2020 AWP Conference Schedule

The #AWP20 Conference & Bookfair in San Antonio, Texas, schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. Visit the offsite event schedule for a listing of literary events taking place throughout the San Antonio area during our conference.

A version of the schedule accessible to screen readers is also available.

Please note that your personalized schedule on the AWP website can be saved and printed, but it cannot be transferred to the digital conference app because the two systems are independent.

 

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Saturday, March 7, 2020

7:30 am to 8:45 am

Room 225C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S100. Sober AWP. Daily 12-Step Meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

8:00 am to 8:45 am

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S101. Narrative Healing: Meditation with Lisa Weinert. () Open to all! Start the day tapping inward to open up your senses and attune your attention for the day ahead. This mindfulness meditation series will focus on breath and body awareness. Comfortable clothing encouraged. Featuring publishing professional and mindfulness meditation teacher Lisa Weinert and others. www.lisaweinert.com @lisaweinert www.narrativehealing.com

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, walk straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Lisa Weinert is passionate about the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She is the founder of Narrative Healing, a program that combines meditation, yoga, and writing to help writers (re)connect to their bodies and feel empowered to launch their work into the world.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

8:00 am to 12:00 pm

Room 221C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S102. Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography. () Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a fourth year at AWP, photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high res for $85. (Conference discount: sessions usually priced at $375.) Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required: am-photography.ticketleap.com/author-portraits-at-awp-2020

Adrianne Mathiowetz is a portrait photographer who has photographed over 200 writers, in her studio and at AWP. She is a graduate of The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Fast Company, Wired, and Entertainment Weekly.

8:00 am to 2:00 pm

Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

S103. Conference Registration, Sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level. Please consult the Bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

8:00 am to 4:00 pm

Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

S104. Saturday $5 Bookfair-Only Conference Registration, Sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. Attendees who would like to attend only the Bookfair on Saturday, March 7 can purchase a $5 one-day pass at the AWP Help Desk in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details.

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Room 221D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S105. Dickinson Quiet Space, Meeting Room Level. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." –Emily Dickinson

Room 007D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S106. Dickinson Quiet Space, River Level. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." –Emily Dickinson.

Next to restrooms outside of Exhibit Hall 4A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

S107. Nursing Mothers' Room 1. This nursing mothers' room is located in room 208 on the Meeting Room Level and is available for any nursing mother to use. Using this room will require a key from the AWP Help Desk, which is located in the registration area in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level. A refrigerator will also be available at the AWP Help Desk for your convenience.

Next to Room 215, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S108. Nursing Mothers' Room 2. This nursing mothers' room is located next to room 215 on the Meeting Room Level and is available for any nursing mother to use. This space is a single room that can be locked from the inside. A refrigerator will be available for your convenience at the AWP Help Desk, which is located in the registration area in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level.

Room 208, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S109. Nursing Mothers' Room 3. This nursing mothers' room is located next to the Grab & Go food area in the lobby corridor between the Main and West lobbies and is available for any nursing mother to use. This space has two stalls which can both be locked from the inside. A refrigerator will be available for your convenience at the AWP Help Desk, which is located in the registration area in Exhibit Hall 3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level.

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall 3 & 4, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

S110. Bookfair Concessions, Bar, & Lounge. Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Henry B. González Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference planner or mobile app for location details.

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

S111. AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Trinity University Press. With more than 700 literary exhibitors, the AWP Bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the Bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the Bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

Booth 1447, Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center, Street Level

S111B. Writer to Writer Mentorship Program Booth. AWP's Writer to Writer Mentorship Program matches new writers with published authors for a three-month series on the writing life. Now in its sixth year, Writer to Writer is open to all members, but we particularly encourage applications from those writers who have never been associated with an MFA program and those writing from regions, backgrounds, and cultures that are typically underrepresented in the literary world. To learn more, visit AWP’s Bookfair booth, where you will be able to talk with past program mentors and mentees. Diane Zinna, the program’s director, will also be there to answer your questions.

Room 216B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S112. Traveling Stanzas: Armed With our Voices. In May 1970 at Kent State University, four students were killed and nine were wounded during a non-violent protest against the Vietnam War. The tragedy revealed the grave consequences that result when communication collapses. Today, polarized perspectives, divided communities, and school violence are commonplace. As we approach the 50th anniversary of the May 4 tragedy, the Wick Poetry Center, with its partners, has developed this interactive exhibit, encouraging visitors to explore the history of student protest and the timely themes of peace and conflict transformation. www.armedwithourvoices.org

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S113. Yoga for Writers. (Manisha Sharma) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, go straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S114. The Drama of Writing Trauma: Female Essayists on Tackling the Tough Topics. (, , , , ) Writing nonfiction about trauma speaks the unspeakable, voices stories that have historically been silenced, and removes victim stigma. Trauma writing can heal, but can also re-traumatize, and women especially bear the burden of narrating their own victimhood. How can writers bring these narratives into the world yet protect themselves? What are the risks? The rewards? In this panel, five women will discuss their struggles and strategies for writing on trauma. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Emma Faesi Hudelson is a PhD candidate in literary nonfiction at the University of Cincinnati. Her work appears in Bust, Foglifter, the Nasiona, The Rumpus, and other publications. Her essays have been finalists in the 2017 International Literary Awards and Creative Nonfiction's Spring 2018 Contest.


Twitter Username: emmahudelson

Emily Heiden's work has appeared in the Washington Post, Brevity magazine, and Literary Hub. She will be published in the anthology Don't Look Now: Essays on What We Wish We Hadn't Seen. She holds an MFA in nonfiction from George Mason University.


Twitter Username: _Emily_Heiden_

Kristen Iversen's work includes the books Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats; Molly Brown: Unraveling the Myth; and Shadow Boxing: Art and Craft in Creative Nonfiction. She teaches at University of Cincinnati and is literary nonfiction editor of the Cincinnati Review.


Twitter Username: kristeniversen

Website: www.kristeniversen.com

Dr. Kimberly Mack is a memoirist, music journalist, and tenure-track assistant professor of African American literature and culture. She is at work on her book-length memoir, I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll: A Black Girl’s Musical Journey across America’s Great Racial and Class Divide.


Twitter Username: drkimberlymack

Rajpreet Heir is a writer based in New York who works for TED Conferences. Her work has appeared in the Atlantic, Brevity, Cosmopolitan, the Washington Post, the Collagist, Lit Hub, the Normal School, and the New York Times. She has an MFA in creative nonfiction from George Mason University.


Twitter Username: rajtweet_edu

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S115. On Grading the Creative Writing Workshop in the 21st Century. (, , , , ) This panel will focus on approaches to grading the creative writing workshop. We’ll examine the effects grades have on student work and present practices that can help create equity, inclusion, and risk-taking in the classroom. Our panelists will discuss grading across the spectrum, from graduate workshops to introductory general education workshops. We’ll share perspectives from small liberal arts colleges to HBCUs to large state universities and points in between from across the county. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Barney T. Haney teaches English at the University of Indianapolis, where he is co-chair of the Kellogg Writers Series. Winner of the Chris O'Malley Fiction Prize, his work has appeared in or is forthcoming from Mid-American Review, Marathon Literary Review, and Barely South Review, among others.

Shonda Buchanan is the author of Black Indian, a tale of a mixed race Midwest family caught in bi-ethnic and tri-ethnic identity crises, and an award-winning poet and educator. Buchanan is editor of Harriet Tubman Press. She teaches creative writing and composition at Loyola Marymount University and Otis College.


Twitter Username: shondabuchanan

Website: shondabuchanan.com

Jameelah Lang is the graduate writing specialist at UMKC. Her fiction appears in Kenyon Review, Cincinnati Review, Pleiades, and Witness. She has received awards from Bread Loaf, Sewanee Writers Conference, VCCA, and Hub City Writers Project. She's a board member for Radius of Arab American Writers.

Christopher Coake is the author of the novel You Came Back and the story collection We're in Trouble, for which he won the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship. In 2006 he was named a Best Young American Novelist by Granta. He teaches and directs the MFA program at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Bruce Snider is the author of three poetry collections—Fruit; Paradise, Indiana; and The Year We Studied Women. Coeditor of The Poem's Country: Place and Poetic Practice, he is an associate professor at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: BhsniderBruce

Website: www.brucesnider.com

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S116. Print vs. Online Journals: Editors Navigate a Changing Literary Landscape. (, , , , ) How do literary journals transition from publishing exclusively in print to online? How does the selection process change between the two spaces? This panel brings together editors who have navigated publishing from one medium to another. Panelists will discuss curation in print vs. online, along with the pros and cons of both. They will explore the tradition of print journals and how online spaces have facilitated more topical writing, along with how the two mediums can complement each other. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Dorothy Chan is the author of two poetry collections, Revenge of the Asian Woman and Attack of the Fifty-Foot Centerfold. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, the former editor of The Southeast Review, and poetry editor of Hobart.


Twitter Username: dorothykchan

Kaitlyn Andrews-Rice's short fiction appears in Indiana Review, Copper Nickel, Wigleaf, Paper Darts, SmokeLong Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is the former editor-in-chief of Split Lip Magazine and is currently at work on a collection of linked stories.


Twitter Username: thelegitKAR

Sebastian Hasani Paramo is a doctoral candidate at the University of North Texas. He edits The Boiler and the Rossetti Broadside Prize for American Literary Review. His poems have appeared in Southwest Review, North American Review, Salt Hill, Huizache, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: sebastianparamo

Allison Joseph is part of the creative writing faculty at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She is the author of several books and chapbooks of poems, the director of the SIUC MFA Program, and serves as editor and poetry editor for Crab Orchard Review.


Twitter Username: allisonjoseph

Alex Quinlan is a lecturer in creative writing and literature at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. His poetry has appeared in Beloit Poetry Journal, Tampa Review, and elsewhere. He is formerly editor in chief of The Southeast Review and a staff reviewer at Scout: Poetry in Review.

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S117. Out of Their "Quarrel": Poets Argue with Their History. (, , , , ) "Out of the quarrel with others we make rhetoric; out of the quarrel with ourselves we make poetry." After Yeats, five poets from diverse backgrounds reflect on their geographic, cultural, linguistic, socioeconomic, and culinary history. For some, it provides a generous metaphor one can draw on with confidence; for others, it is a revelation of complicity, a source of reckoning, an occasion for rebellion. For all, it is the place where questions and quests are shaped, justice savored or delayed. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Andrea Carter Brown is the author of Domestic Karma, The Disheveled Bed, and Brook & Rainbow. Her poetry has won the Rochelle Ratner Award from Marsh Hawk Press and the James Dickey Prize from Five Points. She is the series editor of the Word Works Washington Prize. andreacarterbrown.com

Nick Carbo is the author of four books of poetry, the latest being Chinese, Japanese, What Are These? He has also edited and coedited anthologies of Filipino and Filipino American literature, among them Pinoy Poetics and Returning a Borrowed Tongue.

Scott Hightower is the author of Part of the Bargain, a Hayden Carruth Prize winner, Self-evident, and Tartessos, a bilingual English/Spanish collection. Hightower is also the recipient of a Willis Barnstone Translation Award. He is a teacher at NYU and writes book reviews for various venues.

Andy Young is the author of four chapbooks and a full-length poetry collection, All Night It Is Morning. She teaches at New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. A graduate of the Warren Wilson Program for Writers, she's published poems, essays, and translations internationally.


Twitter Username: andimuse

Website: https://www.facebook.com/allnightmorning?fref=ts

Megan Sexton's poetry collection Swift Hour received the Adrienne Bond Award. Her poetry and nonfiction appear in Poetry, Ploughshares, The Literary Review, and elsewhere. She is editor of Five Points: A Journal of Literature & Art and teaches at Georgia State University.


Twitter Username: mmsexton

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S118. Obsessed with Texas: Writing New Stories About an Old Place. (, , , , ) Texas contains vastly different landscapes, histories, and cultures, but its literature often hasn't. Katherine Anne Porter disavowed the state. Larry McMurtry made the world think all Texans were cowboys. Latinx, African American, and women authors from all backgrounds have been neglected by the canon. West Texas and Dallas have gotten more print than the East Texas piney woods and San Antonio. This panel will explore how writers from across the state are remaking Texas's literary image. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Michael Noll is the author of The Writer's Field Guide to the Craft of Fiction& and the program director at the Writers' League of Texas. He edits the blog Read to Write Stories, and his fiction has appeared in the Best American Mystery Stories anthology.


Twitter Username: Readwritestory

Website: readtowritestories.com

Mónica Teresa Ortiz is a writer from Texas. She has been recently published in Pilgrimage, Huizache, and Raspa, amongst numerous other poetry journals and anthologies.


Twitter Username: elgallosalvaje

Vincent Cooper is the author of Zarzamora: Poetry of Survival and the chapbook Where the Reckless Ones Come to Die. Cooper's poetry has appeared in several online zines, journals, and anthologies. He is a member of the Macondo Writers Workshop.


Twitter Username: vinnycoop13

Heather Harper Ellett is a therapist in private practice and teaches at the Writer's Path at SMU. Ain't Nobody Nobody is her first novel.


Twitter Username: heatherellett

Joe Jiménez is the author of Rattlesnake Allegory, his second poetry collection. His essays and poems have recently appeared in the Adroit Journal, Iron Horse, RHINO, Aster(ix), and Waxwing and on the PBS NewsHour and Lambda Literary sites.


Twitter Username: JoeJimenezSATX

Website: joejimenez.net

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S119. A Tribute to Keorapetse William Kgositsile. (, , , , Phillippayaa De Villiers ) Keorapetse Kgositsile (1938–2018) was a South African activist and one of the most influential poets of contemporary Africa. A member of the ANC in the 1960s and '70s, he was inaugurated as South Africa's National Poet Laureate in 2006. Kgositsile was one of the first to connect African and African American poetry and inspired the name of the seminal group "The Last Poets." Join us in celebrating his life and work and his forthcoming Collected Poems published by the African Poetry Book Fund.

Matthew Shenoda is the author of Somewhere Else, winner of the American Book Award, Seasons of Lotus, Seasons of Bone, and Tahrir Suite. He is associate provost for Social Equity & Inclusion and professor of literary arts at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). matthewshenoda.com


Twitter Username: matthewshenoda

Website: www.matthewshenoda.com

Chris Abani's recent books are The Secret History of Las Vegas, The Face (a memoir), and Sanctificum. Honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, the PEN/Hemingway Award, an Edgar Prize, a Ford USA Artists Fellowship, and the PEN Beyond Margins Award. He is a professor of English at Northwestern University.


Twitter Username: chrisabani

John Keene is the author or co-author of several books, including Annotations; Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse; and Counternarratives. He also is the translator of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst’s novel Letters from a Seducer. He teaches at Rutgers University-Newark.


Twitter Username: jstheater

Website: http://jstheater.blogspot.com

Tjawangwa Dema is a poet, former chair of the Writers Association of Botswana, and an Honorary Fellow in Writing of the University of Iowa. A founding member of her country's spoken word movement, she produced a CD anthology of twelve Batswana poets and is coproducer of the Africa Writes Bristol festival.


Twitter Username: Tjdema

Website: www.tjdema.blogspot.com

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S120. Beyond the Hot Take: Women Writing Cultural Criticism That Matters. (, , , , ) How do critics balance the need to respond quickly to ongoing cultural conversations with loyalty to their individual crafts? This panel of five female critics—writing from varying disciplinary perspectives and professional backgrounds—will discuss what culture writing is and how it is changing in a digital landscape. In light of the shifting challenges of the field, each panelist will present her view for the future of criticism and how writers can make art from strong opinions and ideas. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Arielle Bernstein is a writer and cultural critic whose work has been featured in the Atlantic, the Guardian, Salon, AV Club, and Tablet magazine. She is a professorial lecturer at American University in Washington, DC, where she teaches academic and creative writing.

Eileen G’Sell's criticism and poetry can be found in Salon, Vice, Boston Review, and the Millions, among other forums. She teaches rhetoric and film at Washington University in St. Louis and creative writing for the Prison Education Project. Her first book is Life after Rugby.


Twitter Username: Reckless_Edit

Shanon Lee is a survivor activist and storyteller with features on National Geographic, HuffPost Live, The Wall Street Journal, TV One, and the REELZ Channel’s Scandal Made Me Famous. She is a contributor for Forbes and The Lily at The Washington Post.


Twitter Username: mylove4writing

Website: Mylove4writing.com

Amanda Parrish Morgan is an essayist writing (mostly) about teaching, motherhood, literature, and long distance running. Connect with her on Twitter: @ap10k Instagram: @amandaparrishmorgan.


Twitter Username: ap10k

Shani Gilchrist is a freelance journalist, essayist, and critic who seeks to highlight the nuance in America's history and discourse. Her work has appeared in Tthe Literary Hub and the Daily Beast, with essays about race, gender, and inequality in Catapult, the Toast, Longreads, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: ShaniRGilchrist

Website: http://shanigilchrist.com

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S121. Women Trespassing: Women Breaking the Rules in Fiction and Their Writing Careers. (, , , , ) A Catholic-turned-Buddhist has sex with her Zen master. A biomechanist builds a deer suit to live in the woods. A woman stalks the celebrity living on her street. A girl basketball player navigates a male-dominated world. In this panel, women writers discuss how they write trespassing women and break rules in their writing lives. Women writers have been too long excluded from spaces of authority. We’re taking the power back. This panel is for writers ready to make risky choices and daring work. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Blair Hurley is the author of the novel The Devoted. She received a 2018 Pushcart Prize and scholarships from Bread Loaf, Hawthornden Castle, and the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts. She teaches creative writing at the University of Toronto and McMaster University.


Twitter Username: bhurley

Lara Ehrlich is the author of the short story collection Animal Wife, and her short stories appear in StoryQuarterly, Hunger Mountain, the Massachusetts Review, the Normal School, and River Styx, among others.


Twitter Username: ehrlichlara

Dana Czapnik is the author of the critically acclaimed debut novel The Falconer. She has earned fellowships in fiction from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Center for Fiction, and the Hertog Foundation.


Twitter Username: danaczapnik

Laura Sims is the author of Looker, a debut novel. She has published four books of poetry, most recently Staying Alive, and is the editor of Fare Forward: Letters from David Markson.


Twitter Username: ljsims50

Website: www.laurasims.net

Kristen Millares Young is the author of Subduction. A prizewinning journalist, essayist, and book critic, she is Prose Writer-in-Residence of Hugo House. Her work appears in The Washington Post, The Guardian, The New York Times, Hobart, Moss, and Poetry Northwest. She is cofounder and chair of InvestigateWest.


Twitter Username: kristenmillares

Website: www.kristenmyoung.com

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S122. Dismantling the White Imagination: On Intimacy in Creative Nonfiction. (, , , , ) Creative nonfiction requires intimacy and vulnerability. Within a genre where the relationship between “I” and “you” is always on the line, how can we as writers forge connections between self and other? How can we reimagine whiteness and disrupt the marginalization of nonwhite voices? By exploring the electric space of collaboration and conversation, panelists will discuss how writers of color and white writers can make otherized identities familiar and new American narratives viable. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Emily Arnason Casey is the author of Made Holy: Essays. Her writing has appeared in the Normal School, The Rumpus, Hotel Amerika, Briar Cliff Review, Mid-American Review, and elsewhere. She teaches writing at the Community College of Vermont. www.emilyarnasoncasey.com


Twitter Username: emilyarna

Rita Banerjee is the director of the MFA in Writing & Publishing program at Vermont College of Fine Arts and author of Echo in Four Beats, CREDO: An Anthology of Manifestos and Sourcebook for Creative Writing, and A Night with Kali. Her work appears in Poets & Writers, The Rumpus, VIDA, and LARB.


Twitter Username: Rita_Banerjee

Website: http://ritabanerjee.com

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, which won the CLMP Firecracker Award for Nonfiction. She is currently the Helen Zell Visiting Professor of Creative Nonfiction at the University of Michigan.

Jericho Parms is the author of Lost Wax. Her essays have appeared in Fourth Genre, The Normal School, Hotel Amerika, Brevity, and elsewhere. She received her MFA in writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts and teaches at Champlain College.

David Shields is the internationally bestselling author of more than 20 books, including Reality Hunger (30 "best books of 2010" mentions),The Thing about Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead (New York Times bestseller), The Trouble with Men, and Nobody Hates Turmp More Than Trump. He is an NBCC finalist and his books appear in twenty-four languages.


Twitter Username: _DavidShields

Website: www.davidshields.com

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S123. Writing the Mother Wound, A Reading. (, , , , ) We live in a culture that insists that we sacrifice ourselves at the altar of the mother, and are shamed when we refuse. How do we push back on the imposed silences, and what can we do to make work around the mother wound inclusive and intersectional? Five multi-genre writers of color will address the complex realities of mother-daughter relationships and interrogate how legacies of slavery, racism, colonization, and immigration have shaped those relationships.

Jaquira Díaz is the author of the forthcoming Ordinary Girls and the recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and the Kenyon Review. Her work appears in The Best American Essays, Longreads, and the New York Times Style Magazine.


Twitter Username: jaquiradiaz

Website: www.jaquiradiaz.com

Elisabet Velasquez is a Boricua writer from Bushwick, Brooklyn. Her work has been published by NBC, WeAreMiTu, AJ+. She is the 2017 Button Poetry Video Prize Winner. She is the author of the chapbook PTSD.

Vanessa Martir has been published in Longreads, The Rumpus, The Washington Post, and Roxane Gay’s anthology Not That Bad, among others. She is the founder of the Writing Our Lives Workshop and the Writing the Mother Wound class. Vanessa is working on her memoir, A Dim Capacity for Wings.


Twitter Username: Vanessa_LaLoba

Website: vanessamartir.wordpress.com

Leslie Contreras Schwartz is a multi-genre writer from Houston. She is the author of the collections of poems Nightbloom & Cenote and Fuego and is the current Houston poet laureate.


Twitter Username: @LesConSchw

H’Rina DeTroy is a hapa Montagnard American memoirist, essayist and creative writing instructor. She's the recipient of Aspen Word's 2019 Emerging Writer Fellowship. Her essay "The Vengeance of Elephants" was chosen for the 2017 Curt Johnson Prose Award in Creative Nonfiction, selected by Roxane Gay.


Twitter Username: hjdetroy

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S124. Teaching Global Literature in the American Creative Writing Class. (, , , ) Ursula K. Le Guin said, “We read books to find out who we are.” With rising nationalism and fundamentalism worldwide, this quote is of even greater importance now. We underestimate our students’ hunger and curiosity when we teach them worlds they already know. Panelists will discuss works of global literatures (including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry) uniquely suited to the contemporary American classroom along with teaching strategies and exercises. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sayantani Dasgupta is the author of Fire Girl: Essays on India, America, & the In-Between--finalist for the 2016 Foreword Indies Award--and the chapbook The House of Nails: Memories of a New Delhi Childhood. She teaches at UNCW and has led writing workshops in India, Italy, Mexico, and the US.


Twitter Username: sayan10e

Website: www.sdasgupta.com

Khem K. Aryal writes fiction and poetry. His fiction has appeared in such journals as Isthmus, Hawaii Pacific Review, Poydras Review, Northeast Review, and Warscapes. He is the author of two poetry books, Epic Teashop and Kathmandu Saga, and teaches creative writing at Arkansas State University.


Twitter Username: khemaryal

Mildred K. Barya is assistant professor of creative writing and literature at UNC-Asheville and a board member of African Writers Trust (AWT) and has published three poetry books and short stories in various journals. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Denver and blogs on literary matters.


Twitter Username: midibarya twitter

Aruni Kashyap is a writer, translator, and poet, author of The House with a Thousand Stories and His Father's Disease. He translates from the Indian language Assamese to English and is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: arunikashyap

Website: http://www.arunikashyap.com/

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S125. The Future Is Female and Fantastic. (, , , ) More and more writers are flouting the conventions of “realistic” fiction by incorporating surrealism, myth, horror, and black comedy into their narratives. Four writers of compellingly weird and weirdly compelling fiction discuss the fabulist writing that inspires them and how the reality of unreality allows them to push boundaries in their own work, dig deeper into the strange, fantastic, and absurd truths of female experience, and evocatively reflect how it feels to live in the world. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Mimi Lok is the author of the story collection Last of Her Name. The title story was a finalist for the 2018 Katherine Anne Porter Fiction Prize, and she is the recipient of a Smithsonian Ingenuity Award and an Ylvisaker Award for Fiction.

Rita Bullwinkel is the author of the story collection Belly Up, which won the Believer Book Award. She is a contributing editor of NOON and an editor at large for McSweeney's. She is a recipient of grants and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, and the Sewanee Writers' Conference.


Twitter Username: RitaBullwinkel

Anita Felicelli is the author of Chimerica: A Novel and the short story collection Love Songs for a Lost Continent, which won the 2016 Mary Roberts Rinehart Fiction contest.


Twitter Username: anitafelicelli

Meng Jin’s debut novel Little Gods is forthcoming. Her short fiction appears or is forthcoming in the Threepenny Review, Ploughshares, the Masters Review, and elsewhere. She is a Kundiman Fellow, David TK Wong Fellow, Elizabeth George Grantee, and Steinbeck Fellow.


Twitter Username: jinittowinit

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S126. We’ve Been Too Patient: Voices from Radical Mental Health. (, , , ) We’ve Been Too Patient is more than a book. It is a movement, a reclamation. We are a chorus of voices working to shift the conversation from individual pathology to collective understanding and liberation, while highlighting grassroots alternatives to the “Mental Health Industrial Complex.” Join us for a panel discussion with five contributors from a groundbreaking book that Sonya Renee Taylor says “shreds stigma and replaces it with dignity, autonomy, and power.” Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kelechi Ubozoh is a Nigerian American writer and mental health advocate. She was the first undergraduate published in The New York Times and is featured in The S Word documentary. Her first book, We've Been Too Patient, features diverse voices of radical mental health.

Jeneé Darden is an award-winning journalist and mental health advocate. She blogs about Black women's issues at Cocoa Fly and is a host/reporter for NPR station KALW in the Bay Area. Jeneé is an alum of USC and UC San Diego. Her debut womanist book of poems and essays is When a Purple Rose Blooms.


Twitter Username: cocoafly

Leah Harris has been published in Beltway Poetry, Mizna, and DC Poets Against the War: An Anthology, and is featured in the anthology Word Warriors: 35 Women Leaders in the Spoken Word Revolution. Leah's solo storytelling show, Aliens, Nazis, and Angels, debuted at the 2016 Capital Fringe Festival.


Twitter Username: leahida

LD Green is a genderqueer writer, performer, college educator, and mental health advocate. She co-edited and contributed to the book We've Been Too Patient. She writes poetry, nonfiction, and speculative fiction and is a Lambda Literary Fellow. She is an English professor at Los Medanos College.


Twitter Username: lizdemigreen

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S127. Hay poesía en el Midwest. (, , , , ) A bilingual poetry reading, in spoken Spanish and projected English supertitles, by poets that write the immigrant experience from the heartland and are originally from Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Bolivia, Honduras, and Venezuela.

Juana Goergen is a Latin American literature professor at DePaul University, As a poet she has published La sal de las brujas (finalist, Letras de oro, 1997), La piel a medias, Las ilusas/Dreamers in Desarraigos, and Mar en los huesos.

Silvia Goldman published two books of poetry: Cinco movimientos del llanto and De los peces la sed. A section of the former book was translated and published under the title No one rises indifferent to sorrow.  Her manuscript, miedo, was a finalist for the VI Fernández Labrador international award.

Miguel Marzana is a poet and writer. Founder of Editorial Andras, he is the author of the collection of poems Decomposiciones - aceite de un cielo. He currently directs contratiempo’s literary workshop and coordinates the project of poetic performance and scenic poetry: Prohibido leer.

Oriette D’Angelo is currently pursuing her MFA in Spanish creative writing at the University of Iowa, where she was awarded the Iowa Arts Fellowship. In 2014, she obtained the Prize for Works of Authors Unpublished granted by Monte Ávila Editores with her book Cardiopatías.


Twitter Username: oriettedangelo

León Leiva Gallardo is a fiction writer and poet. He is the author of the novels Guadalajara de noche and La casa del cementerio , short fiction book El pordiosero y el dios, and poetry collections Breviario, Tríptico: tres lustros de poesía, and Desarraigos. His works also appear in international magazines and anthologies.

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S128. Serious Daring: Building a Summer Writing Workshop in the Deep South. (, , , , ) Five Southern writers tell the story of building a residential creative writing workshop for talented youth. Students from diverse backgrounds live and write together as they explore the literary legacy of Mississippians from Eudora Welty to Margaret Walker and craft their own writerly identities. From 20 students to 80 in just five years, the story of the McMullan Young Writers Workshop is a harbinger of the next generation of great writers to emerge from the Deep South. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Margaret McMullan is the author of nine award-winning books including In My Mother's House, Sources of Light, and the anthology Every Father's Daughter. She received an NEA grant and a Fulbright to Hungary to write Where the Angels Lived: One Family’s Story of Exile, Loss, and Return.


Twitter Username: MargaretMcMulla

Website: www.margaretmcmullan.com

Mary Miller is the author of two novels, Biloxi and The Last Days of California, as well as two collections of stories, Big World and Always Happy Hour. She is a former Michener Fellow in Fiction at the University of Texas and Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: maryumiller

Website: maryumiller.tumblr.com

Shalanda Stanley is a contemporary young adult writer and is the author of two novels, Drowning Is Inevitable and Nick and June Were Here. In addition to writing, she is an assistant professor of literacy and teaches reading and writing methods to education majors at her local university.


