Once pastoral was code for nostalgia, escapism, idealization. Poets of late invoke pastoral as ecological engagement, as making palpable elusive realities in a virtual, counterfactual world. This panel returns not to fantasies of green space but to the tedium of the desert, frustration of difficult weather, alienation of ravaged shores, discomfort of exposure. Pastoral’s ancient contradictions may not idealize but rather realize the world, and our place in it, in an era of precarious climate. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Joseph Campana is a poet, arts writer, scholar of Renaissance literature at Rice University, and author of The Book of Faces, Natural Selections, which won the Iowa Poetry Prize, and The Book of Life. He has received grants from the NEA, the Bread Loaf Writer's Conference, and the Houston Arts Alliance.


Twitter Username: joseph_campana

Katie Peterson is the author of four books of poetry including The Accounts (the winner of the 2014 Rilke Prize from the University of North Texas) and A Piece of Good News. She directs the creative writing program at the University of California at Davis.

Jennifer Elise Foerster is the author of Leaving Tulsa and Bright Raft in the Afterweather. A member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, she has a PhD in literary arts from the University of Denver. She teaches at the Institute of American Indian Arts Low-Residency MFA and the Rainier Writers Workshop.

Cecily Parks is the author of the poetry collections Field Folly Snow and O'Nights, and editor of The Echoing Green: Poems of Fields, Meadows, and Grasses. Her poems appear in The New Republic, The New Yorker, Tin House, and elsewhere. She teaches in the MFA program at Texas State University.

Sandra Lim is the author of two collections of poetry, Loveliest Grotesque and The Wilderness. She was awarded the Barnard Women Poets Prize and the Levis Reading Prize for The Wilderness. She is an associate professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R231. CANCELLED: New and Collected: A Trans/Nonbinary Reading. (, , , , ) Trans/nonbinary literature has been proliferating while subterranean, but  is now starting to thrive above ground! Join us for a reading that puts a sliver of the robustness and variety of very contemporary trans/nonbinary poetics on display, featuring writers with new collections published in the interval between AWP 2019 and 2020.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Cameron Awkward-Rich is the author of two poetry collections: Sympathetic Little Monster and Dispatch. A Cave Canem fellow and poetry editor for Muzzle magazine, he teaches in Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at UMass Amherst.


Twitter Username: cawkward_rich

Samuel Ace, poet and sound artist, is the author of Our Weather Our Sea and Meet Me There. He is a recipient of an Astraea Lesbian Writer's Award and a two-time finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in poetry. He teaches writing at Mount Holyoke College.


Twitter Username: samuel_ace

Oliver Baez Bendorf is the author of Advantages of Being Evergreen and The Spectral Wilderness, with poems in APR, Bomb, and Poetry. A recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, Lambda, Vermont Studio Center, and Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, he teaches poetry at Kalamazoo College.


Twitter Username: queerpoetics

Website: oliverbaezbendorf.com

Paige Lewis is the author of Space Struck. Their poems have appeared in Poetry, American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, The Georgia Review, Best New Poets, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: Paige_M_Lewis

T Fleischmann is the author of Time Is the Thing a Body Moves Through, Syzygy, Beauty, and the pamphlet Gonorrhea, SESTA, Institutions. They are a nonfiction editor at DIAGRAM and a contributing editor at Essay Daily.

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R232. CANCELLED: Writing on the Spectrum: Teaching in Neurologically Diverse Classrooms. (, , , ) This neurologically diverse group of panelists will share pedagogical strategies that serve students on the autism spectrum, shaped by their own experiences as students and professionals. The panel will suggest techniques and resources creative writing instructors can use to create syllabi, exercises, and a classroom environment that is more supportive of neurologically diverse students, while also bearing in mind that some students are navigating multiple diagnoses and identities.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Joe Biel is a self-made autistic publisher who draws origins, inspiration, and methods from punk rock. He is the founder/manager of Microcosm Publishing, where he has sold 2.5 million paperbacks over the past twenty-two years. He is the author of eight books, including A People's Guide to Publishing.


Twitter Username: joebiel_

Website: www.joebiel.net

Daniel Bowman Jr. is the author of A Plum Tree in Leatherstocking Country and The Autism Journals: A Novel. His work has appeared in dozens of journals in the US and abroad. He is associate professor of English at Taylor University.


Twitter Username: danielbowmanjr

Website: http://danielbowmanjr.com

Dave Griffith is the author of A Good War is Hard to Find: The Art of Violence in America (Soft Skull Press). He is an Advising Professor at the University of Notre Dame and is the founder of Write Differently: A Community for Young Writers on the Autism Spectrum.

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R233. To Boldly Go: Unconventional Publishing Opportunities from Radio and Beyond. (, , , , ) How are you getting your work out there? We are no longer limited to bare text on the physical or digital page. This panel features mixed-media publishers, distributors, and technological facilitators who have worked across a variety of disciplines—including literature-centered podcasts and radio shows, video poetry, animated shorts, and special-effects makeup portraiture that turns you into your own characters—to get writers’ stories into the world in cutting edge ways. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Anjoli Roy is a creative writer and founder and cohost of It’s Lit with PhDJ, a literature and music podcast that has featured 100 creative writers to date. With a PhD in English from University of Hawai‘i, she is a VONA alum and winner of the COG Page to Screen award and a StoryQuarterly prize in nonfiction.


Twitter Username: anjoliroy

Website: www.anjoliroy.com

Athena Dixon is a writer, editor, and founder of Linden Avenue Literary Journal. She is a fellow of VONA and Callaloo and a Tin House workshop alumna. She is the author of the poetry chapbook No God in This Room and co-host of the New Books in Poetry podcast. Her MFA is from Queens University of Charlotte.


Twitter Username: AthenaDDixon

Website: http://www.athenadixon.com

Soma Mei Sheng Frazier recently served as a San Francisco Library Laureate. Her award-winning fiction chapbooks earned praise from Nikki Giovanni and others. Frazier’s writing has placed in competitions offered by HBO, Zoetrope: All-Story, Glimmer Train, and more. She's at work on a novel and script.


Twitter Username: somameisheng

Website: http://enizagam.org

Antonio M. Harrison is a Behavior Scientist and owner of Renaissance Behavior LLC, specializing in helping parents create a better world for their children. Dr. Harrison gives talks, conducts workshops, creates videos and blogs, and has a podcast to build the community and share info.