Twitter Username: shalandastanley

Liz Egan is director of the Writing Center and assistant professor of creative writing at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. She is also director of the McMullan Young Writers Workshop and coeditor of Gazing Grain Press.


Twitter Username: lizemilie

Maurice Carlos Ruffin is novelist, essayist, and short story writer. He writes on the subjects of family, race, economics, and art.


Twitter Username: mauriceruffin

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S129. The Borderlands of Latinx Poetics and Disability Studies. (, , , ) Susan Sontag writes, “Everyone who is born holds dual citizenship… the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick.” Most of us end up with a “good passport” for our lives, even if at times, we “identify… as citizens” of the “kingdom of sick.” But what happens to the poet who remains a “citizen of that other place?” This panel will focus on intersections of disability, poetry, and creativity. Panelists will explore disability and writing as a kind of borderland space and metaphor.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

M. Soledad Caballero is Professor of English at Allegheny College.Her scholarship focuses on British Romanticism, WGSS, and interdisciplinarity. Her poetry has appeared in the Missouri Review, Memorious, the Crab Orchard Review, and other venues.


Twitter Username: ProfMSCaballero

Jasminne Mendez is an award winning author, performance poet, and educator. She received her BA in English literature and her MEd in curriculum and instruction from the University of Houston. She is the author of two hybrid collections of poetry and essays.


Twitter Username: jasminnemendez

Vanessa Angelica Villarreal is the author of Beast Meridian. She is the recipient of a 2019 Whiting Award, a 2018 Texas Institute of Letters John A. Robertson Award for Best First Book of Poetry, a Friends of Literature Prize from Poetry, and was a 2019 Kate Tufts Discovery Award finalist.


Twitter Username: Vanessid

Carolina Ebeid received a 2015/2016 NEA Fellowship and awards from the Stadler Center, CantoMundo, and Bread Loaf Writers Conference. She holds an MFA from the Michener Center and is a doctoral student at the University of Denver. You Ask Me to Talk about the Interior is her first poetry collection.


Twitter Username: carolinaebeid

Website: carolinaebeid.com

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S130. Iowa Short Fiction Award Series 50th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) Since its creation in 1969, the Iowa Short Fiction Award series, juried through the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, has awarded the publication of the first fiction books of over 65 writers. This reading will bring together current and past winners of the Iowa Short Fiction Award and John Simmons Short Fiction Award in celebration of the series’ 50th anniversary and the University of Iowa Press’s ongoing commitment to elevating the voices of emerging fiction writers. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ashley Wurzbacher's debut short story collection, Happy Like This, won Iowa's 2019 John Simmons Short Fiction Award. She lives in Birmingham, Alabama and teaches creative writing at the University of Montevallo. She is at work on a novel.


Twitter Username: alwurzbacher

Anthony Varallo is the author of a novel, The Lines, as well as four short story collections, including This Day in History, winner of the John Simmons Short Fiction Award. He teaches in the MFA program in creative writing at the College of Charleston, where he is the fiction editor of Crazyhorse.


Twitter Username: TheLines1979

Allegra Hyde's first book, Of This New World, won the John Simmons Short Fiction Award. She is the recipient of three Pushcart Prizes, as well as fellowships from the Lucas Artists Program, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, and the Fulbright Commission. She currently teaches at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: allegra_hyde

Ruvanee Pietersz Vilhauer won the Iowa Short Fiction Award in 2018 and the Commonwealth Short Story Competition in 2004. She is the author of a story collection, The Water Diviner and Other Stories, and a novel, The Mask Collectors.

Emily Wortman-Wunder is an award-winning essayist and fiction writer who has published in Kenyon Review, Creative Nonfiction, Nimrod, High Country News, and elsewhere. Her book of stories, Not a Thing to Comfort You, won the 2019 Iowa Short Fiction Award.

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S131. Towards a "Third Language": Rethinking Text and Image Assignments in the Workshop. (, , , , ) Of synthesizing verbal and visual material, C.D. Wright wrote: “In collaboration we create a third language.” How can we adapt the workshop to practice this “third language”? On this panel, we’ll present useful assignments—essays, films, poems, stories—that help students engage the flux and friction between text and images: from adaptation to activism, sampling to speaking out, illustration to transfiguration. We’ll also consider how multimodal forms call us to rethink the workshop itself. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Katy Didden is the author of The Glacier’s Wake (a book of poems). She holds a PhD from the University of Missouri and an MFA from the University of Maryland. A former Hodder Fellow at Princeton University, Katy is currently an assistant professor of creative writing at Ball State University.


Twitter Username: kedidden

Website: www.katydidden.com

Kelcey Parker Ervick is the author of The Bitter Life of Bozena Nemcova, a hybrid work of biography, memoir, and visual art. Her two previous books of fiction are Liliane's Balcony and For Sale by Owner. She teaches creative writing, comics, and collage at Indiana University South Bend.


Twitter Username: KelceyErvick

Website: http://kelceyervick.com

Sarah Minor is the author of The Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated, a digital chapbook. She runs a series on visual essays at Essay Daily and teaches as a doctoral candidate in creative nonfiction at Ohio University. Her recent work appears at The Normal School, Passages North, and Territory.


Twitter Username: sarahceniaminor

Saara Myrene Raappana is author of A Story of America Goes Walking and Milk Tooth, Levee, Fever. She's a founding editor of Cellpoems, a poetry journal distributed via text message, and is director of communications and educational initiatives for Motionpoems, a poetry film production organization.


Twitter Username: saaramyrene

Website: saaramyrene.com

Kristen Radtke is the author of the graphic nonfiction book Imagine Wanting Only This, and the forthcoming Seek You: Essays on American Loneliness and Terrible Men, a graphic novel. She is the art director and deputy publisher of The Believer.


Twitter Username: kristenradtke

Website: www.kristenradtke.com

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S132. Inclusive Who?: Running a Reading Series That Supports Marginalized Writers. (, , , , ) From sightings in bookstores and galleries to bars and boxing rings, reading series’ are a vital part of all literary communities. A reading series with special focus on POC, queer, disabled, and otherwise marginalized communities, though, creates spaces of resistance and camaraderie that otherwise wouldn’t exist within the mainstream literary canon. On this panel, curators will share how their reading series started and how they decenter traditional methods of running a reading series. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Schandra Madha is one half of a double scoop cohost sundae for the monthly I Scream Social feminist reading series and a coeditor of the print anthology of the same name. The series takes place at Malvern Books in Austin, Texas, where Schandra has been a bookseller since opening day.

Annar Veröld is a Honduran-American poet, screenwriter-director, and the managing editor at Host Publications. She proudly hosts the reading series I Scream Social.


Twitter Username: annarverold

Cori Bratby-Rudd is a queer LA-based writer and cofounder of Influx Collectiv(e)’s Queer Poetry Reading Series. She graduated cum laude from UCLA’s Gender Studies department, and received her MFA in creative writing from California Institute of the Arts. In 2018, she was a Lambda Literary fellow.

Julia Lattimer is the poetry editor for Breakwater Review. They were named Editor's Choice for the 2019 Sandy Crimmons National Prize for Poetry and run a monthly queer poetry reading series in Boston.

Nia KB is a Black queer nonbinary poet, editor, and teaching artist. They’ve received a number fellowships, most notably from Lambda Literary, Winter Tangerine, and UTSA’s African American Literatures and Cultures Institute. They host and curate the reading series/open mic ATX Interfaces.


Twitter Username: nia_kb

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S133. The So-Called Yellow Rose—Talking With Three Women Texas State Poets Laureate. (, , , ) Emily West, the so-called Yellow Rose of Texas, has come down through lore as a slave, a spy, and an erotic distraction. The powerful reality was a free woman of color making Texas history. Also historic is the recent naming of women of various ethnicities, life experiences and esthetics to the position of Poet Laureate. Panelists will discuss being a civic poet of a large diverse state during the years of border wall debate, climate change, and #metoo, each engaging the position on her own terms.

Emmy Pérez, 2020 Texas poet laureate, is the author of With the River on Our Face and Solstice. She is a past recipient of an NEA poetry fellowship, cofounded Poets Against Walls, and serves on CantoMundo's organizing committee. She is also professor of creative writing at UT Rio Grande Valley.


Twitter Username: emmyemmaperez

Website: www.emmyperez.com

Laurie Ann Guerrero is the author of A Tongue in the Mouth of the Dying and A Crown for Gumecindo. She held consecutive posts as the San Antonio poet laureate (2014–2016) and Texas poet laureate (2016–2017). She is the Writer-in-Residence at Texas A&M University-San Antonio.


Twitter Username: LaurAnnGuerrero

Website: www.LaurieAnnGuerrero.com

ire’ne lara silva is the author of three poetry collections, furia, Blood Sugar Canto, Cuicacalli/House of Song, and a short story collection, flesh to bone, which won the Premio Aztlán. She and poet Dan Vera are also the coeditors of Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzalduan Borderlands.


Twitter Username: irenelarasilva

Rosemary Catacalos was 2013 Texas poet laureate. Her work has has twice appeared in The Best American Poetry, and she has held NEA and Stanford Stegner fellowships. She is the author of a fine press chapbook, Begin Here. She is listed on the Texas Commission on the Arts Touring Roster.

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S134. Home in the Diaspora, Poetics of. (, , , , ) Home in America often means home in a diaspora in which two lives are lived simultaneously. The homeland of origin exerts emotional, cultural, spiritual, and imaginative influences both on the individual and collective consciousness. Fives poets of African-, English/Spanish Caribbean-, Irish-, Jewish-, and Haitian-American backgrounds will explore how diaspora and homeland are represented in the poetries of their cultures and own works, highlighting themes as well as craft and poetics.

Owen Lewis is the winner of the 2016 International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry & Medicine and 2016 Jean Pedrick Chapbook Award, professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, and author of four poetry collections poetry: March In San Miguel, Sometimes Full of Daylight, Best Man, and Marriage Map.


Twitter Username: owenlewispoetry

Website: www.owenlewispoet.com

Nathan McClain is the author of Scale. He is a graduate from Warren Wilson's MFA Program for Writers and a Cave Canem fellow. He currently teaches creative writing at Drew University.

Aaron Coleman is the author of Threat Come Close and St. Trigger, a chapbook that won the 2015 Button Poetry Prize. A Fulbright Scholar, Cave Canem fellow, and ALTA's 2017 Jansen Memorial Fellow, Aaron is currently a PhD student in comparative literature at Washington University in St. Louis.

Daniel Tobin is the author of nine books of poems, most recently Blood Labors, From Nothing, and The Stone in the Air. On Serious Earth is his latest book of essays. His awards include the Massachusetts Book Award in Poetry, fellowships from the NEA and Guggenheim Foundation.

Danielle Legros Georges is a poet, essayist, and professor at Lesley University. She is the author of two book of poems, The Dear Remote Nearness of You and Maroon.

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S135. The Past Is Present: Writing the Legacy of Historical Injustice. (, , , , ) Authors across genres pursue past subjects to consider present injustices. How can historical excavation illuminate the legacy of oppression? Diverse writers of hybrid, fiction, nonfiction, and poetry discuss the challenges of research work, ways to move between fact and fiction, and imaginative strategies to recreate a lost time. Each author discusses the concerns that drew them to their subjects, and the conversations their work invites. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sheila O’Connor writes and publishes across genres and audiences. Her six books include her recent hybrid text Evidence of V: A Novel in Fragments, Facts, and Fictions. She teaches at Hamline University and serves as fiction editor of Water~Stone Review.

Angela Pelster's essay collection Limber won the Great Lakes Colleges Award New Writer Award in Nonfiction and was a finalist for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel award for the art of the essay. She has published in Ploughshares, LitHub, The Kenyon Review, and The Gettysburg Review, amongst others.

Hai-Dang Phan is the author of Reenactments: Poems and Translations. A recipient of a 2017 NEA creative writing fellowship, he teaches at Grinnell College.

Victoria Blanco's field research and writing focuses on Rarámuri migration from the Sierra Madre mountains of western Mexico to Chihuahua. She also writes about her family's five generations on the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. She received her MFA from the University of Minnesota.


Twitter Username: V_Blanco1

LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) is a novelist, poet, and filmmaker. Her latest book is Savage Conversations. Awards include a United States Artist Ford Fellowship, and an American Book Award. She's the Eidson Distinguished Chair in English at UGA, Athens.


Twitter Username: LeAnneHowe

Website: http://mikokings.wordpress.com/

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S136. Crossover Appeal of Innovation in Creating Culturally Authentic Children's Books. (, , , ) A discussion of creative new paths for writers of edgy, culturally authentic, or crossover appeal work in the field of children's literature by five award-winning authors and illustrators who have pushed the envelope in the area of cultural diversity. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Author Lupe Ruiz-Flores has had six bilingual picture books published. She is the regional advisor for the Texas Southwest chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI), a member of the Writers’ League of Texas, the Author’s Guild, and the Texas Library Association (TLA).


Twitter Username: LupeRuizFlores

Xelena González is a storyteller, essayist, screenwriter, poet, and author of All Around Us. A 2019 fellow of Sandra Cisneros’ Macondo Writers Workshop, she is currently developing work with support from the Artist Foundation of San Antonio and the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture.

Adriana Garcia is a visual artist, muralist, illustrator, and scenic designer. She was awarded the prestigious Pura Belpré Honor Book Award and the Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award for her illustrations. Garcia has been invited to present her work at national conferences and teaches.


Twitter Username: adrianamjgarcia

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S137. Building Capacity: Fundraising Strategies for Small Literary Publishers, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , , ) Hear directly from funders about financial opportunities, best practices for applying for grants, information about the application and reporting process, and best practices for responsible stewardship.

Mary Gannon is the executive director of the Community of Literary Magazines and Presses, a 50-year-old nonprofit organization that works to ensure a vibrant, diverse literary landscape by supporting and advocating for small literary publishers and their authors.


Twitter Username: gannonme

Neal Thompson is a journalist and the author of five books, including A Curious Man, Driving with the Devil, and the 2018 memoir Kickflip Boys. Neal manages the Amazon Literary Partnership; he previously ran Amazon's Best Books of the Month program and co-owned the Amazon Book Review blog.


Twitter Username: nealthompson

Website: www.nealthompson.com

Courtney Hodell is the director of writers' programs at the Whiting Foundation, overseeing the Whiting Awards for emerging writers in addition to other literary grants. She is also a book editor.

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S138. Gendered Land: The Meaning of Metaphor in Environmental Writing. (, , , ) Virgin wilderness, fertile land, Mother Nature, barren ground: American English is infused with gendered metaphors describing our landscape, and these metaphors inform our experiences, our cultural identities, and our writing. A diverse panel explores the creative spaces and limitations of these metaphors across genre, examining the settler colonial roots of common perceptions of land and bodies, and the potential such metaphor can offer stories of environmental and social justice and survival. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Erica Watson lives and writes on the boundary of Denali National Park, Alaska. Her work has appeared in Panorama, High Desert Journal, Alaska Women Speak, and other publicatons. She earned her MFA in nonfiction from the University of Alaska Anchorage in 2014 and is working on her first book.

CMarie Fuhrman is the coeditor of Native Voices: Indigenous American Poetry, Craft and Conversations and author of poetry and nonfiction which appeared in multiple journals including Cutthroat, a Journal of the Arts, Whitefish Review, Broadsided Press, High Desert Journal, and others.

Ruby Hansen Murray, a citizen of the Osage Nation, received an MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. She teaches writing in tribal and community settings. A prose writer and poet, she is a Hedgebrook, Jack Straw, and VCCA fellow awarded residencies in remote Oregon, Wyoming, and Alaska.


Twitter Username: osage_writer

Website: www.rubyhansenmurray.com

Emily Withnall is a freelance writer and editor. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Kenyon Review, and The Rumpus, among other publications. She is at work on a book about domestic violence and hydraulic fracturing.


Twitter Username: emilywithnall

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S139. Beyond the Brady Bunch: Reinventing the Poem of the American Family. (, , , , ) While poets have long delved into the complications of rendering family on the page, it can be challenging to navigate poems in the vein of parental devotion or childhood trauma when our families break the traditional mold. Whether caring for aging parents or raising kids, these narratives remain utterly familiar while their specifics—queer parents, neurodiverse children, transracial adoption—have never felt so varied. How do we find new ways to write the new families so many of us belong to?

Geffrey Davis is the author of Night Angler, winner of the James Laughlin Award, and Revising the Storm, winner of the A. Poulin Prize. His honors also include fellowships from Bread Loaf, Cave Canem, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Whiting Foundation.


Twitter Username: GeffreyDavis

Website: www.geffreydavis.com

Keetje Kuipers is a former Stegner Fellow and the author of three collections of poetry. A recipient of the Pushcart Prize, her poetry and prose have appeared widely, including The Best American Poetry anthology. Keetje teaches at Hugo House in Seattle and is senior editor at Poetry Northwest.

Erika Meitner is the author of five books of poems, including Holy Moly Carry Me, which won the 2018 National Jewish Book award, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award. She is an associate professor of English and creative writing program director at Virginia Tech.


Twitter Username: rikam99

Website: erikameitner.com

Oliver de la Paz is the author of five books of poetry. His most recent book, The Boy in the Labyrinth, is published by the University of Akron Press. He is a founding member of Kundiman and teaches at the College of the Holy Cross and in the low-res MFA Program at PLU.


Twitter Username: @Oliver_delaPaz

Website: http://www.oliverdelapaz.com

Blas Falconer is poetry editor for the Los Angeles Review and teaches in the MFA at San Diego State University. His third poetry collection is Forgive the Body This Failure. Awards include an NEA Fellowship and the Maureen Egen Writers Exchange.


Twitter Username: blas_falconer

Website: blasfalconer.com

Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S140. The Hustle: Learning to Promote Yourself and Your Writing. (, , , , ) You have a book or a book deal, and now you're looking for the most efficient, cost-effective, and interesting ways to start marketing. Whether your book is with a big publisher, small press, or self-published, it is vital to have self-promotion strategies that you feel confident in. As an author, what can you do to move the needle on sales, engage with potential readers, and be well positioned to publish your next book? Authors come together to discuss their own challenges and successes.

Joseph Scapellato earned his MFA in fiction at New Mexico State University. He is the author of the novel, The Made-Up Man, and the story collection, Big Lonesome. Joseph is an assistant professor of English at Bucknell University.

Amy Trueblood grew up in Southern California only ten minutes from Disneyland which sparked an early interest in storytelling. Her debut novel, Nothing but Sky, a Spring 2018 Junior Library Guild selection, is available now. Her next book is Across a Broken Shore.


Twitter Username: atrueblood5

Kit Frick is a novelist, poet, and MacDowell Colony fellow. A senior editor at Black Lawrence Press, she holds an MFA from Syracuse University. Kit is the author of the YA novels See All the Stars, All Eyes on Us, and I Killed Zoe Spanos and the poetry collection A Small Rising Up in the Lungs.


Twitter Username: kitfrick

Adrianne Finlay is the author of two young adult novels, Your One And Only and Cut Off. She received her PhD in literature and creative writing from Binghamton University. She is an associate professor of English at Upper Iowa University and the program director of creative writing.


Twitter Username: AdrianneFinlay

Jeremy Schraffenberger is editor of The North American Review and a professor of English at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author of Saint Joe's Passion and The Waxen Poor. His other work has appeared in Best Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, Prairie Schooner, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jdschraff

Website: jdschraffenberger.wordpress.com

Room 218, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S141. Women at the Trenches: Writing of War in the Americas. (, , , ) War is the most extreme act of violence and, as Svetlana Aleksievich states, it has a man’s face. The rise of violence in the Americas is impossible to ignore; therefore more women writers are representing the feminine and, thus, invisible pain, trauma, and loss war inflicts. Our reading travels multigenre lands to address issues such as the Shining Path insurgency in Perú, the narco-war at the Frontera, gender violence in México, and the intimate terrorism women are constantly subjected to.

Sylvia Aguilar-Zéleny received her MFA in creative writing from the University of Texas at El Paso. She is a bilingual author. Her work has been included in anthologies of Korea, Peru, Mexico, and the US. She currently coordinates Casa Octavia, a writing residency for women in El Paso, TX.


Twitter Username: sylviruk

Website: www.sylviaaguilar.com

Cristina Rivera Garza is an award-winning author of novels, collections of short stories, and poetry books, and a distinguished professor of Hispanic studies and creative writing at the University of Houston. She has theorized the link between writing and community in our violent times.


Twitter Username: criveragarza

Website: cristinariveragarza.com

Julie Carr is the author of five books of poetry, including 100 Notes on Violence, Sarah--Of Fragments and Lines, RAG, and Think Tank. Prose books include Surface Tension: Ruptural Time and the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry and Objects from a Borrowed Confession.


Twitter Username: carrcarrjuli

Website: juliealicecarr.com

Claudia Salazar-Jiménez is a Peruvian born writer and scholar. She holds a PhD from NYU. Her debut novel Blood of the Dawn was awarded the Las Americas Narrative Prize of Novel in 2014. She also received the TUMI-USA Award in 2015.


Twitter Username: claudiagsj

Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S142. Joy Is an Act of Resistance: A Poetry Reading by Women of Color. (, , , , ) In a culture where women of color are ever-expected to perform rage/anger as a primary mode of social protest, five poets flip the script and read poems with joy as their primary focus. The panelists find strength in Toi Derricotte’s poem and notion “Joy Is an Act of Resistance.” They explore the powers of gratitude, eros, humor, devotion, and love—those forces necessary to defy/oppose/disarm regimes of hate and division.

Brenda Shaughnessy is the author of five poetry books, most recently The Octopus Museum. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry, The Nation, The New Yorker, Poetry, and elsewhere. She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2013 and is associate professor at Rutgers University-Newark.

Tina Chang, Brooklyn poet laureate, is the author of the poetry collection Hybrida. She is also the author of Half-Lit Houses and Of Gods & Strangers, and she is the co-editor of the international anthology Language for a New Century.

Patricia Smith's books include Incendiary Art (2018 Kingsley Tufts, 2018 Pulitzer finalist, LA Times Book Prize), Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah (2013 Lenore Marshall), and Blood Dazzler (2008 National Book Award finalist). She is a Guggenheim fellow, twice a Pushcart winner, and a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada's MFA program.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

francine j. harris is the author of play dead, winner of 2017 Lambda Literary and Audre Lorde Awards. She has received fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, is a Cave Canem poet, and is the 2018/2019 Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellow at the Cullman Center at New York Public Library.


Twitter Username: francinejharris

Rachel McKibbens is the author of three full-length books of poetry, blud, Into the Dark & Emptying Field, and Pink Elephant, as well as the chapbook Mammoth. She is a two-time New York Foundation for the Arts poetry fellow and founder of the Pink Door Writing Retreat.


Twitter Username: RachelMcKibbens

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S143. From Page to Stage: How to Write a Play That Will Actually Get Produced. (, , , ) Playwriting is its own hybrid form of technical writing and prose with a mix of stage directions, dialogue, and not much else. After a play is written, it’s up to its directors and actors to make the world come to life. Once you have a short or a full-length play written, how do you get it actually produced on stage? This panel will focus on the different aspects of getting a play into production whether you are a playwright in residency, submitting work to theater companies, or self-producing.

Lauren Gorski is an award-winning writer and editor-in-chief of Exposition Review. She has a master's in Professional Writing with emphasis in Stage and Screen from USC. She writes fiction, screenplays, and stageplays. Her plays have been produced for the Hollywood Fringe, Playground-SF, and more.


Twitter Username: gorski_lauren

Neal Adelman writes plays and short stories. His full-length play Pontiacs was the recipient of the KCACTF Mark Twain Award, and recently his one-woman play I, Custer was a semifinalist for the Judith Royer Award of Excellence in Playwriting and a finalist for the S. Lehr Playwriting Competition.

Josh Inocéncio is a playwright in Houston. He is currently working on a trilogy called Splintered in Three which explores collisions between ethnicity and sexuality in his three ethnic backgrounds. In 2019, Josh finished as a semifinalist for the Eugene O'Neill National Playwright's Conference.


Twitter Username: inocencio_josh

Jelisa Jay Robinson is a playwright from whose work focuses on Black woman in the diaspora. Her plays include The Stories of Us, Fae and Paciencia, and Delivery. Her work has been developed and/or presented in Austin, Colorado, New York, Detroit, and Houston.


Twitter Username: jelisathewriter

Website: jelisajayrobinson.com

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S144. Transcreación/Transcreation: Literary Translation and Hemispheric Poetics. (, , , ) Literary translators have always played crucial roles in facilitating poetic exchange and making possible literary dialogues across spatial, temporal, and linguistic borders. This panel brings together poet-translators of United States and Latin American poetry for a conversation on how our work engages in a hemispheric project. We will discuss the aesthetic, (geo)political, and critical significance of translation as transcreation for inter-American poetries. This panel includes a reading.

Andrea Cote Botero is the author of the poetry collections Puerto Calcinado, La Ruina que nombro, and Chinatown 24 hours. She has also published books of prose: A Nude Photographer: A Biography of Tina Modotti and Blanca Varela or Writing From Solitude. She is assistant professor in the bilingual creative writing MFA program at UTEP.


Twitter Username: botero_cote

Olivia Lott translates Spanish American poetry. She is the cotranslator of Soleida Ríos's The Dirty Text  and the translator of Lucía Estrada's Katabasis. She is a PhD candidate in Hispanic studies at Washington University in St. Louis.


Twitter Username: oliviamlott

Rosa Alcalá is the author of three books of poetry, most recently MyOther Tongue. Recipient of an NEA Translation Fellowship, her translations are included in Cecilia Vicuña: New & Selected Poems, which she also edited. She teaches at the University of Texas-El Paso.


Twitter Username: myothertongue

Katherine M. Hedeen is professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. She has published over twenty books of Spanish and Spanish American poetry in translation. She is translation editor at the Kenyon Review and a two-time recipient of a NEA Translation Project Grant.


Twitter Username: kmhedeen

Room 304, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S145. Reading and Writing from Adrienne Rich. (, , , , ) The Cherrywood Poetry Workshop in Austin, TX, following a format we learned in Hoa Nguyen’s private studio, read and wrote in response to all 1,216 pages of Adrienne Rich, Collected Poems 1950-2012. Surmising that having read every published Rich poem in community might be a unique accomplishment, we want to report on how deeply prescient Rich is about the ruptures in contemporary American life and share some of the work we developed in response. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Rebecca M. Raphael is a poet, writer, and scholar of religion and holds a PhD in religion and literature from University of Chicago Divinity School.

Cindy Huyser’s poems appear in many journals and anthologies and in a chapbook, Burning Number Five: Power Plant Poems. She coedited Bearing the Mask: Southwestern Persona Poems and several editions of the Texas Poetry Calendar.

Lisa Moore is the author of the chapbook 24 Hours of Men and a winner of the Lambda Literary Foundation Book Award. The author or editor of five scholarly books, she is director of the LGBTQ Studies Program at The University of Texas at Austin.


Twitter Username: LisaLynneMoore

Desiree Morales is a poet and educator in Austin, Texas. Her work has appeared in What Rough Beast, Conflict of Interest, and Truck: I35 Corridor. She grew up in Southern California and plans to never stop talking about it.


Twitter Username: verbadverb

Rob Stanton teaches in Austin, Texas. He is the author of The Method, Trip-, and Takes, Cuts, the latter in collaboration with Colin Winborn.

10:35 am to 11:50 am

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S146. Teaching, Writing, and Growing: Opportunities at Literary Centers. (, , , ) For MFA students and graduates, teaching at a literary center can be an artistic and practical opportunity to gain work and writing experience. Many of these community-based centers provide MFA-quality workshops and classes in all genres and often provide outreach and other opportunities for writers and students. Panelists from a variety of writers centers will explore how they can meet the needs of writers and teachers as they strive to build their careers. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Michael Khandelwal writes and publishes fiction and poetry and teaches workshops for the Muse Writers Center in Norfolk, Virginia, for which he is the Executive Director (and co-founder). He is a columnist for Coastal Virginia Magazine and a former webmaster for the American Council on Education.

Shawn Girvan received his MFA in creative writing from Goddard College. His work has appeared in the Pitkin Review, Wraparound South, and West Texas Literary Review. Shawn currently teaches and works at the Muse Writers Center in Norfolk, Virginia, and is finishing his first memoir.

Maggie Marshall is a fiction writer and award-winning screenwriter, and is the cofounder of the Flatiron Writers Room in Asheville, North Carolina. She has written for numerous 1-hour TV dramas, is currently at work on a novel, and has had fiction and nonfiction pieces published in The Great Smokies Review.


Twitter Username: FWRAsheville

Website: www.flatironwritersroom.com

Melissa Wyse is a fiction writer and essayist. She has held residencies at MacDowell, VCCA, and Ragdale. Her work appears in publications including Shenandoah, The Rumpus, Momus, and Urbanite, and her first book is forthcoming from Chronicle. She founded and directs the Idlewild Writers Retreat.


Twitter Username: melissa_wyse

Website: www.MelissaWyse.com

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S147. The Importance of Novels in Preserving Queer History. (, , , ) History is determined by those who record and remember what happened. LGBTQ people are not the only group that has seen its history distorted or eliminated. Novels often serve as the only place readers can find information about queer lives, events, and livelihoods in the near and distant past. Four novelists will read from their works and discuss how they have preserved the real-life stories of people and events which offer insights to queer contributions to history.

Lucy Jane Bledsoe is the author of the novel The Evolution of Love, the story collection Lava Falls, and kids’ book Running Wild. She’s won a Yaddo fellowship, the Arts & Letters Prize, a California Arts Council Award, an ALA Stonewall Award, and two National Science Foundation Writer Fellowships.