Twitter Username: rebirthbx

Jocelyn Kapumealani Ng is a queer Kanaka Maoli artist. She is a Brave New Voices International Slam Poetry champion, a special-effects makeup artist who transforms authors into their own creations, and a theater performer featured in the Smithsonian APA Center’s Pop Up Culture Lab ‘Ae Kai.

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R234. CANCELLED: Crossover Collaboration: Poets with Visual Artists, Dancers, and Musicians. (, , , , ) Four poets and a poet-musician who have collaborated with dance companies, visual artists, composers, and musicians will share their experiences producing works across the arts through performance, exhibition, and publication. This panel will address the opportunities, processes, and challenges of interdisciplinary collaboration as a practice that can expand understanding, empathy, creative vision, and audience. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jeffrey Bean is author of two chapbooks and the poetry collections Woman Putting on Pearls and Diminished Fifth. Holding a bachelor of music and an MFA, he has collaborated with numerous composers and musicians. He is professor of English and a teaching award winner at Central Michigan University.


Twitter Username: JeffreyBeanPoet

Website: www.jeffreybeanpoet.com

Joanna White, DMA, professor of music at Central Michigan University, is a flutist/recording artist. As a poet, she has a recent MA, works in literary and medical humanities journals, collections that reached contest finals, and a first book, Drumskin and Bones, accepted for forthcoming publication.


Twitter Username: JoannaWhite8

Website: joannawhitepoet.com and joannawhiteflute.com

Rebecca Morgan Frank is the author of three collections of poetry, recently Sometimes We're All Living in a Foreign Country, and her collaborations with composers have been performed across the US. She is co-founder and editor of the online literary magazine Memorious.


Twitter Username: poetmorgan

Website: www.rebeccamorganfrank.com

Kiki Petrosino is professor of poetry at the University of Virginia. She is the author of four books of poetry, including White Blood: A Lyric of Virginia and Witch Wife. She is a National Endowment for the Arts fellow in literature.

Timothy Liu is the author of ten books of poems, including Luminous Debris: New & Selected Legerdemain (19922017) and Kingdom Come: A Fantasia. His journals and papers are archived in the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. He is professor of English at William Paterrson University.


Twitter Username: arabadjisliu

Website: Http://timothyliu.net

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R235. CANCELLED: Do Words Heal? Writers on the Power and Difficulty of Writing Pain & Trauma. (, , , , Vanessa Martir) Trauma and pain can inhibit—even paralyze—creativity. Yet for some writers, trauma serves as the nexus of their work. Participants will share brief excerpts of their work and then discuss the dangers and triumphs of reckoning with personal experience. Does surviving and choosing to write about traumatic events serve to transcend or mire us? Is it worth facing your biggest pain and trauma for the sake of creating? What is left in the aftermath? Who, if anyone, is transformed?

Cleyvis Natera is an immigrant from the Dominican Republic. She has a bachelor of arts from Skidmore College and an MFA in fiction from New York University. She recently completed her first novel, Neruda on the Park.

Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel The Residue Years won a Whiting Award and the Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel prize, and the Hurston Wright Legacy award.


Twitter Username: mitchsjackson

Website: www.mitchellsjackson.com

Susan Kim Campbell’s fiction and nonfiction are published in the Alaska Quarterly Review, Meridian, the Mississippi Review, SmokeLong Quarterly, and the anthology Us against Alzheimer’s: Stories of Family, Love and Faith. She holds a BA from Brown University.


Twitter Username: ASusanCampbell

Alison C. Rollins is a National Endowment for the Arts, Cave Canem, and Callaloo Fellow as well as a 2016 recipient of the Poetry Foundation's Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship. Her debut poetry collection is Library of Small Catastrophes.


Twitter Username: AlisonCRollins

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R236. CANCELLED: Demystifying Poetry Editing. (, , , ) The poetry editing process can seem a bit mystifying. How one edits the poem of another is an absurdly basic question and yet fundamental. Here, guided by an experienced interviewer, editors will discuss their philosophies of approach, the types of work they find most challenging, their failures, what conversations with the poets they edit might look like, and how the editing process affects an editor's own writing for better or worse.

David Naimon is coauthor of Ursula K. Le Guin: Conversations on Writing and host of the literary podcast Between the Covers (tinhouse.com/podcasts). His work can be found in AGNI, Boulevard, VQR, Tin House, Fourth Genre, Zyzzyva, StoryQuarterly, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: davidnaimon

Erika Stevens is Coffee House Press's poetry editor at large. She freelances as Quick Bread Editorial. Formerly of the University Press of Florida and the University of Georgia Press.

Parneshia Jones is the author of Vessel: Poems, winner of the Midwest Book Award. Jones is a recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award and the Aquarius Press Legacy Award. She currently holds positions as sales and community outreach manager and poetry editor for Northwestern University Press.


Twitter Username: parneshia

Suzi F. Garcia is the author of the chapbook Dear Dorothy: A Home Grown Fairytale. She is the executive editor at Noemi Press, a CantoMundo Fellow, and a Macondonista, and her work is published or forthcoming from the Georgia Review, Ninth Letter, Fence, the Offing, and more.


Twitter Username: SuziG

Website: http://suzifgarcia.tumblr.com/

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R237. Innovative Partnerships: The Advantages of Publishing with Small Presses. (, , , , ) This multi-genre panel of writers and an independent publisher will discuss the distinct advantages of working with a small press in the current democratized literary landscape and how to collaborate effectively to create innovative marketing strategies, find audiences, obtain reviews, compete successfully for national awards and other honors, and establish multi-book partnerships that will sustain both writer and publisher long-term. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

K.L. Cook is the author of six books, including the forthcoming Marrying Kind (stories), Lost Soliloquies (poetry), and The Art of Disobedience (essays on form and fiction). He teaches in the MFA Program for Creative Writing & Environment at Iowa State and the low-res MFA Program at Spalding.

Nan Cuba's books are Body and Bread (PEN/Southwest and Steven Turner Awards) and Art at Our Doorstep (coeditor). She reported on causes of extraordinary violence in Life and D magazine. She founded a literary center, Gemini Ink, and is the writer-in-residence at Our Lady of the Lake University.


Twitter Username: nacuba1

Website: http://nancuba.com

Tim Bascom is the author of a novel, a collection of essays, two memoirs, and a forthcoming collection of stories titled Climbing Lessons. His essays have been selected for Best American Travel Writing and Best Creative Nonfiction. He directs the creative writing program at Waldorf University.

Katy Yocom's novel Three Ways to Disappear won the Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature and was shortlisted for other prizes. She is associate director of the low-residency graduate programs of Spalding University’s School of Creative and Professional Writing.


Twitter Username: KatyYocom1

Website: https://katyyocom.com

Andrew Gifford is the founder and director of the Santa Fe Writers Project. He is the author of the memoir We All Scream: The Fall of the Gifford’s Ice Cream Empire.


Twitter Username: sfwp

Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R238. CANCELLED: Here's Why It Matters: Responding to Contemporary Issues in Fiction. (, , , , ) Contemporary issues beyond politics inform fiction, but how important is it for today’s writers to actively engage with these issues on the page? How can cultural engagement create meaningful, enduring fiction? From factory farming to religion in schools, and from gender relations to reimagining Liberia’s founding, these Graywolf Press authors grapple with the world around them. These four authors will read and discuss with editor Steve Woodward how contemporary issues have informed their work. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Belle Boggs is the author of The Gulf: A Novel, The Art of Waiting: On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood, and Mattaponi Queen: Stories. She directs the MFA program at North Carolina State University.


Twitter Username: belleboggs

Deb Olin Unferth is the author of six books, including the novel Barn 8. Her work appears in Harper's, The Paris Review, Tin House, Vice, and Granta. She received a Guggenheim fellowship, a Creative Capital Grant, four Pushcart Prizes, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Susan Steinberg is the author of the novel Machine and the story collections Spectacle, Hydroplane and The End of Free Love. She teaches at the University of San Francisco.

Wayétu Moore is the founder of One Moore Book and is a graduate of Howard University, Columbia University, and the University of Southern California. She teaches at the City University of New York’s John Jay College.

Steve Woodward is an editor at Graywolf Press.


Twitter Username: snwood

Room 218, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R239. Not Your Parents' Nature Walk: The Next Environmental Nonfiction. (, , , , ) The country or woodsy stroll is a staple of “nature writing.” But circling Walden Pond or pacing wilderness trails doesn’t cut it today. We live in cities and suburbs. Our communities are diverse. Species are vanishing and “invading.” Climate is changing. Presented by the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, this panel will explore how the pedestrian nature essay of old might give way to something fresh, feral, and footloose, exploring new environments, histories, and voices. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Nick Neely's most recent book is Alta California: From San Diego to San Francisco, a Journey on Foot to Rediscover the Golden State. He is the recipient of a PEN Northwest Boyden Wilderness Writing Residency, the 2015 John Burroughs Nature Essay Award, and a AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award.


Twitter Username: nsneely

Maya L. Kapoor is an associate editor at High Country News, where she writes about science, environmental policy, and social justice in the urbanizing West.


Twitter Username: Kapoor_ML

Kathryn Miles is the author of four books, including Quakeland. Her writing has appeared in publications including Best American Essays, Boston Globe, The New York Times, Outside, Popular Mechanics, and Time. She serves as writer in residence at Green Mountain College.


Twitter Username: kathryn_miles

Website: www.kathrynmiles.net

Julia Corbett is a professor in the Department of Communication and Environmental Humanities Graduate Program at the University of Utah. Her latest book, Out of the Woods: Seeing Nature in the Everyday, won the 2018 Reading the West Book Award in Nonfiction.

Michael Branch is Foundation Professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is the author or editor of nine books and more than 200 essays and reviews. His most recent books are Raising Wild, Rants from the Hill, and How to Cuss in Western.

Lila Cockrell Theatre, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

R240. 10 Years of CantoMundo: Founders, Faculty, and Fellows. (, , , ) Join CantoMundo for a discussion on contemporary Latinx letters, the history of CantoMundo, and what’s ahead for us. Each poet will also do a short reading.

Deborah Paredez is the author of the poetry volumes, This Side of Skin and Year of the Dog, and the critical study, Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory. She is an associate professor at Columbia University and cofounder of CantoMundo, a national organization for Latinx poets.

Dr. Celeste Guzmán Mendoza is the author of Beneath the Halo (Wings Press, 2013), and the chapbook, Cande te estoy llamando (Wings Press, 1999). Her work has appeared in Entre Guadalupe and Malinche: Tejanas in Literature and Art (University of Texas Press: 2016) and ¡Floricanto Sí!: U.S. Latina Poetry (Penguin:1998), among others. She is a co-founder of CantoMundo, a literary community of Latinx poets, and co-directed the organization with Dr. Deborah Paredez for ten years. She also is a Macondista and Hedgebrook resident. She holds a PhD from the Program of Higher Education Leadership and Policy from the University of Texas at Austin, an MFA in Poetry from Bennington College, and a BA in English Literature and Theatre from Barnard College.

Rigoberto González is the author of fifteen books. He is the recipient of Guggenheim, NEA, and USA Rolón fellowships; an NYFA grant in poetry; the Shelley Memorial Award; the Poetry Center Book Award; the Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award; and the 2015 Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Publishing Triangle.


Twitter Username: MariposaBoy

Website: www.rigobertogonzalez.com

Malcolm Friend is a poet and author of the collection Our Bruises Kept Singing Purple. He received his BA from Vanderbilt University and his MFA from the University of Pittsburgh. He has received fellowships from organizations including CantoMundo and the Center for African American Poetry & Poetics.

HemisFair Ballroom C3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R241. CANCELLED: The Path To Rad Empowerment: YA Lit Today, Sponsored by Blue Flower Arts. (, , , , ) Literary revolutionaries Elizabeth Acevedo, Mahogany L. Browne, Carrie Fountain, and Marilyn Nelson are breaking into the new ground of representation and empowerment in YA lit. Illuminating anew the coming-of-age experience, they bring to life real-world youth awakening to activism: from the streets of NYC to the Dominican Republic, from first loves to freedom fighting, they show young people of color for whom defiance holds the key to decoding the complexities of our present and shared histories.