Twitter Username: LucyBledsoe

Website: www.lucyjanebledsoe.com

Viet Dinh teaches at the University of Delaware. He has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as two O. Henry Prizes and the Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction. His debut novel, After Disasters was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Prize.


Twitter Username: vietpdinh

Carter Sickels is the author of the novel The Evening Hour, and the editor of Untangling the Knot: Queer Voices on Marriage, Relationships & Identity. He is assistant professor of creative writing at Eastern Kentucky University.


Twitter Username: cartersickels

Website: cartersickels.com

Alan Lessik is a novelist, Zen practitioner, LGBT activist, and NWU member. His debut novel, The Troubleseeker, was a finalist for Publishing Triangle 2017 LGBTQ Fiction Award. His nonfiction works have been published in Lambda Literary and The Advocate, He is the treasurer of the AWP LGBTQ Caucus.


Twitter Username: alanlessik

Website: alanlessik.wordpress.com

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S148. Celebrating Difficult Women: Acceptance and Accessibility in Experimental Prose. (, , , , ) Now that more women are publishing with experimental presses—and starting their own presses—the craft of experimental writing is becoming more diverse. In a world where difficult women are seldom cherished in the style of difficult men, how do we understand accessibility in experimental writing, where the prose often challenges the reader to the point of difficulty? Are women sometimes punished for difficulty and the lack of accessibility in ways that their male counterparts are not? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Aimee Parkison is the author of Refrigerated Music for a Gleaming Woman, which won the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Parkison teaches in the creative writing program at Oklahoma State University and has published five books of fiction.


Twitter Username: AimeeParkison

Website: www.aimeeparkison.com

Bailey Pittenger has an MA in English from Wake Forest University and an MFA in prose from the University of Notre Dame. She is a coeditor for pulpmouth magazine. She is currently a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Denver.


Twitter Username: baimestayer

Aurelie Sheehan is the author of two novels and three story collections. Her short fiction has appeared in Alaska Quarterly, Conjunctions, Fence, The Mississippi Review, New England Review, Ploughshares, and The Southern Review. She teaches fiction at the University of Arizona.

Carol Guess is the author of twenty books of poetry and prose, including Tinderbox Lawn, Darling Endangered, and Doll Studies: Forensics. She is professor of English at Western Washington University, where she teaches creative writing and queer studies.

Evelyn Hampton is the author of two full-length story collections and a novella. She has an MA in rhetoric from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities and an MFA from Brown University and is currently a PhD student at the University of Denver.


Twitter Username: lispservice

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S149. New Nature: Rewriting Place in the Anthropocene. (, , , , ) Split Rock Review celebrates eight years of publishing literature and art that centers on place, environment, and the relationship between humans and the natural world. Four featured authors published by Split Rock Review will read and discuss how their work explores place and complicates the traditions of nature poetry in the Anthropocene. Crystal S. Gibbins, founder and editor of Split Rock Review, will introduce and moderate. A Q&A session will follow the reading. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Crystal S. Gibbins is the founder and editor of Split Rock Review, editor of Rewilding: Poems for the Environment, and author of Now/Here, winner of the 2017 Northeastern Minnesota Book Award in Poetry. Her work has appeared in Hayden's Ferry Review, Prairie Schooner, Verse Daily, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: SplitRockReview

Jen Karetnick has authored nine poetry collections, including the award-winning The Crossing Over and The Burning Where Breath Used to Be (forthcoming). She co-curates SWWIM, a reading series, and co-edits SWWIM Every Day, a journal. Jen works as a food critic, journalist, and trade book author.


Twitter Username: Kavetchnik

Website: https://kavetchnik.contently.com

Rachel Morgan is the author of the chapbook, Honey & Blood, Blood & Honey. She was a finalist for 2017 National Poetry Series and recipient of a grant to the Vermont Studio Center. She teaches at the University of Northern Iowa and is the poetry editor for the North American Review.


Twitter Username: rachelmoreagain

Website: https://www.rachelmorganpoet.com/

Rosemarie Dombrowski is the inaugural poet laureate of Phoenix, AZ, as well as the founder of rinky dink press and The Revolution (Relaunch). She is the author of two collections of poetry, the recipient of a 2017 Arts Hero Award, and the winner of the 2017 Split Rock Review chapbook competition.


Twitter Username: poetryprofAZ

Wendy Oleson is the author of two award-winning prose chapbooks, Please Find Us and Our Daughter & Other Stories. Her fiction appears in Cimarron Review, Copper Nickel, Fourteen Hills, Carve, and elsewhere. Wendy serves as associate prose editor for Fairy Tale Review.


Twitter Username: weoleson

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S150. Paper Tigers. (, , , , ) With discourse around elevating the marginalized, how do male Asian writers navigate the discrimination they experience with institutional gatekeepers without pushing down Asian women and other groups? The writers in this panel will talk about how cultural expectations, from within and without, have shaped their work. Are there subjects they feel entitled to speak about about exclusively, or any they feel shut out from? And are there are any advantages to having an Asian face or name? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kevin Chong is the author of six books, including the novel The Plague and the biography Northern Dancer. He teaches at the University of British Columbia.


Twitter Username: kevinchong1975

Huan Hsu is the author of The Porcelain Thief: Searching the Middle Kingdom for Buried China. His essays and fiction have appeared in Slate, The Guardian, the Literary Review, and Lucky Peach. He teaches journalism and creative writing at Amsterdam University College in the Netherlands.

Andrew X. Pham is an independent writer, instructor, and engineer. He holds a BS in aerospace engineering. He is the author of Catfish and Mandala, The Eaves of Heaven, and A Theory of Flight, and the translator of Last Night I Dreamed of Peace. His work has won multiple honors and prizes.


Twitter Username: AndrewXPham

Website: andrewxpham.com

C.E. Gatchalian is a queer Filipinx author based on unceded Coast Salish territories (Vancouver, BC). He is the author of six books, and his plays have been produced nationally and internationally. He currently teaches at the University of British Columbia. Double Melancholy is his latest book.


Twitter Username: CEGatchalian

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S151. Round Characters: Writing Family in Creative Nonfiction. (, , , ) How do we avoid revenge prose and the flat characters it produces? This panel focuses on work that grows out of a literary crafting of the complex experiences of the writer/narrator with their family members. This panel will explore the writers’ representations of their individual home family communities, the challenges of writing the personal and intimate, and the insights they gained from the different techniques for constructing character on the page. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

José Antonio Rodríguez is the author of House Built on Ashes: A Memoir and the poetry collections Backlit Hour and The Shallow End of Sleep. He is a fellow of CantoMundo and Macondo and teaches writing at The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley.

Sarah Pape teaches English and works as the managing editor of Watershed Review at California State University, Chico. She curates community literary programming and is a member of the Quoin Collective, a local letterpress group.


Twitter Username: sarah_pape

Sarah Jefferis is an author, editor, and mentor. Her business, Write. Now., offers generative creative writing workshops, and editing services. Her poetry books include What Enters the Mouth and Forgetting the Salt.


Twitter Username: SarahBJefferis

Barrett Bowlin teaches at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His essays and short stories appear in places like Ninth Letter, Hobart, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Rumpus, Salt Hill, and Bayou, which awarded him the James Knudsen Prize in Fiction.


Twitter Username: barrettbowlin

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S152. Postcards from My Bed: How Autoimmunity Shapes Form, Practice, and Career. (, , , , ) This panel features writers whose experiences with autoimmunity have informed their writing practices. Panelists who write, edit, and teach in multiple genres will address how their perspectives shifted in relation to character and agency, plot and time, and structure or poetic form. They will discuss how they navigate these topics with editors, interviewers, and readers and how moving between illness and wellness affect how they move between creative and professional work, and poetry and prose. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Alexa Weinstein holds an MFA from Mills College. Her written work has appeared on Essay Daily and the Brevity blog, and she regularly performs her live work. She is currently finishing her first book: a collection of essays about finding a place in language where you can speak from all your parts.


Twitter Username: WeinsteinAlexa

Katie Willingham is the author of Unlikely Designs. She is the poetry editor for Michigan Quarterly Review and has taught writing at the University of Michigan. Her poems have appeared in Bennington Review, Kenyon Review, Poem-A-Day, Colorado Review, and others.

Judy Halebsky is the author of the poetry collections Tree Line, Sky=Empty, and the chapbook Space/Gap/Interval/Distance. Her honors include fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Millay Colony. She directs the low-residency MFA program at Dominican University of California.

Jennifer Militello is the author of the nonfiction book Knock Wood as well as four collections of poetry: A Camouflage of Specimens and Garments; Body Thesaurus; Flinch of Song; and Anchor Chain, Open Sail. She teaches in the MFA program at New England College.


Twitter Username: JenifrMilitello

Website: www.jennifermilitello.com

giovanni singleton is a poet, professor, yoga teacher, and founding editor of nocturnes (re)view of the literary arts, a journal of the African Diaspora and other contested spaces. She is author of Ascension, winner of the California Book Award Gold Medal, and AMERICAN LETTERS: works on paper.

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S153. Keep the Press Open: The Future of Print Journals. (, , , , ) Why do literary magazines stay in print when online journals are cheaper to produce/distribute and easier to link to via social media? Won't all literature be electronic in 100 years? Editors from print journals across the country will discuss the importance of the physical magazine and their decision to continue to produce printed artifacts for their contributors and subscribers despite rising costs in production and shipping, and the ever-present threat of funding cuts.

John Gallaher is the author of two chapbooks and five books of poetry, most recently In a Landscape, as well as co-editor of The Akron Series in Poetics, the Laurel Review, and Time Is A Toy: The Selected Poems of Michael Benedikt.

Luke Rolfes teaches creative writing in Missouri. He co-runs Greentower Press and is the author of the Midwestern collection of stories Flyover Country. He serves as a mentor in the AWP Writer to Writer program.

Caroline Chavatel is the author of White Noises, and her work has appeared in Sixth Finch, AGNI Online, Prairie Schooner​, and others. She is an editor at Madhouse Press and a cofounding editor of the Shore. She is currently a PhD student at Georgia State University.


Twitter Username: caro___chavatel

Gary Jackson is author of Missing You, Metropolis, which was the winner of the 2009 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in Callaloo, Los Angeles Review of Books, Tin House, and elsewhere. He lives in Charleston, SC, where he teaches in the MFA program at the College of Charleston.

Minna Zallman Proctor is the author of Landslide: True Stories and Do You Hear What I Hear. She translates from Italian; her most recent translation is Natalia Ginzburg's Happiness, As Such. She is editor of The Literary Review and teaches creative writing at Fairleigh Dickinson University.


Twitter Username: FranklinProctor

Website: www.minnaproctor.com

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S154. Making a Career as a Lit Mag Editor. (, , , , ) What are the paths to editing a literary magazine? This panel of accomplished editors will share their own experience and best advice for hopeful future editors. We’ll cover getting that first job, getting paid, what hiring parties are looking for, issues of inclusivity and bias, industry trends, and how editing can complement or conflict with other parts of a writer’s career. Journals represented include Ecotone, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Paris Review, Shenandoah, and Virginia Quarterly Review. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Rachel Ranie Taube is the managing editor of Ecotone at UNC Wilmington, where she is pursuing her MFA in fiction. Her writing has appeared in Hayden's Ferry Review, Cleaver, matchbook, Penn Review, and The Millions.


Twitter Username: racheltaube

Emily Nemens became editor of The Paris Review in summer 2018, after five years coediting The Southern Review. Her fiction has appeared in The Gettysburg Review, n+1, The Iowa Review, and Esquire. Her debut novel, The Cactus League, is forthcoming in 2020.


Twitter Username: emilynemens

Website: www.nemens.com

Khaled Mattawa's latest collection of poetry is Mare Nostrum. He teaches in MFA program at the University of Michigan and is the editor of Michigan Quarterly Review.

Beth Staples is editor of Shenandoah at Washington & Lee University, where she is assistant professor of English. Previously, she was senior editor at Ecotone and Lookout Books at UNC Wilmington and editor of Hayden's Ferry Review. She received her MFA from Arizona State and is working on a novel.

Allison Wright is the executive editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review and former editor of Tiny Hardcore Press. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, VQR, Popular Mechanics, Lit Hub, and elsewhere. She holds a PhD from the University of Texas and teaches journalism at the University of Virginia.


Twitter Username: wrightallison

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S155. La Llorona: Tales of Powerless or Powerful Women?. (, , , ) The most famous folk tale to come out of Mexico concerns the weeping woman who has drowned her children and is doomed to wander the riverbanks searching for them. Many see this as a misogynous story perpetuating the myth of the vengeful woman. Others see it as a cautionary tale about power. Still others see la llorona as a rebel willing to break the silence imposed on women by the patriarchy. Can we reclaim and repurpose this story? With, perhaps, an anthology to follow. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kathleen Alcalá is the author of six award-winning books of fiction and nonfiction, most recently The Deepest Roots. Honored by the Western States Book Award, PNBA Fiction Award, Governors Writers Award, ArtistTrust, Island Treasure, International Latino Book Award, and Con Tinta, she is the cofounder of Raven Chronicles.


Twitter Username: katkat_alcala

Website: www.kathleenalcala.com

Alicia Gaspar de Alba is a professor of Chicana/o Studies, English, and Gender Studies and Chair of the LGBTQ Studies Program at UCLA. She has published twelve books, five academic and seven creative writing: novels, short fiction, and poetry. Her latest book is Curse of the Gypsy: 10 Stories & a Novella.


Twitter Username: LaProfe

Website: www.aliciagaspardealba.net

Maiah Alicia Merino, emerging Chicana poet, mixed-genre writer, is currently a writer in residence with Seattle Arts & Lectures, teaching poetry to youth. Recently, she had two poems published in Yellow Medicine Review and an essay in Raven Chronicle.

ire’ne lara silva is the author of three poetry collections, furia, Blood Sugar Canto, Cuicacalli/House of Song, and a short story collection, flesh to bone, which won the Premio Aztlán. She and poet Dan Vera are also the coeditors of Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzalduan Borderlands.


Twitter Username: irenelarasilva

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S156. Try This, You Might Like It: A First Taste of Translation. (, , , , ) As seen in the recent increase of translations published in the US—and the growing recognition of such work through awards like the National Book Award in Translated Literature—translation is “having a moment.” But how can we find translations? How do we know if a translation is “good”? And how can we help literature in translation reach more readers? If you’re getting into translation—whether as a reader, writer, editor, or publisher—this panel will offer suggestions about where to start. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Elisabeth Jaquette is executive director of the American Literary Translators Association. Her translations from Arabic include Basma Abdel Aziz's The Queue and Adania Shibli's Minor Detail, among others. She has also taught translation at Bread Loaf and judged numerous translation prizes.


Twitter Username: lissiejaquette

Lisa Lucas is the executive director of the National Book Foundation, presenter of the National Book Awards. Before joining the Foundation, she served as the publisher of Guernica and the director of education at Tribeca Film Institute.


Twitter Username: likaluca

Michael Holtmann is the director of the Center for the Art of Translation and publisher of Two Lines Press. He serves on the board of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) and the international programming committee of the Bay Area Book Festival.


Twitter Username: michaelholtmann

Jamia Wilson is the executive director and publisher of the Feminist Press. She is the author of Young, Gifted, and Black, Step Into Your Power, ABC's of AOC, Big Ideas for Young Thinkers, coauthor of Road Map for Revolutionaries, and the introduction and oral history for Together We Rise.


Twitter Username: jamiaw

Website: www.jamiawilson.org

Jeremy Tiang has translated more than 20 books from Chinese—most recently Lo Yi-Chin's Far Away. He also writes and translates plays. His novel State of Emergency won the Singapore Literature Prize. He is the managing editor of Pathlight and a member of translation collective Cedilla & Co.


Twitter Username: JeremyTiang

Website: www.JeremyTiang.com

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S157. Tribute to Linda Gregg. (, , , , ) This tribute will celebrate the life of Linda Gregg as a poet, mentor, and beloved friend who died on March 20, 2019. Participants will include Tree Swenson, the Director of Hugo House; Tina Chang, the Poet Laureate of Brooklyn and former grad student of Linda's at Columbia University; Charif Shanahan, a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University and former undergrad student of Linda's at Princeton University; & myself, who served as Linda's personal assistant and friend for almost thirty years. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Timothy Liu is the author of ten books of poems, including Luminous Debris: New & Selected Legerdemain (19922017) and Kingdom Come: A Fantasia. His journals and papers are archived in the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. He is professor of English at William Paterrson University.


Twitter Username: arabadjisliu

Website: Http://timothyliu.net

Tree Swenson is the executive director of the Seattle literary center Hugo House. She was previously executive director of the Academy of American Poets in New York City. Her work in the literary arts began with cofounding Copper Canyon Press, where she was publisher and executive director for twenty years.


Twitter Username: Tree_s

Charif Shanahan is the author of Into Each Room We Enter without Knowing, which was a finalist for the Lambda Literary and Thom Gunn Awards for Gay Poetry. He has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Fulbright/IIE, the NEA, and elsewhere. He is currently a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: charifshan

Paisley Rekdal is the author, most recently, of The Broken Country and Nightingale. A Guggenheim fellow and Utah's Poet Laureate, she teaches at the University of Utah, where she edits the web archive project Mapping Salt Lake City.


Twitter Username: paisleyrekdal

David Semanki is literary executor for both Linda Gregg and Jack Gilbert and a former graduate student of Linda's at Columbia University.

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S158. Righteous Fury: Women's Anger in Memoir. (, , , , ) There's an expectation that conflict should be resolved, and antagonists forgiven, by the end of a memoir. This is especially true for women, whose anger is still taboo—despite what the Instagram cross-stitchers would have you believe. But what about when you're still angry at the end of the story? When the anger you're holding onto is not only justified but necessary for your survival? This panel looks beyond the "forgiveness arc" to explore the personal and creative power of women's anger.

Lilly Dancyger is contributing editor, writing instructor, and columnist at Catapult; assistant books editor at Barrelhouse; and the editor of Burn It Down, an anthology of essays on women's anger.


Twitter Username: lillydancyger

Wendy C. Ortiz is the author of Excavation: A Memoir, Hollywood Notebook, and the dreamoir Bruja. Her publishing credits include the New York Times, Joyland, StoryQuarterly, and a year-long series in McSweeney's Internet Tendency. She is a psychotherapist in private practice in Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: WendyCOrtiz

Website: www.wendyortiz.com

Kelly Sundberg's memoir is Goodbye, Sweet Girl. Her essays have appeared in Best American Essays 2015 and many literary magazines. She has a PhD in creative nonfiction from Ohio University and is an assistant professor of creative writing at Ashland University.


Twitter Username: K_O_Sundberg

Evette Dionne is a Black feminist culture writer, editor, and scholar. Presently, she’s the editor-in-chief of Bitch Media. She is the author of the forthcoming Lifting as We Climb: Black Women's Battle for the Ballot Box and Fat Girls Deserve Fairytales Too.


Twitter Username: freeblackgirl

Krystal Sital is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Secrets We Kept. A PEN Award finalist, her essays are forthcoming in the anthologies A Map Is Only One Story and Fury: Women’s Lived Experiences of the Trump Era. Her work can also be found in Elle, The New York Times, and Catapult.


Twitter Username: krystalAsital

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S159. The Latinx Files: Speculative Fiction for Dreamers. (, , , ) In this panel, the creators of the forthcoming young adult anthology, The Latinx Files: Speculative Fiction for Dreamers (Ohio State University Press, 2020), will discuss the the major themes of the collection, as well as the process of organizing the book. There is a growing movement of young adult Latinx writers who are engaging science fiction and fantasy, and The Latinx Files demonstrates how these new voices are transforming the genres.

Matthew David Goodwin is an assistant professor in English at the University of Puerto Rico in Cayey. His work is focused on the ways that science fiction, fantasy, and digital culture have been used to express the experience of migration. He is the editor of Latinx Rising.


Twitter Username: latinxfiles

Sarah Rafael García is author of Las Niñas and SanTana's Fairy Tales. She's also the founder of Barrio Writers and LibroMobile and coeditor for the pariahs writing from outside the margins and Latinx Files anthologies. As of 2019, she's a University of Houston KGMCA and Project Row Houses Fellow.


Twitter Username: SarahRafaGarcia

Website: www.sarahrafaelgarcia.com

Frederick Luis Aldama is the author of twenty-nine scholarly books and one book of fiction, Long Stories Cut Short: Fictions from the Borderlands. He is University Distinguished Professor and Teacher at The Ohio State University. He is founder & director of LASER, a Latinx high school college readiness program.


Twitter Username: LatinxGraphix

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S160. In Limbo: The Dilemma of Digital Thesis Repositories. (, , , , ) As universities across the nation have transitioned to electronic theses, many graduate students face a dilemma: to earn a degree they are required to submit their work to a digital thesis repository. And though several top programs offer exemptions, not all programs protect students from having to submit their creative work to open-access repositories. What solutions exist for programs to protect creative theses from future publication roadblocks or potential piracy? We'll describe a few.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Alan Soldofsky's most recent collection of poems is In the Buddha Factory. He is also coeditor with David Koehn of Compendium: A Collection of Thoughts on Prosody by Donald Justice. He is a professor of English and director of the creative writing program at San Jose State University.


Twitter Username: ADSoldof

Website: http://www.sjsu.edu/people/alan.soldofsky/

Lily Dayton is a freelance journalist who also writes fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Her work appears in Writer’s Digest, the Los Angeles Times, Pacific Standard, and The Rumpus, among other fine outlets. She is pursuing her MFA in fiction at San Jose State University.


Twitter Username: Lily_Dayton

Website: https://lilydayton.com/

Douglas Unger is the author of four novels, including Leaving the Land, finalist for the Pulitzer, and the collection Looking for War and Other Stories. He is a founder and director of the Creative Writing International Program at UNLV, and serves on the executive board of Words Without Borders.

Leah Agne is the staff librarian at the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa. Previously she served as university archivist and assistant professor at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

Lorinda Toledo earned a PhD in literature with creative dissertation from the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where her work was supported by a Black Mountain Institute Fellowship and other awards. She is past fiction editor of Witness, and teaches at Antioch University Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: Lorinda_Toledo

Website: www.lorindatoledo.com

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S161. Border Crossing: Racial, Culture, and Social borders in Working-Class Fiction. (, , ) Issues of race and culture are growing topics in the USA. However, mainstream outlets rarely consider how these issues are addressed in working-class literature. Writers from poor and working-class backgrounds read stories and novel excerpts that address the various conceptual and literal borders that their characters face in day to day lives in south Texas, California’s east bay, and rural Michigan.

Joseph D. Haske is a writer and critic whose debut novel is North Dixie Highway. His fiction appears in journals such as Boulevard, Fiction International, the Texas Review, the Four Way Review, Pleiades, and in the Chicago Tribune's literary supplement, Printers Row.


Twitter Username: jhaske4

Website: josephdhaske.com

Keenan Norris is the author of the novel Brother and the Dancer and the story collection by the lemon tree. Keenan was a 2017 Marin Headlands Artist-in-Residence. He's also the editor of Street Lit: Representing the Urban Landscape. He holds a PhD from University of California, Riverside and teaches at San Jose State University.

Daniel M. Mendoza is the editor of Stray Dogs: Interviews with Working-Class Writers. He is an assistant editor at Pleiades: A Journal of New Writing. His fiction and essays have appeared in journals across the country.

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S162. Many-Splendored Muslim Literature. (, , , , ) At a time when “Muslim” connotes a monolithic identity, five writers display the racial, geographical, philosophical, and aesthetic diversity of Muslim literature. All have personal experience of Islam and locate themselves on a complex spectrum from faith to secularity. Their work represents Black Urban, Azerbaijani, Palestinian, and Pakistani/American contexts in poetry, fiction, essays, plays, and YA lit. Together, their voices defy oversimple views that reduce the rich textures of their worlds. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Samina Najmi, professor of English at CSU Fresno, writes essays centered on her life in Pakistan, UK, and the U.S. She has just completed a book-length memoir of her home in Karachi. Her work has appeared in World Literature Today, Massachusetts Review, Entropy, The Rumpus, The Progressive, and elsewhere.

Shadab Zeest Hashmi, author of Ghazal Cosmopolitan, Kohl & Chalk, and Baker of Tarifa, is the winner of the San Diego Book Award and the Nazim Hikmet Poetry Prize. Her work has been published worldwide and has been translated into Spanish, Turkish, and Urdu. She has an MFA from Warren Wilson.


Twitter Username: ShadabZeest

Website: http://shadabhashmi.com/

Alison Mandaville has received two UNESCO cultural heritage grants for her work supporting women writers and artists in Azerbaijan. A poet, scholar, and translator, she teaches at Fresno State. Her creative and scholarly work has appeared in dozens of US and international journals and books.


Twitter Username: aliyemarie

Lena Mahmoud is the author of Amreekiya, an Arab American Book Award winner and a finalist for the Louise Meriwether First Book Prize. Her work has also appeared in Fifth Wednesday, Sukoon, and A Gathering Together, among others; she has been nominated for two Pushcart Prizes.


Twitter Username: lena_mabsutina

Umm Juwayriyah (Maryam A. Sullivan) is an urban Muslim fiction author of five books, a teaching artist who has staged three plays throughout New England, and an Autism advocate.

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S163. The Case for Digital Pedagogy in Creative Writing. (, , , ) These five accomplished diverse writers and instructors share experiences from the frontiers of online and blended teaching for BFA and MFA programs. They’ll share best practices in cultivating foundational tools in craft, technique and critical analysis while considering various online community-building practices to create a deeper connection with students. They’ll also discuss valuable strategies for faculty to create institutional buy-in to develop online creative writing courses.

John Vigna’s first book of fiction, Bull Head, was selected by Quill & Quire as an editor’s pick of the year and was a finalist for the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. Named one of 10 writers to watch by CBC Books, John is a fiction instructor and pedagogy chair in the UBC creative writing program.


Twitter Username: john_vigna

Jasmine Sealy is a Barbadian Canadian writer. Her work has appeared in Geist, The New Quarterly, Adda Stories, and Cosmonauts Avenue. In 2017, she was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. She is an MFA candidate and teaching assistant at UBC, and a past editor at PRISM.

Stephanie Vanderslice's books include The Geek's Guide to the Writing Life, Can Creative Writing Really Be Taught, and Rethinking Creative Writing. Professor and director of the Arkansas Writer's MFA Workshop, she is also chair of the Creative Writing Studies Organization.


Twitter Username: wordamour

Website: wordamour.wordpress.com

Tamara Girardi is an Assistant Professor of English at HACC, Central Pennsylvania’s Community College. She writes young adult fiction, and her primary research interests are online pedagogy, student engagement, young adult literature, and creative writing studies.


Twitter Username: TamaraGirardi

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S164. The Craft of the Literary Podcast Interview. (, , , ) This panel will explore the craft of the literary podcast interview with an eye toward both the "how" and the "why" of interviewing. What are the challenges and opportunities of podcasting as a medium for literary interviews? What is the role of the host? How can we create spaces to facilitate meaningful conversations? The panelists will share their insights and experiences interviewing writers from a variety of genres. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Mike Sakasegawa is a writer, photographer, and host of the arts and literature podcast Keep the Channel Open.


Twitter Username: sakeriver

David Naimon is coauthor of Ursula K. Le Guin: Conversations on Writing and host of the literary podcast Between the Covers (tinhouse.com/podcasts). His work can be found in AGNI, Boulevard, VQR, Tin House, Fourth GenreZYZZYVA, StoryQuarterly, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: davidnaimon

Rachel Zucker is the author of ten books, including SoundMachine, MOTHERs, and Museum of Accidents, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Zucker teaches poetry at NYU and is the host of the podcast Commonplace: Conversations with Poets (and Other People).


Twitter Username: rachzuck

Website: www.rachelzucker.net

Dujie Tahat cohosts The Poet Salon Podcast. A recipient of fellowships from Brooklyn Poets, Hugo House, and Jack Straw, his poems have been published or are forthcoming in Sugar House Review, The Journal, The Southeast Review, Narrative, Bennington Review, Poetry Northwest, Nimrod, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: dujietahat

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S165. Mentors: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. (, , , , ) The writing life can be lonely and isolating. Often, we look to mentors to provide feedback, guidance, and connection. A bad mentor can stop inspiration and motivation. A good mentor can lead to a lifelong friendship. What does it mean to be a good mentor? Five writers will discuss their experience with previous mentors and what lessons they’ve learned about mentorship. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ramiza Shamoun Koya writes fiction and nonfiction and is the director of youth programs at Literary Arts in Portland, Oregon. She has an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and her book The Royal Abduls is forthcoming in spring 2020.


Twitter Username: RamizaKoya

Roberto Tejada is a visual arts writer, translator, and poet whose books include Full Foreground, Exposition Park, and Mirrors for Gold; as well as the art histories National Camera: Photography and Mexico’s Image Environment and A Ver: Celia Alvarez Muñoz.


Twitter Username: fullforeground

Renee Simms is a Bread Loaf and NEA fellow who teaches at University of Puget Sound and the Rainier Writing Workshop. Her debut story collection, Meet Behind Mars, was a Foreword Indies Finalist for Short Stories and listed by The Root as one of 28 brilliant books by black authors.


Twitter Username: renee_e_simms

Devin Samuels is a poet educator who has spent years cultivating youth arts spaces throughout New England. Now in Detroit, Samuels works with Inside Out Literary Arts supplying poetry programming to youth throughout the city.

Kathryn Savage is a recipient of the 2018 Academy of American Poets James Wright Prize, with work appearing in American Short Fiction, Poets.org, the Guardian, and Poets & Writers, among others. She has served as a program manager at the Loft Literary Center for six years and teaches at MCAD.

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S166. Heretic Poets Rewriting Sacred Texts. (, , , ) How do we reimagine our sacred texts in ways that free them (and us) from colonization and oppression? A panel of poets engaged with their own faith traditions discusses the challenges and excitement of retelling inherited sacred narratives, especially for those of us in queer, femme, or nonbinary bodies, and indigenous or previously colonized communities. We'll share approaches for rehearing and rewriting traditional sacred stories, and offer strategies for others to do the same. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Elizabeth Harlan-Ferlo is the curator of Interfaith Muse, a project that explores spiritual questions through civic dialogue and creative arts. Her poetry has been published in Poet Lore, Anglican Theological Review, Tupelo Quarterly, and other journals. She holds an MFA from University of Oregon.

Rajiv Mohabir translator of I Even Regret Night (PEN/Heim Award), author of The Cowherd's Son  and The Taxidermist's Cut is an assistant professor of poetry at Auburn University's creative writing program.


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Melissa Bennett (Umatilla/Nimiipuu/Sac & Fox) is a poet and storyteller interested in story as medicine, especially its ability to heal historical trauma among indigenous communities. Twice nominated for the Pushcart Prize, Melissa's work focuses on culture, tradition, social justice, and spirituality.

Alicia Jo Rabins is a poet, composer, performer, and Torah scholar. She is the author of Divinity School (winner of the 2015 APR/Honickman First Book Prize) and Fruit Geode. She tours extensively as a violinist, singer, and Jewish educator.


Twitter Username: ohaliciajo

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S167. An Editorial Perspective on Experimental Fiction. (, , , , ) “Experimental fiction” encompasses a wide range of formal and narrative strategies, and goes by many names—innovative, risky, strange, different, etc. Editors from Black Warrior Review, Denver Quarterly, Juked, Ninth Letter, and Quarterly West discuss how they define the term, what they look for in submissions, and what common pitfalls writers and submitters make. Why do some journals prefer experimental work and what can these forms achieve that more traditional approaches cannot? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Michelle Donahue is a PhD candidate in creative writing at the University of Utah. Her fiction has been published in Sycamore Review, CutBank, Arts & Letters, and elsewhere. She is fiction editor for Quarterly West.


Twitter Username: M_Dithyrambic

Website: http://michelle-donahue.com/

Vincent James is a PhD candidate in fiction at the University of Denver. There, he serves as the associate editor of Denver Quarterly. James' first novel, SWERVE, is forthcoming. www.FatherFever.com

Jodee Stanley is the editor of Ninth Letter, published by the Creative Writing Program at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She has worked in literary publishing for over twenty years, and her fiction, essays, and book reviews have appeared in numerous publications.


Twitter Username: jodeestanley

Ryan Ridge is the author of five books and four chapbooks. He codirects the creative writing program at Weber State University and edits the literary magazine Juked.


Twitter Username: ryan_ridge

Website: www.ryanridge.com

Lily Davenport is a third-year MFA student at the University of Alabama, where she also worked as fiction editor for BWR 46.1 and 46.2.

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S168. Right at the Border: Marching in Students' Footsteps. (, , , ) On February 11, 2019, thousands assembled along the US-Mexico Border to protest the president's visit. The voices of teachers, activists, and artists followed the paths of high school/college students who cross over daily. Rather than let politicians “build a wall” of hate speech, El Paso Community College faculty work to unite the communities our students inhabit. Through culturally responsive instruction and outreach, we are witness to testimonies that shape us into stronger practitioners. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Richard Yañez is the author of a book of stories, El Paso del Norte, and an award-winning novel, Cross Over Water. His work has been anthologized in Hecho en Tejas: Texas-Mexican Literature, U.S. Latino Literature Today, and New Border. He teaches in the Pasos Program at El Paso Community College.

Yasmin Ramirez is a 2018 Dickinson House Fellow. Her fiction/creative nonfiction works have appeared in Cream City and Huizache, among others. She completed her first collection of creative nonfiction narratives titled Por Un Amor and is professor of English and creative writing at El Paso Community College.


Twitter Username: YasminRamRio

Website: yasminramirez.com

Arturo Valdespino is an assistant professor of English at El Paso Community College. His primary areas of research include Chicana/o Literature and YA Literature. He currently serves as the online/dual credit coordinator for English.

Minerva Laveaga Luna is a Mexican writer living in the US. She holds an MFA in creative writing from UTEP. She is a cofounding editor and publisher of Veliz Books and she is an associate professor at El Paso Community College. Her fiction and creative nonfiction is anthologized in Argentina and the US.

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S169. Surviving Your First Year as a Debut Author. (, , , ) Nafissa Thompson-Spires, José Olivarez, and Nina McConigley will discuss pre- and postpublication life, how they balance their literary ambitions and the reality of the publishing industry, and what the future holds after an impressive debut. What’s next after your book is out in the world? How do you survive the highs and lows of being a debut author? What is it like to navigate your first book tour, reviews, and related publicity efforts? Moderated by Clarisse Rosaz Shariyf of PEN America.

Clarisse Rosaz Shariyf is the director of public programs at PEN America with a decade of experience in curating public arts and educational programs. She has a special interest in audience development, public engagement strategies, and cultural community partnerships.


Twitter Username: clarissers

Nafissa Thompson-Spires is the author of Heads of the Colored People, which was longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award and which won the PEN Open Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and an Audie Award. She is also the recipient of a 2019 Whiting Award.


Twitter Username: @TisforThompson

José Olivarez is the son of Mexican immigrants. His debut book of poems, Citizen Illegal, was a finalist for the PEN/Jean Stein Award and a winner of the 2018 Chicago Review of Books Poetry Prize. It was named a top book of 2018 by NPR and the New York Public Library.


Twitter Username: _joseolivarez

Nina McConigley is the author of the short-story collection Cowboys and East Indians, winner of the PEN Open Book Award. She teaches at the University of Wyoming and at the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers.


Twitter Username: ninawyo

Website: www.ninamcconigley.com

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S170. We Are Who We’ve Been Waiting For: Writers of Color Talk Peer Mentorship. (, , , , ) Multigenre writers and editors of color discuss the importance of peer mentors: fellow writers at similar career stages who can offer support, encouragement, and access to valuable resources in the absence (or unavailability) of traditional mentorships, such as those forged between teachers and students in MFA and PhD programs. Panelists will individually discuss their experiences with peer mentors, followed by a roundtable discussion and Q&A. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Destiny Birdsong is a poet, essayist, and fiction writer whose work has appeared in Adroit Journal, The Cambridge Companion to Transnational American Literature, storySouth, and other publications. A Cave Canem and Callaloo alum, she has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: destinyoshay

Maya Marshall is cofounder of underbellymag, a magazine focused on the art and magic of poetry revision. She holds fellowships from MacDowell, Callaloo, and Cave Canem. She is an editor for PANK, the author of Secondhand, and is a manuscript editor at Haymarket Books.


Twitter Username: mayaamarshall

Natasha Oladokun is a Cave Canem fellow, poet, and essayist. Her work has appeared in the American Poetry Review, Harvard Review Online, Kenyon Review Online, Pleiades, and elsewhere. She holds the inaugural First Wave Fellowship at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she currently teaches.


Twitter Username: NatashaOladokun

Claire Jimenez is a fiction writer who received her MFA from Vanderbilt University and is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Nebraska Lincoln.


Twitter Username: clairedjimenez

Donika Kelly is the author of the chapbook Aviarium and the full-length collection Bestiary, winner of the 2015 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and long listed for the National Book Award. She is an assistant professor at Baruch College.


Twitter Username: officialdonika

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S171. All My Hexes Live in Texas: Writing the Weird, Weird West. (, , , , Kimberly King Parsons) The Sand Creek Massacre, Yucca Mountain, Area 51—the West’s desolate “emptiness” belies depths of the dangerous and the bizarre. Writing its mysteries, consequently, runs deeply: from Louise Erdrich’s Love Medicine to Joy Williams’s The Quick and the Dead. In this panel, five established and emerging prose writers read within this regional tradition, ranging in subject from mesa megafauna to ghosts of annihilation. These writers present an updated essence of the phantasmagorical American West. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Alexander Lumans was awarded a 2018 NEA fellowship in prose. He was the Spring 2014 Philip Roth Resident at Bucknell, and he was a 2015 Fellow on The Arctic Circle Residency. He has attended MacDowell, Yaddo, and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation. He teaches at the University of Colorado Denver.


Twitter Username: oldmanlumans

Website: http://www.alexanderlumans.com/

Fernando A. Flores is the author of the collection Death to the Bullshit Artists of South Texas and the novel Tears of the Trufflepig.

C Pam Zhang's debut novel, How Much of These Hills Is Gold, is coming from Riverhead Books. Her short fiction appears in Kenyon Review, McSweeney's Quarterly, The Pushcart Prize Anthology, and elsewhere. She's received support from Bread Loaf, Tin House, Aspen Words, and the Iowa Writers' Workshop.


Twitter Username: cpamzhang

Ramona Ausubel is the author of Awayland, Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty, A Guide to Being Born, and the PEN/USA Award-winning novel No One Is Here Except All of Us. She teaches in the low-residency MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts and Colorado State University.

Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S172. One Hundred Years of Poetry in The Sewanee Review: A Celebration. (, , , ) In 1920, after 28 years of continuous publication, The Sewanee Review first published verse in its pages. Since then it has fostered many of the essential voices in American poetry. Four recent contributors to the magazine will read and analyze poems from the SR archive, as well as their own work, in order to answer the question: what will the next century of poetry look like, in the pages of The Sewanee Review and beyond?

Spencer Hupp is an assistant editor for the Sewanee Review, the nation's oldest continuously published literary magazine.

Ange Mlinko is the author of Distant Mandate, her fifth collection of poetry. She received the Randall Jarrell Award from the Poetry Foundation, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is an associate professor at the University of Florida.

Kaveh Akbar's poems appear in the New YorkerPoetryParis ReviewBest American Poetry, the New York Times, and elsewhere. He is the author of Calling a Wolf a Wolf and the forthcoming collection Pilgrim Bell. He teaches at Purdue University.


Twitter Username: kavehakbar

Website: kavehakbar.com

Katy Didden is the author of The Glacier’s Wake (a book of poems). She holds a PhD from the University of Missouri and an MFA from the University of Maryland. A former Hodder Fellow at Princeton University, Katy is currently an assistant professor of creative writing at Ball State University.


Twitter Username: kedidden

Website: www.katydidden.com

Room 218, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S173. Knocking Down Death's Door: How Nonfiction Writers Address Capital Punishment. (, , , ) Panelists will discuss the dig-deep research that takes their work beyond the predictable headlines running in news outlets. How do we interview traumatized witnesses, access records? How do we practice the self-care so necessary for immersion in the death penalty world? We'll read briefly to show the range of topics: perpetrators/victims, the executioner's hood, gun control, clemency, racist jurors, even museum/art exhibits. Ultimately, we'll answer the question: are we historians or activists?

Leslie Jill Patterson's work has appeared in Pushcart XLIII, Prime Number Magazine, Hotel Amerika, and other journals. She teaches at Texas Tech University and serves as editor of Iron Horse. Her awards include a Soros Justice Fellowship and the Richard J. Margolis Award for Social Justice Writing.


Twitter Username: lesliejillp

David R. Dow is the Cullen Professor at the University of Houston Law Center, where he teaches constitutional law and theory and death penalty law. Dow and his team have represented more than 100 death row inmates in their state and federal appeals. His seven books include two memoirs and a novel.

Alex Marzano-Lesnevich is the author of The Fact of a Body: A Murder & A Memoir, which received a Lambda Literary Award, the Chautauqua Prize, and the Prix France Inter-JDD and was translated into nine languages. They are an assistant professor at Bowdoin.


Twitter Username: alexmlwrites

Website: http://www.alexandria-marzano-lesnevich.com/

Shani Gilchrist is a freelance journalist, essayist, and critic who seeks to highlight the nuance in America's history and discourse. Her work has appeared in Tthe Literary Hub and the Daily Beast, with essays about race, gender, and inequality in Catapult, the Toast, Longreads, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: ShaniRGilchrist

Website: http://shanigilchrist.com

Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S174. Poets to Prose: Finding Footing in Multiple Genres and Industries. (, , , , ) Many poets have published in multiple genres, but questions abound for ones thinking of making this leap: What can prose do that poetry can’t? How can a poet wade into the prose industry—what of agents, proposals, pitches, synopses? Can only “famous” poets do this? Finding footing in various genres can be a mystifying task; as diverse and historically quelled or silenced voices, this panel of women and poets of color will identify some of the pathways for writers trying to do so. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Remica L. Bingham-Risher is a Cave Canem fellow and an Affrilachian Poet. She has published three books of poems, ConversionWhat We Ask of Flesh, and Starlight & Error. She is Director of Quality Enhancement Plan Initiatives at Old Dominion University.

Ross Gay is the author of the poetry collections Against Which, Bringing the Shovel Down, and Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude and the essay collection The Book of Delights. He teaches at Indiana University.

Carrie Fountain is the author of poetry collections Burn Lake and Instant Winner, as well as a novel, I'm Not Missing, and a forthcoming kids' book, The Poem Forest. She is writer-in-residence at St. Edward's and hosts NPR's poetry podcast This is Just to Say. She is the 2019 Texas poet laureate.

Gregory Pardlo's ​collection​ Digest won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. He has received Guggenheim, NEA, and NYFA fellowships. He is the author of the essay collection Air Traffic, and teaches in the Rutgers-Camden MFA program.


Twitter Username: pardlo

Website: www.pardlo.com

Jon Pineda is the author of the novels Let's No One Get Hurt and Apology. His recent poetry collection Little Anodynes received the 2016 Library of Virginia Literary Award, and his memoir Sleep in Me was a 2010 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection.


Twitter Username: scrimshawcinema

Website: http://www.jonpineda.com

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S175. Writing the Difficult with Fabulist Elements. (, , , , ) When myth and magic coexist with domestic concerns in literature, the ordinary is amplified. As within magical realism, incorporating fabulist elements allows a focus in which painful subjects can be eyed from a comfortable distance. Our panel will explore critical ideas about domestic fabulism in women’s writing; concentrating on poems that address common, yet difficult, events through mysticism and highlighting the safe narrative spaces this genre offers, especially to marginalized stories. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Catherine Moore is the author of Wetlands and Ulla! Ulla! and coeditor of Fiolet & Wing. Her poetry appears in Southampton Review, Mid-American Review, and others. A Walker Percy and Hambidge fellow, she won the Southeast Review’s Gearheart Poetry Prize, and has been awarded a Nashville MetroArts grant.


Twitter Username: CatPoetic

paulA neves is the author of the poetry chapbook capricornucopia (the dream of the goats) and the coauthor of the poetry/photography chapbook Shirts & Skins. She is also a visual artist whose work has appeared in various GlassBook Project collections and other exhibits.


Twitter Username: itinerantmuse

Website: paulaneves.net

Nandini Dhar is a bilingual poet who writes in English and her native language, Bangla. She is the author of three books, one in English, and two in Bangla: Historians of Redundant Moments, Jitakshara, and Ma-Rupak Khelchhi Na.

Melinda Palacio is the author of the novel, Ocotillo Dreams, the poetry collections Folsom Lockdow, How Fire Is a Story, Waiting, and Bird Forgiveness. She writes a column for La Bloga and teaches workshops on fiction and poetry.


Twitter Username: LaMelinda

Website: www.melindapalacio.com

Erin Elizabeth Smith is the creative director at the Sundress Academy for the Arts and author of two full-length collections. Her poems have appeared in Mid-American Review, 32 Poems, Zone 3, and more. She teaches at the University of Tennessee and serves as the managing editor of Sundress Publications.


Twitter Username: SundressErin

Website: http://www.sundresspublications.com/erin/

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S176. From Memoir to the Personal Essay: Race Studies Today. (, , , ) There is something exciting happening in race studies today, and it is the flowering of memoir and the personal essay. The current climate in American politics has made the sharing of stories of survival more urgent than ever. The personal anecdote has always evidenced the ability to solicit empathy through communal sharing. This panel promises to excite you about the multiple approaches to the unabashed intimacy and compelling narrative possibilities of creative nonfiction.

Bridgett M. Davis is the author of the memoir The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother's Life In The Detroit Numbers, a New York Times Editors' Choice, and the novels Into the Go-Slow and Shifting Through Neutral. She is a professor at Baruch College, CUNY, where she teaches creative writing.


Twitter Username: bridgettmdavis

Website: bridgettdavis.com

Emily Bernard is the author of Black Is the Body: Stories from My Grandmother's Time, My Time, and Mine. Her work has been published in O Magazine and the American Scholar, among other forums. She is the Julian Lindsay Green and Gold Professor of English at the University of Vermont in Burlington.


Twitter Username: emilyebernard

Tisa Bryant is the author of Unexplained Presence and Residual (forthcoming), cocreator of the Black Book visual mixtape series, and co-founder of the Encyclopedia Project. Focused on experimentation and Black feminist thought, she teaches at the California Institute of the Arts.


Twitter Username: misstisab

Artress Bethany White is a poet, essayist, and literary critic. She is the author of two poetry collections, the most recent, My Afmerica. Her essay collection, Survivor's Guilt: Essays on Race and American Identity, is forthcoming. Her work has appeared in Pleiades, Hopkins Review, and Ecotone.


Twitter Username: Artresswhite

Website: artressbethanywhite.com

Room 304, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S177. Uprooted/Unrooted: Adopted & Donor-Conceived Poets Re-Writing Family. (, , , , ) The bonds that make “family” have always extended beyond its traditional definition; blood isn’t always thicker than water. Five poets redefine the notion of family, discussing their experiences with adoption from birth, late-discovery cross-cultural adoption, and donor conception, and sharing how such experience has (or hasn’t) impacted the writing and/or publishing of creative work. To widen the discussion and make room for all families, this event will invite the audience to join in via Q&A. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Stacey Balkun is the author of three chapbooks, including Jackalope-Girl Learns to Speak. Her work has appeared in Best New Poets 2018, The Rumpus, and Prairie Schooner. Chapbook series editor for Sundress Publications and reviewer for the Bind, she teaches online at the Poetry Barn and the Loft.

Patricia Caspers's work includes In the Belly of the Albatross and Homecoming, a newspaper column. She won the Nimrod/Hardman Pablo Neruda Prize and was named California's ed reporter and columnist of the year. She teaches writing and co-edits Roundhouse Review at Sierra College.


Twitter Username: patriciacaspers

Jennifer Givhan is a Mexican American poet, NEA fellowship recipient, and author of Landscape with Headless Mama (2015 Pleiades Editors’ Prize), Protection Spell (2016 Miller Williams Poetry Prize Series, U of Arkansas Press), and Girl with Death Mask (2017 Blue Light Books Prize, Indiana U Press).


Twitter Username: JennGivhan

Website: jennifergivhan.com

Lori Desrosiers' recent poetry books include typing with e.e. cummings and Sometimes I Hear the Clock Speak. She teaches poetry in the Lesley University MFA program. A new book, Keeping Planes in the Air, is forthcoming. She is editor of two journals, Naugatuck River Review and Wordpeace.co.


Twitter Username: lorides

Website: http://loridesrosierspoetry.com

Lee Herrick is the author of three books of poems, most recently, Scar and Flower. He is co-editor of The World I Leave You: Asian American Poets on Faith and Spirit and served as Fresno poet laureate (2015–2017). He teaches at Fresno City College and the MFA Program at Sierra Nevada College.


Twitter Username: leeherrick

12:10 pm to 1:25 pm

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S178. Yoga for Writers. (Alysia Sawchyn) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, go straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S179. A Mind of One's Own: An Asset-Based Look at Writing from Mental Difference. (, , , , ) “Would I rather be neurotypical?” writes Sejal Shah. “Maybe; it would be easier. But would I be me?” Psychiatric diagnoses can be significant challenges. And yet, for some writers, one’s worldview, voice, and creative journey are grounded in those challenges and experiences. Without romanticizing, this panel of neurodiverse writers will offer an asset-based view that suggests surprising, positive, and in fact joyful ways in which mental difference may shape writers, personally, and literarily. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sara Henning is the author of View from True North, winner of the 2017 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Competition Award. Winner of the Crazyhorse Lynda Hull Memorial Poetry Prize and the Poetry Society of America's George Bogin Memorial Award, she teaches at Stephen F. Austin State University.


Twitter Username: SaraDHenning

Website: https://www.sarahenningpoet.com/

Destiny Birdsong is a poet, essayist, and fiction writer whose work has appeared in Adroit JournalThe Cambridge Companion to Transnational American LiteraturestorySouth, and other publications. A Cave Canem and Callaloo alum, she has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: destinyoshay

David Ebenbach is the author of seven books of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, including the novel Miss Portland. He teaches creative writing and literature at Georgetown University and is a project manager at Georgetown’s teaching center, the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship.


Twitter Username: debenbach

Website: www.davidebenbach.com

Katy Richey’s work has appeared in Rattle, Cincinnati Review, RHINO, and The Offing. She received an honorable mention for the 2015 Cave Canem Poetry Prize and has received fellowships from Fine Arts Work Center, MD State Arts Council, and the Cave Canem Foundation.

Susanne Paola Antonetta’s most recent book is Curious Atoms. Awards include a New York Times notable book, an American Book Award, a Library Journal best science book, a Pushcart Prize, and others. She coauthored nonfiction text Tell It Slant and is editor of the Bellingham Review.

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S181. Unearthing the Female Canon: Recovering Women's Place in the Essay Tradition. (, , , , ) Contemporary women writers make an undeniable case for their rightful place in the essay canon. Still, a long tradition of women essayists remains poorly known. What are their names? Where can we find their work? Five writers and editors share the recovery work they've done, name their favorite lost foremothers of the essay, and situate those essays within a larger nonfiction tradition. This panel will both make visible the essential work of women essayists and probe ways they speak to us today. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Joanna Eleftheriou is on the faculty at Christopher Newport University and the Writing Workshops in Greece. Her fiction, essays, and poetry appear in journals including Arts & Letters, Chautauqua, and the Crab Orchard Review. Her manuscript, This Way Back, is an essay collection about home.


Twitter Username: JOANNAessayist

Website: https://www.joannaeleftheriou.com/

David Lazar was a Guggenheim Fellow in Nonfiction for 2015. His books are I’ll Be Your Mirror: Essays and Aphorisms, Who's Afraid of Helen of Troy, After Montaigne, Occasional Desire, and The Body of Brooklyn. He is founding editor of Hotel Amerika, and series coeditor of 21st Century Essays at OSU Press.


Twitter Username: DavidEssays

Website: lazar.org

Desirae Matherly teaches writing at Tusculum College, and serves as nonfiction editor for The Tusculum Review. Desirae earned a PhD in creative nonfiction from Ohio University in 2004 and is a former Harper Fellow at the University of Chicago.

Beth Peterson is a nonfiction writer and assistant professor of writing at Grand Valley State University. A wilderness guide before she began writing, Beth's first book of essays, about glaciers, volcanoes, disappearing people and places, was published in 2019.


Twitter Username: BethLPeterson

Jenny Spinner is an associate professor of English at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia where she teaches nonfiction writing and literature and directs the university writing center. She earned her PhD in English from the University of Connecticut and an MFA in nonfiction from Penn State.


Twitter Username: essaydoctor

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S182. The Master's Tools: Singaporean Novelists on Writing in the Colonizer's Language. (, , , , ) Singapore has a rich history of literature in Malay, Chinese, Tamil, and other Asian languages; English-language literary production began to flourish after independence in the 1960s, and has since come to dominate the scene. Yet as in other postcolonial states, anglophone Singaporean writers cannot ignore the politics inherent in their elevation, especially as other language communities grow more marginalized. How far is it possible to reclaim the language of one's colonizer, and at what cost?

Rachel Heng is the author of the novel Suicide Club. Her short fiction has received a Pushcart Prize Special Mention and Prairie Schooner's Jane Geske Award and has appeared in Glimmer Train, McSweeney's Quarterly, Guernica, and elsewhere. She is a fiction fellow at the Michener Center for Writers.


Twitter Username: rachelhengqp

Jeremy Tiang has translated more than 20 books from Chinese—most recently Lo Yi-Chin's Far Away. He also writes and translates plays. His novel State of Emergency won the Singapore Literature Prize. He is the managing editor of Pathlight and a member of translation collective Cedilla & Co.


Twitter Username: JeremyTiang

Website: www.JeremyTiang.com

Yu-Mei Balasingamchow won the Mississippi Review Fiction Prize 2019 and was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize. She is also the co-author of the nonfiction title Singapore: A Biography and coeditor of In Transit: An Anthology from Singapore on Airports and Air Travel.


Twitter Username: bubblevicious

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S183. Writing Empathy Across Cultures. (, , , , ) Do writers have a responsibility to leaven visions of horror with images of compassion, connection and empathy? If so, how might that be done artfully? How do writers know when their presentations of violence are merely gratuitous? How can they keep from offering “preachy” or agenda-ridden work if they wish to present positive messages? Panelists representing Native and mainstream cultures will offer examples from their stories and discuss the way these questions inform their writing processes. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lisa Norris is a professor at Central Washington University. Her story collections are Toy Guns and Women Who Sleep with Animals, winners of the Willa Cather and SFASU Fiction Prizes, respectively. Her poems and nonfiction have appeared in Shenandoah, Ascent, Terrain.org, and others.

Shann Ray is the author of American Masculine: Stories; the nonfiction book, Forgiveness and Power in the Age of Atrocity; Balefire: Poems; and the novel, American Copper. His work has been honored with an American Book Award, and an NEA Literature Fellowship. He teaches leadership and forgiveness studies at Gonzaga University

Alan Heathcock is the author of VOLT and 40. He's won a National Magazine Award, an NEA Fellowship, and a Whiting Award and was a finalist for the Barnes and Noble Discover Prize. He teaches in the MFA program at Sierra Nevada College.


Twitter Username: alanheathcock

Kristiana Kahakauwila, Kanaka Maoli, is author of This is Paradise: Stories, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection. Associate professor of English at Western Washington University, she was the 2015–16 Lisa Goldberg Fellow at Harvard University's Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study.

Marie-Helene Bertino, author of Safe as Houses and 2 A.M. at the Cat's Pajamas, was the 2018 Frank O'Connor International Story Fellow in Cork, Ireland. O. Henry Award and Pushcart Prize winner, her third book, Parakeet, will be published in 2020. She teaches at NYU and IAIA.


Twitter Username: mhbertino

Website: www.mariehelenebertino.com

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S184. Finding and Keeping a Solid Mentorship: A Guide for the Writing Odyssey. (, , , , ) While Emily Dickinson made poetry in near isolation, most writers find that mentorship is a necessary part of the creative process. But how do emerging writers find mentors, much less develop and sustain such relationships? Academic programs offer mentorship opportunities that can last a lifetime, and AWP has its Writer to Writer mentorship program. This panel of former AWP Writer to Writer mentees discuss the ins and outs of finding mentors and nurturing mentoring partnerships. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Laura Laing is a queer journalist, essayist, and author. A graduate of Goucher's MFA in creative nonfiction, she is the vice president of ASJA. Her essays have appeared in a number of literary journals, and she is working on a memoir, weaving narrative with explorations of abstract mathematics.


Twitter Username: llaingwriter

Naomi Ulsted writes young adult fiction, memoir, and screenplays. Her work has been published in multiple venues. She's currently at work on a young adult novel. She was the winner of a 2017 Literary Fellowship from Oregon Literary Arts in the drama category.


Twitter Username: https://twitter.com/Naomi

Preeti Parikh is a poet, essayist, and current MFA candidate at the Rainier Writing Workshop where she is also a recipient of the Bierds-Smith Graduate Scholarship. Her poems have been published in various journals and anthologies. Preeti's earlier academic training was in the field of medicine.


Twitter Username: poetpreeti

Manisha Sharma is a multigenre writer who collaborates across different disciplines such as music, design, computers, and virtual reality. Be it a poem, short story, a play, or a sound-art or VR installation, her work explores feminist and social issues. Sharma is also a yoga, mindfulness expert.

Sarah Dalton is a Panamanian American writer and teacher from the San Francisco East Bay. She is a member of the Macondo Writers’ Workshop community and has been a writer-resident at Hypatia-in-the-Woods. She is an MFA student at San José State University.


Twitter Username: sdaltonwrites

Website: www.sarah-dalton.com

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S185. Crossing the Line: Jewish Writers on the Taboo. (, , , , ) Jewish writers sometimes feel free to write about abortion, guns, divorce, and sex. Yet they continue to have a conflictual identity, passing as white and yet remaining outsiders and subject to increasing anti-Semitism. As racism and white supremacy are on the rise, how has the complicated identity of Jewish-identified writers entered their work: Their perceived privilege as well as their status as Other? Do they censor themselves or find some subjects are taboo for them? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Sharon Dolin has published six poetry books, most recently Manual for Living, Whirlwind, and Burn and Dodge (AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry winner), plus her translations from Catalan, Book of Minutes by Gemma Gorga. Associate editor at Barrow Street, she directs Writing about Art in Barcelona.


Twitter Username: SharonDolin

Website: www.sharondolin.com

Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored 10 titles, including 6 translations. A BTBA finalist, she is a recipient of grants from the NEA and Maryland Arts Council and was decorated with the French Academic Palms. An Infusion of Violets was called "new & noteworthy" by the the NY Times Book Review.