Marilyn Nelson is a recipient of the Ruth Lilly Prize, the Frost Medal, the NSK Neustadt Award, and the NCTE Poetry Award, and a former chancellor of the Academy and former poet in residence at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine. Her most recent books are My Seneca Village and American Ace.

Carrie Fountain is the author of poetry collections Burn Lake and Instant Winner, as well as a novel, I'm Not Missing, and a forthcoming kids' book, The Poem Forest. She is writer-in-residence at St. Edward's and hosts NPR's poetry podcast This is Just to Say. She is the 2019 Texas poet laureate.

Elizabeth Acevedo, a National Poetry Slam Champion, received the 2018 National Book Award for her New York Times bestselling novel, The Poet X. Acevedo holds a BA in performing arts from the George Washington University and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Maryland.


Twitter Username: acevedowrites

Website: www.acevedopoetry.com
Mahogany L. Browne is a writer, organizer, educator, and spoken word poet. She is the author of the YA poetry book Black Girl Magic, and the children’s book Woke Baby. Her poetry collections include Kissing Caskets and Redbone. She co-edited the poetry anthology The Breakbeat Poets Vol. 3: Black Girl Magic and is at work on WOKE: A Young Poets Guide To Justice. Browne is the recipient of numerous literary fellowships and has appeared on BuzzFeed Live, HBO & PBS NEWShour. She is the Artistic Director of Urban Word NYC and the Poetry Coordinator at St. Francis College’s MFA Program. She resides in Brooklyn, NY.
Twitter Username: mobrowne

Website: www.mobrowne.com
Anya Backlund is the vice president of Blue Flower Arts, a literary speakers agency. She represents internationally acclaimed poets, authors, and artists for lectures, readings, and appearances across the country and around the world.

Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R242. Five Writers Walk into a Bar: Using Humor in Fiction. (, , , , ) Humor is an effective tool for communicating shared truths about the human experience in an accessible way. But too much humor, especially in literary works, can quickly feel heavy-handed or counterproductive. The best writers of funny fiction balance levity with poignancy, the absurd with the humane. Our panel will examine a range of literary texts that use humor effectively and discuss strategies and exercises to hone our abilities to identify what’s funny, and what’s extraneous, in our work.

Cara Blue Adams’s fiction appears in GrantaAmerican Short FictionKenyon Review, and Epoch. A 2018-19 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellow, she has been awarded the Kenyon Review Short Fiction Prize and the Missouri Review Peden Prize. She is an assistant professor at Seton Hall University.


Twitter Username: carablueadams

Website: www.carablue.com

Danielle Evans is the author of the short-story collection Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self, winner of the PEN Bingham Award, the Hurston Wright Award, and a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 Selection. She teaches in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University.


Twitter Username: daniellevalore

Website: http://daniellevaloreevans.com/

Kristen Arnett is a queer fiction and essay writer. She's held several writing fellowships and was Ninth Letter's Literary Award winner in fiction. She is the author of Felt in the Jaw, a story collection which won the Coil Book Award. Her debut novel, Mostly Dead Things, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: Kristen_Arnett

Jennine Capó Crucet is the author of My Time Among the Whites, Make Your Home Among Strangers, and How to Leave Hialeah. Her work has received numerous awards, and her novel has been an all-campus/first-year read at over twenty-five colleges. She works as an associate professor at the University of Nebraska.


Twitter Username: crucet

Website: www.jcapocrucet.com

Courtney Maum is the author of the novels Costalegre, Touch, I Am Having So Much Fun Here without You, and the forthcoming humor guide for writers Before and After the Book Deal: A Writer's Guide to Finishing, Publishing, Promoting and Surviving Your First Book. Find her online at courtneymaum.com


Twitter Username: cmaum

Website: https://www.courtneymaum.com/

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R243. CANCELLED: Legible Prescriptions: Mental Illness and Writing about Medication. (, , , Mimi Khúc) What are our responsibilities in representing medicated voices and personae? How do we address pharmaceutical substances that seem to embody elements of metaphor, plot, character, and theme all at once? The poets and prose writers on this panel all have intimate experience with taking medication for mental illness and integrating it into our work. We’ll discuss the challenges, ambivalences, failures, and humor we’ve encountered in representing the medicated self. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Nicky Beer is the author of two books of poems, The Octopus Game and The Diminishing House, both winners of the Colorado Book Award for Poetry. Her awards include an NEA grant and a Ruth Lilly Fellowship. She is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver.


Twitter Username: nbeerpoet

Website: nickybeer.com

Erika Sánchez is a poet, novelist, and essayist. She is the author of Lessons on Expulsion and I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter. She is a 2017–2019 Princeton Arts Fellow.


Twitter Username: ErikaLSanchez

Website: erikalsanchez@gmail.com

Shira Erlichman is an author, visual artist, and musician. She recently released her debut poetry book Odes to Lithium and children's book Be/Hold. She's received fellowships from Vermont Studio Center, Millay Residency, and AIR Serenbe.


Twitter Username: sheer_awe

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R244. Women in Open Spaces: Life after the (Un)remarkable Journey. (, , , , ) Many women’s narratives emphasize redemption, self-acceptance, or working through of hardship that comes from traveling through open spaces, but what about the details often omitted from these stories? This diverse panel of women will discuss their journeys, including thru-hikes in America and abroad, driving through national parks, and walking neighborhood trails; the difficult transitions back to “real life”; and how, for some, those spaces replicate the trauma from which they seek an escape. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kristine S. Ervin is an associate professor at West Chester University, where she teaches creative nonfiction, poetry, and composition. Excerpts of her memoir about her mother's murder have appeared in Silk Road, the Crab Orchard Review, Brevity, and Passages North.

Keya Mitra is creative writing director, editor in chief of Silk Road Review, and associate professor of creative writing/literature at Pacific University. Her fiction was recognized under "Other Distinguished Stories" in Best American Short Stories 2017. She was a 2008 Fulbright Scholar in India.

Alden Jones is the author of The Wanting Was a Wilderness, Unaccompanied Minors, and The Blind Masseuse, finalist for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award. She is co-director of the Cuba Writers Program and teaches at Emerson College and the Newport MFA Program.


Twitter Username: jones_alden

Website: aldenjones.com

Minda Honey is a professional writer whose work has been featured by Longreads, the Oxford American, the Guardian, Playboy, Vice, and elsewhere. She writes a relationship advice column for her local alt-weekly and is an assistant professor and director of the creative writing BFA program at Spalding.


Twitter Username: mindahoney

Mathina Calliope is a writer, teacher, editor, and writing coach. In 2016 she quit a lucrative desk job to try to hike the Appalachian Trail, break her addiction to comfort, and find the courage to face the insecurity of freelancing. Her work has appeared in WSJ, WashPost, NPR, Real Simple, Prevention, and Streetlight.


Twitter Username: MathinaCalliope

Room 305, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

R246. Sensitivity Snaggle: Why the Industry Still Can’t Get Race and Diversity Correct. (, , , , ) Viet Thanh Nguyen has said that we don’t need more sensitivity readers but rather more people of color in all areas of publishing: editors, publishers, agencies, and reviewers. Books are getting pulled from shelves due to insensitive treatment of race and culture, and authors are still confused. This panel explores why this is the case and what to do about it. How can an industry that bandies about diversity buzzwords put better approaches into practice and avoid the sensitivity snaggle? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Phuc Luu is the chief creative officer at Bloomsday Literary, an independent literary press in Houston, Texas. He is also a writer, philosopher, and theologian. He has published a number of articles on philosophy, theology, and culture, and has completed a forthcoming book.


Twitter Username: phuc_luu

Deborah D.E.E.P. Mouton is internationally known poet, writer, educator, and first Black poet laureate of Houston, Texas. This seven-time National Poetry Slam Competitor has been ranked the #2 Best Female Performance Poet in the World. Her recent collection, Newsworthy, is available now.


Twitter Username: LiveLifeDeep

Anna Meriano is the author of the Love Sugar Magic series. She earned her MFA from The New School, works with Cake Literary, and is represented by Patricia Nelson.


Twitter Username: annamisboring

Daniel Peña is a Pushcart Prize-winning writer and assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of Houston-Downtown. Formerly, he was a Fulbright-Garcia Robles Scholar in Mexico City where he finished his first novel, Bang. He's a regular contributor to the Ploughshares Blog.


Twitter Username: danimalpena

Jessica Cole is a poet, novelist, and editor. She teaches and coruns Bloomsday Literary.

The University of Texas at Austin Stage, Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center

R246B. Lily Poetry Review and Lily Poetry Review Books. (eileen cleary, Christine Jones, Nicole Zdeb) Lily Poetry Review and Lily Poetry Review Books reading featuring Jeff Oaks, Joey Gould, Christine Jones, Eileen Cleary, Quintin Collins, Nicole Zdeb, and Mark Jednaszewski.

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm

Room 004A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R247. CANCELLED: Narrative Healing: Yoga & Writing Workshop with Lisa Weinert. () Open to all! This full-body, full-spirit storytelling experience will use yoga, writing, and listening exercises to inspire a holistic and freeing storytelling experience. This 75-minute afternoon workshop will include a gentle yoga practice, writing prompts, and listening exercises. These classes will build off each other; come for the entire series or drop in for a single class. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a pen and paper. www.lisaweinert.com @lisaweinert www.narrativehealing.com

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, walk straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Lisa Weinert is passionate about the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She is the founder of Narrative Healing, a program that combines meditation, yoga, and writing to help writers (re)connect to their bodies and feel empowered to launch their work into the world.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R248. CANCELLED: Loss, Memory, Transformation: Women Poets and the Elegy. (, , , , ) Susan Stewart notes that, traditionally, women's reactions to death were often "limited to suicide, euphemism or enforced silence.” These five women poets will explore how they utilize the elegy form today—whether it be as lament, meditation, song, or howl—to give shape to loss. Together, they will speak to their own strategies for writing about grief and survival, paying attention to how loss intersects with gender, identity, silencing, and trauma. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Cara Dees is the author of the debut collection Exorcism Lessons in the Heartland, winner of the 2018 Barrow Street Book Prize. Currently a PhD candidate at the University of Cincinnati, her work appears in Best New Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, Poetry Daily, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: _caradees_

Yalie Kamara is a Sierra Leonean American writer. She is the author of two chapbooks and is a fellow of the Vermont Studio Center and Callaloo. She is a doctoral candidate in English literature and creative writing at the University of Cincinnati. For more: yaylala.com.


Twitter Username: Yaliesaweda

Allison Adair teaches at Boston College and GrubStreet. Her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry, Best New Poets, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, and Kenyon Review, among other journals, and have received the Pushcart Prize, the Orlando Prize, and the Florida Review Editors' Award.


Twitter Username: fascicles

Melissa Cundieff is the author of Darling Nova, a full-length collection of poems. She's also a visual artist and a lecturer at the University of Minnesota.


Twitter Username: clackshaw123

Janine Joseph is a poet, librettist, and essayist. Her collection Driving Without a License won the Kundiman Poetry Prize and the da Vinci Eye award, and an honorable mention for the Sheila Margaret Motton Book Prize. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Oklahoma State University.


Twitter Username: ninejoseph

Website: http://www.janinejoseph.com/

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R249. CANCELLED: A Showcase of Fat Poets: An Unapologetic Celebration of Radical Visibility. (, , , , ) Poets of diverse aesthetics and body histories investigate public and personal stakes of embodied fat poetics/politics. Scholar Kathleen Lebesco argues fat is “neither simply an aesthetic state nor a medical condition” but a subversive “political situation.” Poets complicate and reimagine the thin, white, able, cis-male body assumed in contemporary poetics to allow for fatness. Can poetic craft connect a body of work and a physical body? What is the intersection of fat poetics and social justice? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jennifer Jackson Berry is the author of The Feeder and the chapbook Bloodfish. Her second full-length collection, a memoir-in-verse, will be published in 2020. 


Twitter Username: jaxnberry

Website: www.jenniferjacksonberry.com

Jessica Rae Bergamino is the author of the full-length collection Unmanned, winner of Noemi Press' 2017 Poetry Prize, as well as several chapbooks. She is a doctoral candidate in literature and creative writing at the University of Utah, where she is a Steffenson Cannon scholar.