Lisa Olstein is the author of four poetry collections, most recently, Late Empire, and a book-length lyric-essay Pain Studies. She teaches in the New Writers Project and Michener Center for Writers MFA programs at UT Austin.

Jacqueline Osherow is author of eight books of poetry, most recently My Lookalike at the Krishna Temple. She’s received the Witter Bynner Prize and grants from the NEA, Guggenheim, and Ingram Merrill Foundations. She is Distinguished Professor at the University of Utah.

Jill Pearlman is a poet. In Mirrors, she works with midrash by pairing Avivah Zornberg's texts with her own probing spiky poems. She is the author of Beyond the Pale, about the dark woods of Lithuanian history. For decades she worked as a music and arts journalist and continues to profile musicians.


Twitter Username: JillPearlman

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S186. How To Start a Poetry Festival and Why. (, , , , ) Why did Dodge Poetry, Mass Poetry, O, Miami, Rio Grande Valley, and Split This Rock call themselves festivals? Do they share some fundamental goals for the kinds of events and experiences they want to create, voices they choose to present, or the audiences they hope to reach? What distinguishes them from academic or professional conferences? Past and present directors of some of our most vibrant poetry festivals discuss the hows and whys of starting, sustaining, and keeping them alive and well.

P. Scott Cunningham, author of Ya Te Veo, serves as the director of O, Miami, a festival that aims for every single person in Miami to encounter a poem during the month of April. He is the executive editor of Jai-Alai Books.


Twitter Username: omiamifestival

Sarah Browning is cofounder and for ten years was executive director of Split this Rock. Author of Killing Summer and Whiskey in the Garden of Eden and co-editor of three special issues of Poetry magazine, she is the 2019 recipient of the Lillian E. Smith Writer-in-Service Award.

Laurin Becker Macios is the former executive director of Mass Poetry and the former program director of the Poetry Society of America. She holds an MFA from the University of New Hampshire. Her books include Somewhere to Go and the chapbook I Almost Was Animal.


Twitter Username: laurinmacios

Daniel García Ordaz is the founder of the Rio Grande Valley International Poetry Festival and the author of You Know What I'm Sayin'? and Cenzontle/Mockingbird: Songs of Empowerment. His writing focuses is on celebrating the power of language. He teaches in the borderlands of deep S. Texas.


Twitter Username: poetmariachi

Website: https://www.pw.org/directory/writers/daniel_garcia_ordaz

Martin Jude Farawell directs the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival, where he has filled a variety of roles since 1996. Author of the poetry collection Odd Boy, he was a visiting poet and writing, literature, and poetry instructor for a decade before arriving at Dodge.

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S187. “What I Have Forgotten Is What I Have Written”: A Tribute to Meena Alexander. (, , , , ) Writers and friends of Meena Alexander remember her work and discuss her influence.

Sokunthary Svay is the author of Apsara in New York. She has received fellowships from Poets House, American Opera Projects, Willow Books, and the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is a doctoral student in English. Her first opera premiered at the Kennedy Center in January 2020.


Twitter Username: SokSrai

Kimiko Hahn finds material from disparate sources: identity, current events, Japanese zuihitsu, nature, science (Brain Fever). She explores iterations of Foreign Bodies in her latest book. Awards include a Guggenheim. She teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Translation, Queens College-CUNY.

Lee Briccetti is the long-time executive director of Poets House, a national poetry library and literary center in New York City. She has been the recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Poetry. Her most recent book of poetry is Blue Guide.

Kazim Ali is a poet, translator, essayist, and fiction writer. His books include Inquisition, Bright Felon, and Silver Road: Essays, Maps & Calligraphies. He is a professor of cultural studies and comparative literature at the University of California, San Diego.


Twitter Username: kazimalipoet

Website: www.kazimali.com

Marilyn Chin's award-winning poems and tales have become Asian American classics and are taught all over the world. Her latest book—A Portrait of the Self as Nation: New and Selected Poems—celebrates thirty years of activist writing. She serves as a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.


Twitter Username: poetmarilynchin

Website: marilynchin.org

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S188. Apple, Tree: Writers on Their Parents. (, , , ) It happens to us all: we think we’ve settled into an identity, a self, and then out of nowhere, traces of our parents appear to us, in us—in mirrors, in gestures, in reaction and reactivity. For this collection of new work, the apple looked at the tree: 25 writers bring eloquence, integrity, and humor to topics such as arrogance, obsession, psychics, grudges, table manners, luck, and laundry. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Mat Johnson is the author of the novel Pym, the graphic novel Incognegro, and several other books. He is a recipient of the United States Artist James Baldwin Fellowship, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and the Dos Passos Prize. He teaches at the University of Houston Creative Writing Program.

Leland Cheuk is the author of three books of fiction, including the novels The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong and No Good Very Bad Asian. He has been awarded fellowships at the MacDowell Colony, Hawthornden Castle, Djerassi, and elsewhere. He runs the indie press 7.13 Books.


Twitter Username: lcheuk

Susan Ito coedited the anthology A Ghost at Heart's Edge: Stories and Poems of Adoption. She is author of the memoir The Mouse Room. She is a member of the San Francisco Writers' Grotto, and on faculty at Mills College and BayPath University's MFA programs.


Twitter Username: thesusanito

Website: http://www.susanito.com

Donna Masini's books include 4:30 Movie, Turning to Fiction, That Kind of Danger, and a novel, About Yvonne. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Ploughshares, and Best American Poetry. She is a professor of English and creative writing at Hunter College


Twitter Username: donnamasini

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S189. Translation as Social Activism. (, , , , ) This panel focuses on writers who undertake translation to meet the political necessity of feeling for and better understanding others. Spanning generations and ethnicities, panelists will share the process of coming to their work in translation, and consider such questions as, What do translations offer that history does not? How do translations help us to think “with” the people of another country, instead of think “about” them? Each writer will finish by reading a translation or two. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Cynthia Hogue has published nine poetry collections, most recently Revenance and In June the Labyrinth. Her co-translation, from the French of Nathalie Quintane, is Joan Darc. Hogue was the inaugural Marshall Chair in Poetry at Arizona State University. She is emerita professor of English.

Afaa M. Weaver is a poet, playwright, editor, and translator. Spirit Boxing is his 15th poetry collection. His awards include four Pushcarts, an NEA fellowship, a Fulbright fellowship, the Kingsley Tufts Award, the Phillis Wheatley Award, a Guggenheim fellowship, and the Botolph Club Foundation Distinguished Artist Award.


Twitter Username: Afaa_Weaver

Website: afaaweaver.net

Martha Collins's most recent book of poems is Because What Else Could I Do. She has also published nine earlier collections of poetry and four co-translated volumes of Vietnamese poetry. She founded the creative writing program at UMass-Boston and taught at Oberlin College for ten years.


Twitter Username: mcollinspoet

Website: www.marthacollinspoet.com

Eman Hassan's debut poetry collection, Raghead, received a Folsom Award and was Editor's Choice in the 2018 New Issues Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in Aldus Journal of Translation, Blackbird, Ilonot Review, and Painted Bride Quarterly, among others. She is an ASU (MFA) and UNL (PhD) alumnus.

Aaron Coleman is the author of Threat Come Close and St. Trigger, a chapbook that won the 2015 Button Poetry Prize. A Fulbright Scholar, Cave Canem fellow, and ALTA's 2017 Jansen Memorial Fellow, Aaron is currently a PhD student in comparative literature at Washington University in St. Louis.

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S190. Money, Money, Money: How to Make a Living and Be a Writer. (, , , , ) In an increasingly competitive academic job market, many writers are seeking alternative career pathways where they know their creative and critical thinking skills will make an impact— and they’ll be able to pay their bills. Five writers will discuss how they arrived in industries outside academia, offering tips on pursuing a meaningful career and sustaining a vibrant professional life as a writer. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Harriet Riley is a freelance writer focusing on creative nonfiction. She taught creative writing for eleven years with Writers in the Schools Houston. Harriet also taught journalism, worked as a nonprofit director, and as a newspaper reporter. She has her MA in journalism from UT Austin.


Twitter Username: hatriri

Rebecca Wadlinger is a graduate of the Michener Center for Writers and earned her PhD from the University of Houston's creative writing program. She currently works in the creative department at the Portland advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy.


Twitter Username: the_beccas

Long Chu oversees grantmaking for Houston Endowment's arts and culture portfolio. Prior to joining the foundation in 2015, he was associate director of Writers in the Schools. His poems have been published in several anthologies, including From Both Sides Now: The Poetry of the Vietnam War.

Keith S. Wilson is an Affrilachian Poet, Cave Canem fellow, graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and recipient of three Bread Loaf scholarships. He holds an MFA in poetry from Chicago State University. Keith works as a writer and game designer in Chicago.


Twitter Username: robottomulatto

Megan Peak received her MFA in poetry from The Ohio State University Her first book of poetry, Girldom, won the 2018 Perugia Press Prize from Perugia Press and 2019 The John A. Robertson Award for Best First Book of Poetry from the Texas Institute of Letters.


Twitter Username: megan_peak

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S191. Teaching Creative Writing Abroad: Translanguaging, Trauma, and Transformation. (, , , , ) This panels brings together the experiences of writers who teach creative writing abroad in postconflict and postcolonial contexts. Panel presenters work with the incarcerated in Russia, translingual students in Romania, Kazakhstan, Belarus, refugees in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Estonia, Croatia, and Eastern Ukraine. Delving into the interplay of translanguaging, trauma, politics, and history, this panel will showcase how these experiences shape the students, the teachers, and writing itself. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Mariya Deykute is a teacher, writer, performing artist and translator. Mariya received her MFA from UMass: Boston and has taught at UMass, the OLLI Institute, PEN New England and at Tohatchi High School. She currently teaches creative writing at Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan.

Ariella Katz is a graduate of the University of Chicago. She is a poet and a coeditor of A Literary Criminal Almanac, an anthology of stories by formerly incarcerated people in Moscow. Supported by a Fulbright Fellowship, she founded a writing program for former prisoners in Russia.


Twitter Username: Katz_Ariella

Heather Derr-Smith is the author of four books of poetry, Each End of the World, The Bride Minaret, Tongue Screw, and Thrust. She is the founder and director of Cuvaj se/Take Care, a nonprofit supporting writers in conflict zones and post-conflict zones and communities affected by trauma.


Twitter Username: Hderrsmith

Website: http://heatherderrsmith.com/

Tara Skurtu is a poet, teacher, and public speaker based in Bucharest. A two-time US Fulbright grantee and recipient of two Academy of American Poets prizes and a Robert Pinsky Global Fellowship in Poetry, she is the author of Skurtu, Romania and The Amoeba Game.


Twitter Username: taraskurtu

Caitlin E. Krause works in interdisciplinary arenas connecting learning, leadership, technology, writing, and immersive VR storytelling. A graduate of Duke University (BA) and Lesley University (MFA), she founded MindWise in 2015; her book Mindful by Design addresses mindfulness and creativity.


Twitter Username: MindWise_CK

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S192. “Sing Together as Long as We’re Alive”: Writing Music, Teaching Culture. (, , , , ) When writing, creating, and teaching about music and culture, is our engagement always, necessarily, political? Does it have to be about Trump? In this panel, writers and educators discuss why we look to music for forms of resistance, survival, and the reclamation of joy in times of crisis. We’ll discuss craft and criticism; the urgency and pleasure of writing and talking about music with students and audiences; and the strengths and challenges we derive from and give back to our communities.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Alison Kinney is the author of Hood and of essays for the Paris Review Daily, the New Yorker, Harper’s, Lapham’s Quarterly, and the New York Times. In 2019 she became Assistant Professor of Writing (Nonfiction) at Eugene Lang College at the New School.


Twitter Username: Alison_Kinney

Michelle Villegas Threadgould is a Chicana journalist covering Latinx issues and resistant art movements. Her work has been published in CNN, Pacific Standard, and KQED, and her essays were featured in the music anthology, Women Who Rock. Her book Why Rage Against the Machine Matters comes out 2020.


Twitter Username: mthreadgould

Laina Dawes is a music journalist, cultural critic, and the author of What Are You Doing Here? A Black Woman’s Life and Liberation in Heavy Metal. She is also a fourth-year PhD in Columbia University’s ethnomusicology department.


Twitter Username: lainad

Dianca London Potts earned her MFA from The New School and is the former online editor of Well-Read Black Girl. Her words have appeared in The Village Voice and elsewhere. She is a 2015 Pushcart Prize nominee and a Kimbilio Fiction fellow. Her memoir is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: diancalondon

Yasmin Dalisay fronts two indie rock bands and is primary songwriter for the Minettes’ EP Party’s Over and Tuffy’s LP Lighting Things on Fire. She teaches rhetoric and composition as well as creative writing at John Jay College. She is currently writing a science fiction novel.


Twitter Username: YasminDalisay

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S193. Celebrating Ten Years of Argos Books. (, , , , ) Argos Books celebrates ten years of publishing innovative poetry and interdisciplinary work that subverts established conventions of genre, form, function, and audience. This reading features poets and fiction writers who span Argos' decade of making chapbooks, writing in translation, full-length poetry collections, cross-genre works, and gatherings that bring diverse literary communities together. 

Marina Blitshteyn is the author of the full-length collection Two Hunters, published by Argos Books with a CLMP Face-Out grant. Prior chapbooks include Russian for Lovers, Nothing Personal, $kill$, and Sheet Music. She works as an adjunct instructor of composition and literature in NYC.


Twitter Username: p0drushka

Sade LaNay (fka Murphy) is a poet and artist. They are the author of ​Härte, ​self portrait, ​Dream Machine, and ​I love you and I’m not dead​. @dichterin.


Twitter Username: marmarmur1

Website: http://bonesandjangle.tumblr.com/

Luis Othoniel Rosa wrote in Spanish two experimental novels, and a research book on anarchist aesthetics. He studied in Puerto Rico, has a PhD from Princeton and currently teaches at the University of Nebraska. Argos will publish his second novel translated to English, Down with Gargamel!


Twitter Username: LuisOthonielR

Website: https://luisothonielrosa.com/

Poet, publisher, translator, and audio producer Noel Black is the author of three full-length collections: Uselysses, La Goon, and The Natural Football League.


Twitter Username: darksandal

Bianca Stone is a poet and visual artist. Her books include Someone Else’s Wedding Vows, Poetry Comics from the Book of Hours, and The Mobius Strip Club of Grief. She is creative director at the Ruth Stone Foundation in Goshen, Vermont.


Twitter Username: biancastone

Website: poetrycomics.org

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S194. Invincibles: Women Writers Publishing After 50. (, , , , ) Many panels and articles claim to honor older women writers—then define “older” as over 35! The fiction writers on this panel all published their first books after age 50. What are the particular challenges—and opportunities—posed by our age and gender? How do we simultaneously manage the demands of writing, publishing—and menopause? In what ways are we constrained—or free? We share true stories, tips, and encouragement for writers of all ages. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Naomi Williams is the author of the novel Landfalls and an in-progress book of stories inspired by Japanese ghost stories and folktales. Her short fiction has appeared in many journals and garnered a Pushcart Prize. She teaches at the low-res MFA program at Ashland University.


Twitter Username: naomiwilliams

Website: http://naomijwilliams.com/

Val Brelinski was raised in Nampa, Idaho, a daughter of evangelical Christians. Her debut novel is The Girl Who Slept with God. She is a former Wallace Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, where she currently teaches creative writing.

Peg Alford Pursell is the author of A Girl Goes into the Forest and of Show Her a Flower, A Bird, A Shadow, named 2017 Indie Book of the Year in Literary Fiction. She is the director, founder, and editor in chief of WTAW Press and of Why There Are Words.


Twitter Username: peg_a_pursell

Website: http://www.pegalfordpursell.com

Jimin Han is the author of the novel A Small Revolution. Her work appears in or is forthcoming in Platypus's digital shorts series, NPR's Weekend America, Poets & Writers, Catapult, Hyphen magazine, The Rumpus, and others. She teaches at the Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College.


Twitter Username: jiminhanwriter

Website: Tumblr.com/blog/notesfromstonebarn.

Geeta Kothari is the nonfiction editor at The Kenyon Review. Her writing has appeared in various anthologies and journals, including Best American Essays. Her book is I Brake for Moose and Other Stories. She teaches at the University of Pittsburgh and at Carlow University.


Twitter Username: Kothari_Geeta

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S195. Disabled Voices: Disfluent Writers Speak. (, , , ) Sound and voice are vital elements of prose and poetry. Writers with speech disabilities (cerebral palsy, stuttering, and dystonia) discuss how their speaking voices have influenced their writing. This panel explores how vocal difference can serve as a catalyzing force in form, content, and performance across many genres, and discusses the realities of public speaking and publishing as a writer with a disability. Writers talk about their processes and make recommendations for further reading.

Adam Giannelli is the author of Tremulous Hinge (winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize) and the translator of Diadem (a selection of prose poems by Marosa di Giorgio). His writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Washington Post Magazine, Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.

Jennifer Bartlett is the author of three books of poetry and coeditor of Beauty is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability.

Denise Leto is a poet, writer, and dance dramaturge. Her current project involves issues of voice and accessibility in ecopoetics. She wrote the poems for Your Body Is Not a Shark, a performance of vocal difference. With the art collective, Olimpias, she does cross-genre and disability culture work.


Twitter Username: sealeto

Website: onecontuousword.wordpress.com

David Shields is the internationally bestselling author of more than 20 books, including Reality Hunger (30 "best books of 2010" mentions),The Thing about Life Is That One Day You'll Be Dead (New York Times bestseller), The Trouble with Men, and Nobody Hates Turmp More Than Trump. He is an NBCC finalist and his books appear in twenty-four languages.


Twitter Username: _DavidShields

Website: www.davidshields.com

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S196. Writing Medicine: The Role of Artists in Cultural and Community Healing. (, , , , ) In November 2018, the FBI reported that hate crimes increased for the third consecutive year. Writers and artists build resilience and help communities heal, not only through our work on the page, but through our work in the world. Panelists offer reflections on their healing practices, from hosting pláticas following the Pulse Nightclub shooting, to working with Central American migrants at the border, to rewriting the centuries-old proclamation for the city of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Michelle Otero is the poet laureate of Albuquerque and the author of Malinche’s Daughter. Her work has appeared on NPR’s Code Switch and in the Best of Brevity anthology. She is a graduate of Harvard University and Vermont College and a member of the Macondo Writer's Workshop.


Twitter Username: oterotweets

Website: michelleotero.wordpress.com

Valerie Martínez's books of poetry include Absence, Luminescent, And They Called It Horizon, World to World, and Each and Her. She was the poet laureate of Santa Fe, New Mexico, from 2008–2010. Martinez is currently the director of history and literary arts at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.


Twitter Username: valmatz

Website: www.valeriemartinez.net

Anel I. Flores, lesbiana, chicana, artist, is the author of Empanada, a Lesbiana Story en Probaditas. She is a member of Macondo Writer’s Workshop and NALAC. Currently she is completing her forthcoming manuscripts, Cortinas de Lluvia and her graphic memoir, Pindada de Rojo.


Twitter Username: aneliflores

Website: www.anelflores.com

Chasity Salvador is a writer, performer, advocate, and cocreator for/of indigenous women. Her professional, academic, and personal careers are focused on seeking and practicing healing among Pueblo communities, indigenous women, and Mother Earth through ancestral ways of knowing/being.


Twitter Username: chasitylolita

Maya Chinchilla is the author of The Cha Cha Files: A Chapina Poética and editor of CentroMariconadas: A Queer and Trans Central American Anthology. She teaches literature, creative writing, and Latina/o/x studies at San Francisco State University, UC Davis, UC Santa Cruz, and Holy Names University.


Twitter Username: chachachapina

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S197. Fake News and Hard Truths: Teaching Students Creative Research Approaches. (, , , , ) In this post-fact era, students tend to avoid research in their creative work, viewing it as suspect or thwarting self-expression. Yet, research invigorates a piece of creative writing and is one of the most powerful tools for making positive change. This panel will offer vetted research exercises for poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction students. Moving beyond secondary methods, panelists will discuss immersive research, social action research, and document collage.

Charlotte Pence is the author of Many Small Fires, which received a Foreword's Book of the Year award. She is also editor of The Poetics of American Song Lyrics and director of University of South Alabama's creative writing program and the Stokes Center for Creative Writing.


Twitter Username: PenceCharlotte

Website: http://charlottepence.com

Margaret Lazarus Dean is the author of three books: a work of creative nonfiction, Leaving Orbit; a novel, The Time It Takes to Fall; and a memoir cowritten with astronaut Scott Kelly, Endurance. Her MFA is from the University of Michigan and she teaches creative writing at the University of Tennessee.


Twitter Username: mlazarusdean

Website: http://www.margaretlazarusdean.com/

Kwoya Fagin Maples is a poet and creative writing instructor at the Alabama School of Fine Arts. She is a Cave Canem Graduate Fellow. Her book Mend is a collection of historical persona poetry and was finalist for the Donald Hall Prize for Poetry.


Twitter Username: kwoya_maples

Website: kwoyafaginmaples.com

Frank X Walker is a cofounder of the Affrilachian Poets, a Cave Canem fellow, and editor of PLUCK!. The author of nine collections of poetry and a recipient of a Lannan Foundation Poetry Fellowship, he is professor of English and African American and Africana Studies at the University of Kentucky.

Andrew Malan Milward is the author of The Agriculture Hall of Fame and I Was a Revolutionary. He is an assistant professor of English at the University of Kentucky.

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S198. Their Dogs Came with Them: A Staged Reading. (, ) A staged reading with local actors of Helena María Viramontes’s epic novel Their Dogs Came with Them. Told through the voices of four Mexican American youth in East LA during the 1960s, Viramontes ascribes new meanings to gang life dramas, genderqueer identities, and Chicana coming-of-age barrio tales. Adapted for the stage by Virginia Grise, the play addresses the effects and aftereffects of war, mental illness, and state violence. Manuel Muñoz will introduce the reading.

Virginia Grise is a recipient of the Whiting Writers' Award, Princess Grace Award in Theatre Directing, and the Yale Drama Series Award. Her published work includes Your Healing Is Killing Me, blu, and The Panza Monologues. She earned her MFA from the California Institute of the Arts.


Twitter Username: vgrise

Manuel Muñoz is the author of a novel, What You See in the Dark, and two collections, Zigzagger and The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue, which was shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. The recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award, he teaches at the University of Arizona.

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S199. New Engagements with Forgotten Writers. (, , , ) Contemporary reinterpretations and appreciations of older mentor poets play a crucial role in keeping the legacy of those writers alive and contextualizing them for a new generation of readers and writers. Four poet-editors explore their secret muses (Gloria Anzaldúa, Lynn Lonidier, tatiana de la tierra, and Georgia Douglas Johnson) and why the work of these obscure writers inspires their own work creatively and editorially. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kim Roberts is the author of A Literary Guide to Washington, DC: Walking in the Footsteps of American Writers from Francis Scott Key to Zora Neale Hurston, and five books of poems, most recently The Scientific Method. She coedits the web exhibit DC Writers' Homes.


Twitter Username: fan_belt

Website: www.kimroberts.org

Dan Vera coedited Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands and authored two books of poetry. A CantoMundo and Macondo fellow, he's the recipient of the 2017 Oscar Wilde Award and Letras Latinas/Red Hen Poetry Prize, and his work appears in various publications and university curricula.


Twitter Username: danvera

Website: http://www.danvera.com

Julie R. Enszer is the author of Avowed, Lilith's Demons, Sisterhood, and Handmade Love. She is the editor of The Complete Works of Pat Parker and Milk & Honey: A Celebration of Jewish Lesbian Poetry; both were finalists for a Lammy. Enszer is the editor and publisher of Sinister Wisdom.

Olga García Echeverría is the author of Falling Angels: cuentos y poemas. Her work has appeared in several anthologies, among them Lavanderia: A Mixed Load of Women, Wash, and Words, and Telling Tongues: A Latino/a Anthology on Language. She teaches at Cal State University LA.

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S200. A House of Our Own: A Tribute to Sandra Cisneros. (, , , , ) Sandra Cisneros is best known as the author of The House on Mango Street and a MacArthur “genius” grantee. Yet a powerful aspect of her legacy began 25 years ago in San Antonio, when she founded the Macondo Writers Workshop by gathering writers around her kitchen table and imploring them to think about their conscience. Five acclaimed Latinx authors who have been deeply influenced by Cisneros in both their art and their activism will pay tribute to their mentor/muse/madrina. 

Stephanie Elizondo Griest is the author of Around the Bloc, Mexican Enough, and All the Agents & Saints. Associate professor of creative nonfiction at UNC-Chapel Hill, she lectures globally, including as a Moth storyteller, and won a Margolis Award for Social Justice Reporting at the US border.


Twitter Username: SElizondoGriest

Website: www.MexicanEnough.com

Angie Cruz is a New York born Dominicana and the author of the novels Soledad and Let It Rain Coffee. She teaches at University of Pittsburgh, and is the editor of asterixjournal.com. Her novel Dominicana is forthcoming. angiecruz.com


Twitter Username: acruzwriter

Daisy Hernández is the author of A Cup of Water Under My Bed: A Memoir and coeditor of Colonize This! Her work has been published in National Geographic, Dogwood, The Rumpus, and many literary journals. She’s an assistant professor at Miami University in Ohio.


Twitter Username: daisyhernandez

Website: daisyhernandez.com

Mexican writer Reyna Grande is the author of the novels Across a Hundred Mountains and Dancing with Butterflies, which received several awards including an American Book Award. Her memoir, The Distance between Us, is about her life before and after illegally immigrating from Mexico to the US at nine.


Twitter Username: reynagrande

Website: www.reynagrande.com

Alex Espinoza is the author of Still Water Saints,The Five Acts of Diego León, and Cruising: An Intimate History of a Radical Pastime. He's written for the NY Times, LA Times, VQR, and NPR. He is the recipient of an NEA fellowship and an American Book Award.


Twitter Username: @alex_esp

Website: www.alexespinoza.com

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S201. Who is "Desi"? Tradition & History in South Asian Native & Diasporic Literature. (, , , , ) This panel explores South Asian writing through the lens of how migration and immigration have impacted South Asian writers. The immediacy of popular "desi" subcultures lays bare areas of historical division and conflict. The panel will explore how writers uproot disparate language and traditions to create simulacra of the country left behind, and the relationships and conflicts that arise between writers both in and out of the diaspora when faced with these differing realities.

Kamil Ahsan is currently a doctoral student in history at Yale University, with a prior doctorate in biology from the University of Chicago. Originally from Lahore, Pakistan, he is also a freelance journalist, critic, and an editor at Barrelhouse magazine. 


Twitter Username: kamuleosaurus

Hasanthika Sirisena's stories have appeared in Glimmer Train, Epoch, StoryQuarterly, Narrative, and other magazines. She is a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writer's Award and the 2015 Juniper Prize for Fiction. Her short story collection is The Other One.


Twitter Username: thinkhasie

Website: http://hasanthikasirisena.com/

Palvashay Sethi is a writer and a teacher whose experimental short stories and nonfiction work have appeared in Barrelhouse, minor literature[s], Queen Mob’s Teahouse, The Aleph Review, Severine magazine, and DAWN.


Twitter Username: Palvashits

Feroz Rather is a doctoral candidate of creative writing at Florida State University. His work has appeared in The Common, The Kenyon Review, The Ploughshares Blog, The Millions, The Rumpus, and in Mad Heart, Be Brave: On the Poetry of Agha Shahid Ali. The Night of Broken Glass is his first book.

Aditya Desai's stories, essays, and poems have appeared in B O D Y, The Rumpus, the Millions, the Margins, District Lit, the Kartika Review, the Aerogram, and others. He received his MFA in fiction from the University of Maryland, College Park. He currently teaches writing in Baltimore.


Twitter Username: atwittya

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S202. Lambda Literary Fellows on Transnational and Intersectional Queer Fiction. (, , , , ) Recent fiction has increasingly featured diverse local and global representations of queer identities. But the concept of queerness also conveys a nonnormative, nonessentialist, anti-identity stance. Mindful of this inherent tension, this panel of 2018 Lambda Literary fellows engages with the following questions: What forms does, and can, queerness take in fiction? And what roles do nationality and intersectionality play in how queer writers explore questions of identity? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Serkan Gorkemli’s fiction has appeared in Ploughshares, Foglifter, and Chelsea Station. His book Grassroots Literacies: Lesbian and Gay Activism and the Internet in Turkey won the 2015 CCCC Lavender Rhetorics Award. He is a 2018 Lambda Literary fellow and an associate professor of English at UConn.


Twitter Username: sgeenyc

Website: http://english.uconn.edu/serkan-gorkemli/

Javier Fuentes is a Spanish American writer. He holds an MFA in fiction from Columbia University where he was a teaching fellow in the undergraduate writing program. A 2018 Lambda Literary Fellow, Javier is working on a novel against the cliches of being queer, undocumented, and marginalized.

Melissa Nigro is a queer writer working on a collection of short stories set in Eden, a dying Californian gold rush town. They are a 2018 Lambda Literary Fellow and their fiction has appeared in The Knicknackery and Emerge: The 2018 Lambda Fellows Anthology.

Ricco Villanueva Siasoco is the author of a story collection, The Foley Artist. He has received fellowships from The Center for Fiction, Lambda Literary, and has taught at Columbia University and Boston College. He is a board member of Kundiman.


Twitter Username: rsiasoco

Website: https://www.facebook.com/foleyartiststories/

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S203. Teaching the Podcast: A New Exercise in Creative Writing Multimodality. (, , , ) Each year brings an intense demand for more dynamic, more interactive creative writing courses, and this is because there is a necessary trend among educators to embrace the multimodal nature of media as fundamental to our student’s learning lives. In the past decade, podcasts have become a driving force in our cultural landscape, and this panel will discuss the value of challenging students to produce podcasts as well as address the functionality of using podcasts as teaching tools.