Twitter Username: jrbergamino

Diamond Forde is a Tin House and Callaloo fellow whose work has appeared in Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, the Offing, and more. She is a recipient of the Margaret Walker prize and a finalist for the GA Poetry Prize, and her debut book, Mother Body, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: PoemsandCake

Simone Person is a dual MFA/MA at Indiana University and the author of Dislocate, winner of Honeysuckle Press's 2017 Fiction Chapbook Contest, and Smoke Girl, winner of Diode Editions' 2018 Poetry Chapbook Contest.


Twitter Username: princxporkchop

Rachel Wiley is a performer, poet, feminist, and fat positive activist from Columbus, Ohio. She is the author of two full length collections of poetry.


Twitter Username: rachielouwho

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R250. CANCELLED: The Poetry Chapbook: Entry and Energy. (, , , , ) What is a chapbook, nonpoets often ask. Five poets and poet-editors discuss unique qualities of the chapbook form and how crafting and publishing a chapbook can help emerging poets and established poets reach an audience or explore a theme. Chapbook editors and authors look at the different paths chapbook poets take postpublication. The chapbook as a gateway to publishing a full-length collection as well as the reasons poets turn to chapbooks throughout their writing lives will be discussed. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jennifer Franklin (Brown AB, Columbia MFA) is the author of No Small Gift and Looming. Her poetry has been published in the Paris Review, the Nation, and Boston Review and on poets.org. She is co-editor of Slapering Hol Press and teaches at the Hudson Valley Writers' Center.

Kimiko Hahn finds material from disparate sources: identity, current events, Japanese zuihitsu, nature, science (Brain Fever). She explores iterations of Foreign Bodies in her latest book. Awards include a Guggenheim. She teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Translation, Queens College-CUNY.

Sean Nevin is the author of Oblivio Gate and the chapbook A House That Falls. His honors include a Literature Fellowship from the NEA, The Robinson Jeffers Tor House Prize, and two fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts. He directs Drew University’s MFA in poetry program.

Leela Chantrelle, a poet, is a graduate of Cornell University. Currently, she teaches English at a progressive high school in Baltimore Maryland. In 2019 she cowrote Leading With a Naked Body along with Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon.


Twitter Username: leelachantrelle

J. Bruce Fuller is a 2016–2018 Wallace Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford University. He is the author of five chapbooks and the editor of two anthologies of poetry. He is the founder and publisher of Yellow Flag Press. He received a PhD from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


Twitter Username: JBruceFuller

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R251. CANCELLED: Strangers in a Changing Land: Poets on Living and Working in Texas. (, , , , ) The real world puts pressure on a poet, and thus on poems. Since the writing-teaching life can be an itinerant one, we are often navigating new landscapes, communities, and political realities. Join poets from across Texas as they read from their work and discuss the experience of being transplants in a state that looms large in the national consciousness.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sasha West’s first book, Failure and I Bury the Body, won the National Poetry Series and a Texas Institute of Letters award. She is finishing a manuscript of poems about climate change. She teaches in Austin, Texas, as an associate professor of creative writing at St. Edward’s University.

Joseph Campana is a poet, arts writer, scholar of Renaissance literature at Rice University, and author of The Book of FacesNatural Selections, which won the Iowa Poetry Prize, and The Book of Life. He has received grants from the NEA, the Bread Loaf Writer's Conference, and the Houston Arts Alliance.


Twitter Username: joseph_campana

Jehanne Dubrow is the author of seven poetry collections, including most recently American Samizdat, Dots & Dashes, and The Arranged Marriage, as well as a book of creative nonfiction, throughsmoke: an essay in notes. She is a professor at the University of North Texas.

Niki Herd is the author of The Language of Shedding Skin. Her work has been supported by the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and Cave Canem and has appeared in a number of journals. She is completing her PhD in literature and creative writing at the University of Houston.

Sasha Pimentel is author of For Want of Water, winner of the National Poetry Series, and Insides She Swallowed, winner of the American Book Award. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, PBS NewsHour, and APR. She was the 2018–19 Picador Professor, is a 2019 NEA fellow, and is an associate professor at UTEP.


Twitter Username: SashaRPimentel

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R252. Literary Impostordom: Do I Deserve to Be in This Room?. (, , , , ) Five writers discuss practical ways they work through impostor syndrome, from submitting work to living up to hype. Impostor syndrome, the conviction that we're uniquely untalented, underqualified, and undeserving, afflicts students, authors, editors, and teachers. We’ll discuss confidence and belonging as cultural, political topics in the face of all-too-real barriers, and our visions for truly welcoming, sustaining literary communities. Our survival and success require it. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Alison Kinney is the author of Hood and of essays for the Paris Review Daily, the New Yorker, Harper’s, Lapham’s Quarterly, and the New York Times. In 2019 she became Assistant Professor of Writing (Nonfiction) at Eugene Lang College at the New School.


Twitter Username: Alison_Kinney

Elisa M. Gonzalez is a Puerto Rican writer raised in Ohio. Her work appears in Harvard Review, Hyperallergic, the New Yorker, and elsewhere. A 2016–2018 US Fulbright scholar in Poland, she has also received fellowships from Yale University, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, and Rolex Foundation.


Twitter Username: athenek

Rafia Zakaria is the author of The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan that was named one of the best nonfiction titles of 2015 by Newsweek  and Veil. She is a columnist for Dawn Pakistan and writes the "Read Other Women" Series at the Boston Review.


Twitter Username: rafiazakaria

Minda Honey is a professional writer whose work has been featured by Longreads, the Oxford American, the Guardian, Playboy, Vice, and elsewhere. She writes a relationship advice column for her local alt-weekly and is an assistant professor and director of the creative writing BFA program at Spalding.


Twitter Username: mindahoney

Marisa Siegel holds an MFA in poetry from Mills College in Oakland, California. Her poems have appeared in Handsome, Zaum, (T)here, and elsewhere. Her essay "Inherited Anger" appears in the anthology Burn It Down. She is editor in chief and owner of The Rumpus.


Twitter Username: marisasaystweet

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R253. Space Is the Place: Literary Spatialities and New Approaches to Placemaking. (, , , , DJ Lee) Just as there has been a “spatial turn” in the humanities more broadly, writers have been creating meaningful and evocative settings using sensitive, sophisticated approaches to space, place, and cartography. Panelists will discuss how we create and consider real and unreal urban landscapes, wilderness, borderlands, and ecologies of built spaces, with particular attention to how space and place dovetail into identity, the crisis of territoriality, and the trauma of displacement. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ben Reed's fiction has appeared in West Branch, PANK, Seattle Review, and Tin House. His essays have appeared in Southern Humanities Review, The Millions, and The Texas Review. He teaches writing and literature at Texas State University. His first novel and first collection are forthcoming.


Twitter Username: BenFromAustin

Website: www.benjamin-reed.com

Kelli Jo Ford's debut novel-in-stories, Crooked Hallelujah, is forthcoming. She's the recipient of the Paris Review's 2019 Plimpton Prize and the Missouri Review's 2018 Peden Prize in Fiction. She's a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.


Twitter Username: kellijoford

Syed Ali Haider is the executive director for Austin Bat Cave, a nonprofit that connects writers with students. ABC's writing programs empower students to find their voices and tell their stories. His work has been published in the Cimarron Review and Glimmer Train. He is working on a novel.


Twitter Username: SyedARHaider

Ito Romo's work, dubbed “Chicano Gothic” and “Chicano Noir,” shows the dark and gritty life along Interstate 35 through South Texas. He is the author of The Border is Burning and El Puente / The Bridge. This year, Romo was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters.


Twitter Username: omoroti

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R254. Developing the MA-MFA in Literature, Creative Writing, and Social Justice. (, , , ) Our Lady of the Lake University offers a radically unique Master of Arts-Master of Fine Arts degree in Literature, Creative Writing, and Social Justice. Each graduate course is created through the optic of social justice, and the MA-MFA graduates are scholars and artists. Non-Anglo scholars and artists have been marginalized in academe. No more. Sixty percent of OLLU's MA-MFA graduates are non-Anglo. This program serves its community and its field. Come hear four students speak about about transformation. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Wallis Sanborn is graduate program head and associate professor of English at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, Texas.

Kelly Zayas Daughtry is an emerging writer and MA/MFA graduate student in literature, creative writing, and social justice at Our Lady of the Lake University. She is the 2018–2019 Benoist Scholar and is an MFA candidate focusing on creative nonfiction and fiction.


Twitter Username: ZayasDaughtry

Carolina Hinojosa-Cisneros is an MA/MFA student in English at Our Lady of the Lake University, where she is a Jack Sr. and Doris McCord Smothers Scholar. She is the 2019 recipient of the Rubem Alves Award in Theopoetics.


Twitter Username: Cisneroscafe

Website: http://cisneroscafe.org

S.T. Shimi has been writing and making performance work in San Antonio since 1994. Born and raised in Singapore, she examines the intersections and contradictions of multiple identities in irreverent, provocative, and visually intriguing ways.  


Twitter Username: shimarella

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, River Level

R255. CANCELLED: Time Passes: When Life Is Long and Art Is Short(er). (, , , ) Fiction writers are often advised to tackle tales taking place over modest, supposedly manageable amounts of time: days, weeks, months. These panelists all instead wrote stories and books that unspool over years, decades, generations. How do writers keep such a story aloft, sustaining narrative tension and selecting which moments to depict? How do we maintain readers’ belief in and empathy for characters who keep changing, shaped by a lifetime’s worth of half-seen experiences? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lisa Ko is the author of The Leavers, a novel which won the 2016 PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction and was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award for Fiction, the 2018 PEN/Hemingway Award, and the 2017 Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Award.


Twitter Username: iamlisako

Derek Palacio is the author of the novella How to Shake the Other Man and the novel The Mortifications.


Twitter Username: derekpalacio

Website: derekpalacio.com

Adrienne Celt is the author of the novels Invitation to a Bonfire and The Daughters, which won the 2015 PEN Southwest Book Award, as well as a collection of comics entitled Apocalypse How? Her work has appeared in O. Henry Prize Stories 2016, Zyzzyva, Ecotone, the Kenyon Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: celtadri

Website: adriennecelt.com

Caitlin Horrocks is author of the novel The Vexations and the story collection This Is Not Your City. Work appears in the New Yorker, Best American Short Stories, PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories, Pushcart Prize, and elsewhere. She teaches at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, MI.


Twitter Username: horrockscaitlin

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R256. Queer and Femme Digital Literature. (, , , , ) YES FEMMES, a digital publishing experiment. Kardashians, an existentialist reality TV novel. "Emoji Collages w/ Matisse," a drag & paste world. "The Infinite Woman," a computational poem. Panelists discuss their approaches to queer and femme digital literary forms and processes. What’s femme about code? What’s queer about erasure? What’s femme about remix, pixels, hypertext, emojis? How do queer/femme aesthetics impact the form, content, and interactive experience of multimedia poetry and fiction? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Katie Schaag publishes poems, play scripts, and essays in print and digital journals, and presents her work at museums, libraries, and theatres. She teaches in the Writing & Communication Program at Georgia Tech, where she’s also developing a digital creative writing project, The Infinite Woman.


Twitter Username: KatieSchaag

Website: katieschaag.com

Sam Cohen's fiction is recently published or forthcoming in BOMB magazine, Fence, DIAGRAM, and many others. She is a candidate in USC Dornsife's Creative Writing and Literature PhD program, the producer of the Lambda LitFest, the fiction editor of Gold Line Press, and the Founding Editor of Yes Femmes.

Kate Durbin is the author of the poetry books Hoarders, E! Entertainment, and Ravenous Audience. Her interactive poetry app ABRA: A Living Text, won an Expanded Artist's Book Grant and the Turn on Literature Prize for Electronic Literature. She's a visiting professor of English at Whittier College.

Feliz Lucia Molina is a poet and author of three books: Undercastle; The Wes Letters; and Roulette. She is a former fellow of Kundiman and The MacDowell Colony and former poetry editor at The Los Angeles Review of Books. She works as a psychotherapist intern and contributes to various publications.

Sandra Rosales is a queer digital designer and front-end web developer.

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R257. CANCELLED: Writing Nepantla. (, , , , ) Along the southern border there exists a betwixt and between place. Included in this state of being is Dr. Américo Paredes' "greater Mexico" and Gloria Anzaldua's "land in between." Five writers who hail from California and Texas borderlands discuss how living and writing in two or more languages defines and enriches their work. What Nepantla means to them, what challenges it may pose for educators, and those who teach creative writing as a way to empower people to find and share their voices. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Odilia Galván Rodríguez, poet, writer, activist, and co-editor of Poetry of Resistance: Voices for Social Justice, is the author of six volumes of poetry, also widely anthologized on and offline. She facilitates creative writing workshops nationally and coordinates Poets Responding.


Twitter Username: apaxicana

Website: http://xhiuayotl.blogspot.com


Twitter Username: EdwardVidaurre

Brenda Nettles Riojas is a CantoMundo Fellow who hosts a weekly radio program—Corazón Bilingüe, featuring interviews with writers. La Primera Voz Que Oí is her first collection of Spanish poetry. She earned her MFA from the University of New Orleans.


Twitter Username: Brendariojas

Rodney Gomez is the author of Citizens of the Mausoleum and Ceremony of Sand. His work appears in Poetry, Poetry Northwest, the Gettysburg Review, Blackbird, North American Review, Pleaides, Denver Quarterly, Verse Daily, and other journals. He works at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.


Twitter Username: Rodneyxgomez

Priscilla Celina Suarez was the 2015–17 McAllen Poet Laureate. A native of the Rio Grande Valley, her poetry is a hybrid of rancheras, polkas, pop, rock, and musica internacional. She is the author of the YA book Cuentos Wela Told Me: That Scared the Beeswax Out of Me!.


Twitter Username: suapri78501

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R258. CANCELLED: MFA to ELA: Teaching K-12 Students . (, , , ) Too many of us face the post-degree sadjunct life: lack of health insurance, low pay, no job security. We are graduating to face an ever-dwindling job market without fair compensation. But what if we looked to K-12 for our teaching posts? Five practicing writers discuss the realities of teaching outside the ivory tower and in a diverse array of settings: rural high schools, inner-city arts schools, and Montessori elementary. These can be rewarding and nourishing sites of income and pedagogy.

Kenyatta Rogers is a Cave Canem fellow whose work has been previously published in or is forthcoming from Jubilat, The Volta, Rhino Poetry, Bat City Review, and others. He's an associate editor with Rhino Poetry and currently serves on creative writing faculty at the Chicago High School for the Arts.

William Archila, author of The Art of Exile (2010 International Latino Book Award) and The Gravedigger’s Archaeology (2013 Letras Latinas / Red Hen Poetry Prize), has been published in American Poetry Review, AGNl, the Georgia Review, the Missouri Review, Prairie Schooner, and Tin House.

Molly Sutton Kiefer is the author of the lyric essay "Nestuary," as well as three poetry chapbooks. She is founding editor of Tinderbox Poetry Journal and runs Tinderbox Editions, a nonprofit press. Molly teaches in Minnesota.

Kerrin McCadden's Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes won the New Issues Poetry Prize and the Vermont Book Award. An NEA Fellow and Sustainable Arts Foundation Awardee, her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry, American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Ploughshares, and Prairie Schooner.


Twitter Username: Kerrin_McCadden

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R259. CANCELLED: Women Who Wit: Readings by Writers (Who Happen to Be Women) of McSweeney’s . (, , , , Sarah Aswell) McSweeney’s Internet Tendency has been bringing doses of daily humor since 1998, and in that time has been publishing some of the sharpest, wittiest, and funniest satire and humor by writers (who happen to be women). This panel of writers (who happen to be women) come from diverse backgrounds, places, and sets of experiences, but they all share one thing in common (aside from happening to be women), they are all hilarious contributors to McSweeney’s, an American institution. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Tiffany Midge is a citizen of the Standing Rock Sioux, a former humor columnist for Indian Country Today, and author of the memoir Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese's. Midge won the Kenyon Review Earthworks Indigenous Poetry Prize for The Woman Who Married a Bear.


Twitter Username: TiffanyMidge

Mia Mercado is a humor writer whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Reductress, McSweeney's, The Rumpus, and a bottle she threw in the Milwaukee River when she was 9. Her debut nonfiction humorous essay collection Weird but Normal is set to publish in Summer of 2020.


Twitter Username: miamarket

Rebecca Saltzman's humor writing appears in The New Yorker, McSweeney's, The Belladonna Comedy, and on her mother's facebook account. She is an MFA candidate at New York University.


Twitter Username: beccasaltz

Juliana Gray is the author of Honeymoon Palsy and two other poetry collections. Her humor writing has appeared in McSweeney's, the Belladonna, and elsewhere. She is a professor of English at Alfred University in western New York.


Twitter Username: JGray_Writer

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

R260. This Is Not a Love Story: Writing Young Adult Novels That Don’t Center Romance. (, , , , Liara Tamani) The discovery of love and sex is only one aspect of teens’ lived experiences. Five young adult novelists discuss the issues at the heart of their characters’ stories—from dealing with loss and illness to navigating worlds full of racism, systemic poverty, and how they harness their own power for change. We’ll examine both the opportunities and challenges of crafting narratives that are not driven by romantic tension and explore the many forms of love that are equally deserving of celebration. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lance Rubin is the author of Crying Laughing, Denton Little’s Deathdate (winner of the ILA Award for Best YA Novel), and Denton Little’s Still Not Dead. He’s also the co-writer, along with Joe Iconis and Jason SweetTooth Williams, of the musical Broadway Bounty Hunter.


Twitter Username: lancerubinparty

Mark Oshiro is the Hugo-nominated writer of the online Mark Does Stuff universe (Mark Reads and Mark Watches), where they analyze book and TV series. Anger Is a Gift is their debut YA novel. It was honored with the 2019 Schneider Family Book Award for Best Teen Book and is a 31st Annual Lammy Awards


Twitter Username: markdoesstuff

Natalia Sylvester is the author of the novels Chasing the Sun and Everyone Knows You Go Home. Her debut YA novel, Running, is forthcoming. Sylvester's work has appeared in The New York Times, Bustle, Catapult, Latina, Electric Literature, and McSweeney's Publishing. @NataliaSylv


Twitter Username: NataliaSylv

Guadalupe García McCall is the author of four award-winning YA novels. She is the recipient of the prestigious Pura Belpré Author Award, a Westchester Young Adult Fiction Award, the Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Children’s Book Award. She teaches English at George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon.


Twitter Username: ggmccall