Saul Lemerond is a visiting assistant professor of English at Hanover College. He received his PhD in English with an emphasis in creative writing-fiction from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. He has a book of short stories, Kayfabe and Other Stories.


Twitter Username: SaulLemerond

Leigh Camacho Rourks's forthcoming collection of short stories, Moon Trees and Other Orphans, is the winner of the 2018 St. Lawrence Book Award. She is also the recipient of the Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Award and the Robert Watson Literary Review Prize.


Twitter Username: DrScaredWriter

Website: lcrourks.com

Billie R. Tadros is the author of three books of poems, Graft Fixation, Was Body, and The Tree We Planted and Buried You In, as well as three chapbooks of poetry. She is an assistant professor at the University of Scranton, where she teaches in the Department of English and Theatre.


Twitter Username: BillieRTadros

Website: www.BillieRTadros.com

Kase Johnstun is the author of Beyond the Grip of Craniosynostosis as well as the co-editor/author of Utah Reflections: Stories from the Wasatch Front. He hosts the LITerally Podcast, where he interviews authors about writing and publishing.


Twitter Username: kasejohnstun

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S204. Writing Climate, Catalyzing Change. (, , , , ) What role can writers play in the fight against climate change? Some writers use their craft to bear witness to an increasingly unlivable world; others go further, not only addressing the connections between human activities and environmental catastrophe, but also taking action to change it, and compelling others to do the same. These writers will discuss how our work makes possible (or fails to make possible) ways of reimagining how we can evolve in a context of persistent natural disasters.

Lacy M. Johnson is a Houston-based professor, curator, activist, and author of the essay collection The Reckonings, the widely acclaimed memoir The Other Side, and Trespasses: A Memoir. She teaches creative nonfiction at Rice University.


Twitter Username: lacymjohnson

Website: www.lacymjohnson.com

Emily Raboteau is the author of a novel, The Professor's Daughter, and a work of creative nonfiction, Searching for Zion: The Quest for Home in the African Diaspora, winner of the 2014 American Book Award. She is a professor in the MFA program at the City College of New York, in Harlem.


Twitter Username: emilyraboteau

Website: www.emilyraboteau.com

Sarah M. Broom is a New Orleans native whose essays have appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, Oxford American, and elsewhere. Obsessed with geographies, family, and home, she's currently at work on The Yellow House


Twitter Username: sarahmbroom

Elizabeth Rush is the author of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore, a finalist for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction. She teaches creative nonfiction at Brown University.


Twitter Username: elizabetharush

Cinelle Barnes is the Manila-born author of Monsoon Mansion and Malaya: Essays on Freedom. Her work has received support from Kundiman, VONA, the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund, and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and has appeared in CatapultLiterary Hub, and Buzzfeed Reader.

Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S205. Behind the Curtain: The Editors Speak!. (, , , , ) The submission process can be daunting and mysterious. Most of us use an online submission system and them patiently wait—sometimes for more than a year—before receiving a canned rejection. So what can the average writer do to be a better submitter of their work, to catch an editor's eye, to get past the slush pile? This diverse panel assembles some of the top literary magazine editors in the country to answer your questions about the submissions process and what goes on behind the scenes.

Christian Kiefer is the author of the novels Phantoms, The Infinite Tides, and The Animals and the novella One Day Soon Time Will Have No Place Left to Hide. He is recipient of a Pushcart Prize and directs the low-res MFA program at Ashland University.


Twitter Username: xiankiefer

Website: www.xiankiefer.com

Emily Nemens became editor of The Paris Review in summer 2018, after five years coediting The Southern Review. Her fiction has appeared in The Gettysburg Review, n+1, The Iowa Review, and Esquire. Her debut novel, The Cactus League, is forthcoming in 2020.


Twitter Username: emilynemens

Website: www.nemens.com

Allison Wright is the executive editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review and former editor of Tiny Hardcore Press. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, VQR, Popular Mechanics, Lit Hub, and elsewhere. She holds a PhD from the University of Texas and teaches journalism at the University of Virginia.


Twitter Username: wrightallison

Oscar Villalon is the managing editor of ZYZZYVA. He is a former book editor at the San Francisco Chronicle, as well as a past board member of the National Book Critics Circle. He is also a contributing editor to Literary Hub.


Twitter Username: ovillalon

Adam Ross, editor of The Sewanee Review, is the author of the novel Mr. Peanut and the story collection Ladies and Gentlemen.


Twitter Username: adamrosswriter

Room 218, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S206. Subversive KidLit. (, , , , ) Young adult, middle grade, and picture books like Elizabeth Acevedo’s The Poet X and Aisha Saeed's Amal Unbound are pushing boundaries in content and form while literature for adults—for now—lags behind. Why is KidLit so subversive? Why is KidLit’s subversive nature so exciting? And what can writers who write for adults learn from KidLit authors? This panel of five KidLit writers, a few of us also crossover authors in the adult market, will celebrate and share KidLit’s subversive power.

Jenny Ferguson is Métis, an activist, a feminist, an auntie, and an accomplice with a PhD. She believes writing and teaching are political acts. Border Markers is her collection of linked flash fiction narratives. She is a visiting assistant professor at Loyola Marymount University.


Twitter Username: jennyleesd

Website: www.jennyferguson.ca

Nova Ren Suma is The New York Times bestselling author of The Walls Around Us, and more. She has an MFA from Columbia University and is a MacDowell and Yaddo fellow. She is coeditor of Foreshadow: A Serial YA Anthology and teaches at Vermont College of Fine Arts and the University of Pennsylvania.


Twitter Username: novaren

Website: http://novaren.com/

Margaret Owen is a YA author whose debut fantasy is The Merciful Crow.


Twitter Username: what_eats_owls

Yamile (sha-MEE-lay) Saied Méndez is a fútbol-obssessed Argentine American. An inaugural Walter Dean Myers Grant recipient, she’s also graduate of Voices of Our Nations (VONA) and the Vermont College of Fine Arts.


Twitter Username: YamileSMendez

Website: yamilesmendez.com

Adrianne Russell is a writer, editor, and cofounder of marginsbox, a BIPOC-centered young adult book subscription service. Her writing has appeared in Smithsonian, Fusion, Temporary Art Review, and the young adult anthology The (Other) F Word: A Celebration of the Fat and Fierce.


Twitter Username: writersrepublic

HemisFair Ballroom C1, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S206A. Writers with Disabilities Featured Event. More information coming soon!

HemisFair Ballroom C3, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S207. Jill Soloway & TOPPLE Books Featured Event. More information coming soon!

Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S208. The Perfect Match: Finding the Right Agent for You and Your Work. (, , , , ) The world of literary agents can seem murky and impenetrable to authors beginning the querying process, but it doesn't have to be that way. This panel focuses on candidly exploring how authors and agents actually find each other in the real world. What do agents actually do, why do they do it, and where will you find them? With an extended question-and-answer session, writers have the opportunity to ask our panel of actively acquiring agents their most burning questions.

Michelle Brower is an agent with Aevitas Creative Management, where she specializes in literary fiction, book club fiction, and narrative nonfiction. Her authors include Clare Beams, Sarah Domet, Jason Mott, Tara Conklin, Viet Dinh, and many others.


Twitter Username: michellebrower

Kent D. Wolf is an agent at The Friedrich Agency, representing literary fiction and narrative nonfiction in the areas of memoir, essays, immersive reportage, and pop culture. His clients include National Book Award–finalist Carmen Maria Machado and New York Times–bestselling essayist Samantha Irby.


Twitter Username: kentdwolf

Annie Hwang is a literary agent at Folio Literary Management, where she represents literary fiction and select nonfiction. A former journalist, Annie is constantly on the hunt for underrepresented voices and gifted storytelling that stretches its genre to new heights.


Twitter Username: AnnieAHwang

Emily Forland is an agent at Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents. She represents voice-driven literary fiction and narrative nonfiction and has a special place in her heart for original writing that jumps off the page.


Twitter Username: EmilyForland

Sarah Domet is the author of the novel The Guineveres, the craft book 90 Days to Your Novel, and numerous works of short fiction and nonfiction. She teaches in the creative writing program at Ball State University.


Twitter Username: sarahdomet

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S209. Code-Switching in Class: Writing and Teaching with Vernaculars. (, , , , ) It’s not bad grammar, it’s alternate grammar: writers use dialect, patois, creoles, slang, and hybrid lexicons not only to evoke voice, tone, and place, but to generate friction from the textures of languages in combination. How can alternate grammars be approached progressively in creative writing classrooms? Four writer-teachers who mix dictions in their own work discuss inclusive teaching practices that honor the range, richness, and complexity of the languages and dialects of their students.

BK Fischer is the author of four books of poetry—Mutiny Gallery, St. Rage's Vault, Radioapocrypha, and My Lover's Discourse—and a critical study of ekphrasis, Museum Mediations. She teaches the Comma Sutra, a cross-genre seminar on grammar and syntax for MFA writers, at Columbia University.


Twitter Username: BK_Fischer

Website: www.bkfischer.com

Molly Sutton Kiefer is the author of the lyric essay Nestuary, as well as three poetry chapbooks. She is founding editor of Tinderbox Poetry Journal and runs Tinderbox Editions, a nonprofit press.

Anna V. Q. Ross is a Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow in Poetry and the author of the collections If a Storm, Figuring, and Hawk Weather. Her work appears in The Nation, The Southern Review, Harvard Review, and elsewhere. She teaches at Emerson College and hosts Unearthed Song & Poetry.


Twitter Username: annavqross

Website: annavqross.com

Eddie Vega is a poet, spoken word artist, and career educator. He writes about food, Tejano culture, social justice, and the intersections thereof. He is the author of a full-length book of poetry, Chicharra Chorus. He can be found on Twitter and Instagram at @eltacolico.


Twitter Username: eltacolico

Antoinette Cooper is a poet, educator, and TEDx speaker. Her work focuses on the black female body, and she is currently at work on her first poetry collection. She has led writing workshops from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to Rikers Island. She teaches writing at Columbia and CUNY Medical School.

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S210. Zach Doss Memorial Reading. (, , , , ) Zach Doss was a writer and PhD candidate at the University of Southern California. During his MFA at The University of Alabama, he served as editor of Black Warrior Review. Shortly after his passing in 2018, Kelly Link selected his manuscript, Boy Oh Boy, as the winner of The Grace Paley Prize for Short Fiction. Five writers will honor Zach with a reading of Boy Oh Boy, as well as contribute their own words about how Zach and his work affected their lives.

Tasha Coryell received her MFA from the University of Alabama. She currently teaches full time at Alabama while simultaneously pursing a PhD in composition and rhetoric. Her first collection of short stories, Hungry People, came out in 2018 from Split Lip Press.


Twitter Username: tashaaaaaaa

Brian Oliu is an Instructor at the University of Alabama. He is the author of four books of nonfiction and two chapbooks, ranging from Craigslist Missed Connections, to computer viruses, to 8-bit video games, to NBA basketball. Works in progress deal with pro wrestling and long-distance running.


Twitter Username: beoliu

Website: http://www.brianoliu.com

Jonathan Wlodarski is a graduate of the Northeast Ohio MFA and is pursuing a doctorate at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.


Twitter Username: jonathanwlod

Emily Geminder is the author of Dead Girls and Other Stories. Her work has appeared in AGNI, American Short Fiction, Conjunctions, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Prairie Schooner, Tin House online, and elsewhere. She is a PhD fellow in fiction at the University of Southern California.

Alexander Chee is the author of the novels Edinburgh and The Queen of the Night and How To Write An Autobiographical Novel, a collection of essays. Recipient of the Whiting Writers Award and an NEA in Fiction, he is an associate professor of English at Dartmouth College.


Twitter Username: alexanderchee

Website: http://alexanderchee.net

Room 304, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S211. Tenemos Tumbao: On Building a Black Latinx Poetics. (, , , , ) Black Latinx writers are often excluded when it comes to discourse around Latinx literature, and when included only tend to come from a few specific places and backgrounds. In this panel, five Black Latinx poets from various ethnic and geographical backgrounds will discuss how their upbringings inform their notions of Black Latinidad, and what figures they turn to in building a Black Latinx poetics. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Malcolm Friend is a poet and author of the collection Our Bruises Kept Singing Purple. He received his BA from Vanderbilt University and his MFA from the University of Pittsburgh. He has received fellowships from organizations including CantoMundo and the Center for African American Poetry & Poetics.


Twitter Username: friendlypoet

Jennifer Maritza McCauley is a PhD candidate at University of Missouri, and holds editorial positions at The Missouri Review and Pleiades. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment of the Arts, CantoMundo, and Kimbilio, and is the author of the collection SCAR ON/SCAR OFF.


Twitter Username: BibliophileMari

Julian Randall is a living queer Black poet from Chicago. A Pushcart Prize nominee, he has received fellowships from Callaloo, BOAAT, and the Watering Hole. Julian is the curator of Winter Tangerine Review’s Lineage of Mirrors and a candidate for his MFA in poetry at Ole Miss.

Jasminne Mendez is an award winning author, performance poet, and educator. She received her BA in English literature and her MEd in curriculum and instruction from the University of Houston. She is the author of two hybrid collections of poetry and essays.


Twitter Username: jasminnemendez

Yesenia Montilla is an Afro Latina poet. Her poetry has appeared in Prairie Schooner, Gulf Coast, Academy of American Poets Poem-A-Day, and others. She received her MFA from Drew University and is a CantoMundo Fellow. The Pink Box is her first collection and was longlisted for the PEN Open Book Award.


Twitter Username: yeseniamontilla

1:45 pm to 3:00 pm

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S212. United States of Writing: Strengthening Literary Communities Nationwide. (, , , ) In 2019, Poets & Writers launched United States of Writing with a commitment to deepen its service to writers nationwide as the organization celebrates its 50th Anniversary. Poets & Writers staff and its outreach coordinators in Detroit, Houston, and New Orleans will share experiences from the project's inaugural year including how they've used events, convenings, and social media to build community across genres and neighborhoods. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ricardo Hernandez is the recipient of fellowships from Poets House, Lambda Literary, and The Vermont Studio Center, and program associate of the Readings & Workshops program (East) at Poets & Writers, Inc.


Twitter Username: bourgiepapi

Kelly Harris is a Cave Canem Fellow and the author of Shame on Her: Poems & Essays. She received her MFA from Lesley University. Kelly is the Poets & Writers Literary Coordinator in New Orleans and serves as the lead programming curator for Words & Music Festival in the city.


Twitter Username: khdpoetry

Lupe Mendez (educator/writer/activist) has prose work in the Kenyon Review and Sudden Fiction Latino as well as poetry that appears in Huizache, Luna, The Texas Review, Tinderbox, Hunger Mountain, Glass Poetry, and Gulf Coast. His book is Why I Am Like Tequila.


Twitter Username: thepoetmendez

Website: www.thepoetmendez.org

Justin Rogers is a Black poet from Detroit, Michigan. Rogers shares poems surrounding living and praying as a Black man in America and explores fantasy through pop culture. He is the author of micro-zine Nostalgia as Black Matilda and Black, Matilda.


Twitter Username: blklyfmattering

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S213. Adding and Removing the Comma: Grammar, Syntax, and the Poetic Line. (, , , , ) In The Art of Syntax, Ellen Bryant Voigt claims “the infinite variations of generative syntax take another quantum leap when they can be reinforced or reconfigured… by the poetic line.” This panel discusses some of the ways poets use grammar, mechanics, and syntax. Panelists consider punctuation, parallelism, modifiers, active and passive voice, grammar in revision, the role of editor, grammatical tense and mood, phrasing re: line breaks, and pronouns and the style guide. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Diane K. Martin is an online instructor for grammar, mechanics, and usage with UC Berkeley Extension. Her work has appeared in APR, Field, Harvard Review, Kenyon Review, Plume, ZYZZYVA, and many other journals. Conjugated Visits was her first collection and Hue & Cry is her second.

Anna Leahy is a poet, nonfiction writer, and pedagogy scholar. Her books include Aperture, Constituents of Matter, Tumor, Generation Space, and Power and Identity in the Creative Writing Classroom. She directs the MFA in creative writing program at Chapman University and edits TAB.


Twitter Username: AMLeahy

Beth Ann Fennelly, poet laureate of Mississippi, teaches at the University of MS. Winner of a Pushcart, an NEA, a Fulbright, and a USA Artist Grant, she's published six books: three poetry, three prose. Her newest, Heating & Cooling: 52 Micro-Memoirs, was an AJC Best Book of 2017 and a Goodreads favorite.

Emily Pérez is the author of House of Sugar, House of Stone, and the chapbooks Made and Undmade and Backyard Migration Route. A CantoMundo fellow, she has received funding and support from Bread Loaf, the Artist Trust, Jack Straw Writers, and the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley.


Twitter Username: budlemon

Idris Anderson has published two poetry collections. Mrs. Ramsay's Knee was selected by Harold Bloom for the May Swenson Prize. Her most recent book, Doubtful Harbor, was selected by Sherod Santos for the Hollis Summers Prize. She has won a Pushcart Prize and the New York Yeats Society Poetry Prize.

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S214. Essential Contemporary Texts in the Classroom: Natasha Trethewey's Native Guard. (, , , ) Trethewey received the Pulitzer Prize for Native Guard, and those of us who teach it know why: in terms of its content; formal architectures; and historical, cultural, and racial underpinnings, the collection represents a trove of value in the classroom, a collection remarkable for its textured approach to matters of race, identity, historical erasure, memory, and grief. This panel, comprised of poets who regularly teach the book, will provide insight and strategies for teaching it.

John Hoppenthaler's books of poetry are Domestic Garden, Anticipate the Coming Reservoir, and Lives of Water. He has also co-edited Jean Valentine: This-World Company. Editor of "A Poetry Congeries," he is a professor of creative writing and literature at East Carolina University.


Twitter Username: jhoppenthaler

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers has published four books of poetry, including The Glory Gets. Most recently, she received a poetry fellowship from the Witter Bynner Foundation and a fiction fellowship from Aspen Summer Words Conference. She is professor of English at the University of Oklahoma.


Twitter Username: blklibrarygirl

Website: http://www.honoreejeffers.com

Shara McCallum is the author of five books of poetry published in the US and UK, including Madwoman, winner of the OCM Bocas Poetry Prize for Caribbean literature and the Sheila Margaret Motton Book Prize from the New England Poetry Club. She teaches at Penn State University.

Michael Waters's books include Caw, The Dean of Discipline, Celestial Joyride, Gospel Night, Darling Vulgarity (LA Times Book Prize finalist), and Parthenopi: New & Selected. Recipient of five Pushcart Prizes and NEA, Guggenheim, and Fulbright fellowships, he teaches at Monmouth University and in the Drew university MFA.

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S215. Misrepresentation and Stigmatization of Suicide in YA Novels about Suicide. (, , , ) How should we define the responsibility of YA writers and publishers to represent suicide as a public health issue, in order to avoid common misconception, stigmatization, or taboo associated with the topic? What genre conventions or narrative techniques are privileged over the understanding and analysis the topic deserves? What are some ways YA writers can better represent the complexities of suicide, in an effort to encourage young readers who experience suicidality to seek help? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Virginia Lee Wood is a Korean American writer and former assistant fiction editor at the American Literary Review. A PhD candidate and dissertation fellow in literature and creative writing at the University of North Texas, her work appears in The Minnesota Review, online at Cutbank, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: TheWoodJung

Minadora Macheret is a poetry editor for Devilfish Review and is a PhD student in creative writing at the University of North Texas. Her work focuses on the intersectionality of the body, disability, Judaism, and epigenetics.

Carly Susser is a teaching fellow in the PhD in English and creative writing program at the University of North Texas. Her prose and poetry have appeared in various online journals. She is the assistant fiction editor at the American Literary Review.

Brian Clifton writes poetry and studies in Dallas.


Twitter Username: yeaheyesyeah

Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S216. Gratitude as Grit: Poetry of Appreciation in Times of Strife. (, , , , ) Contemporary poetry turns frequently toward criticizing socioeconomic and environmental injustices while veering away from poems of thanksgiving and appreciation. However, poetry that perpetuates narratives of hope, grace, and beauty is crucial: without such narratives, personal and political despair become paralyzing. In this reading, poets share work that acknowledges the difficulties of experience while also praising that which gives us the ability to write and take action. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Amie Whittemore is the author of Glass Harvest and an educator. Her poetry has been recognized with a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize and featured in Cold Mountain Review, Terrain: A Journal of Built & Natural Environments, Gettysburg Review, The Southeast Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: amiewhittemore

Diana Khoi Nguyen is a poet and multimedia artist,  and the author of Ghost Of, which won the 2019 Kate Tufts Discovery Award, and was a finalist for the National Book Award and other prizes. A Kundiman fellow, she currently teaches in the Randolph College MFA program and Lighthouse Writers Workshop.

Tyree Daye is the author of two poetry collections, River Hymns (winner of the APR/Honickman First Book Prize) and Cardinal (forthcoming). A Whiting Award Winner and Amy Clampitt fellow, Daye’s work has been published in Prairie Schooner, New York Times, Nashville Review, and VQR.


Twitter Username: Tyree Daye

Jessica Jacobs is the author of Take Me With You, Wherever You're Going and Pelvis with Distance, winner of the New Mexico Book Award and a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award. She serves as the associate editor of Beloit Poetry Journal.


Twitter Username: jlgjacobs

Catherine Pierce's most recent book is The Tornado Is the World; her new book, Danger Days, is forthcoming. Her work has appeared in The Best American Poetry, American Poetry Review, New York Times, and elsewhere. A 2019 NEA Fellow and Pushcart Prize winner, she teaches at Mississippi State.


Twitter Username: katieppierce

Website: www.catherinepierce.net

Room 007B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S217. On the Road Again: Authors Planning and Surviving a Book Tour. (, , , , ) The book tour used to be a staple of the writing life—a 20-city tour, expenses paid, nice hotels, name in lights, etc. But the market has radically changed. Now, most authors should be prepared to coordinate many of their own events and pay for their own expenses. The writers on this panel will discuss how they cobbled together their own tours, funded them, and juggled a tour with a job. They also will discuss the benefit and pitfalls of the DIY tour and what they would and wouldn’t do again. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Ivelisse Rodriguez is the author of Love War Stories, a 2019 PEN/Faulkner finalist and a 2018 Foreword Reviews INDIES finalist. She curates an interview series focused on contemporary Puerto Rican writers. She has taught creative writing at various universities.


Twitter Username: IvelisseWrites

Kali Fajardo-Anstine's story collection, Sabrina & Corina, and novel, Woman of Light, chronicle the lives of Chicanas in the Southwest. Kali has received fellowships from Yaddo, MacDowell Colony, and Hedgebrook. She has an MFA from the University of Wyoming.


Twitter Username: kalifaja

Adam Giannelli is the author of Tremulous Hinge (winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize) and the translator of Diadem (a selection of prose poems by Marosa di Giorgio). His writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Washington Post Magazine, Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.

Cinelle Barnes is the Manila-born author of Monsoon Mansion and Malaya: Essays on Freedom. Her work has received support from Kundiman, VONA, the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund, and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and has appeared in Catapult, Literary Hub, and Buzzfeed Reader.

Gabino Iglesias is a writer, journalist, professor, and book reviewer. He’s the author of Coyote Songs and Zero Saints. His work has been translated into three languages, optioned for film, and nominated to the Wonderland Book Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the Locus Award.


Twitter Username: Gabino_Iglesias

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S218. The Tabula Rasa Conundrum: How to Thrive Despite High Staff Turnover Rates. (, , , , ) The challenges facing literary journals are many—shrinking budgets, ballooning submission pools, etc.—but one chronic difficulty plaguing the industry remains strangely underexamined: the loss of institutional knowledge that often comes with the arrival of a fresh, new editorial staff. Editors from Barrelhouse, The Cincinnati Review, Juked, Miracle Monocle, and Salamander discuss best practices for overcoming the tabula rasa conundrum: how do we grow, but also maintain aesthetic consistency? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

José Angel Araguz is a CantoMundo fellow and the author of seven chapbooks as well as the collections Everything We Think We Hear, Small Fires, Until We Are Level Again, and An Empty Pot's Darkness. He is editor-in-chief of Salamander Magazine and teaches at Suffolk University.


Twitter Username: JoseAraguz

Website: https://thefridayinfluence.wordpress.com

Ryan Ridge is the author of five books and four chapbooks. He codirects the creative writing program at Weber State University and edits the literary magazine Juked.


Twitter Username: ryan_ridge

Website: www.ryanridge.com

Dave Housley is the author of four story collections, most recently Massive Cleansing Fire and If I Knew the Way, I Would Take You Home, and the novel This Darkness Got to Give. He is a cofounder of Barrelhouse magazine and co-organizer of the Conversations and Connections writer's conference.


Twitter Username: housleydave

Website: davehousley.com

Lisa Ampleman is the managing editor of he Cincinnati Review and the poetry series editor at Acre Books. She is the author of two books of poetry, Romances and Full Cry, and a chapbook, I've Been Collecting This to Tell You.


Twitter Username: LisaAmpleman

Sarah Anne Strickley is the author of the short story collection, Fall Together. She teaches creative writing and serves as faculty editor of Miracle Monocle at the University of Louisville. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and earned her PhD from the University of Cincinnati.


Twitter Username: sastrick

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S219. Our Name Is Offred: Living The Handmaid's Tale. (, , , ) Since its publication in 1986, Margaret Atwood's novel The Handmaid's Tale has only grown in relevance and popularity. With adaptations from film to opera to graphic novel to the hit television series, as well as Atwood's own 2019 sequel, The Testaments, this speculative fiction is particularly resonant in 2020. From across genres and perspectives, we will discuss the history, legacy, controversy, and prescience of this canonical—yet topical—work.

Elizabeth Isadora Gold’s writing has appeared in the NY Times, the Believer, Tin House, The Rumpus, Salon, and many other publications. She is the author of the nonfiction book The Mommy Group: Freaking Out, Finding Friends, and Surviving the Happiest Times of Our Lives.


Twitter Username: elizisadora

Website: www.elizabethisadoragold.com

A past president of the National Book Critics Circle, Kate Tuttle writes about books and authors for the Boston Globe. Her reviews, profiles, and interviews have also appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Washington Post. She also writes essays on politics, race, and parenting.


Twitter Username: katekilla

Bethanne Patrick, one of Flavorwire's "35 Writers Who Run the Literary Internet," is a critic whose reviews and profiles appear in The Washington Post, NPR Books, The LA Times, VQR.com, and others. A contributing editor at Literary Hub, she is writing a memoir for the Counterpoint Press.


Twitter Username: thebookmaven

Website: bethannepatrick.com

Héloïse Chung is a Korean American writer and filmmaker focused on female-driven narratives.


Twitter Username: hzla_de_encanta

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S220. Chicanas de la Frontera: Writing and Activism from the Border States. (, , , , ) In the tradition of the 1960s Chicano Movement, made well-known by the United Farm Workers strikes of Central Valley, California, and high school blowouts of Los Angeles, Chicana poets and writers from the four border states—Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California—discuss creative writing, activism, and the connections between the two. Listen to poems and stories from the borderlands, learn about current day actions to fight tyranny, and gain strategies for organizing in your own communities.

Marisol Baca is the author of Tremor. She received an MFA from Cornell, was the recipient of the Robert Chasen poetry award, and is a professor at Fresno City College. She teaches in the Resources for American Indian Needs learning community and founded Women Writers of Color in the Central Valley.


Twitter Username: Bacagirl2

Sarah Gonzales is a community organizer and artist in Tucson, AZ. She is the Director of Spoken Futures, Inc, a youth-centered social justice and literary organization. Sarah is a writer and trickster performance artist whose work landed her 6th place in the AZ US Presidential Primaries in 2012.


Twitter Username: truthsarita

Viktoria Valenzuela is a human rights activist, mother-writer, the organizer of 100 Thousand Poets for Change SATX and a Women Who Submit chapter lead. Valenzuela is also a Macondista and Zoeglossia Fellow. Her work keeps keen focus on Chican@ m(other)ing as decolonization and political action.


Twitter Username: ViktoriaValenz

Denise Chávez is a Borderland writer, teacher, playwright, and human rights activist. She is the owner of Casa Camino Real Bookstore, which in collaboration with the American Booksellers Association, has created Libros Para El Viaje/Books for the Journey, a Refugee Book Drive.

Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo is the author of Posada: Offerings of Witness and Refuge and is a former Steinbeck Fellow and Poets & Writers California Writers Exchange winner. She is the creator of the quarterly reading series Hitched and a cofounder of Women Who Submit.


Twitter Username: xochitljulisa

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S221. Poetry’s First and Last Stop: Libraries as Partners in the Publishing Process. (, , , , ) Libraries serve a unique role in the writing and publishing process; they are the birthplace of inspiration and the final home for poetic works. Panelists from Central Texas universities, public libraries, and independent publishers will discuss the ways poetry and libraries have intersected in their creative work and careers. Panelists will also share how poets can work with librarians and library workers to promote their books, so that writers are prepared to utilize the library market. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Tomás Q. Morín is the author of Patient Zero and A Larger Country. He translated Pablo Neruda's The Heights of Macchu Picchu and with Mari L’Esperance coedited Coming Close: Forty Essays on Philip Levine. He teaches at Drew University and in the low-residency MFA program at VCFA.

Gina Bastone is the humanities librarian at the University of Texas at Austin, where she curates the UT Poetry Center at the Perry-Castañeda Library. She served on the board of Chicon Street Poets and writes poetry in her spare time. She received her MS in information science from UT Austin.


Twitter Username: gina_bastone

Annar Veröld is a Honduran-American poet, screenwriter-director, and the managing editor at Host Publications. She proudly hosts the reading series I Scream Social.


Twitter Username: annarverold

Sam Treviño is a writer, poet, and literary organizer from Austin, Texas. He is currently Community Outreach Director for Chicon Street Poets, a literary nonprofit based in East Austin, and oversees the Aural Literature reading series for Austin Public Library, where he is a library associate.

Dave Lucas is the author of Weather, which received the Ohioana Book Award for Poetry. In 2018, he was appointed the second poet laureate of the State of Ohio. He teaches at Case Western Reserve University.


Twitter Username: fakedavelucas

Room 206B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S222. Being an Accomplice: Supporting Local Communities through Literary Programming. (, , , , ) There is an explosion of literary events all over the country, from readings showcasing famous writers to poetry nights at the local bookstore. But a neighborhood, a community, a city needs more. Literary accomplices can work together to create events that open spaces, fight erasure, and shift culture, providing environments that are safe, generative, supportive, and inclusive. Join four panelists producing events around the country to elevate the unique communities in which they work. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kate Maruyama's debut novel was Harrowgate and her short work has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She holds an MFA from Antioch University, LA where she now teaches in their MFA and BA programs as well as on the inspiration2publication.com and for Writing Workshops Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: katemaruyama

Website: www.katemaruyama.com

Judeth Oden Choi is founding partner of The Accomplices and a PhD student in human computer interaction at Carnegie Mellon, where she studies social justice activism online and uses theatre in speculative design. She has a BA in theatre studies from Yale, an MFA in dramatic writing from NYU, and a MS from CMU.


Twitter Username: JudethO

Scott Woods is a poet, writer, and award-winning organizer operating in Columbus, Ohio. He is the author of We Over Here Now, Urban Contemporary History Month, and Prince and Little Weird Black Boy Gods. He is the founder and CEO of Streetlight Guild, a nonprofit performing arts organization.


Twitter Username: scottwoodssays

Nick Demske works as a children's librarian at the Racine Public Library and is the County Supervisor of Racine County's 1st District. His self-titled book was selected by Joyelle McSweeney for the 2010 Fence Modern Poets Series Award and was published by Fence Books. He runs the BONK! arts series.

traci kato-kiriyama is an author and theater deviser who has awards from Center for Cultural Innovation, Network of Ensemble Theaters, and UCLA Distinguished Lectureship. Founder of Tuesday Night Project, she has also served as a guest lecturer for the Claremont Colleges and Teaching Writer-in-Residence for Grand Park.


Twitter Username: traciakemi

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S223. Leaving the Movie Theater: Cinema and Literature. (, , , , ) What makes a text cinematic? Does entanglement promote different ways of seeing? How can writers re-envision cinematic forms to expand their own text-based work? This panel will explore the overlapping spaces between text and moving image in order to uncover what their enmeshment might reveal about language, translation, collaboration, creative practice, genre, and more. Four writers whose work crosses fiction, nonfiction, and poetry will address how cinema is a conduit for their own writing.

Tisa Bryant is the author of Unexplained Presence and Residual (forthcoming), cocreator of the Black Book visual mixtape series, and co-founder of the Encyclopedia Project. Focused on experimentation and Black feminist thought, she teaches at the California Institute of the Arts.


Twitter Username: misstisab

Diana Marie Delgado's first poetry collection, Tracing the Horse, is forthcoming. She is the author of Late Night Talks with Men I Think I Trust. She is a 2017 NEA Fellow in Poetry.


Twitter Username: pompomrituals

Website: http://flavors.me/dianamarie

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, which won the CLMP Firecracker Award for Nonfiction. She is currently the Helen Zell Visiting Professor of Creative Nonfiction at the University of Michigan.

Mimi Wong is the editor in chief of The Offing. Her writing on art and culture has been published in ArtAsiaPacific, Catapult, Electric Literature, Hyperallergic, Literary Hub, and Refinery29. She's worked as a producer and editor in film and television for the past decade.


Twitter Username: whoismims

Allison Conner's writing has appeared in Bitch, Jacket2, and The Rumpus and in the anthologies Forward: 21st Century Flash Fiction and Rockhaven: A History of Interiors. She is the reviews editor at Full Stop and manages the Speakers Bureau at Jack Jones Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: al_noellec

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S224. All About Anthologies. (, , , , ) This panel pulls back the curtain on the process of editing an anthology—from the big philosophical challenges like making your anthology as inclusive as possible and creating a cohesive whole while staying true to each contributor's voice; to the nuts and bolts of soliciting, editing, and paying contributors, managing contracts, and getting reviews for what's sometimes considered a "hard sell" in the industry. Editors of essay, poetry, and mixed-genre anthologies tell all.

Lilly Dancyger is contributing editor, writing instructor, and columnist at Catapult; assistant books editor at Barrelhouse; and the editor of Burn It Down, an anthology of essays on women's anger.


Twitter Username: lillydancyger

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan is the editor of the Go Home! anthology. She is the author of the novel Harmless Like You, which was a New York Times Editors' Choice.


Twitter Username: rowanhlb

Elissa Washuta (Cowlitz Indian Tribe) is the author of two books, My Body Is a Book of Rules and Starvation Mode, and coeditor of the anthology Shapes of Native Nonfiction: Collected Essays by Contemporary Writers. She is an assistant professor at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: elissawashuta

Website: http://washuta.net

celeste doaks, a poet and journalist, is the editor of Not Without Our Laughter and author of Cornrows and Cornfields. Doaks, a Pushcart prize nominee, received her MFA from NC State University. Currently, she is the Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Delaware.


Twitter Username: thedoaksgirl

Website: www.thedoaksgirl.com

Sari Botton is the essays editor for Longreads and edited of the award-winning anthology Goodbye to All That: Writers on Loving and Leaving NY and its New York Times-bestselling follow-up, Never Can Say Goodbye: Writers on Their Unshakable Love for NY.


Twitter Username: saribotton

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S225. Nurturing Danticats and Nabokovs: Multilingual/ESL Students in Creative Writing. (, , , , ) Multilingual and ESL students, a sizable segment of college populations, are traditionally underrepresented in writing courses. How do we help them develop their voices? How can we tailor writing pedagogies to their needs? Community college panelists from around the country discuss teaching creative writing and publishing to migrant farmworkers, utilizing poetry translation in multilingual classrooms, refocusing grading policies to foster creativity, and writing contest and journal inclusion. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lane Igoudin is a nonfiction writer and a tenured English/ESL professor at Los Angeles City College, where he teaches writing and linguistics. In 2018-19, he also served as an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow with the Humanities Division of UCLA. He has written personal essays and a memoir.


Twitter Username: LIgoudin

Website: www.laneigoudin.com

Sharon Coleman teaches creative writing at Berkeley City College. She directs the journal Milvia Street. She's a contributing editor at Poetry Flash, a member of the Northern California Book Reviewers, and a curator the reading series Lyrics & Dirges. She was nominated twice for a Pushcart.

Marlys Cervantes serves as department chair of humanities and communication and director of the creative writing program at Cowley College in Arkansas City, Kansas. She teaches literature and writing courses, as well as serving as codirector of the Multi-Cultural Scholars Program.


Twitter Username: MsCerv

Daniel Rios-Lopera holds a degree in audiovisual communications and a creative writing MFA from the University of Texas in El Paso. He´s a Spanish, English, and creative writing teacher in different universities in the El Paso area. He is also director of Memorias del Silencio, creative writing workshops for immigrants farmworkers

Emma Burcart is a graduate of the Antioch University Los Angeles MFA program. She teaches composition and creative writing at a community college in rural North Carolina, where she also heads up the creative writing club on campus.


Twitter Username: EmmaBurcart

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S226. Singing Still: A Tribute to LeAnne Howe. (, , , , ) As an award winning poet, playwright, novelist, scholar, and instructor, LeAnne Howe has been instrumental in transforming the landscape of Native American literature over the course of two decades. She has taught in multiple universities, lectured internationally, and helped create seminal works of literary criticism. Come celebrate Howe’s contributions to Native letters, theater, and her recent Savage Conversations with members of the Indigenous Aboriginal American Writers Caucus. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Travis Hedge Coke is a writer, editor, and teacher, working with Along the Chaparral to story interred veterans at the Riverside National Cemetery. He is the former writer of the Hugo-nominated Pop Medicine column and current author of the weekly, Patricia Highsmash, from Comic Watch.


Twitter Username: travishedgecoke

Oscar Hokeah is a regionalist Native American writer of literary fiction, interested in capturing intertribal, multicultural, and transnational aspects within a contemporary Native landscape. He is half Native American (Kiowa/Cherokee) and half Hispanic.


Twitter Username: OscarHokeah

Website: www.oscarhokeah.com

Kenzie Allen is a descendant of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, a lecturer at York University, and a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee. She is the managing editor of Anthropoid, and her poems have appeared in the Iowa Review, Narrative, Indiana Review, and other venues.


Twitter Username: cerena

Website: http://kenzieallen.co

Ryan Neighbors is a lecturer at Texas A&M University in McAllen where he teaches writing, literature, and film courses. His prose and poetry have appeared in a variety of journals, including Tampa Review, Stoneboat Literary Journal, The Barely South Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: rcneighbors

Deborah Taffa teaches creative nonfiction at Washington University in St Louis. Her work has appeared in Salon, A Public Space, The Best American series, and elsewhere. She'll read her desert poetry onstage at the Lincoln Center with R. Carlos Nakai in 2020. A memoir about life on the res is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: deborahtaffa

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S227. Cold Open: Teaching Poetry in High School. (, , , ) Given the current difficulty of the university academic job market, a number of practicing writers have found sustainable teaching in high schools. In this panel, four poets speak to the merits and challenges of teaching at a different level than many MFA graduates aspire to. Each panelist will discuss the first poem they show their students and reflect on the poets they have found speak best to young adults. The panel will also review how recent MFA graduates might begin pursuing this career. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Keith Leonard is the author of the poetry collection, Ramshackle Ode. His poems have recently appeared in The Believer, Ploughshares, and New England Review. Keith teaches at The Wellington School, an independent school in Columbus, Ohio.


Twitter Username: keith_leonard_

Meghan Dunn is the author of Who Also Will Not Yield, a collaborative art and poetry chapbook, with artist Ben Pinder. She teaches high school English at the Brooklyn Latin School. Her work has appeared in Ploughshares and Narrative, among others.

Kenyatta Rogers is a Cave Canem fellow whose work has been previously published in or is forthcoming from Jubilat, The Volta, Rhino Poetry, Bat City Review, and others. He's an associate editor with Rhino Poetry and currently serves on creative writing faculty at the Chicago High School for the Arts.

Michael Bazzett is a 2017 NEA fellow. He is the author of three books of poetry–You Must Remember This (winner of the Lindquist & Vennum Prize), Our Lands Are Not So Different, and The Interrogation–as well as a verse translation of the Mayan creation epic The Popol Vuh.


Twitter Username: mikhailbazharov

Room 212, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S228. Station to Station: Telling the Stories of QUEENSBOUND. (, , , , ) Hear from Queens poets about poetry as an act of resistance and how to build and fortify a literary community in the midst of the Trump era. The poets of QUEENSBOUND—an online audio project launched in 2018 that collects, records, and shares the stories of Queens—will read work and discuss how, using the Queens subway lines, the project maps out and celebrates the literary community in Queens and, through poetry and narrative, reflects one of the world’s most diverse places back on itself.

KC Trommer is the author of the debut poetry collection We Call Them Beautiful and the chapbook The Hasp Tongue. She is the founder of the audio project QUEENSBOUND and is the assistant director of communications at NYU Gallatin.


Twitter Username: kctrommer

Website: www.kctrommer.com

Jared Harél is the author of Go Because I Love You and The Body Double. He’s been awarded the Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize from American Poetry Review and the William Matthews Poetry Prize from Asheville Poetry Review.

Safia Jama is a Cave Canem fellow and a Harvard graduate. Formerly the nonfiction editor of Apogee Journal, she has published poetry in Ploughshares, Rhino, Cagibi, Spoken Black Girl, and No Dear. Her poetry has also been featured on WNYC’s Morning Edition and CUNY TV’s Shades of U.S. series.


Twitter Username: safiaPOET

Joseph O. Legaspi is the author of the collections Threshold and Imago, and the chapbooks Postcards, Aviary, Bestiary, and Subways. Recent works appeared in Poetry, New England Review, World Literature Today, and Best of the Net. A former Fulbright fellow, he cofounded Kundiman.

Abeer Y. Hoque is a Nigerian-born Bangladeshi American writer and photographer. She has published a monograph of travel photographs and poems (The Long Way Home), a book of linked stories, poems, and photographs (The Lovers and the Leavers), and a memoir (Olive Witch).


Twitter Username: olivewitch

Room 213, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S229. Aztlan Libre Press Presents Four XicanX Authors. (, , , ) Aztlan Libre Press, an independent publishing company based out of San Antonio, Texas that specializes in Native American/XicanX literature and art, presents four of its authors in a special reading and performance. The event culminates with three award-winning Chicana voices sharing their poetry, memoir, and an excerpt from the Xicana punk rock musical "The Cancion Cannibal Cabaret." Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Amalia Ortiz authored Rant. Chant. Chisme. (named one of 10 Great Latino Books of 2015 by NBC Latino) and The Canción Cannibal Cabaret. She was awarded the Alfredo Del Moral Award, and National Hispanic Cultural Center, and Hedgebrook residencies. A CantoMundo Fellow, she received her MFA from UTRGV.


Twitter Username: AmaliaOrtiz

Website: AmaliaOrtiz.net

Reyes Cardenas is the author of Survivors of the Chicano Titanic, I Was Never A Militant Chicano, Chicano Poet (Poems 1970-2010), and Tortured Barrio Songs.

Vincent Cooper is the author of Zarzamora: Poetry of Survival and the chapbook Where the Reckless Ones Come to Die. Cooper's poetry has appeared in several online zines, journals, and anthologies. He is a member of the Macondo Writers Workshop.


Twitter Username: vinnycoop13

Barbara Renaud Gonzalez is a published writer of four books. Her novel, Golondrina, was the first Chicana novel to be published by the University of Texas. She has also founded a nonprofit, AALAS, dedicated to telling the marginalized stories of Texas (s)heroes.

Room 214A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S230. Narrative Disruption: A Catalyst for Meaningful Subversion. (, , , , ) If we think of formal choices as political acts, what might disruption in prose mean? How can narratives of dislocation, trauma, alienation, and marginalization be enacted through prose disruptions? Whether by juxtaposing multiple selves, creating fissures in narrative meaning, using fragments in the narrative line, or subverting grammatical or syntactical expectations, these authors explore and embrace disruption as a tool to create subversion in order to make meaning from chaotic experience.

Melissa Matthewson's essays have been published in numerous literary journals including DIAGRAM, Guernica, American Literary Review, Mid-American Review, and Bellingham Review, among others. She is the author of the memoir, Tracing the Desire Line. She teaches at Southern Oregon University.


Twitter Username: melmatthewson

Emily Arnason Casey is the author of Made Holy: Essays. Her writing has appeared in the Normal School, The Rumpus, Hotel Amerika, Briar Cliff Review, Mid-American Review, and elsewhere. She teaches writing at the Community College of Vermont. www.emilyarnasoncasey.com


Twitter Username: emilyarna

Mary-Kim Arnold is the author of Litany for the Long Moment and The Fish & The Dove (forthcoming). A former arts administrator, she now teaches in the Nonfiction Writing Program at Brown University.


Twitter Username: mkimarnold

Website: http://mkimarnold.com/

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the novel The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, a Haven, which won the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, and the family history project Zat Lun, which won the 2018 Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize.


Twitter Username: thiriimkm

Katherine Agard is a writer and artist. Her first book, of color, will be published in early 2020. A dual citizen of Trinidad & Tobago and Ghana, she lives in San Francisco.

Room 214B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S231. Game On Again: Teaching Writing for Video Games 2.0. (, , , ) Following last year’s successful panel on writing for video games, this year’s panel will focus on pedagogical tools teachers can use in the classroom. Software like Twine, Imagine 7, Bitsy, or RPG Maker are easy to use and adaptable to many different kinds of writing, from fiction to poetry, to multimodal writing. Our panel will show how to incorporate these tools in the classroom to write compelling digital narratives that promote empathy through interactivity. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Salvatore Pane is the author of the novel Last Call in the City of Bridges as well as Mega Man 3. His work has appeared in American Short Fiction, Hobart, and Paste. He is an associate professor of creative writing and new media at the University of St. Thomas.

Eric Freeze teaches at Wabash College. He has published fiction and essays in periodicals including the Southern Review, Harvard Review, and Boston Review. He is author of Dominant Traits (stories), Hemingway on a Bike (essays), and Invisible Men (stories).

Julialicia Case is a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Cincinnati, where she studies digital narratives and contemporary fiction and teaches courses in video games as literature and digital creative writing. She writes fiction, creative nonfiction, and digital work.

Nick Francis Potter is the author of New Animals, a hybrid collection of prose and comics. He teaches classes in writing, cartooning, and digital media at the University of Missouri, and currently serves as the comics editor at Anomaly.


Twitter Username: haircut_drone

Room 214C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S232. Zoeglossia: A Community of Writers with Disabilities. (, , , , ) This reading will introduce AWP attendees to the founders, directors, teachers, and inaugural fellows of this first-ever US retreat for writers with disabilities. Consisting of readings, talks, roundtables, and intensive workshops, the first retreat took place in May 2019 in San Antonio, TX. The readings will spotlight the important work coming from the diverse Zoeglossia community and promote awareness of the program's role in creating a safe creative space for a marginalized writer population. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Jennifer Bartlett is the author of three books of poetry and co-editor of Beauty Is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability.

C.S. Giscombe teaches English at the University of California, Berkeley. His recent books include Prairie Style, Ohio Railroads, Border Towns, and Overlapping Apexes. He is at work on a mixed-genre prose book titled Railroad Sense and a poetry book titled Negro Mountain.

Zoe Stoller is a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, where she studied English and creative writing. She currently works at a digital marketing agency in Philadelphia.


Twitter Username: zstoller4

Zoe Stoller is a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, where she studied English and creative writing. She currently works at a digital marketing agency in Philadelphia.


Twitter Username: zstoller4

Gaia Thomas is a poet and scholar. She is a 2019 graduate of the MFA program at Mills College and a Zoeglossia fellow. In 2018 she presented at UPenn's New Disability Poetics Symposium. Her critical work encompasses crip perspectives on modern and contemporary poetry.


Twitter Username: GaiaCThomas

Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S233. Killing the Story to Tell the Self: Innovating Black Women's Narratives. (, , ) Innovative Black women poets have contributed much to the landscape of contemporary poetry by challenging traditional conventions of lyric poetry to convey narratives long considered less traditional and unconventional. This panel presents four innovative Black women writers who have reimagined the poetic landscape and now embark on projects of literary narrative in various forms including creative nonfiction and studio art in their pursuit of the authentic story.

Ruth Ellen Kocher's most recent books are Third Voice, Ending in Planes, Goodbye Lyric: The Gigans and Lovely Gun, and domina Un/blued. She teaches poetry, poetics, and literature at the University of Colorado-Boulder.


Twitter Username: ruthellenkocher

Website: www.ruthellenkocher.com

Dawn Lundy Martin, PhD, is professor in the English department at the University of Pittsburgh. Her books include A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering; DISCIPLINE; Life in a Box Is a Pretty Life; and GOOD STOCK, STRANGE BLOOD, winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award.


Twitter Username: dawnlundy

Website: http://www.writing.pitt.edu/people/faculty/dawn-lundy-martin

Duriel E. Harris is the author of the solo play Thingification and three books of poetry, including Drag, Amnesiac, and the prize winning No Dictionary of a Living Tongue. Editor of Obsidian and co-founder of the Black Took Collective, she is an associate professor of English at ISU in Normal, IL.


Twitter Username: DrPoMo

Website: thingification.org

Room 216A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S234. Comics Editors and Literary Journals. (, , , ) Graphic literature, poetry comics, sequential art—whatever the term, the hybrid form of image-text sequences in all of its diverse expressions is finding new homes in literary journals, including those that might once have considered comics too lowbrow to publish. Now journal mastheads increasingly include editors devoted specifically to comics. What are the experiences, goals, and challenges of literary comics editors? Find out from five major journals. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Chris Gavaler is an associate professor of English at Washington & Lee University, where he teaches creative writing and serves as comics editor of Shenandoah. He has published two novels and four books of comics scholarship.

Kristen Radtke is the author of the graphic nonfiction book Imagine Wanting Only This, and the forthcoming Seek You: Essays on American Loneliness and Terrible Men, a graphic novel. She is the art director and deputy publisher of The Believer.


Twitter Username: kristenradtke

Website: www.kristenradtke.com


Twitter Username: ZachLinge

Room 217A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S235. Agent Access: Everything You Need to Know about Agents but Were Too Afraid to Ask. (, , , , ) Publishing can too often seem like a fortress designed to keep writers out. Hear directly from four successful agents who want nothing more than to open those gates of perception and usher writers in. Drawing from their experiences discovering and selling books by some of the most exciting and talented writers in the country, these agents will offer insights about how to approach them with new work and how you can be the best publishing partner to your agent, your editor, and your publicist.

Kevin Larimer is the editor in chief of Poets & Writers, where he edits Poets & Writers, oversees pw.org, and directs Poets & Writers Live. He is coauthor of The Poets & Writers Guide to Being a Writer.


Twitter Username: kevinlarimer

Emily Forland is an agent at Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents. She represents voice-driven literary fiction and narrative nonfiction and has a special place in her heart for original writing that jumps off the page.


Twitter Username: EmilyForland

Julia Kardon is a literary agent at Hannigan, Salky, Getzler Agency. She was formerly an agent and the director of foreign rights at Mary Evans Inc. A graduate of the University of Chicago with a degree in comparative literature, Julia now represents literary fiction and some memoir.


Twitter Username: jlkardon

Kent D. Wolf is an agent at The Friedrich Agency, representing literary fiction and narrative nonfiction in the areas of memoir, essays, immersive reportage, and pop culture. His clients include National Book Award–finalist Carmen Maria Machado and New York Times–bestselling essayist Samantha Irby.


Twitter Username: kentdwolf

Raised in California, Marya got her BA in English at Harvard, where she was fiction editor for the Advocate, and her MFA in fiction at NYU, where she taught undergraduate creative writing. She represents literary fiction and narrative nonfiction.


Twitter Username: mwspence

Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S236. Screenwriting: The 8 Traits of Killer Characters. (, , , ) And by “killer,” we mean memorable! In this panel, screenwriters will discuss eight traits often seen in the most enduring, extraordinary, exceptional characters in film history. This session will help writers create real people who leap off the page—engaging readers and viewers on an emotional journey.

Leslie Kreiner Wilson, PhD, is a produced screenwriter and directs the MFA Program in Writing for Screen and Television at Pepperdine University. Her recent publications include fiction as well as essays on early screenwriters Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and Mae West in various academic journals.

Andrea Baltazar is an assistant professor of communication at Weber State University, where she teaches audio production, editing, and documentary filmmaking. She’s also a writer/director of a short film entitled Urban Uber. She graduated from Pepperdine University with an MFA in screenwriting.

Andrés Orozco is the writer/director of various award winning films, including Yo Soy Tu Niña, God Speaks Spanish, and 16 Summers. He is an assistant professor at Weber State University, where he teaches digital media, screenwriting, and oversees film production. He's also a working SAG actor.


Twitter Username: orozcofilms

Tom Provost wrote Under Suspicion starring Oscar winners Morgan Freeman and Gene Hackman. It was nominated for an Edgar Award. He wrote and directed The Presence starring Oscar winner Mira Sorvino. The film won numerous best picture and best director awards. He is an honors graduate from UT Austin.


Twitter Username: provostom

Website: cinemalanguage.org

Room 217C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S237. The Case for Crime: Writing Crime Narratives in a Changing World. (, , , , ) A recent surge in high-quality literary work engaging with crime through lenses of race, gender, class, and queerness have breathed new life into a genre once seen as salacious and formulaic. Yet writers may still encounter prejudices and expectations from readers and the publishing world. How do we approach crime stories with responsibility and care? And why write crime in the first place? Nonfiction writers and novelists with recent books in the field offer practical insights.

Alex Marzano-Lesnevich is the author of The Fact of a Body: A Murder & A Memoir, which received a Lambda Literary Award, the Chautauqua Prize, and the Prix France Inter-JDD and was translated into nine languages. They are an assistant professor at Bowdoin.


Twitter Username: alexmlwrites

Website: http://www.alexandria-marzano-lesnevich.com/

Emma Copley Eisenberg is the author of The Third Rainbow Girl. Her writing has appeared in McSweeney's, Granta, Tin House, VQR, Zyzzyva, AGNI, Vice, the New Republic, and others. She co-directs Blue Stoop, a hub for the literary arts in Philadelphia.


Twitter Username: frumpenberg

Meredith Talusan is an award-winning author and journalist who has written for The Guardian, The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Wired, among many other publications, and has contributed to several essay collections. Her debut memoir, Fairest, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: 1demerith

Steph Cha is the author of Follow Her Home, Beware Beware, Dead Soon Enough, and her recent fourth novel, Your House Will Pay. She’s the noir editor for the Los Angeles Review of Books and a regular contributor to the Los Angeles Times and USA Today.


Twitter Username: stephycha

Rachel Monroe is the author of Savage Appetites, a book of meta-true crime. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, The Believer, and Best American Travel Writing. She has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Fulbright Foundation.


Twitter Username: rachmonroe

Website: http://therachelmonroe.tumblr.com/

Room 218, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S239. An FC2 Reading. (, , , , ) FC2 has been a leading publisher of experimental writing for over 40 years, hosting a dynamic and diverse conversation about what constitutes the innovative. Their authors include, among many others, Samuel Delany, Leslie Scalapino, Lidia Yuknavitch, Stephen Graham Jones, Diane Williams, Marc Anthony Richardson, Amelia Gray, and Vi Khi Nao. This event features readings by authors of their latest releases, followed by a Q&A.
Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Marream Krollos received her PhD from the University of Denver. Her books include the collection Big City and the novella Stan.

Kiik Araki-Kawaguchi writes dreampop speculative fictions that can be enjoyed on a bus ride or in line for coffee. All his best stories have something to do with talking insects. He is the author of Disintegration Made Plain and Easy and The Book of Kane and Margaret.


Twitter Username: annhoggiscoming

Grant Maierhofer is the author of Flamingos, Gag, Clog, Postures, the forthcoming nonfiction work Peripatet, and Drain Songs, also forthcoming. He holds an MFA from the University of Idaho where in his final year he was the Hemingway Fellow. Further work is available via grantmaierhofer.fail.


Twitter Username: g____ maierhofer

Susan Neville is the author of several collections of nonfiction and fiction, including story collections Invention of Flight, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award, and the forthcoming The Town of Whispering Dolls, from FC2. She teaches in the MFA program at Butler University in Indianapolis.

Darcie Dennigan's recent books are The Parking Lot and other feral scenarios and Slater Orchard: an etymology.

HemisFair Ballroom C1, Henry B. González Center, Ballroom Level

S240. A Reading & Conversation with Akwaeke Emezi & Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Sponsored by PEN America. PEN America is proud to present Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah in conversation with Akwaeke Emezi, two writers known for their innovative approaches to genre, form, and writing beyond reality. Adjei-Brenyah was the recipient of the 2019 PEN/Jean Stein Book Award for Friday Black, a collection of short stories that imagines an America where racial injustice and capitalism continue to flourish unchecked. Emezi’s sophomore title and young adult debut, PET, centers on a black trans girl named Jam, and asks difficult questions about what people can do to improve their world, even if much of society is in denial about its problems. PET is nominated for a National Book Award for Young People’s Literature.

HemisFair Ballroom C3, Henry B. González Center, Ballroom Level

S241. A Reading & Conversation with Cave Canem Prize Winners Major Jackson, Donika Kelly, & Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon, Sponsored by Cave Canem. (, , , ) 20 years of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize: past winners read their work and discuss the impact of the prize in the world and in their lives.

Julian Randall is a living queer Black poet from Chicago. A Pushcart Prize nominee, he has received fellowships from Callaloo, BOAAT, and the Watering Hole. Julian is the curator of Winter Tangerine Review’s Lineage of Mirrors and a candidate for his MFA in poetry at Ole Miss.

Major Jackson is the author of five collections, most recently The Absurd Man. A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Jackson is the Richard A. Dennis Professor of English at University of Vermont. He is the editor of Best American Poetry 2019.


Twitter Username: Poet_Major

Website: majorjackson.com

Donika Kelly is the author of the chapbook Aviarium and the full-length collection Bestiary, winner of the 2015 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and long listed for the National Book Award. She is an assistant professor at Baruch College.


Twitter Username: officialdonika

Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon is the author of ] Open Interval [, a finalist for the National Book Award, and Black Swan, winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. She has written plays and lyrics for the Cherry, an Ithaca arts collective, and in 2018 her work was featured in Courage Everywhere, celebrating women’s suffrage and the fight for political equality, at National Theatre London.

Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S242. Paul Celan at 100: Looking Back, Looking Forward. (, , , , ) To mark the centennial of Celan's birth, five poets talk about him as continuing catalyst, model, and influence, with a focus on poetry as "urgent conversation," as "encounter, dissent, and leave-taking all in one." What can poets make—what have they made—if guided, as Celan said of his own work, by experience, fate, and "a need for responsibility and solidarity." A newly published translation of Celan's complete posthumous prose calls for further celebration and reconsideration.

Catherine Barnett is the author of Human Hours, The Game of Boxes, and Into Perfect Spheres Such Holes Are Pierced. Recipient of the Believer Book Award, the James Laughlin Award, and a Guggenheim, she's an independent editor, lectures at Hunter College, and is core faculty in NYU's writing program.

Tarfia Faizullah is the author of Seam and Register of Illuminated Villages. She is the recipient of three Pushcart Prizes, a Fulbright fellowship, and a GLCA award, among other honors, . She is a visiting artist-in-residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

francine j. harris is the author of play dead, winner of 2017 Lambda Literary and Audre Lorde Awards. She has received fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, is a Cave Canem poet, and is the 2018/2019 Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellow at the Cullman Center at New York Public Library.


Twitter Username: francinejharris

Ilya Kaminsky lives in San Diego, CA.

Valzhyna Mort is the author of Factory of Tears and Collected Body. A recipient of several American and European awards and fellowships, including the Lannan Literary Fellowhsip, she teaches at Cornell University and writes in English and Belarusian. Her new book is forthcoming.

Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S243. Working with Literary Agents: Insider Advice for Small Press Publishers, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , ) Hear from leading literary agents about what makes a small press publisher attractive to an agent, how they cultivate working relationships with editors, and what a small press publisher can expect from working with an agent.

Serene Hakim is an agent with Ayesha Pande Literary. Prior to joining APL, she worked for Laura Gross literary in Boston. As an agent, she is looking for a variety of genres including literary fiction, YA, and nonfiction. Her focus is on underrepresented voices and stories with international themes.


Twitter Username: serenemaria

Sonali Chanchani is an assistant and rising literary agent at Folio Literary Management, where she specializes in upmarket fiction and narrative nonfiction.

Erin Harris, a VP at Folio, represents literary/upmarket fiction and narrative nonfiction. Her clients include Pulitzer Prize & National Book Award finalist Carla Power; Indie Next Pick author Erica Ferencik; Iowa Short Fiction Award winner Allegra Hyde; and National Jewish Book Award finalist Adam Wilson.


Twitter Username: ErinHarrisFolio

Website: http://foliolit.com/erin-harris/#

Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S244. 25 Years of ALTA Fellows. (, , , , ) For 25 years, the American Literary Translators Association’s Travel Fellowship program has supported and celebrated the work of emerging translators. Many of our fellows have gone on to shape the field as award-winning literary translators, book publishers, and influential teachers and mentors. Join past fellows for a bilingual reading in Vietnamese, French, Spanish, and Hungarian, as well as a discussion of how to enter the field of literary translation. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Kelsi Vanada holds MFAs in poetry and literary translation from the Writers' Workshop and the University of Iowa. Her translation of Berta García Faet's The Eligible Age came out last year; her chapbook Rare Earth is forthcoming in spring 2019. She is the program manager of ALTA in Tucson, AZ.


Twitter Username: KelsiVanada

Emma Ramadan is a translator based in Providence, RI, where she co-owns Riffraff bookstore and bar. She's received an NEA Fellowship, a Fulbright, and a PEN/Heim grant. Her translations include Sphinx by Anne Garréta, Pretty Things by Virginie Despentes, and Me and Other Writing by Marguerite Duras.


Twitter Username: emkateram

Robin Myers is a poet and translator. She was among the winners of the 2019 Poems in Translation Contest held by Words Without Borders. Translations-in-progress include work by Mónica Ramón Ríos, Javier Peñalosa, Maricela Guerrero, and Mateo García Elizondo.


Twitter Username: robin_ep_myers

Adam Levy is the copublisher of Transit Books.

Hai-Dang Phan is the author of Reenactments: Poems and Translations. A recipient of a 2017 NEA creative writing fellowship, he teaches at Grinnell College.

Room 304, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

S245. Small Press Success: A Business Primer for Both Authors and Publishers. (, , , , ) Small presses are a vital wellspring of emerging and underrepresented voices, but the financial challenges of running a small press are as present as ever. The successful release requires a savvy, creative, and efficient approach from both publisher and author. Publishers from both independent and institutional presses will discuss the benefits and limitations of small press publishing, and offer insider knowledge on how to best produce and market an author’s book while remaining solvent. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

William Todd Seabrook is the author of four novellas-in-flash including The Imagination of Lewis Carroll, The Passion of Joan of Arc, and The Genius of J. Robert Oppenheimer. He earned his PhD at Florida State University, and is the coeditor of The Cupboard Pamphlet, a prose chapbook press.


Twitter Username: wtseabrook

Website: williamtoddseabrook.net

Amanda Miska runs Split Lip Press. She received her MFA from American University. Her essays and fiction can be found at Catapult, Midnight Breakfast, The Rumpus, Hobart, Wigleaf, the Prairie Schooner blog, Huffington Post, and elsewhere. amandamiska.com.


Twitter Username: akmiska

Deena Drewis is the founder and editor of Nouvella, an independent press dedicated to novella-length works of fiction. Nouvella titles have been the recipients of a National Jewish Book Award and an Amazon Best Book of the Month and have helped launch the career of authors Emma Straub and Edan Lepucki.


Twitter Username: nouvellabooks

Abigail Beckel is the publisher of Rose Metal Press, a nonprofit publishing house for books in hybrid genres that she cofounded in 2006. She is a published poet and prose writer, as well as co-editor of two anthologies.


Twitter Username: rosemetalpress

James Brubaker is the author of The Taxidermist's Catalog, Black Magic Death Sphere: (science) fictions, Liner Notes, and Pilot Season. He is associate professor of writing at Southeast Missouri State University, where he also directs the Univesity's press and edits the journal Big Muddy.


Twitter Username: mrbnatural

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm

Room 004, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S246. Narrative Healing: Yoga & Writing Workshop with Lisa Weinert. () Open to all! This full-body, full-spirit storytelling experience will use yoga, writing, and listening exercises to inspire a holistic and freeing storytelling experience. This 75-minute afternoon workshop will include a gentle yoga practice, writing prompts, and listening exercises. These classes will build off each other; come for the entire series or drop in for a single class. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a pen and paper. www.lisaweinert.com @lisaweinert www.narrativehealing.com

Directions from the Main Lobby: Go past the administration building, turn right into the hallway and proceed past the restrooms and Grab & Go area towards the West Lobby, take a right and go inside the Lila Cockrell Theatre, take the elevator to the River Level, and arrive at Room 004.
Directions from the Meeting Level: Take any elevator to the River Level area, proceed past rooms 007–006 and exit the building, keep going towards the Lila Cockrell Theatre and enter the theater on your right, walk straight until you arrive at Room 004.

Lisa Weinert is passionate about the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She is the founder of Narrative Healing, a program that combines meditation, yoga, and writing to help writers (re)connect to their bodies and feel empowered to launch their work into the world.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

Room 006A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S247. Teaching the Teen Writer: Creating Accessible and Successful Programming for Teens. (, , , , ) This panel discussion and Q&A will address managing the teen workshop and creating effective curriculum. Panelists range from working with at-risk teens, bringing creative writing into the classroom and working in pre-college programs. What are the challenges in creating a safe-space classroom? How do mandated reporting and other laws impact the creative writing classroom? Panelists will share their approach and advice to those interested in starting a teen program or becoming involved with one.

Tania Pabón Acosta holds an MA in English from the University of Puerto Rico and an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College, where she is an administrator. Her work has appeared in Pigeon Pages, Entropy, Cosmonauts Avenue, among others, and is forthcoming in The Los Angeles Review and Great River Review.


Twitter Username: TaniaPabon

Website: taniapabon.wordpress.com

Patricia Dunn has an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College, where she teaches and is senior director of The Writing Institute. Author of Rebels by Accident, her writing has appeared in Salon.com, CSM, the Nation, and Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women, among others.


Twitter Username: shewrites

Website: patriciadunnauthor.com

Tori Weston is the founder and assistant director of the Arts & Communication Pre-College Programs at Emerson College. She received a BFA in writing and publishing and a MFA in creative writing from Emerson College.


Twitter Username: writergrrl76

Sylvia Chan is the author of We Remain Traditional. She serves as court advocate for foster kids in Pima County and nonfiction editor for Entropy, where she curates a domestic violence series. She teaches in the writing program at the University of Arizona.


Twitter Username: sylinchan

Seth Michelson teaches at Washington and Lee University. His most recent books of poetry are Swimming through Fire and Eyes Like Broken Windows. He edited Dreaming America: Voices of Undocumented Youth in Maximum-Security Detention, and he has translated eight books of poetry.

Room 006B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S248. It’s Too Late for Us, Save Yourselves. (, , , , ) Five debut nonfiction authors discuss the difficulties of bringing a book into the world, even after securing an agent or book contract. Writing about a diversity of subjects across the genre, and publishing with “Big Five,” academic, and small presses, the panelists will give perspective on the pre- and post-launch, and how to stay sane when things don’t go as planned. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Neda Semnani is a journalist and writer whose work has appeared in various online and print publications, including the Washington Post, Longreads, New York, Kinfolk, The Baffler, The Week, and Roll Call, among others. She is currently at work on her memoir, They Said They Wanted Revolution.


Twitter Username: neda_semnani

Stephanie Gorton has written for NewYorker.com, Smithsonian.com, LA Review of Books, the Toast, the Millions, and other publications. She has held editorial roles at Canongate Books, the Overlook Press, and Open Road. She is the author of Citizen Reporters, a book about Gilded Age journalists.


Twitter Username: sdgortonwords

Thomas P. Kapsidelis is the author of After Virginia Tech: Guns, Safety, and Healing in the Era of Mass Shootings. He worked for twenty-eight years at the Richmond Times-Dispatch and was a Virginia Humanities fellow. He is a visiting assistant journalism professor at the University of Richmond in 2019–20.


Twitter Username: tomkapsidelis

Simon J. Dahlman (aka Jim) is professor of communications and humanities at Milligan College, Tennessee, and serves as chair of the Performing, Visual, and Communicative Arts area. A veteran journalist, author, and editor, he holds an MFA in creative nonfiction from Goucher College.


Twitter Username: sjdahlman

Website: www.sjdahlman.com

Kristina Gaddy is a writer who focuses on history, culture, and health. Her pieces have appeared in the Washington Post, Narratively, and Ozy, among others. Her young adult nonfiction book about teenagers who fought the Nazis during the Third Reich is forthcoming.

Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S249. Bodily Transformations: Reclaiming the Self. (, , , , ) Join five diverse poets as they share their artistic work and theories on the merit of writing bodily transformations. Panelists will discuss using transformations to understand societal constraints placed on femme, POC, and queer bodies, how myths and fairytales can be deconstructed to ruminate on historical and personal violences, and how reimagining the liminal body and the mind tethered to it as folkloric, animal, and even monstrous can provide distance needed to reclaim the self. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Canese Jarboe is the author of two collections of poetry, vo/luptuary and dark acre, a chapbook. Their poems have appeared in Bennington Review, South Carolina Review, Willow Springs, Indiana Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: canesejarboe

Christina Rothenbeck is an instructor at Louisiana State University. She is the author of the chapbook Girls in Art, and her poems have appeared in Sugar House Review, Bone Bouquet, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA from West Virginia University and a PhD from The University of Southern Mississippi.


Twitter Username: doc_rothenbeck

Mary Leauna Christensen is a multiracial individual and a current PhD in creative writing candidate at the University of Southern Mississippi. She received her MFA from Eastern Washington University, and is managing editor of the Swamp literary magazine.

Victoria C. Flanagan holds a dual-genre MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. They are the recipient of an Academy of American Poets Prize and the 2018 Emerging Poets Prize from Palette Poetry, among other honors. Recent work can be found in New South, Beloit Poetry Journal, and Crab Creek Review.


Twitter Username: vicstronaut

Cassandra J. Bruner, the 2019–2020 Jay C. and Ruth Halls fellow, earned her MFA in poetry from EWU. A transfeminine poet and essayist, their work has appeared in Black Warrior Review, Crazyhorse, New England Review, and elsewhere. Bruner's chapbook, The Wishbone Dress, won the 2019 Frost Place competition.


Twitter Username: RCassBruner

Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S250. Tyrant or Beacon: The State of Narrative in Contemporary Creative Nonfiction. (, , , , ) Is narrative in creative nonfiction a tyrannical form that needs to be obliterated or is it a path to clarity? Storytelling is giving way more and more these days to the fragments, gaps, and associative leaps of lyric essays. This panel of memoirists, personal essayists, and lyric essayists will discuss the impulses that bring them to the page in an attempt to better understand the value of narrative’s presence, or absence, particularly when the world outside the essay resists causality. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Lee Martin is the author of four novels, including the Pulitzer Prize–finalist The Bright Forever. He is also the author of three memoirs, most recently Such a Life, and two story collections. He teaches in the creative writing program at The Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: LeeMartinAuthor

Bonnie Friedman is the author of the books Writing Past Dark, The Thief of Happiness, and Surrendering Oz: A Life in Essays, longlisted for the PEN award in the Art of the Essay. Her work has appeared in The Best American Movie Writing, The Best Writing on Writing, and The Best Buddhist Writing.

Harrison Candelaria Fletcher is the author of the award-winning Descanso For My Father: Fragments of a Life and Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams. His essays and prose poems have appeared widely in journals and anthologies. He teaches at Colorado State University and Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Kyoko Mori is the author of three nonfiction books (The Dream of Water; Polite Lies; and Yarn) and four novels (Shizuko's Daughter; One Bird; Stone Field, True Arrow; and Barn Cat). She teaches creative writing at George Mason University and for the low-residency MFA program at Lesley University.

Lia Purpura authored nine collections (essays, poems, and translations) most recently, All the Fierce Tethers (essays.) Her awards include Guggenheim, NEA, and Fulbright fellowships, and four Pushcarts. On Looking (essays) was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She teaches at UMBC.

Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S251. Healing the Divide: Poetry of Kindness and Connection. (, , , , ) At a time of greed-driven politics and environmental destruction, it can seem impossible to hold the space for poetry that highlights kindness and connection. Yet relational, accessible writing, at this divisive historical moment, has the power to lift readers out of isolation and blur the artificial borders between us. This panel will address how poetry can serve both as a potent form of resistance and connective force in the lives of ordinary people.

Amy Fleury is the author of the poetry collections Beautiful Trouble and Sympathetic Magic. She directs the the MFA program in creative writing at McNeese State University in Lake Charles, Louisiana.

Albert Garcia is the author of three collections of poetry: Rainshadow, Skunk Talk, and A Meal Like That. He serves as Vice President of Instruction at Sacramento City College.

Danusha Lameris's poems have been published in American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, Tin House, The Sun, The New Ohio Review, The New York Times Magazine, and other journals and anthologies. Her books are The Moons of August and Bonfire Opera. She is the poet laureate of Santa Cruz, California.


Twitter Username: danushalameris

Website: danushalameris.com

James Crews is the author of two collections of poetry, The Book of What Stays and Telling My Father. He is also the editor of two anthologies--the forthcoming Queer Nature, a gathering of LGBTQ environmental poetry, and Healing the Divide: Poems of Kindness and Connection.

Natalia Trevino is the author of Lavando La Dirty Laundry. She is a professor of English, a winner of the Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Award, the Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize, and others. Her first novel, This Thin Edge of Barbwire is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: lavandoladirty

Website: nataliatrevino.com

Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

S252. Talking Loud, Talking Soft. (, , , ) African American and Mexican American authors find themselves challenged by the resurgence of white nationalism and its misrepresentations of black and brown citizens. Though direct responses are important, many writers refuse to allow the parameters of their writing to be determined by this rising tide of bigotry. How and why do writers from these communities maintain a broad-minded approach to their work in spite of heightened racial tensions. What shapes might literary "resistance" take?

Tim Seibles has published several collections of poetry, including Buffalo Head Solos, Fast Animal—a finalist for the National Book Award in 2012—and, most recently, One Turn around The Sun. He is a professor of English at Old Dominion University and the current Poet Laureate of Virginia.


Twitter Username: Timseibles77@gmail.com

Dagoberto Gilb has nine books, including The Magic of Blood, Woodcuts of Women, and Before the End, After the Beginning. Recipient of a Whiting and Guggenheim, he won the PEN Hemingway Award and was a finalist for the Pen Faulkner and National Book Critics Circle Awards. 


Twitter Username: DagobertoGilb

Laurie Jean Cannady’s Crave: Sojourn of a Hungry Soul was named one of the best nonfiction books by black authors in 2015 by The Root. Kirkus Review describes Crave as a "bold, honest, and courageous memoir." Foreword Reviews announced Crave as a finalist in the Indiefab 2015 Book of the Year competition.


Twitter Username: lauriecann

Website: www.lauriejeancannady.com

Laurie Ann Guerrero is the author of A Tongue in the Mouth of the Dying and A Crown for Gumecindo. She held consecutive posts as the San Antonio poet laureate (2014–2016) and Texas poet laureate (2016–2017). She is the Writer-in-Residence at Texas A&M University-San Antonio.


Twitter Username: LaurAnnGuerrero

Website: www.LaurieAnnGuerrero.com

Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S253. For Colored Girls' Fam, Friends, Fans: A Celebration of Ntozake Shange. (, , , , ) This panel is a tribute to poet, playwright, novelist, Ntozake Shange, and her play, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf. Each panelist will read a short excerpt from the work and discuss its enduring relevance. Panelists will also discuss how the "choreopoem" and Shange have influenced them personally and professionally as poets, activists, and educators. Panelists will also share the importance of this work in the contemporary classroom across curricula. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Tamara J. Madison is a writer, poet, editor, and instructor. Her critical and creative works have been published in Poetry International, Web del Sol Review of Books, and Tidal Basin Review. Her poetry collection is Threed, This Road Not Damascus.


Twitter Username: TamaraJMadison

Website: www.tamarajmadison.com

Amanda Johnston is the author of Another Way to Say Enter. She is an Affrilachian poet, a Cave Canem graduate fellow, a cofounder of Black Poets Speak Out, and founder of Torch Literary Arts. She teaches in the Stonecoast MFA program at the University of Southern Maine.


Twitter Username: amejohnston

Website: www.amandajohnston.com

Remica L. Bingham-Risher is a Cave Canem fellow and an Affrilachian Poet. She has published three books of poems, Conversion, What We Ask of Flesh, and Starlight & Error. She is Director of Quality Enhancement Plan Initiatives at Old Dominion University.

Gabrielle Lawrence is a poet, editor, and writing instructor. Her writing has been nominated for Best of the Net and Best New Poets. She serves as the editor in chief of Linden Avenue Literary Journal, "a safe space for writers of all backgrounds." Gabrielle-l.com


Twitter Username: gabrielle__l

JP Howard's debut collection Say/Mirror was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. JP was awarded the 2016 Judith Markowitz Emerging Writers Award from Lambda Literary Foundation. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Lambda, and VONA/Voices. JP curates Women Writers in Bloom Poetry Salon.


Twitter Username: JPHoward_poet

Website: https://www.facebook.com/JPHowardAuthor

Room 206A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S254. Close Readings: Experiments in Bibliomemoir. (, , , , ) The bibliomemoir—“a subspecies of literature combining criticism and biography with the intimate, confessional tone of autobiography” (Joyce Carol Oates)—is not a new genre, but it is experiencing a surge of popularity. What characterizes bibliomemoir, with its intense focus on one text and merging of criticism and memoir? Five writers of creative critical texts on books by writers including Cormac McCarthy, Cheryl Strayed, and Karl Ove Knausgaard discuss their work and this elastic genre.

Alden Jones is the author of The Wanting Was a Wilderness, Unaccompanied Minors, and The Blind Masseuse, finalist for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award. She is co-director of the Cuba Writers Program and teaches at Emerson College and the Newport MFA Program.


Twitter Username: jones_alden

Website: aldenjones.com

Stacie Williams is a Chicago-based writer who has written book reviews, reported features, essays on pop culture and race, and short fiction. She is the director of the Center for Digital Scholarship at the University of Chicago.


Twitter Username: wribrarian

Adam Colman is the author of New Uses for Failure and Drugs and the Addiction Aesthetic in Nineteenth-Century Literature. He has also written for The Believer, KCRW and McSweeney's Organist podcast, Pittsburgh City Paper, and more.


Twitter Username: _AdamColman_

Stephanie Reents is the author of The Kissing List, which was an Editors' Choice in The New York Times Book Review, and I Meant to Kill Ye, an account of coming to terms with the strange void at the heart of Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. Her awards include a Rhodes Scholarship and a Stegner Fellowship.

Kim Adrian is the author of The Twenty-Seventh Letter of the Alphabet, a memoir, and Sock, an Object Lessons book. Her third book, Letters to Knausgaard, is forthcoming this year. The Shell Game: Writers Play with Borrowed Forms is an anthology of lyric essays, edited by Kim.

Room 207, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S255. Words Aren't Enough: Zero Tolerance for a Manufactured Crisis in the Borderlands. (, , , , ) In an era dominated by hateful policies and rhetoric, poets living in what Gloria Anzaldúa calls “the open wound” will discuss cofounding Poets against Walls and Angry Tias and Abuelas of the Rio Grande Valley, TX. Panelists will discuss collaborating with larger activist efforts, embracing DIY video poem recordings, and utilizing social media to reach larger audiences. We'll also discuss how to negotiate writing increasingly blunt works or putting pens aside to serve border communities directly.

Emmy Pérez, 2020 Texas poet laureate, is the author of With the River on Our Face and Solstice. She is a past recipient of an NEA poetry fellowship, cofounded Poets Against Walls, and serves on CantoMundo's organizing committee. She is also professor of creative writing at UT Rio Grande Valley.


Twitter Username: emmyemmaperez

Website: www.emmyperez.com

Carolina Monsivais is the author of three collections of poetry: Somewhere between Houston and El Paso, Elisa’s Hunger, and Descent. She holds an MFA from NMSU and  worked many years with survivors of patriarchal violence. She is currently a doctoral candidate in borderlands history at UTEP.


Twitter Username: carotlicue

Cesar L. De Leon is a poet-organizer for Poets Against Walls and an educator. He holds an MFA from UTRGV, and his work has been published in various anthologies and journals. He has received awards from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association and the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association.


Twitter Username: CesarPoet

Celina A. Gómez is a performance poet and educator who coaches performance poetry to high school students. She has her MFA in creative writing and graduate certificate in Mexican American studies. She is the reigning Ultimate Poetry Boxing Champion and published in various anthologies and journals.

Nayelly Barrios is an intersectional feminist, writer, educator, and Rio Grande borderlands native. Her poetry has appeared in Beloit Poetry Journal, Puerto del Sol, Notre Dame Review, and others. An activist, she is a cofounder of Angry Tias and Abuelas of the Rio Grande Valley.


Twitter Username: nayellybarrios

Room 209, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S256. You Can Drive 800 Miles. (, , , , ) In Texas you can drive 800 miles in a straight line and still be in Texas. The influence of place upon one’s writing is known, but what if one is from a place that has many places within place? How does one write about expanse and a conflicting sense of terrain?—A place of borders, yet an openness seemingly without borders. Is there a writing of place in Texas? Four writers will discuss how to write about place when it is fragmented and expansive and includes several cultures and voices. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Diane Glancy is professor emerita at Macalester College. Her latest books are The Collector of Bodies, Concern for Syria and the Middle East, (poetry), Mary Queen of Bees (a novella), The Servitude of Love (short stories), and an anthology, The World Is One Place, Native American Poets Visit the Middle East.

Bruce Bond is the author of twenty-one books including Black Anthem (Tampa Review Prize), Gold Bee (Helen Smith Award, Crab Orchard Award), Sacrum, Blackout Starlight: New and Selected Poems 1997-2015 (Phillabaum Award), Dear Reader, and Rise and Fall of the Lesser Sun Gods (Elixir Poetry Prize).

Alex Lemon’s most recent books are Feverland: A Memoir in Shards and The Wish Book. He is the author of Happy: A Memoir and three other poetry collections: Mosquito, Hallelujah Blackout, and Fancy Beasts. A fifth poetry collection, Or Beauty, is forthcoming. He teaches at TCU.


Twitter Username: Alxlemon

Website: www.alexlemon.com

Leslie Ullman has published five poetry collections, most recently The You That All Along Has Housed You and Library of Small Happiness, a hybrid collection of craft essays, writing exercises, and poems. She teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Vermont College of the Fine Arts.

Nathaniel Lee Hansen is the author of Measuring Time & Other Stories and Your Twenty-First Century Prayer Life: Poems. He is associate professor of English at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, where he also edits the literary biannual, The Windhover.


Twitter Username: plainswriter

Website: plainswriter.com

Room 210A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S257. Literary Citizenship: What Does It Actually Mean?. (, , , ) This panel consists of diverse panelists and presenters who will engage in lectures and discussion about the importance of literary citizenship and how it relates to different areas of existing within society. Panelists will present lectures about the importance and role of social media, reviews, political mainstream consciousness, interpersonal interaction, mentorship, and existing as a mediator within and outside of the literary community.

Sara Fan is a creative nonfiction MFA candidate at the University of San Francisco and has an MFA in poetry from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where she was assistant managing editor of Ninth Letter.


Twitter Username: sarabeefan

Shara Lessley (author of The Explosive Expert's Wife and Two-Headed Nightingale, and coeditor of The Poem's Country) has been awarded NEA, Wallace Stegner, Diane Middlebrook, Olive B. O'Connor, Mary Wood, and Reginald S. Tickner fellowships. She is assistant poetry editor for Acre Books.


Twitter Username: sharalessley

Website: www.sharalessley.com

Aria Aber is a poet based in Madison, WI. Her debut book, Hard Damage, won the 2018 Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Poetry. Her poems are forthcoming or have appeared in the New Yorker, Kenyon Review, Poetry, and others.


Twitter Username: ariaaber

Carlina Duan is the author of I Wore My Blackest Hair. She received her MFA in poetry from Vanderbilt University and is currently a PhD candidate in English and education at the University of Michigan, where she studies creative writing pedagogy and sociolinguistics.


Twitter Username: ccduan

Room 210B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S258. Carrying Pollen from Exile to Exile—International Journals and Translation. (, , , , ) Editors consider the role of translation and the literary communities curated through international journals in an age of massive displacement of populations. For example, translation preserves and shares stories hidden in source languages while renewing the target language. But what do we look for in translation submissions? What do we mean by, and how do we achieve, diversity? How does one evaluate works from various aesthetic traditions with distinct goals and values in an age of crisis? Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Marcela Sulak has written the memoir Mouth Full of Seeds and three poetry collections and co-edited Family Resemblance, a hybrid anthology. Her five poetry translations received an NEA grant and PEN Award nomination. She edits the Ilanot Review and is associate professor at Bar-Ilan University.

Wayne Miller's most recent books are the poetry collection Post-, a cotranslation of Moikom Zeqo's Zodiac, and the essay collection Literary Publishing in the 21st Century (coedited with Travis Kurowski and Kevin Prufer). He teaches at the University of Colorado Denver and edits Copper Nickel.

Sarah Coolidge is the associate editor at Two Lines Press. She manages the Two Lines journal as well as the Two Lines Press Calico series.

Eilis O'Neal is editor in chief of Nimrod International Journal and the author of the young adult fantasy novel The False Princess. She has served as Nimrod's editor for six years; prior to being named editor, she served as Nimrod's managing editor for eleven years.


Twitter Username: eilisoneal

Geoffrey Brock is the author of two books of poetry, the editor of The FSG Book of 20th-Century Italian Poetry, and the translator of numerous books of various genres, mostly from Italian. He teaches at the University of Arkansas, where he edits the Arkansas International.


Twitter Username: gbrock

Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

S259. Out of Sight: Teaching Form and Writing Blind. (, , , , ) How do writers and teachers of fiction and nonfiction tackle structure and form beyond the visual? How can we comprehend forms without leaning on sight? This panel features five creative writers, including a blind essayist, who collaborated in an independent study course to teach form. They will discuss how to navigate blindness and sightedness in writing and technology, and ultimately, how to expanded the ways we write, think about, and teach form. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Spencer Hyde is the author of Waiting for Fitz, and his short fiction and nonfiction have recently appeared in Glimmer Train, Bellevue Literary Review, and Five Points. He is a founding editor of elsewhere, and an assistant professor of creative writing at Brigham Young University.


Twitter Username: Spencer_Hyde

Jill Talbot is the author of The Way We Weren’t: A Memoir and the editor of Metawritings: Toward a Theory of Nonfiction. Her writing has appeared in AGNI, Brevity, Hotel Amerika, and River Teeth, among others. She is associate professor of creative writing at the University of North Texas.


Twitter Username: jilltalbot

Nikki Lyssy studies creative writing at the University of North Texas. Her work has appeared in Essay Daily and Hobart. She plans to pursue an MFA after graduation.


Twitter Username: blindnikkii

Clinton Crockett Peters teaches at Berry College and wrote Pandora's Garden (essays). He's won prizes from Shenandoah, North American Review, Columbia Journal, and Crab Orchard Review. He holds an MFA from Iowa, a PhD from UNT, and has work in Orion, Southern Review, The Rumpus, and Hotel Amerika.


Twitter Username: ClintCrockettP

Website: http://clintoncrockettpeters.com/

Kimberly Garza's stories and essays can be found in Creative Nonfiction, Copper Nickel, TriQuarterly, CutBank, and elsewhere. She is an assistant professor at the University of Texas-San Antonio and a graduate of the Creative Writing Program at the University of North Texas.


Twitter Username: