2019 AWP Conference Schedule

The  #AWP19 Conference & Bookfair in Portland, Oregon’s schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. Visit the offsite event schedule for a listing of literary events taking place throughout the Portland area during our conference.

A version of the schedule accessible to screen readers is also available.

Please note that your personalized schedule on the AWP website can be saved and printed, but it cannot be transferred to the digital conference app because the two systems are independent.

 

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Thursday, March 28, 2019

7:30 am to 8:45 am

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R101. Sober AWP. Daily 12-Step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Registration Area, Exhibit Hall A, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R102. Conference Registration, Sponsored by Butler University MFA in Creative Writing. Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall A of the Oregon Convention Center, Level 1. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement registrations.

8:00 am to 10:30 pm

Near A103, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R103. Mamava Lactation Suite 1. Mamava lactation suites are located outside of the A and E meeting rooms on Level 1 of the Oregon Convention Center. All Mamava suites come with a Bluetooth SmartLock that syncs with Mamava’s mobile app. You may also request a door code for entry in the Administration Office on Level 2 and by calling 503-235-7575.

Near E148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R104. Mamava Lactation Suite 2. Mamava lactation suites are located outside of the A and E meeting rooms on Level 1 of the Oregon Convention Center. All Mamava suites come with a Bluetooth SmartLock that syncs with Mamava’s mobile app. You may also request a door code for entry in the Administration Office on Level 2 and by calling 503-235-7575.

8:00 am to 6:00 pm

VIP Suite D, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R105. Dickinson Quiet Space. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. Please consult the map in the conference planner for detailed location. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity." —Emily Dickinson

8:15 am to 8:45 am

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R105B. Narrative Healing: Meditation. () Open to all! Start the day tapping inward to open up your senses and attune your attention for the day ahead. This mindfulness meditation series will focus on breath and body awareness. Comfortable clothing encouraged. Featuring publishing professional and mindfulness meditation teacher Lisa Weinert and others.

Lisa Weinert is passionate about powerful voices and the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She has worked with authors as a publicist, editor, and agent for fifteen years and is the creator of the debut annual Program in Narrative Medicine at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

8:30 am to 5:30 pm

C127, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R106. Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography. () Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a third year at AWP, photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high res for $85. (Conference discount: sessions usually priced at $350.) Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required.

Adrianne Mathiowetz is a Boston-based portrait and editorial photographer. She is a Spring 2010 photo graduate of The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Wired, and Entertainment Weekly, amongst others. She lives for the in-between moments, and loves to take photos of costume changes, interruptions, and delays.

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R107. Bookfair Concessions, Bar, & Lounge. Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Oregon Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference planner or mobile app for location details.

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R108. AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Wilkes University Low-Residency MA/MFA in Creative Writing. With more than 700 literary exhibitors the AWP bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

Booth 2041, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R109. Writer to Writer Mentorship Program Booth. AWP's Writer to Writer Mentorship Program matches new writers with published authors for a three-month series on the writing life. Now in its fifth year, Writer to Writer is open to all members, but we particularly encourage applications from those writers who have never been associated with an MFA program and those writing from regions, backgrounds, and cultures that are typically underrepresented in the literary world. To learn more, visit AWP’s Bookfair booth, where you will be able to talk with past program mentors and mentees. Diane Zinna, the program’s director, will also be there to answer your questions.

D130, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R110A. Traveling Stanzas: Poets for Science. The Wick Poetry Center’s “Traveling Stanzas: Poets for Science” exhibit features twenty art banners designed with science-themed poems curated by Poets for Science founder Jane Hirshfield, as well as interactive writing tools to inspire meaningful discourse at the intersection of science and creativity. Visitors will get a chance to engage with Emerge™ and Thread™, the Wick Center’s apps that prompt users to create erasure poetry in conversation with scientists. This ongoing interdisciplinary project began as a featured exhibit at the 2017 March for Science on the National Mall. More information can be found at the Poets for Science website at http://science.travelingstanzas.com/.

9:00 am to 10:00 am

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R110B. Yoga for Writers. (Alysia Sawchyn) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

9:00 am to 10:15 am

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R111. The Development of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry in the Last Five Years. (, , , Patty Seyburn, Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet) Come join us for the five-year anniversary of an important anthology that explores the thoughts, concerns, and experiences of Jewish poets today. One of the editors and five contributors to The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry will read from their work and reflect upon how Jewish American poetry has changed in the last five years with the developments in politics and the rise of anti-Semitism while still exploring the heart of Jewish traditions that honor the human spirit.

M.E. Silverman founded Blue Lyra Review. His books include The Floating Door and The Breath before Birds Fly, and he edited three anthologies including Bloomsbury’s Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry, The Plume Anthology of Longish Poems, and one on the Holocaust.


Twitter Username: bluelyrareview

Website: http://mesilverman.com

Susan Cohen was a Washington Post contributing writer and UC Berkeley journalism professor before studying poetry on a Knight Fellowship at Stanford, then earning an MFA at Pacific University. She’s the author of two books of poems: Throat Singing and A Different Wakeful Animal.

Philip Terman is the author of five books of poetry, including Our Portion: New and Selected Poems. A selection of his poems has been translated into Arabic. He founded the Chautauqua Writers' Festival and teaches at Clarion University, where he directs the visiting writers series.

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R113. Don’t Quit Your Day Job: Writers on Employment Outside of Academia . (, , , , ) From spreadsheets to court briefs to forestry to tech, writers who are employed outside of academia discuss how their work empowers their writing lives. Rather than a burden or distraction from creative writing, the divorce of art and economy opens doors to authors with bold ideas and risky manuscripts. When writing is not hinged on tenure nor rent, what can we accomplish?

Wendy J. Fox, MFA, is the author of The Seven Stages of Anger and Other Stories, the novel The Pull of It, and the forthcoming novel If The Ice Had Held


Twitter Username: wendyjeanfox

Website: www.wendyjfox.com

Daniel Olivas is the author of nine books including The King of Lighting Fixtures: Stories and Crossing the Border: Collected Poems. Olivas has also written for the Los Angeles Review of Books, The New York Times, El Paso Times, La Bloga, and the Los Angeles Times. By day, he is an attorney.


Twitter Username: olivasdan

Website: http://danielolivas.com

Teow Lim Goh is the author of Islanders (2016), a volume of poems on the history of Chinese exclusion at the Angel Island Immigration Station. She is an MFA candidate at Western State Colorado University and works in business.

Yuvi Zalkow's debut novel A Brilliant Novel in the Works (about a failed writer named Yuvi) was published by MP Publishing. His stories have been published in Glimmer Train, Narrative Magazine, Carve Magazine, Rosebud, and others. By day, he writes developer guides for a software company. 


Twitter Username: yuvizalkow

Website: http://yuvizalkow.com

David Abrams is the author of Brave Deeds and Fobbit. His stories have appeared in Esquire, Glimmer Train, F(r)iction, Narrative, and many other publications. He blogs about the literary life at The Quivering Pen.


Twitter Username: ImDavidAbrams

Website: www.davidabramsbooks.blogspot.com

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R114. Writing the Transcendent. (, , , , ) In our most enduring literature, the reader often experiences something ungraspable: a sudden sense of loss or delight or elevation, just beyond the realm of conscious reckoning. In this panel, we call it transcendence, and ask: What is that feeling, anyway? How do you write toward it? What's the relationship between the divine, the inspirational, the science fictional or fantastical? In this panel, five diverse writers of the numinous and otherworldly discuss the deep mysteries of writing.

Courtney Sender's fiction has won the Glimmer Train fiction open, the Mississippi Review fiction contest, and the Boulevard emerging writers contest, and appears in the Kenyon Review, AGNI, and more. A fellow of Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony, she holds an MFA from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars.


Twitter Username: CourtneySender

Website: www.courtneysender.com

Goldie Goldbloom’s first novel, The Paperbark Shoe, won the AWP Novel Award. Her short fiction has been published in PloughsharesPrairie Schooner, and Narrative. She teaches at Northwestern and the University of Chicago and is the recipient of NEA and Dora Maar fellowships. She is an LGBT activist.

Yehoshua November is the author of two books of poetry, God's Optimism, which was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize; and Two Worlds Exist, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award and the Paterson Poetry Prize. November teaches at Touro College and Rutgers University.

Sarah Stone is the author of the novels The True Sources of the Nile and the forthcoming Hungry Ghost Theater and coauthor, with Ron Nyren, of the textbook Deepening Fiction. She teaches creative writing at Stanford University and in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.


Twitter Username: sstoneauthor

Website: www.sarahstoneauthor.com

Rahul Kanakia's first book is a contemporary young adult novel entitled Enter Title Here. He has published short stories in Apex, Clarkesworld, The Indiana Review, and Nature, and holds an MFA in Fiction from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars.


Twitter Username: rahkan

Website: http://www.blotter-paper.com

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R115. #saferLIT: Fighting Sexual Misconduct in the Literary World. (, , , , ) In the #metoo era, we recognize that abuse and sexual harassment consume community members’ time and energy, and silence marginalized voices. Join VIDA, as well as reps from the Academy of American Poets, CLMP, and Canto Mundo, as we discuss how to make conferences, residencies, workshops, literary events and organizations, presses, and writing programs as safe as possible from nonconsensual sexual advances, requests for unwanted sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment.

Lynn Melnick is author of the poetry collections Landscape with Sex and Violence and If I Should Say I Have Hope, both with YesYes Books. She is a 2017-2018 Cullman Center Fellow at the NYPL. She serves on the Executive Board of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: LynnMelnick

Jen Benka is the Executive Director of the Academy of American Poets. In her role she advocates for poets and poetry and oversees Poets.org, Poem-a-Day, National Poetry Month, prizes, readings, and more. She is the author of two books of poetry and holds an MFA from the New School.


Twitter Username: jenbenka

Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and the author of two books, My Body Is a Book of Rules and Starvation Mode. She is an assistant professor at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: elissawashuta

Website: http://washuta.net

Deborah Paredez is the author of the poetry collection This Side of Skin and the critical study Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory. She is an Associate Professor at Columbia University and cofounder of CantoMundo, a national organization for Latina/o poets.

Jeffrey Lependorf serves as the shared Executive Director of our two national service organizations for independent literary publishing—the Community of Literary Magazines and Presses (CLMP) and Small Press Distribution (SPD)—providing technical assistance to and advocating on behalf of the indies.


Twitter Username: jefflependorf

Website: http://www.jeffreylependorf.com

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R116. In Pursuit of Inclusivity: Actively Creating Opportunities. (, , , , ) Recently, the lack of diversity in publishing has become a prioritized issue. However, creating awareness is not enough of a solution; publishers must actively seek and embrace voices that might otherwise not be heard. In our panel, outreach directors and program coordinators will discuss ways to create a more inclusive industry, calling for publishing professionals, on every level of the industry, to actively seek out and request work from more diverse authors, on more diverse topics.

Mia Herman is the Outreach Director and Creative Nonfiction editor for F(r)iction. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Hofstra University, and her poems and essays have appeared in numerous publications.


Twitter Username: MiaMHerman

William Johnson is the online editor of Lambda Literary Review. He is also the editor and publisher of Mary: A Journal of New Writing dedicated to publishing gay writing of artist merit and a contributing arts and culture writer for CrushFanazine.

Cheryl Buchanan is a founder of Writers Without Margins, providing workshops in shelters, rehabs, health centers, youth services and prison reentry. Cheryl received the 2018 National Association for Poetry Therapy’s Social Justice Award. She is a producer of the documentary, In Their Shoes.


Twitter Username: CherylEBuchanan

Caits Meissner is the author of the illustrated hybrid poetry book Let It Die Hungry. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the City College of New York, and currently serves as the Prison and Justice Writing Program Manager at PEN America.


Twitter Username: caits_meissner

Website: www.caitsmeissner.com

Andrew Jimenez is a writer, editor, and literary journal publishing consultant. Former Circulation and Marketing director at The Paris Review, he is now Publishing Director at F(r)iction.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R117. Indigenous Fiction: Intersections in the United States & Canada. (, , , , ) This panel will feature Indigenous writers from Canada and the United States from a variety of literary traditions, from fantasy to realism, from work that in form moves from post-modern or surreal to linear and narrative. Though the writers are from distinct geographic and aesthetic traditions, the connections between Indigenous writers from Canada and the United States run deep, and the conversations between them hold the key to the content of much of Indigenous fiction.

Erika T. Wurth's publications include two novels, two poetry collections, and a short story collection. She teaches creative writing at Western Illinois University and was a guest writer at Institute of American Indian Arts. She is Apache/Chickasaw/Cherokee and is represented by Peter Steinberg.


Twitter Username: etwurth

Website: http://www.erikatwurth.com/

Eden Robinson is the author of three novels, Monkey Beach, Son of a Trickster, and Trickster Drift. She is a recipient of the Writer's Trust 2017 Fellowship and Marion Engel Mid-Career Prize 2016.

Carole Lindstrom is an author of children’s literature and is the author of two picture books, including Girls Dance, Boys Fiddle. She is agented by Kathleen Rushall of Andrea Brown Literary Agency.


Twitter Username: CaroleLindstrom

Daniel Heath Justice holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture at the University of British Columbia. Widely published in Indigenous literary studies, his books include Why Indigenous Literatures Matter, Badger, and The Way of Thorn and Thunder.

Alicia Elliott is Creative Nonfiction Editor of The Fiddlehead. Her fiction is appearing in Best American Short Stories 2018 and her creative nonfiction has won Gold at the National Magazine Awards. Her book of essays A Mind Spread Out On The Ground is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: WordsandGuitar

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R118. Invisible Disabilities, Necessary Supports. (, , , , ) This panel will look at the many issues that people with invisible disabilities can face in creative writing programs as well as strategies and structures that programs can adopt to lessen those struggles. From discussing pedagogical concerns like challenge of putting subtext into dialogue for some writers on the spectrum to helping students with high school IEPs transition to college to managing the daunting and stressful life of rejection and competition in writing programs.

Zeke Jarvis is a Professor at Eureka College and an instructor at APUS. His books include So Anyway..., a collection of introductions to poems that don't exist; In A Family Way; and Lifelong Learning.


Twitter Username: zekjar

Aby Kaupang is the author of NOS, disorder not otherwise specifiedDisorder 299.00, & Little “g” God Grows Tired of Me. She holds master’s degrees in both CW & Occupational Therapy & served as Fort Collins' Poet Laureate from '15–'17.

Clare Paniccia is a doctoral candidate at Oklahoma State University where she works as an associate editor of the Cimarron Review.


Twitter Username: ClarePaniccia

Website: clpaniccia.com

Pat Berryhill has been published in Incunabula, YESweekly, Cultural weekly, Breath and Shadow, Change Seven Magazine, Fictional Pairings, Wicked Banshee Press, and The Arrival Magazine. Pat is the founder and coeditor of Wraith Infirmity Muses, an e-zine giving platform to invisible illness.


Twitter Username: dp_pat

Emily Rose Cole is the author of Love & a Loaded Gun, a chapbook of persona poems in women's voices. She holds an MFA in poetry from Southern Illinois University Carbondale and is currently a PhD student in poetry and disability studies at the University of Cincinnati.


Twitter Username: EmilyColeWrites

Website: www.emilyrosecolepoetry.com

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R119. Empathy and Exploitation: Immersion Writing Among Vulnerable Populations. (, , , ) Immersion writing requires empathy. But in building relationships with subjects, how can writers avoid exploiting those who may be traumatized, may not speak their language, may not grasp the implications of sharing their stories? This roundtable panel of immersion writers working with varied populations—refugees, veterans, fundamentalist Christians, low-income patients—grapple with these ethical questions and offer concrete tips for navigating the fine line between empathy and exploitation.

Kimberly Meyer's The Book of Wanderings (Little, Brown) won the American Society of Journalists and Author’s 2016 Memoir Book Award and was a finalist for the 2015 PEN Southwest Book Award. Long-form work appears in Texas Monthly, Orion, The Oxford American, Ploughshares, and This American Life.

Jessica Wilbanks is the author of the memoir When I Spoke in Tongues: A Story of Faith and Its Loss. She has received national awards for her nonfiction, including a Pushcart Prize, the VanderMey Nonfiction Prize, and Ninth Letter’s inaugural creative nonfiction award.


Twitter Username: creativenonfic

Website: http://jessicawilbanks.com

Ricardo Nuila is a practicing doctor, teacher, and writer. His journalistic work has appeared in The New Yorker and The Atlantic websites, and his fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories 2011. He was awarded the inaugural New England Review Award for Emerging Writers.


Twitter Username: riconuila

Website: ricardonuila.com

Dr. Max Rayneard is the cocreator of the Telling Project process. He has written and directed productions nationwide at such venues as the Coolidge Auditorium at the Library of Congress, the Lincoln Center, the Guthrie Theatre, and the Alley Theatre.

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R120. Kenyon Review 80th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) The Kenyon Review celebrates 80 years of publishing new and established voices in contemporary literature. Featuring a diverse selection of KR contributors as well as the latest KR Fellows, this reading will offer a range of styles and viewpoints. Since its founding in 1939, the Kenyon Review has constantly evolved. Now a bimonthly print magazine and thriving online journal, KR plans to celebrate this anniversary by looking ahead. What comes next?

Dana Levin is the author of four books of poetry, most recently Banana Palace. A recipient of honors from the NEA and the Library of Congress, as well as the Rona Jaffe, Whiting and Guggenheim Foundations, she serves as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Maryville University in Saint Louis.


Twitter Username: danalevinpoet

Website: http://www.danalevinpoet.com/

Tess Taylor’s work has appeared in the Atlantic, Poetry, the Kenyon Review, and the New Yorker. She is the on-air poetry reviewer for NPR's All Things Considered and has taught at Whittier College, University of California Berkeley, and Queen's University Belfast. Her books are The Forage House and Work & Days.


Twitter Username: tessathon

Website: www.tess-taylor.com

Patricia Engel is the author of The Veins of the Ocean, It's Not Love, It's Just Paris, and Vida. Her books have received numerous awards and her stories have appeared in the Best American Short Stories, the Best American Mystery Stories, and elsewhere. She teaches at the University of Miami.


Twitter Username: patricia_engel

Website: www.patriciaengel.com

Keith S. Wilson is an Affrilachian Poet, Cave Canem fellow, graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and recipient of three Bread Loaf scholarships. He holds an MFA in poetry from Chicago State University. Keith works as a writer and game designer in Chicago.


Twitter Username: robottomulatto

Misha Rai is the 2018–2020 Kenyon Review Fellow in Prose. Her novel-in-progress, Blood We Did Not Spill, was awarded the Dana Award in the novel category, the Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies (2016), and a MacDowell Colony Fellowship (2018).


Twitter Username: RaiMisha

Website: www.misharai.com

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R123. Cheating on Poetry: On Writing Nonfiction Too. (, , , , ) In an interview about micro-memoirs, Beth Ann Fennelly revealed she had found herself “cheating on poetry” by having “a love affair with the sentence.” Here, writers who studied poetry discuss what it means to work in this second genre, with attention to opportunities, challenges, conflicts, and intersections. Discussion includes focus on craft and form, line and/versus sentence, literary influences, MFA program limitations, and affinity across genres that can lead poets to creative nonfiction.

Anna Leahy's publications include the nonfiction books Tumor, Conversing with Cancer, and Generation Space; the poetry books Aperture and Constituents of Matter; and the pedagogy book What We Talk about When We Talk about Creative Writing. She teaches at Chapman University and edits TAB.


Twitter Username: AMLeahy

Beth Ann Fennelly, poet laureate of Mississippi, teaches at the University of Mississippi. Winner of a Pushcart, an NEA, a Fulbright, and a USA Artist Grant, she's published six books. Her newest, Heating and Cooling: 52 Micro-Memoirs, was an AJC Best Book of 2017 and an Goodreaders' favorite.

Paisley Rekdal is the author, most recently, of The Broken Country and Imaginary Vessels. Her forthcoming book of poetry is Nightingale. A Guggenheim fellow and Utah's poet laureate, she teaches at the University of Utah, where she edits the web archive project Mapping Salt Lake City.


Twitter Username: paisleyrekdal

Lisa Ko is the Managing Director of Anastamos. She holds an MA in English at Chapman University and is a graduate assistant for Chapman and a mentor coordinator for The Chapman University/Orange High Literacies Partnership. She holds a BA English and BA French from UC Irvine and is pursuing an MFA.


Twitter Username: kolisa_

Cori A. Winrock’s manuscript, Little Envelope of Earth Conditions, is forthcoming from Alice James Books. Her work has appeared in Boston Review, Best New Poets, West Branch, Crazyhorse, and elsewhere. Winrock is a PhD candidate at the University of Utah where she is poetry editor of Quarterly West.


Twitter Username: cori_winrock

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R124. Getting Beyond 3%: International Literature and US Literary Culture. (, , , , Milena Deleva) It’s now been more than ten years since the NEA announced that only 3% of books published annually in the US are translations, with literary work accounting for less than 1%. This panel will address ways publishers and literary organizations have attempted to tackle these statistics, as well as discuss the importance, politics, and methods of bringing diversity to reading markets across the US, creating a literary culture that embraces international voices to help expand narrowing world views.

Jeremiah Chamberlin teaches at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of Fiction Writers Review, a Contributing Editor for Poets & Writers Magazine, and a coauthor of Creative Composition. Most recently, he was a 2017 Fulbright Research Scholar in Bulgaria.

Chad W. Post is the director of Open Letter Books at the University of Rochester, a publishing house dedicated to promoting international literature in translation. He is also the managing editor of Three Percent, a website on translation and home to the Best Translated Book Awards.


Twitter Username: chadwpost

Website: http://www.rochester.edu/threepercent

Will Evans is the founder and director of Deep Vellum Publishing, a nonprofit literary arts organization bringing the world together in conversation through literature. He is also founder and owner of Deep Vellum Books, an indie bookstore in Dallas, and a literary translator from the Russian.


Twitter Username: deepvellum

Website: http://deepvellum.org

Rachael Small is the Director of Publicity for Europa Editions, where she also edits novels in translation from French and Spanish. A graduate of the University of Iowa MFA in Literary Translation, she is the translator of the short story collection Another Morocco by Abdellah Taïa.


Twitter Username: RachaelASmall

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R125. Reaching Climax: Girls with Sexual Agency. (, , Candice Montgomery , Meagan Macvie, Michelle Ruiz Keil) Today’s young women have inherited a complicated narrative. Be sexy but not sex-starved; don’t show too much skin but be adventurous in bed; no means no, except for the times it means yes. How do you craft female characters with sexual agency? And how do you write stories about girls claiming ownership of their bodies in a culture that has never prioritized a woman’s pleasure, nor historically upheld the idea of consent? In this panel, four YA authors talk about how and why they write about sex.

Bree Barton’s debut novel is Heart of Thorns, the first in a fierce feminist fantasy series. She has published short fiction and ghostwritten more than twenty books, including one novel adapted for television. Bree is the founder of Rock ‘n’ Write, a nonprofit dance-and-writing class for teen girls.

Sarah Nicole Smetana is the author of The Midnights. She received her BFA in Creative Writing from Chapman University and her MFA in Fiction from The New School. 


Twitter Username: sarahnsmetana

Website: www.sarahnicolesmetana.com

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R127. How to Win a Writing Fellowship. (, , , , ) Most writers have applied for a fellowship to finance their work, but relatively few actually receive grants. What’s the secret to securing a substantial amount of money to support one’s writing? Past winners of National Endowment, Fulbright and state funding describe putting together a manuscript, writing an artist’s statement, and getting recommendations. We will also describe the process from the inside. Writers who have served on fellowship panels will reveal how they made their decisions.

Thaddeus Rutkowski is author of six books, most recently Border Crossings, a poetry collection. He teaches at Sarah Lawrence, Medgar Evers, and the YMCA. He received a fiction fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts and served as a panelist for the NYFA nonfiction fellowship.


Twitter Username: thadrutkowski

Website: www.thaddeusrutkowski.com

Ava Chin, the author of Eating Wildly, has written for the New York Times (Urban Forager), Marie Claire, Saveur, and the Village Voice. An associate professor of creative nonfiction at CUNY, she has been awarded fellowships from the Cullman Center, the Fulbright US Scholar program, and NYFA.


Twitter Username: avachin

Website: www.AvaChin.com

Janet Kaplan's four prize-winning/shortlisted poetry collections include 2019's Ecotones from Eyewear Ltd. She's earned private, state, and local writers' grants and received numerous residency fellowships. She teaches poetry writing at Hofstra University, where she edits the digital lit-mag AMP.

Tim Keane is a fiction writer, poet, and Associate Professor at BMCC, CUNY. His writing has appeared in Modern Painters, The London Magazine, Shenandoah, Quarterly West, Alaska Quarterly Review, Denver Quarterly, and other magazines. He has won fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts and The Bronx Council on the Arts.


Twitter Username: tim_tadgh

Website: timkeane.com

Pedro Ponce is the author of the forthcoming novel Dreamland, as well as Stories After Goya, Alien Autopsy, and Superstitions of Apartment Life. A 2012 National Endowment for the Arts fellow in creative writing, he teaches fiction writing and literary theory at St. Lawrence University.


Twitter Username: PedroEPonce

Website: blogs.stlawu.edu/pponce

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R128. And the Earth Did Not Devour Us: Writers Who Worked the Fields. (, , , ) Driven to honor the resiliency and creativity of migrant/seasonal farmworkers, especially in the current political climate, this panel of writers and editors invites you to witness their farmworker pasts as they revisit and celebrate farmworker texts that influence their writing and pedagogical choices in traditional and nontraditional classrooms. The panelists, diverse in age, education, and location, and who are in various stages of their careers, will also share their #FarmworkerLit writings.

Miguel M. Morales grew up in Texas working as a migrant/seasonal farmworker and child laborer. A Lambda Literary Fellow and an alum of the Macondo Writers Workshop, Miguel's work appears in several anthologies and literary journals. He is the coeditor of Pulse/Pulso: In Remembrance of Orlando.


Twitter Username: TrustMiguel

Allison Adelle Hedge Coke, is the author of Streaming, Off Season-City Pipe, Dog Road Woman, Burn, Blood Run, Rock Ghost Willow Deer, Sing: Poetry from the Indigenous Americas, Effigies I & II, is directing Red Dust (film), directs the Lit Sandhill CraneFest, and is Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at UCR.


Twitter Username: AAHedgeCoke

Website: www.allisonhedgecoke.com

Oswaldo Vargas is a Michoacan native raised and living in northern California, and a student at the University of California, Davis, studying History, Human Rights, and Jewish Studies. Previous publications include Huizache, Nepantla: An Anthology Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color, and Green Mountains Review.

A native Californian, poet Diana Garcia is a retired professor and co-director of the Creative Writing and Social Action Program at California State University, Monterey Bay. Her collection When Living Was a Labor Camp captures the cross-generational experience of migrant farm workers.

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R129. Translators Are the Unacknowledged Ambassadors of the World. (, , , ) Percy Shelley said, “Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.” Similarly, translators are the unacknowledged ambassadors of the world. In what sense is a translator an ambassador for a people, language, and culture to another? How does the responsibility of representing the insights of one society to another influence the translator’s choice of projects, and the way s/he works? Translators from Arabic, Persian, Spanish, and French discuss these topics.

Zack Rogow is author, editor, or translator of twenty books or plays. His eighth book of poems, Talking with the Radio, was published by Kattywompus Press. He teaches in the low-residency MFA at University of Alaska Anchorage. His translations include works by Colette and Breton. zackrogow.com


Twitter Username: @ZackRogow

Website: http://www.thirteenways.org/poets/Zack/zack.html

Niloufar Talebi is a writer, award-winning translator, and multidisciplinary artist. Projects include: Belonging, Vis & I, ICARUS/RISE, Persian Rite of Spring, Fire Angels, Epiphany, Plentiful Peach, and The Investment. Her work is commissioned by Carnegie Hall, Cal Performances, BAM, Stanford, and Kennedy Center.


Twitter Username: NiloufarTalebi

Website: http://www.niloufartalebi.com

Suzanne Jill Levine is Director of Translation Studies at the University of California and noted translator of Latin American literature by writers such as Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Adolfo Bioy Casares and Manuel Puig. Her books include The Subversive Scribe:Translating Latin American Fiction.

Allen Hibbard is Professor of English and Director of the Middle East Center at Middle Tennessee State University. He has written two books on Paul Bowles, edited a collection of interviews with William S. Burroughs, and published dozens of essays, translations (from Arabic), stories, and reviews.

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R130. AWP Program Directors' Plenary Assembly. All AWP program directors should attend this meeting to represent their programs. Susan Jackson Rodgers, Chair of the Professional Standards Committee, will lead a discussion on AWP's Strategic Plan for the years ahead. In plenary and in the breakout sessions that follow immediately, Directors will also discuss the ongoing revision of the Hallmarks and the increasing funding challenges facing writing programs at every level. The plenary assembly will be followed by regional council meetings of program directors for further discussions of the survey, Inclusion Initiative, and revision of the AWP Guidelines and Hallmarks. A central part of the Hallmarks discussion will be attending to how the Hallmarks address inclusion.

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R131. Lit Your City: How To Build Strong Writing Communities & Run Reading Series. (, , , , ) Reading series exist to share ideas, build community, and bridge the gap between the writer and non-writer. They enrich the experience of writers in the community, but also expose the larger population to the importance of writing and hearing diverse voices. Panelists are writers who have worked on series or have in some other way ingeniously brought the word to their city. Each participant will discuss the mission and development of their series or project, as well as the pitfalls and successes.

Tracey Levine

Annie Liontas's novel Let Me Explain You was featured in The New York Times Book Review as Editor's Choice. She is the co-editor of the anthology A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors. She co-hosted Philadelphia's TireFire, which featured writers Kelly Link, Colin Barrett, and Roxane Gay.


Twitter Username: aliontas

Website: www.annieliontas.com

Penina Roth is the founder of two popular literary events in Brooklyn, New York: the Franklin Park Reading Series and the Manhattanville Reading Series for emerging writers. She is also the editor of the Literary Hub column on the reading series Reading Across America.


Twitter Username: PeninaRoth

Rafael Alvarez began publishing newspaper stories at age nineteen and the following year was hired by The Baltimore Sun. After twenty years on the City Desk, he wrote for the HBO drama "The Wire." Alvarez is the author of eleven books of fiction and nonfiction. All of his work is set in Baltimore, his hometown.


Twitter Username: BaltimoreRalph

Quincy Scott Jones is a poet with an MA from Temple University and an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College. His work has been published in the Feminist Wire and the African American Review. He is the author of The T-Bone Series.

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R132. We're Here and We're Queer: LGBTQ Women Tell Their Stories. (, , , , ) Queer people—and queer women especially— have long been marginalized in literature. What are the stories being told about queer women? And who is doing the telling? Four authors with very different backgrounds discuss their books and characters, the stereotypes they fight against, and the truths and lives they reveal. What are the various identities queer women navigate in real life and on the page? What untold stories remain hidden?

Imogen Binnie is the Lambda Literary Award winning author of the 2013 novel Nevada, numerous short stories, zines, and a column for Maximum Rocknroll magazine. She was a writer for the CBS television show Doubt. She's currently working on more short stories, another novel, and a television pilot.


Twitter Username: imogenbinnie

Chelsey Johnson received an MFA from the University of Iowa and a Stegner Fellowship from Stanford. She is the author of the novel Stray City and her stories have appeared in One Story, Ploughshares, NPR's Selected Shorts, and elsewhere. She teaches at Northern Arizona University.


Twitter Username: chelseyhotel

Nicole Dennis-Benn is the author of Here Comes The Sun, a NPR and New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Dennis-Benn is a Lambda Literary Award winner, and named a finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Award and NYPL Young Lions Award.


Twitter Username: ndennis_benn

Website: www.nicoledennisbenn.com

SJ Sindu is the author of the novel Marriage of a Thousand Lies, which won a Publishing Triangle Award and was an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist. She holds a PhD in Creative Writing from Florida State University, and teaches at Ringling College of Art and Design.


Twitter Username: sjsindu

Website: http://sjsindu.com

Patricia Smith's books include Incendiary Art (2018 Kingsley Tufts winner, 2018 Pulitzer finalist, Los Angeles Times Book Prize winner), Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah (2013 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize winner), and Blood Dazzler (2008 National Book Award finalist). A 2014 Guggenheim fellow, two-time Pushcart Prize winner, Smith is a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada College's MFA program.


Twitter Username: pattysmith711

Website: patricia_smith.com

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R133. A Woman's Rites of Passage. (, , , , ) Periods, bras, babies. Marriage, motherhood, menopause. These are experiences many women go through, yet even in 2018 we belittle such topics as “women’s writing”—not as impressive or idea-centered as a man’s. Women writers in workshops still often feel hesitant to turn in work about these topics for fear they will be seen as less serious. This panel seeks to change that conversation and celebrates the craft of these moments and their value.

Kyoko Mori is the author of three nonfiction books (The Dream of WaterPolite LiesYarn) and four novels (Shizuko's DaughterOne BirdStone FieldTrue ArrowBarn Cat). She teaches creative writing at George Mason University and for the Low-Residency MFA Program at Lesley University.

Rajpreet Heir is a coordinator at TED and a writer based in New York. Her work has appeared in The AtlanticCosmopolitanThe Washington PostThe Normal School, and The New York Times. She has an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from George Mason University and writes about growing up Indian in Indiana.


Twitter Username: rajtweet_edu

Emily Heiden is a PhD candidate at University of Cincinnati studying Literary Nonfiction. Her work has appeared in The Washington PostBrevity Magazine, and Literary Hub. She has an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from George Mason University and a Master of Arts in Teaching from The University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: _Emily_Heiden_

Jessie Szalay teaches writing and literature at Salt Lake Community College. Her work has appeared in Gulf Coast, the Jewish Daily Forward, and National Geographic Traveler—Personal Explorer, among other places. She holds an MFA in creative nonfiction from George Mason University.

Susanna Vander Vorste is a PhD candidate for literary nonfiction at the University of Cincinnati. Her work examines trauma, Midwestern culture, and the impact of meditation on people's daily lives. Her essays have appeared in StoneboatThe Chariton ReviewThe Lindenwood Review, and The Rumpus.


Twitter Username: s_vandervorste

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R134. How to Build a Poetry Library. (, , , , ) How can a poetry library serve to challenge the notion that poetry is exclusive? In 2020, the first Manchester Poetry Library (UK) will open its doors to the public. With representatives from the African Poetry Library Initiative, Poetry Foundation Library, Poets House, and University of Arizona Poetry Center, this panel and its audience explore what it means to be or run a poetry library, and how to meet the challenges of keeping the doors open.

Dr Martin Kratz is Poetry Projects Manager at Manchester Metropolitan University. Currently, his main responsibility is project managing the Manchester Poetry Library, which is due to open in 2020.

Tyler Meier is the Executive Director of the University of Arizona Poetry Center, a 17,000 square ft. facility located in Tucson Arizona that features a 70,000+ item poetry library and an extensive list of community based programs, including the Reading and Lecture Series, now in its 56th year.

Maggie Queeney is the library coordinator at the Poetry Foundation, where she designs and delivers adult educational programming. She is the author of settler, winner of the 2017 Baltic Chapbook Contest. Her work has appeared in Copper Nickel, Southern Poetry Review, and Conjunctions, among other journals.

Reginald Harris is Director of Library and Outreach Services for Poets House in New York City. A poet and full-time library professional, he has been involved in the development and presentation of poetry and literature-related humanities programming for over twenty years.


Twitter Username: rmharris

Website: reggieh.blogspot.com

Lorna Dawes is Assistant Professor and Social Science Librarian at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln with fifteen years experience in college and high school libraries. She serves as the Library Consultant for the African Poetry Libraries of the African Poetry Book Fund.


Twitter Username: dawesl

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R135. Create the Literary Future You Want: Writers on Community Organizing. (, , , , ) Are you a writer who wants to change the world in ways beyond your craft? This panel brings together writer/activists who have founded programs and organizations that aim to change the literary world and advance social justice. How do you make literary organizations sustainable? How do you leverage institutional resources to catalyze literary communities? How can you do this work without burning out? Panelists include an arts management educator, festival curators and community organization leaders.

Amy Shimshon-Santo is a writer and educator who believes the arts and culture are powerful tools for personal and social transformation. Her interdisciplinary work connects the arts, education, and urban planning. She is currently Head of the Arts Management Program at Claremont Graduate University.


Twitter Username: amyshimshon

Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, PhD is founding director of the arts nonprofit The Asian American Literary Review and coeditor-in-chief of its critically acclaimed literary journal. He is also a Curator for the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Luis J. Rodriguez was named Poet Laureate of Los Angeles in 2014. He is the author of fifteen books across a number of genres. He has been the recipient of a PEN West/Josephine Miles Award and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He serves as founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and cofounder and president of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural and Bookstore in California.


Twitter Username: luisjrodriguez

Website: www.luisjrodriguez.com

traci kato-kiriyama, author, theater deviser/writer; awards include the Center for Cultural Innovation and Network of Ensemble Theaters. Founder of Tuesday Night Project, she has also served as a guest lecturer for the Claremont Colleges and Teaching Artist-in-Residence for Grand Park.


Twitter Username: traciakemi

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R136. Arab/Indigenous: Palestinian, Indigenous North African, & Arab/Native Art. (, , , , ) Recognizing the importance of constellating Arab diaspora art in multiple ways, including through immigrant/refugee and pan-Asian/African lenses of experience, this panel argues for a creative, critical, pedagogical, and publishing re-evaluative centering of Indigenous Arab realities by placing in dialogue womanist/queer/trans Palestinian, Indigenous North African, and mixed-race Arab/Native American artists, activists, and editors. An Indigenous re-orientation and dismantling of Orientalism.

Ahimsa Timoteo Bodhrán, an AWP WC&C Scholar, is a multimedia artist and author of two poetry collections, Antes y después del Bronx: Lenapehoking and South Bronx Breathing Lessons. A widely published nonfiction writer, he is editor of Yellow Medicine Review's international queer Indigenous issue.

Lisa Suhair Majaj, Palestinian, is author of the poetry book, Geographies of Light; children's book, Naila Shares a Story; and various autobiographical and critical essays. She is coeditor of three academic anthologies focused on Arab and Arab American women writers and international women writers of color.

Katherine Toukhy is a visual artist whose work has been shown in Brazil, Argentina, and the US, including the Arab American National Museum and Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. She is the recipient of awards from the Brooklyn Arts Council, Laundromat Project, Puffin, WAH Center, and Rema Hort Mann Foundation.

Rasha Abdulhadi is a cultural organizer and author of the poetry chapbook, Shell Houses. A queer Palestinian textile artist, she is a Maryland State Arts and Poetry Foundation Incubator Fellow. Her work appears in Mizna, Mslexia, and Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia E. Butler.


Twitter Username: rashaabdulhadi

Website: http://sinnerscreek.com

Micaela Kaibni Raen is a columnist for DC's lesbian/bi/trans publication, Tagg Magazine; activist/community organizer; and Radius of Arab American Writers, Inc. life member. A nonfiction/fiction writer and poet, her work appears in Mizna, Yellow Medicine Review, and The Poetry of Arab Women.

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R137. Towards a Visionary Poetics: A Female Gaze. (, , , , ) The prophetic mode in American poetry is often associated with poets like Whitman, Ginsberg, Olson. This panel explores alternative modes of visionary poetry that are distinctively female or feminine. Our questions are motivated by the crisis of the current political moment and by the urgent need to reimagine our world. Panelists will address the ongoing work of articulating a female prophetic lineage in America and will consider the possibilities opened up by a woman-centered visionary poetry.

Shoshana Olidort is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at Stanford University and poetry editor of Mantis, a journal of poetry, criticism and translation. Her research focuses on poetry as a mode of performing identity through a consideration of five 20th century Jewish women poets.

Alicia Ostriker 's most recent collections of poetry are The Old Woman, the Tulip and the Dog (2014) and Waiting for the Light (2017), which won the National Jewish book Award in 2017. She teaches in the low-res MFA program at Drew University and is an Academy of American Poets Chancellor.

Monica Mody is the author of Kala Pani and two chapbooks. Her work has appeared in Poetry International, Mission at Tenth and Kitaab, among others. She has an MFA in poetry from the University of Notre Dame. Her doctoral research explores South Asian women enacting decolonial spiritual borderlands.


Twitter Username: monicamody

Website: www.modymonica.com

Sara Larsen is a poet living in Oakland. She is the author of two books of poetry, Merry Hell and All Revolutions Will Be Fabulous. Over the course of two years, she and David Brazil edited and published more than 60 issues of the seminal Bay Area literary zine, Try Magazine.


Twitter Username: saralarsenpoet

Website: http://sara-larsen.blogspot.com/

Yosefa Raz is an Assistant Professor of English Literature at the University of Haifa. Her poetry books include In Exchange for a Homeland, and the chapbooks This Rumor of Darger’s Armies of Girls, and All These Years Practicing While Momentous Events Were Happening All Around.

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R138. Playwriting for Novelists. (, , , ) Does your novel or story feel like it needs to be on the stage? At a loss for how to make the leap? This workshop outlines the basic playwriting principles you will need to take your prose to script. We will cover the key issues of transferability, formatting, structure, dialogue, characters, and pacing. We will give you the tools to take your book from the private pleasure of reading to the communal and dynamic experience of live theatre.

Andy Pederson's plays have been produced in New York, Chicago, Atlanta, Memphis, Vermont, and other places. A member of the Dramatists Guild and an alumnus of Goddard College’s MFA program, he is resident playwright of the Saltbox Theatre Collective. He teaches at Concordia University Chicago.

Craig Thornton's absurd play The High Cost of Heating was selected as the runner-up in the Yale Drama Series Prize for 2015. He has a BFA from NYU, MFA from Goddard College, and teaches dramatic writing at Syracuse University. His play In My Shoes was featured in a CNN news story.


Twitter Username: craigstodolist

Website: https://www.wwnytv.com/category/320034/craigs-to-do-list

Jayme McGhan's twenty-one full-length plays have been produced and developed across the country. He currently serves as the Director of the School of Stage and Screen at Western Carolina University. He is a Resident Playwright at Chicago Dramatists. He holds an MFA in Playwriting from UNLV.

Deborah Jordan is Assoc. Professor of Theatre at Jacksonville University, FL. A thirty-year love affair with theatre has afforded her the opportunity to direct, act, and own two professional theatre companies. Her current play, Ian Stories or My Life in Hell is about raising a son with Asperger's Syndrome.


Twitter Username: Debiannjordan

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R139. Crafting the Capital of the Modern Chapbook. (, , , , ) What defines a successful chapbook—content, impact, beauty, sales? This panel will explore best practices for publishing and marketing chapbooks in today’s literary climate. Experienced chapbook publishers will discuss solutions to common hurdles that presses and prizes face, including sustainability, production, and promotion of these no longer liminal objects. We’ll also consider the future of the chapbook—its expanding forms, genres, and possibilities.

Levis Keltner is the author of the novel Into That Good Night. He has an MFA in creative writing and teaches writing at Texas State University. He is the cofounder and editor-in-chief of Newfound.


Twitter Username: levis_gravis

MC Hyland runs DoubleCross Press with Jeff Peterson, and is working toward a PhD in English Literature at NYU. She is the author of the poetry collection Neveragainland and several chapbooks, including TOOTHLESS ALTAR, Every Night In Magic City, and Residential, As In.


Twitter Username: mc_hyland

Website: http://flameshapedabode.tumblr.com/

Dan Mahoney is the editor in chief of Bateau Press. He is the author of the chapbook Quantum Entanglement and the book Sunblind Almost Motorcrash, which is something entirely different.


Twitter Username: BateauPress

Kevin Sampsell is the publisher of Future Tense Books, as well as a bookseller (Powell's Books), collage artist, and author. His books include This Is Between Us and A Common Pornography. One of his essays was included in Best American Essays 2013


Twitter Username: kevinsampsell

Website: www.kevinsampsell.com

Allison Tobey is currently the managing editor for Gertrude, which has the distinction of being the longest consecutively published queer journal. She also cocurates the Portland reading series Women Writers Against Trump with her sister-poet, Chrys Tobey.

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R140. Beyond the Reading: Events-Based Book Marketing. (, , , ) Big 5 publishers use live events to launch high-profile books. How can small presses jump on the live events bandwagon without red carpets and celebrities? Presenting test cases specific to Portland’s small press scene—including partnerships with a craft brewery and local musicians on tour—a book publicist, a project manager, and two book publishing faculty at PSU share how small presses can collaborate with local communities and vendors to launch books beyond readings.

Kathi Inman Berens teaches in Portland State University’s book publishing program and advises the award-winning, student-run Ooligan Press. She researches digital aspects of book publishing, including how social media interacts with live events like literary festivals and other book events.


Twitter Username: kathiiberens

Website: kathiiberens.com

Deborah Jayne is a freelance literary editor and publicist. Former director of publicity at Tin House Books and special sales manager at Timber Press, Deborah has worked in the publishing field for the past fifteen year. She has an MA from the book publishing program at Portland State University.

Rachel Noorda is a researcher of small business marketing and the incoming director of the Book Publishing program at Portland State University, where she teaches various courses, including book marketing.


Twitter Username: rachellynchase

Kelly Hogan, a master’s candidate in Portland State's Book Publishing program, is the Ooligan Press project manager for The Widmer Way, a biography of the iconic brothers who sparked Oregon’s craft brew revolution. The Widmer Way will launch during AWP 2019.

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R141. Twenty-five Years of Two Lines. (, , , , ) For twenty-five years, Two Lines has been publishing world literature in translation, championing underrepresented regions and languages, and celebrating the work of literary translators. Founded in response to the lack of visibility for translators, Two Lines has published the best names in translation from its first issue on. Join past contributors and editors for a reading and discussion of the evolution of translation in the last two decades and of where this field is headed.

Olivia Sears is the founder of the Center for the Art of Translation and the journal Two Lines, and she serves on the editorial board of Two Lines Press. She translates from Italian with a particular focus on contemporary women poets. Her translation of a 1919 volume by Ardengo Soffici is forthcoming.

Forrest Gander’s book Core Samples from the World was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. His translations include Alice Iris Red Horse, Poems by Gozo Yoshimasu and Then Come Back: Lost Neruda Poems. Be With, his first book of poems since 2011, is just out.

Cynthia Hogue has published nine poetry collections, most recently In June the Labyrinth. Her cotranslation from the French of Nathalie Quintane is Joan Darc. Hogue was the inaugural Marshall Chair in Poetry at Arizona State University. She is Emerita Professor of English.

Sidney Wade’s seventh collection of poems, Bird Book, was published by Atelier26 in the fall of 2017. She has served as President of AWP and Secretary/Treasurer of ALTA. She is Professor Emerita of Poetry and Translation at the University of Florida.

Edward Gauvin has received prizes, fellowships, and residencies from PEN America, the NEA, the Fulbright program, Ledig House, the Lannan Foundation, and the French Embassy. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Harper's, Tin House, Subtropics, Words Without Borders, and Weird Fiction Review.

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R142. How To Eat Your Watermelon in Mixed Company (and Enjoy It). (, , , Nabila Lovelace, Camonghne Felix) This reading is an exploration of Black writers contending with issues of authenticity, identity, audience, voice, and craft. Featuring four writers who work in various mediums, this reading will feature dialogue around respectability politics, in/visibility, the intersections of gender and sexuality with race, and the non-Black gaze. Rooted in the notion that through the specific we bring out the universal, this reading aims to give insight to marginalization and tokenism in the literary world.

Jonah Mixon-Webster is a poet, sound artist, and educator from Flint, MI. His is the author of Stereo(TYPE) and a Ph.D. candidate in English Studies at Illinois State University. His work is featured in Callaloo, Best New Poets 2017, Best American Experimental Writing 2018, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: Midbrain412

Danez Smith is the author of two collections, most recently Don't Call Us Dead, a finalist for the National Book Award. They are the cohost of the podcast VS with poet Franny Choi. Their third collection, Homie, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: danez_smif

Justin Phillip Reed is the author of Indecency.


Twitter Username: justafknminute

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R143. Creating Discrimination & Harassment Policies in the Era of #MeToo. (, , , , ) It’s vitally important that all literary places are free of harassment of any kind, and strong policies need to be enacted that not only attempt to prevent harassing or discriminatory behavior, but to ensure accountability for one’s actions as well as protection and advocacy for those who are wronged. Join the leaders of several literary centers to discuss their own policies, how they were created and implemented, and ways we can all do better in creating safe literary places.

Michael Khandelwal writes and publishes fiction and poetry and teaches workshops for The Muse Writers Center in Norfolk, Virginia, for which he is the Executive Director (and cofounder). He is a columnist for Coastal Virginia Magazine and a former webmaster for The American Council on Education.

Eve Bridburg is the founder and Executive Director of Grub Street, one of the country’s leading writing centers. She is also a former literary agent with ZSH Literary agent where she's edited and sold bestselling and award-winning nonfiction and fiction.


Twitter Username: eve_grubstreet

Andrea Dupree is program director for Lighthouse Writers Workshop, a nonprofit literary center she co-founded in 1997. A recipient of two MacDowell fellowships, her fiction has appeared in places including PloughsharesVQRColorado Review, and the Normal School.

Britt Udesen is the Executive and Artistic Director at the Loft Literary Center and has served in leadership positions at LitNet, The Cabin, The Sun Valley Center for the Arts, and Storyfort.


Twitter Username: brittaudesen

Gregg Wilhelm is director of the BFA and MFA Programs in Creative Writing at George Mason University. He is founder and director emeritus of literary arts nonprofit CityLit Project in Baltimore and publisher of its CityLit Press imprint. Wilhelm earned his MFA in fiction from the University of Tampa.


Twitter Username: gregglitpub

Website: www.GreggWilhelm.com

Portland Ballroom 256, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R144. Be Your Own Agent. (, , , Adam Clay) Some poets are represented by literary speaking agents who arrange events, manage logistics, and set fees and conditions. And then there’s everybody else. This panel, aimed at both emerging and established writers, discusses how to advocate for oneself. Four poets share experiences with touring and with running institutional and independent readings; the discussion demystifies booking and negotiation, offering concrete advice on how to know what to ask for and how to get it.

Natalie Shapero is the Professor of the Practice of Poetry at Tufts University, an editor at large of the Kenyon Review, and the author of the books Hard Child and No Object. Her awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Ruth Lilly Fellowship, and a Kenyon Review Fellowship.


Twitter Username: natalieshapero

Leah Umansky is the author of four books of poetry: The Barbarous Century, Don Dreams and I Dream, Straight Away the Emptied World, and Domestic Uncertainties. She earned her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and is the host and curator of the COUPLET Reading Series in New York City.


Twitter Username: lady_bronte

Website: http:/leahumansky.com

Vi Khi Nao is the author of a novel, Fish in Exile, and The Old Philosopher, a poetry collection. She was the winner of 2014 Nightboat Poetry Prize and the 2016 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Contest for A Brief Alphabet of Torture, a collection of short stories.


Twitter Username: vikhinao

Exhibit Hall E, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R145. AWP for First-Timers. Join AWP staff for a welcome to all first-time attendees, an overview of #AWP19, and tips for what to do around Portland!

10:30 am to 11:45 am

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R146. Readings from the Chapter One project. (, , , , ) Marsh Hawk Press presents readings from its Chapter One publishing project, featuring the memoirs of outstanding poets from diverse backgrounds, recalling the ways by which they found their start as writers.

Sandy McIntosh has published eleven volumes of nonfiction prose and poetry. He has published in The New York Times, Newsday, The Nation, The Wall Street Journal, American Book Review, and elsewhere. He has been managing editor of Long Island University's Confrontation magazine, and is currently publisher of Marsh Hawk Press.


Twitter Username: SandyMcIntosh_

Mary Mackey is Professor Emeritus of English at California State University, Sacramento, founder of the CSUS Creative Writing Program, and author of fourteen novels and eight poetry collections, including The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams and Sugar Zone, winner of the 2012 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award.


Twitter Username: MMackeyAuthor

Website: http://marymackey.com/

Denise Duhamel’s most recent book of poetry Scald is published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Her book with Julie Marie Wade The Unrhymables: Collaborations in Prose is forthcoming from Noctuary Press. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, Duhamel is a professor at FlU in Miami.

Geoffrey O'Brien has published eighteen books, including eight poetry collections, most recently Early Autumn, In a Mist, and The Blue Hill; as well as prose works including Dream Time, The Phantom Empire, and Sonata for Jukebox. Retired as editor-in-chief of Library of America, he is a frequent contributor at The New York Review of Books.

Jason McCall holds an MFA from the University of Miami. His poetry collections include Two-Face God; Silver; and Dear Hero, winner of the 2012 Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize. He is coeditor of It Was Written: Poetry Inspired by Hip-Hop, and he teaches at the University of North Alabama.


Twitter Username: JasonMcCall4

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R147. The Heart is a Muscle: Poetry of Protest. (, , , , ) Anger, outrage, and indignation have pushed us into the streets, marching for women, for immigrants, for Black lives. Yet, rage alone will not feed us; social change requires both respite and revelry to be sustainable. As Emma Goldman noted, a revolution without dancing isn’t worth having. To embody this spirit, established and emerging poets read their poems of protest, embracing both tenderness and fury as their work invites us to recognize ourselves in our enemies, our hearts in each other.

Amie Whittemore is the author of Glass Harvest and an educator. Her poetry has been recognized with a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize and featured in North American ReviewSmartish PaceGettysburg Review, the Missouri Review Poem of the Week, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: amiewhittemore

Kendra DeColo is the author of My Dinner with Ron Jeremy and Thieves in the Afterlife. She has received awards and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, the Millay Colony, and the Tennessee Arts Commission. She cohosts the podcast RE/VERB at Third Man Books.


Twitter Username: kendradecolo

Cortney Lamar Charleston is the author of Telepathologies. He has received a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation as well as fellowships from Cave Canem, The Conversation Literary Festival and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.


Twitter Username: bardsbesidebars

José Olivarez is the son of Mexican immigrants, and the co-host of the podcast, The Poetry Gods. He is a recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, Poets House, the Bronx Council on the Arts, the Poetry Foundation, & the Conversation Literary Festival. His first book, Citizen Illegal, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: _joseolivarez

Matthew Olzmann is the author of two collections of poems, Mezzanines and Contradictions in the Design. He teaches in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R148. Northeast by Northwest: New England Review Writers of the PacNW. (, , , , ) Situated at the foot of the Green Mountains, New England Review looks in every direction when it comes to publishing great new writing. In this reading of poetry and prose from recent contributors, New England Review is proud to present four writers who live and work within view of the Cascades. This reading highlights the range of voices that NER has published over the past four decades, while celebrating writers of the Pacific Northwest.

Geri Doran is author of Resin, winner of the Walt Whitman Award; Sanderlings; and Epistle, Osprey (forthcoming). Recipient of a Stegner Fellowship, Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship, and residencies from James Merrill House and Maison Dora Maar, she teaches at the University of Oregon.

Wendy Willis is a poet, essayist, and lawyer. She teaches poetry at the Attic Institute in Portland, Oregon, and serves as the Executive Director of the Deliberative Democracy Consortium and Oregon's Kitchen Table. Her next book, Field Notes from the Republic, will be released in early 2019.


Twitter Username: WendyRaeW

Ismet Prcic is a Bosnian American writer. His debut novel Shards won the Los Angeles Times and Sue Kaufman awards for first fiction as well as the Oregon Book Awards in fiction. He received the NEA award in 2010 and is a Sundance Institute Screenwriting fellow.

Janet Towle’s fiction has appeared in The Normal School, Carve Magazine, Passages North, New England Review, and elsewhere. She is working on a novel and a collection of short stories.


Twitter Username: janettowle

Carolyn Kuebler is the editor of New England Review. Before coming to NER as managing editor in 2004, she was an editor at Library Journal and founding editor of Rain Taxi. She has published her writing in various magazines, literary and otherwise.


Twitter Username: NERweb

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R149. Mentoring an Editorial Eye: Teaching Students How to Slog through the Slush. (, , , ) Student editors, ranging from high school to graduate programs, are at the heart of many lit mags and are largely responsible for selecting what gets published in the emerging market. But are they prepared to sift through the slush pile and make these decisions? How much autonomy should we allow them in determining what literature is “good”? This panel of experienced editors and faculty discusses our varying approaches to mentoring students and helping transform them into editors.

Katie Budris is a Lecturer in Writing Arts at Rowan University where she teaches all levels of composition, creative writing, and the graduate course "Editing the Literary Journal." She is the Editor in Chief of Glassworks magazine and is the author of a chapbook of poetry, Prague in Synthetics.


Twitter Username: ktb8482

Website: katiebudris.com

Carla Spataro is the MFA program director at Rosemont College and the editorial director of Philadelphia Stories and PS Books. She is an prize-winning short story writer who has had students publish novels with Big Five publishers and win nationally recognized awards for their work.


Twitter Username: cjspataro

Website: www.philadelphiastories.org

Lindsay A. Chudzik is an Assistant Professor of Writing at VCU, serves as the Editor in Chief of Feels Blind Literary, and works as a teaching artist with various community organizations. Her short stories have appeared in several literary magazines and her creative nonfiction has been anthologized.

Nick Tryling is the editor of Levitate, a literary magazine connected to a class in the creative writing department of the Chicago High School for the Arts. She's worked with high school students and college undergraduates on editorial skills for more than ten years. She's also a Rhino poetry editor.


Twitter Username: TheNicktr

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R150. The Oh Shit Moment: Issues of Social Justice & Identity in the Writing Classroom. (, , , , ) What can you do in the moment a student shocks your class by introducing the language of racism, sexism, classism, colorism, cissexism, ableism, or victim blaming? This panel will offer practical steps to address the uncomfortable moment and ways to use it as a exercise in critical thinking. We will offer texts, and assignments that will open a productive dialogue on the subjects of social justice regardless if you are in a majority white classroom, an HSBCU, or progressive liberal arts school.

Rachel M. Simon is the author of the poetry collection Theory of Orange and the chapbook Marginal Road. She works as the Associate Director of Multicultural Affairs and LGBTQQ Coordinator at Pace University. She teaches college courses at Bedford Hills Women's Prison and SUNY Purchase College.

Olivia Worden holds an MFA in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College. She has taught writing and diversity workshops at Roger Williams University, Sarah Lawrence College, Andrus, Westchester County Correctional Facility, and Pace University. She is the Director of the Social Justice Intensive at SLC.

Seth Michelson teaches at Washington and Lee University. His most recent books of poetry are Swimming Through Fire (2017) and Eyes Like Broken Windows (2012). He edited Dreaming America: Voices of Undocumented Youth in Maximum-Security Detention (2017), and he has translated eight books of poetry.

Melissa Febos is the author of the memoir, Whip Smart, and the essay collection, Abandon Me. She serves on the Board of Directors for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, and is Associate Professor of Creative Nonfiction at Monmouth University and MFA faculty at the Bennington Writing Seminars.


Twitter Username: melissafebos

Website: melissafebos.com

Syreeta McFadden is a writer and professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Rolling Stone, BuzzFeed News, Brooklyn Magazine, Feministing and The Guardian, where she had been a regular contributor.


Twitter Username: reetamac

Website: syreetamcfadden.com

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R151. AWP Program Directors' Southwest Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Utah. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Ryan Stone, will conduct this meeting.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R152. Que savent-ils?: What Classic Essays Can Teach Contemporary Essayists. (, , , , ) When’s the last time you sat down with an essay by Lamb? Or cracked open The Rambler? Maybe not recently enough. With so many exciting new modes of the essay being written today it can be easy to forget those of the past. But writers like Montaigne, Rousseau, Hazlitt, and Woolf have more bearing on contemporary essayists than you might think. This diverse panel of essayists writing in a variety of sub-genres shows how the “classics” inspire them—as perhaps they will inspire you, too.

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. She is the author of the essay collection Be with Me Always and the lyric essay chapbook Devotional. Other work appears in The New York TimesCreative NonfictionBrevity, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: randonnoble

Website: www.randonbillingsnoble.com

David Lazar was a Guggenheim Fellow in Nonfiction for 2015. His books include: I’ll Be Your Mirror: Essays and Aphorisms, Who's Afraid of Helen of Troy, After Montaigne, Occasional Desire, and The Body of Brooklyn. He is founding editor of Hotel Amerika, and series coeditor of 21st Century Essays at OSU Press


Twitter Username: DavidEssays

Website: lazar.org

Dinty W.Moore is author of The Story Cure: A Book Doctor's Pain-Free Guide to Finishing Your Novel or Memoir, the memoir Between Panic & Desire, and numerous other books of nonfiction. 


Twitter Username: brevitymag

Website: www.dintywmoore.com

Kyoko Mori is the author of three nonfiction books (The Dream of Water; Polite Lies; Yarn) and four novels (Shizuko's Daughter; One Bird; Stone Field, True Arrow; Barn Cat). She teaches creative writing at George Mason University and for the Low-Residency MFA Program at Lesley University.

Beth Peterson is a nonfiction writer and assistant professor of writing at Grand Valley State University. Beth is finishing her first book of lyric essays, set in a disappearing glacial landscape in Norway.


Twitter Username: BethLPeterson

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R153. AWP Program Directors' Mid-Atlantic Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Kathleen Driskell, will conduct this meeting.

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R154. AWP Program Directors' Northeast Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Europe. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, January Gill O'Neil, will conduct this meeting.

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R155. Chaotic Good: Genre Fiction as a Tool for Political Resistance. (, , , , Danielle Dutton) This panel will explore how genre fiction, or fiction that uses genre elements, can address politics and even be an act of resistance. Genre allows writers to broach political topics, take chances, advocate change, and take stands that “straight” fiction sometimes can't. Panelists will discuss how use of genre can be political; how writing genre fiction can free writers to #resist; what “genre" means and how to expand it; and craft advice in using the formal elements of genre in political ways.

Gregory Howard's fiction and essays have appeared in WebConjunctions, The Collagist, Harp & Altar, and Tarpaulin Sky, among other places. He teaches Fiction Writing, Contemporary Literature, and Film at University of Maine. His novel Hospice was published by FC2.

Porochista Khakpour is the author of the forthcoming memoir Sick, and the novels Sons & Other Flammable Objects and The Last Illusion. She received fellowships from the NEA, Ucross, Yaddo, and more. She writes for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Bookforum, WSJ, VQR, and more.  


Twitter Username: Pkhakpour

Website: www.porochistakhakpour.com

Rion Amilcar Scott's story collection Insurrections won the 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. He earned an MFA from George Mason University, and he teaches English at Bowie State University.


Twitter Username: reeamilcarscott

Daniel José Older is the New York Times bestselling author of the Bone Street Rumba urban fantasy series from Penguin’s Roc Books and the Young Adult novel Shadowshaper, a New York Times Notable Book of 2015, which was shortlisted for the Kirkus, Mythopoeic, and Norton awards.


Twitter Username: djolder

Website: ghoststar.net

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R156. Translation as the Art of Reincarnation: World Perspectives on Creative Process. (, , , , ) How do you find and give a new voice to a poem in a different language, infusing other cultures into your own experience?
Working with Hebrew, Greek, French, Korean, Slovenian, Spanish, and Turkish, this panel’s poets, translators, and scholars discuss their roles as intermediaries, technicians, and alchemists dancing between languages to create inspired texts spanning cultural differences, geographic distances, and time.

Hélène Cardona’s third bilingual collection is Life in Suspension. Translations include Hemingway Grant-winner Beyond Elsewhere (Arnou-Laujeac), José Manuel Cardona's Birnam Wood, Walt Whitman, and Dorianne Laux. A Goethe-Institut and Andalucía University Fellow, she coedits Plume and Levure Littéraire.


Twitter Username: helenecardona

Website: http://helenecardona.com

Sidney Wade’s seventh collection of poems, Bird Book, was published by Atelier26 in the fall of 2017. She has served as President of AWP and Secretary/Treasurer of ALTA. She is Professor Emerita of Poetry and Translation at the University of Florida.

Christopher Merrill has published many books of poetry, translations, and nonfiction, most recently: Boat, Necessities, The Tree of the Doves: Ceremony, Expedition, War, and Self-Portrait with Dogwood. He directs the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: CLMerrill

Website: www.christophermerrillbooks.com

Willis Barnstone has been a Guggenheim fellow, and has had four Book of the Month Club selections. His books include Poetics of Translation, Gnostic Bible, Poems of Antonio Machado, Secret Reader: 501 Sonnets, Stickball on 88th St, Moonbook & Sunbook, Mexico in My Heart: Selected, and Poets of the Bible: Song of Songs to Revelation.

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs is the author of Paper Pavilion, winner of the White Pine Press Poetry Prize; Interrogation Room; and the chapbooks Notes from a Missing Person and Necro Citizens (in German edition). She is associate professor of English and directs Race and Ethnic Studies at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: jkwondobbs

Website: www.jkwondobbs.com

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R157. That “Difficult Woman” Thing: How’s It Working on the Page and in the Classroom?. (, , , , ) In recent years, writers, critics, and readers have firmly rebutted the idea that female characters need to be “likable” to be compelling, but how’s the idea of the “difficult woman” affecting real-world writers and writing faculty in 2019? On this panel, four women whose writings and sometimes their lives have taken on this topic consider the opportunities as well as the liabilities provided by writing about and/or being considered difficult in letters and in the literary world now.

Barbara Jones is an executive editor at Henry Holt & Company, where she acquires and edits fiction, memoir, and narrative nonfiction. She was previously the editorial director at Hyperion Books, and previous to that, a longtime magazine editor, at Harper’s Magazine, Vogue, Real Simple, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: voicereader

Susan Choi is the author of four novels: The Foreign StudentAmerican WomanA Person of Interest, and My Education. She lives in Brooklyn.

Lauren Francis-Sharma, is the author of 'Til the Well Runs Dry, her first novel, short-listed for the William Saroyan International Prize and awarded the Honor Fiction Prize by the Black Caucus of the ALA. She is the owner of DC Writers Room, a MacDowell Fellow, and she is working on her second novel.


Twitter Username: laurenfsharma

Website: www.laurenfrancissharma.com

Karen Karbo is the author of fifteen award-winning novels and works of nonfiction. Her novels have all been named NY Times Notable Books. She is an NEA Fellow in Fiction and winner of an Oregon Book Award for her memoir, The Stuff of Life. Her most recent book is In Praise of Difficult Women.


Twitter Username: karbohemia

Cade Leebron is a writer living in Columbus, Ohio. She holds an MFA from Ohio State. Her work has appeared in BrevityAmerican Literary ReviewElectric Literature, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: CadeyLadey

Website: www.mslifeisbestlife.com

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R158. Surfing the Green Wave: Engaging Environmental & Social Issues for Young Readers. (, , , , ) Stories shape the way we think and act. In this interactive panel, four award-winning middle grade and young adult authors discuss how they've sought to engage wicked problems like climate change, species extinction, and income inequality through fiction. They explore how literature is changing to address new problems, what lies beyond apocalyptic fiction, and the challenges of effectively engaging the generation that's inheriting global problems on an unprecedented scale.

Shanetia P. Clark, PhD, is an associate professor of literacy at Salisbury University (MD). She serves as a jurist for the Green Earth Book Award. Her teaching and research interests focus on children's and young adult literature.


Twitter Username: uvagradu8

Todd Mitchell is a Green Earth Honor Book award-winning author of several books for teens and middle grade readers including: The Last Panther, Backwards, and The Secret to Lying. Currently, he directs the Beginning Creative Writing Teaching Program at Colorado State University.


Twitter Username: tmitchellbooks

Website: www.ToddMitchellBooks.com

Eliot Schrefer is a two-time finalist for the National Book Award. His New York Times-bestselling books have been named to the NPR Best of the Year list and the American Library Association best fiction list for young adults. He has also won the Green Earth Book Award and Sigurd Olson Nature Writing Award.


Twitter Username: EliotSchrefer

Website: www.eliotschrefer.com

Sherri L. Smith writes award-winning YA and middle grade novels, including FlygirlOrleansThe Toymaker’s Apprentice, and Pasadena. Sherri was a judge for the 2014 National Book Awards Young People's category. She teaches creative writing at Goddard College MFAW and Hamline University MFAC.


Twitter Username: sherril_l_smith

Website: www.sherrilsmith.com

Cecil Castellucci is the award winning young adult author of books and graphic novels including Soupy Leaves HomeDon't Cosplay with My Heart, and Shade the Changing Girl. She was young adult editor of the LA Review of Books, Children’s Correspondence Coordinator for The Rumpus and a two-time Macdowell Fellow.


Twitter Username: misscecil

Website: http://www.misscecil.com

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R159. A Glimmer Train Reading: 28 Years of Stories. (, , , ) The first issue of Glimmer Train, founded in Portland, Oregon, appeared in 1991. Over its twenty-eight years, its stories, many of them from emerging authors, have been anthologized in Best American Short Stories, The O’Henry Prize Stories, and the list goes on. Please join us for a celebration of its accomplishments as well as conversation about what makes a memorable short story via brief readings and remarks from former Glimmer Train contributors in the city where it all began.

Lee Martin is the author of four novels, including the Pulitzer Prize Finalist, The Bright Forever. He is also the author of three memoirs, most recently Such a Life, and a story collection, The Least You Need to Know. He teaches in the creative writing program at The Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: LeeMartinAuthor

Carrie Brown is the author of seven novels, most recently The Stargazer's Sister, and a collection of short stories. She has won many fellowships and awards for her work, and she teaches at Sweet Briar College where she also directs the College's Center for Creativity, Design, and the Arts.

Matt Bondurant is the author of the novels The Night Swimmer, The Wettest County in the World (2008, which became the movie Lawless), and The Third Translation. He has published short stories, poems, and articles in numerous publications, and in 2013 signed a development deal with HBO.


Twitter Username: bondurantmr

Website: www.mattbondurant.com

Danielle Lazarin is the author of Back Talk: Stories. Her award-winning fiction can be found in The Southern Review, Buzzfeed, Colorado Review, Indiana Review, Glimmer Train, Boston Review, amongst others, and her essays in The Cut and Lenny Letter. She lives in New York.


Twitter Username: d_lazarin

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R160. Shape-Shifting Lineages: Conjuring the Feminine Divine, Power, and Creation. (, , , ) This event will engage diverse lineages of the feminine divine to explore power, myth-making, diasporic, and transnational inheritances, and creation in contemporary writing by women of color. From re-shaping origin stories to seeing monstrosity as divinity, we will delve into aesthetics of the feminine divine to foster attention, care, and value for marginalized communities, and explore craft, character development, and world-building of the feminine divine towards women’s and queer liberation.

Purvi Shah inspires change as an anti-violence advocate and writer. Terrain Tracks is her award-winning book. At the 10th anniversary of 9/11, she directed Together We Are New York, a community poetry project to highlight Asian American voices. 


Twitter Username: PurviPoets

Website: http://purvipoets.net

Rosamond S. King’s poetry is in Rock|Salt|Stone (Lambda Finalist) and dozens of journals and anthologies. A creative and critical writer and artist, she is inspired by her cultures, history, and a sense of play. She is Creative Editor of sx salon and Associate Professor at Brooklyn College.


Twitter Username: RosamondDrKing

Website: www.rosamondking.com

Dr. Ana-Maurine Lara is a national award winning poet and fiction writer. She is author of the novel Erzulie's Skirt (2006), When the Sun Once Again Sang to the People (2011), and Kohnjehr Woman. She is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oregon.


Twitter Username: zorashorse

Sun Yung Shin is the author of Unbearable Splendor, Rough, and Savage, and Skirt Full of Black. She codirects Poetry Asylum in Minneapolis. The editor of A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota and Outsiders Within, and author of Cooper's Lesson, she is widely published in multiple genres.


Twitter Username: sunyungshin

Website: www.sunyungshin.com

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R161. Writing Palestine: Combating Erasure/Imagining the Future. (, , , ) Marking seventy years of displacement and occupation in Palestine, Mizna, the only journal of Arab American literature, presents its Palestine Issue, with readings and discussion about the Palestinian struggle for freedom and the rich literature it has spurred. Acclaimed authors engage with seven decades of resilience and creativity in the face of catastrophe, sharing work that combats erasure by remembering, as well as by imagining possible (and impossible) futures.

Ismail Khalidi's plays include Truth Serum Blues (Pangea World Theater), Tennis in Nablus (Alliance Theatre), Foot (Teatro Amal), Sabra Falling (Pangea), and adaptations of Returning to Haifa (Finborough Theate), and The Corpse Washer (Actors Theatre of Louisville). He holds an MFA from NYU Tisch.


Twitter Username: ismailkhalidi

George Abraham is a Palestinian American poet, activist, and PhD candidate at Harvard. He is the author of two chapbooks: the specimen's apology  and al youm. His writing has appeared in Tin House, Boston Review, The Rumpus, Puerto del Sol, and Nepantla.


Twitter Username: IntifadaBatata

Nathalie Handal’s most recent books include the flash collection The Republics, lauded as “one of the most inventive books by one of today’s most diverse writers,” and the critically acclaimed Poet in Andalucía. She is a professor at Columbia University and writes the column The City and the Writer.

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R162. AWP Program Directors' Western Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Manitoba, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, Saskatchewan, South Dakota, Washington, Wyoming, and the Pacific Rim. This breakout session will begin immediately upon the conclusion of the Program Directors Plenary Assembly, so we recommend that you attend the Plenary Assembly first. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Susan Rodgers, will conduct this meeting.

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R163. AWP Program Directors' Midwest Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Ontario, and Wisconsin. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Kris Bigalk, will conduct this meeting.

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R164. AWP Program Directors' Southern Council. If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program in the following regions, you should attend this session: Alabama, Arkansas, Caribbean Islands, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Your regional representative on the AWP Board of Trustees, Erica Dawson, will conduct this meeting.

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R165. Lenguas Revoltosas: Writers of Color Disrupting Traditional Literary Zones. (, , , , ) "Ethnic identity is twin skin to linguistic identity—I am my language" wrote the legendary poet-scholar Gloria Anzaldúa. Despite the rich linguistic/cultural diversity within the US, the primary passport in mainstream publishing continues to be monolinguistic. This multi-genre reading features Latinx and writers of color with unruly tongues disrupting English-only literary zones and challenging narrow perceptions of what constitutes Latinx and POC writing and identity.

Alan Pelaez Lopez is an Afro-Zapotec poet, and collage and adornment artist. Their first book, Intergalactic Travels: poems from a fugitive alien, explores the intersections of PTSD, undocumented immigration, Indigeneity, queer feelings, and Black flesh. They are finishing a PhD in ethnic studies.


Twitter Username: migrantscribble

Verónica Reyes is the author of Chopper! Chopper! Poetry from Bordered Lives. She scripts poetry for queers of color and Latina/o communities. In 2014, she won the International Latino Book Award, Goldie Award, and she was a Lambda Literary Finalist. At Cal State LA, Reyes teaches in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and English programs.

Olga García Echeverría is the author of Falling Angels: cuentos y poemas. Her work has appeared in several anthologies, among them Lavanderia: A Mixed Load of Women, Wash, and Words; and Telling Tongues: A Latino/a Anthology on Language. She teaches at Cal State University LA.

Maya Chinchilla has an MFA in English and creative writing from Mills College. She is a poet, writer, and educator, who has taught English, creative writing, Latina/o, ethnic, and global studies at San Francisco State University, UC Davis, UC Santa Cruz, and California Institute of Integral Studies.


Twitter Username: chachachapina

Sehba Sarwar's essays, short stories, and poems have appeared in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Asia: Magazine of Asian Literature, Callaloo, and elsewhere. Through longterm writing and art projects, Sarwar tackles parallels between North American and South Asian border regions.


Twitter Username: sehbasarwar

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R166. Writing on the line. (, , , , ) On the border between Mexico and the United States lies the University of Texas, El Paso, where writers from all over the Americas come to earn a bilingual MFA in creative writing, the very first university to offer this degree. On this panel, we discuss what it’s like to function on the line between Latin America and the United States, the line between languages and between metaphor and reality. In Mexico, “la línea” is what people call the border. We will talk about writing on the line.

Daniel Chacón is author of five books, including The Cholo Tree, And The Shadows Took Him, and Hotel Juarez: Stories, Rooms and Loops. He won the Pen Oakland, American Book Award, and the Hudson Prize. He edited the posthumous poems of Andrés Montoya, A Jury of Trees and hosts Words on a Wire.


Twitter Username: deLeonChacon

Website: danielchacon.net

Nelson Cárdenas is the author of two poetry collections, The Warrior, and Days of the Sword. His book Island that Doesn’t Exist: Cuban Writers in the Diaspora won the National Literary Award “Pinos Nuevos” in Cuba in 2002. He teaches Literature and Creative Writing at The University of Texas at El Paso.

Silvias Aguilar received her MFA in Creative Writing from The University of Texas at El Paso. She is a bilingual author. Her work has been included in anthologies of Korea, Peru, México, and the US. She currently coordinates of CasaOctavia, a writing residency for women in El Paso, TX.


Twitter Username: sylviruk

Website: www.sylviaaguilar.com

Alessandra Narváez-Varela is a poet and creative writing instructor at the University of Texas at El Paso, with a Bilingual MFA in Creative Writing from the same institution. Her, a chapbook that explores the modern symbiosis between girls and women, is her most recent publication.

Andrea Cote-Botero is the author of the poetry collections Puerto Calcinado, La Ruina que nombro, and Chinatown 24 hour. She has also published books of prose: A Nude Photographer: A Biography of Tina Modotti and Blanca Varela or Writing From Solitude. She is Assistant Professor at the bilingual creative writing MFA at University of Texas at El Paso.


Twitter Username: botero_cote

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R167. CANCELLED: The Poetics of Addiction. (, , , , ) Event cancelled per organizer request.

Katie Marya is a PhD student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her work has appeared in the Rio Review, North American Review, Southern Indiana Review, and Five Points—as the recipient of the James Dickey Prize for Poetry.


Twitter Username: katiemarya13

Gregory Pardlo's ​collection​, Digest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. He has received Guggenheim, National Endowment for the Arts, and New York Foundation for the Arts fellowships. Author of the essay collection Air Traffic, he teaches in the Rutgers-Camden MFA program.


Twitter Username: pardlo

Website: www.pardlo.com

Michael Schmeltzer earned an MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop. Along with Meghan McClure, he wrote the epistolary memoir A Single Throat Opens, a lyric exploration of addiction and family. Schmeltzer's debut poetry book Blood Song is a Washington State Book Award Finalist.

Airea D. Matthews is the author of Simulacra, winner of the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets. A past recipient of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, she teaches at Bryn Mawr College.

Katie Schmid's chapbook Forget Me, Hit Me, Let Me Drink Great Quantities of Clear, Evil Liquor was the winner of the Split Lip Press Turnbuckle Chapbook contest. A past AWP Intro Journals award winner, she is a PhD student at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R168. Animation and Poetry: A Marriage, a Rebirth. (, , , , ) The Sundance Channel was one of the first premium networks to air animated poetry. Now, this titillating marriage of forms is gaining visibility. But bringing poetry from the page to the screen requires strategy, skill, and technology. Undergraduate students and faculty from a top polytechnical college offer collaborative strategies—and explain how they’ve partnered with 2015–2017 US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera and others to adapt poetic work.

July Westhale is a poet and essayist. She is the author of Trailer Trash (winner of the 2016 Kore Press Book Award), The Cavalcade, and the children’s book Occasionally Accurate Science. She is the 2018 University of Arizona Poetry Fellow, and teaches at Cogswell College.


Twitter Username: JulyWesthale

Website: www.julywesthale.com

David Perry worked in the late '90s as an animator in the commercial and game industries, and, for the last eighteen years, has been teaching drawing and animation classes at Cogswell College. He has been a faculty advisor and animation director for a number of award-winning short films.

Julius Dobos is a film- and music industry professional-turned educator of media production. As a speaker, his interests include technology’s effect on society and culture, the future of education, the relationship between art, creativity and technology, building collaborative learning environments.

Joseph Fortuno is a Business Administration undergrad from Cogswell College. In 2016, he joined his college's student-operated publication group, COG, as the Events and Social Media Coordinator. Outside literature, he is a social entrepreneur recognized by President Obama and the White House.


Twitter Username: josephfortuno

Soma Mei Sheng Frazier recently served as a San Francisco Library Laureate. Her award-winning fiction chapbooks earned praise from Nikki Giovanni and others. Frazier’s writing has placed in competitions offered by HBO, Zoetrope: All-StoryGlimmer Train and more. Recent work is available in ZYZZYVA.


Twitter Username: somameisheng

Website: http://enizagam.org

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R169. A Tribute to Monica A. Hand: Poet, Playwright, Mentor, Activist. (, , , ) Monica A. Hand (1953–2016) was a brilliant poet, playwright, book artist, Cave Canem Fellow, mentor, and activist. Her poetry books, me and Nina (Alice James 2012), winner of the 2010 Kinereth Gensler Award, and The DiVida Poems (Alice James 2018) reveal a profound, major voice for the experiences of African Americans, women, artists, peace, and social justice. Panelists will talk about her, read her poems, and show images of one of our most beloved poets whose loss is felt all over the world.

Aliki Barnstone is a poet, translator, critic, editor, and artist. Some of her recent books of poems are Dwelling, Bright Body, Dear God, Dear Dr. Heartbreak, and a translation of Cavafy. Among her awards are a Fulbright Fellowship in Greece and residencies at VCCA. She is poet laureate of Missouri.


Twitter Username: AlikiBee

Website: www.alikibarnstone.com

Cornelius Eady was born in Rochester, NY in 1954, and is the author of eight poetry collections including Victims of the Latest Dance Craze, winner of the 1985 Lamont Prize, and Brutal Imagination. He holds the Miller Chair at the U of Missouri and is cofounder of Cave Canem.


Twitter Username: roughband

Website: http://blueflowerarts.com/artist/cornelius-eady/

Carey Salerno is the executive editor of Alice James Books. She is the editor, along with Anne Marie Macari, of the anthology Lit from Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James Books. Her first book, Shelter, was published by Alice James Books in 2009. You may find her poems in print and online.

Lauren K. Alleyne is an award-winning poet. She is the author of Difficult Fruit, and Honeyfish, and has published her work widely. She is Assistant Director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center and Associate Professor of English at James Madison University.


Twitter Username: poetlka

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R170. How to Build a Book Festival in 6 Months or Less. (, ) Four days after the 2016 election, a writer and a coffee shop owner in Green Bay sat down and said "What are we going to do to make this a better world?" Six months later, they had a board of directors, over $100K in community funding, a marketing strategy, a nonprofit designation, and a fully formed book and author festival that included over 80 panels, workshops, author readings, and events for kids to help promote literacy and bring new ideas to the community. We'll tell you how we did it.

Alex Galt is the co-owner of Kavarna Coffeehouse in Green Bay, WI, which he's long used as a platform for arts advocacy and civic engagement. He is cofounder of UntitledTown—Green Bay’s emerging Book and Author Festival,


Twitter Username: alex_galt

Wendy Wimmer writing has appeared in Blackbird, Per Contra, Barrelhouse, Drunken Boat, Paper Darts, and other publications. She holds a Master of Arts in Creative Writing from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.


Twitter Username: wendywimmer

Website: http://www.wendywimmer.com

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R171. Intersections of Poetry and Visual Art. (, , , , ) From the works of William Blake to Japanese calligraphic scrolls, poetry and art have been intertwined since their origins. This reading presents the dialogue between visual art and writing in a contemporary context, showcasing works in which the two modes are inextricably linked. Moving beyond ekphrastic poetry, our panelists are engaged in a wide variety of multi-media projects from collaborative chapbooks to poetry comics to graphic poetry that melds words and images together.

Meghan Dunn is the author of Who Also Will Not Yield, a collaborative art and poetry chapbook, with artist Ben Pinder. She lives in Brooklyn, NY, where she teaches high school English. She is the Associate Poetry Editor of upstreet. Her work has appeared in Ploughshares and Narrative, among other places.

Gabrielle Bates's poems and poetry comics appear in The New Yorker, Poetry, and jubilat. She works for Open Books: A Poem Emporium and edits for the Seattle Review, Poetry Northwest, Broadsided Press, and Bull City Press.


Twitter Username: GabrielleBates

Website: www.gabriellebatesstahlman.com

Mita Mahato is a cut paper and comics artist whose poetry comics are collected in the book In Between. She is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Puget Sound, serves on the board for the arts organization Short Run Seattle, and is on the steering committee for Graphic Medicine.

Naoko Fujimoto translates her poems into contemporary picture scrolls. Her project, Glyph: Graphic Poetry=Trans. Sensory, is also meant for the viewer to transport their senses from the flat paper and bridge the gap between words and images that will connect with their physical counterparts.

Youmna Chlala is a writer and an artist. She is the author of The Paper Camera and founding editor of Eleven Eleven {1111} Journal of Literature and Art. She is an Associate Professor in the Humanities & Media Studies and Writing Departments at the Pratt Institute.

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R172. Atlanta Review 25th Anniversary: A Celebration of International Poetry. (, , , , ) Atlanta Review is celebrating 25 years of publishing poetry from around the world. Founding editor, Dan Veach, will join the current editors to host a reading by some of the excellent poets Atlanta Review has published during their first quarter century. There will be readings from the four standard participants, as well as from other poets who have published in the journal. This panel will celebrate as many poets and their works as possible.

Karen Head is the author of Disrupt This! MOOCs & the Promises of Technology, Sassing, My Paris Year and Shadow Boxes. She teaches at Georgia Tech, where she also creates digital poetry. She is the editor of the Atlanta Review, and is a member of the Poetry Atlanta Board.


Twitter Username: poetphd

Website: http://lmc.gatech.edu/~head

Martin Lammon is the author of News from Where I Live: Poems. After 21 years as the Fuller E. Callaway Endowed Flannery O’Connor Chair in Creative Writing at Georgia College & State University, where he founded the MFA in Creative Writing program and the journal Arts & Letters, he is now living and writing in Atlanta, Georgia.


Twitter Username: martinlammon

Website: http://mfa.gcsu.edu

Sholeh Wolpé is an Iranian-born poet and writer. The inaugural 2018 Writer-in-Residence at UCLA, her literary work numbers over twelve collections of poetry, translations, and anthologies, as well as several plays. Her most recent publication includes The Conference of the Birds.


Twitter Username: Sholeh_Wolpe

Website: https://www.sholehwolpe.com//

Ilya Kaminsky lives in San Diego, CA.

Former Louisiana Poet Laureate Julie Kane is Professor Emeritus at Northwestern State U, now teaching in the low-res MFA program at Western State Colorado U. A National Poetry Series and Donald Justice Prize winner, she coedited Nasty Women Poets: An Anthology of Subversive Verse with Grace Bauer.


Twitter Username: juliekanepoet

Website: http://www.juliekanepoet.com

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R173. Teaching Comics in Creative Writing Programs: Why and How?. (, , , , ) Why offer comics classes as part of a creative writing program? These panelists have created a diverse array of comics classes, from large lectures to small seminars, both within creative writing faculties and as part of interdisciplinary programs. Come find out why we started these classes and continue to champion them, not only for cartoonists but for poets, novelists and memoirists, too. You’ll leave this session with inspiration and ideas for bringing comics into your own programs.

Sarah Leavitt teaches comics classes in the University of British Columbia's Creative Writing Program. Her classes include large undergrad lectures, small MFA workshops and a few things in between. She is the author of the comics memoir Tangles and the graphic novel Agnes, Murderess (forthcoming).


Twitter Username: sarahbleavitt

Jennifer Murvin's writing and graphic narrative have been published in The Sun, American Short Fiction, The Florida Review, Bellingham Review, Cincinnati Review, Catamaran, and many other publications . She is a faculty member at Missouri State University and holds an MFA from Pacific University.

Christian Moody’s fiction has been anthologized in Best New American Voices and Best American Fantasy, and he has published stories in Esquire magazine, The Cincinnati Review, The Collagist, Sonora Review, and other literary journals. He's an assistant professor at the Cleveland Institute of Art.

Cole Closser is the author of two graphic novels, Little Tommy Lost (nominated for a Will Eisner Comic Industry Award and featured in Best American Comics 2015) and Black Rat (featured in The Globe and Mail, The New Yorker, and as a Notable Selection in Best American Comics 2017).

Sandy Longhorn is the author of three books of poetry, most recently The Alchemy of My Mortal Form. She teaches in the Arkansas Writers MFA Program at the University of Central Arkansas where she directs The C.D. Wright Women Writers Conference.


Twitter Username: sandylonghorn

Website: http://sandylonghorn.blogspot.com

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R174. Write to Climax: Women Writers on Writing Sex and Intimacy. (, , , Dominique Christina) There’s nothing wrong with a throbbing member or a good bodice-rip. But when female literary fiction writers explore about the realities of sex—the lusts and longings, the abuses and pleasures, the orgasms and agonies—critics and readers are often left agape, despite the fact that men have been covering the same territory for centuries. This censure of women's writing is another way of policing their bodies. The women writers on this panel say: Fuck that. Sex and intimacy belong to us, too.

Luanne Smith has been a creative writing and film professor at West Chester University near Philadelphia for twenty-nine years. She has published short fiction in several literary journals and is currently at work on a novel. She is also coediting an anthology of women writers on badass women.


Twitter Username: luannesmith56

Pam Houston is the author of five books of fiction and nonfiction including Cowboys Are My Weakness and Contents May Have Shifted. She teaches in the CW programs at the Institute for American Indian Art and UC Davis, and she directs the literary nonprofit Writing By Writers. 


Twitter Username: pam_houston

Website: pamhouston.wordpress.com

Jaquira Díaz is the author of Ordinary Girls, forthcoming from Algonquin, and recipient of fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and the Kenyon Review. Her work appears in The Best American Essays, Longreads, and The New York Times Style Magazine.


Twitter Username: jaquiradiaz

Website: www.jaquiradiaz.com

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R175. Assimilate This!: Queer Literary Community as Sites of Mobilizing & Resistance. (, , , , ) From queer bookstores, to poetry readings in bars, underground zine readings and drag queens reading picture books to toddlers in public libraries—books and literature are a site of mobilization and belonging for LGBTQ communities in the US and Singapore. Authors, writers, and literary event organizers will discuss strategies to organizing successful events with focus on inclusion and diversity of queer voices across age/race/gender/sexuality/class/ability.

Sassafras Lowrey is the 2013 winner of the Lambda Literary Emerging Writer Award. Ze is the author of two celebrated novels: Lost Boi and Roving Pack. Lowrey is also editor of the two-time American Library Association honored Kicked Out anthology of current and former homeless LGBTQ youth.


Twitter Username: SassafrasLowrey

Website: www.SassafrasLowrey.com

Michelle Tea is the author of ten books, most recently Black Wave. Her collected journalism and essays is titled Against Memoir. She curates the Amethyst Editions series at Feminist Press, and is the founder of Drag Queen Story Hour.


Twitter Username: TeaMichelle

Website: www.michelletea.com

Tania De Rozario is a visual artist and writer. She is the author of Tender Delirium and And The Walls Come Crumbling Down, both published by Math Paper Press. She is currently pursuing her MFA in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia.


Twitter Username: TaniaDeRozario

Lori Horvitz’s recent work has appeared in a variety of journals and anthologies including Epiphany, Southeast Review, and Chattahoochee Review. Author of a collection of memoir-essays, The Girls of Usually, Horvitz is Professor of English at UNC Asheville.


Twitter Username: lori_horvitz

Website: www.lorihorvitz.com

Mike McClelland's first book, Gay Zoo Day, was released by Beautiful Dreamer Press in 2017. He is a graduate of Allegheny College, the London School of Economics, and Georgia College, and is currently pursuing his doctorate at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: magicmikewrites

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R176. Poets Claim American History. (, , , , ) In recent years, many poets have turned to history as the inspiration for book-length projects. How does the poet’s craft encompass the historian’s? Panelists explore strategies for choosing a resonant subject and interpreting another era using documents, maps, landscapes, and photographs. Do historical characters and events broaden the audience for poetry? Are there different readers for poetry, historical fiction, documentary films, and narrative history or do they overlap?

Dolores Hayden, poet and historian, professor emerita, Yale University, is the author of American Yard, Exuberance, and The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History. A poetry resident at Djerassi and VCCA and an NEA and Guggenheim fellow, she has won a PSA award and an ALA Notable Book Award.

Marilyn Nelson is a recipient of the Frost Medal, the NSK Neustadt Award, the NCTE Poetry Award, a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, and Poet-in-Residence of The Poets Corner at he Cathedral of Saint John the Divine. Her most recently published books are My Seneca Village and American Ace

Frank X Walker is a cofounder of the Affrilachian Poets, a Cave Canem fellow, and Editor of PLUCK!. The author of nine collections of poetry and a recipient of a Lannan Foundation Poetry Fellowship, Walker is Professor of English and African American and Africana Studies at the University of Kentucky.

Martha Collins's most recent book of poems is Night Unto Night. She has also published eight earlier poetry collections and three co-translated volumes of Vietnamese poetry. She is editor-at-large for FIELD magazine and an editor for the Oberlin College Press.

Portland Ballroom 253-254, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R177. Behind the Curtain: The Editors Speak. (, , , , ) The submission process can be daunting and mysterious. Most of us use an online submission system and then patiently wait—sometimes for more than a year—before receiving a canned rejection. So what can the average writer do to be a better submitter of their work, to catch an editor's eye, to get past the slush pile? This diverse panel assembles some of the top literary magazine editors in the country to answer your questions about the submissions process and what goes on behind the scenes.

Christian Kiefer is the author of the novels PhantomsThe Infinite Tides, and The Animals, as well as the novella One Day Soon Time Will Have No Place Left to Hide. He is recipient of a Pushcart Prize and directs the low-res MFA program at Ashland University.


Twitter Username: xiankiefer

Website: www.xiankiefer.com

Oscar Villalon is the managing editor of ZYZZYVA. He is a former book editor at the San Francisco Chronicle, as well as a past board member of the National Book Critics Circle. He is also a contributing editor to Literary Hub.


Twitter Username: ovillalon

Allison Wright is the executive editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review. She also serves as president of the nonprofit literary organization WriterHouse and editor of Tiny Hardcore Press. Her writing has appeared in the Atlantic, VQR, Popular Mechanics, Literary Hub, the Rumpus, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: wrightallison

Emily Nemens became editor of The Paris Review in summer 2018, after five years co-editing The Southern Review. Her fiction has appeared in The Gettysburg Reviewn+1the Iowa Review, and Esquire. Her debut novel, The Cactus League, is forthcoming from FSG in 2020.


Twitter Username: emilynemens

Website: www.nemens.com

Karissa Chen is the editor-in-chief at Hyphen magazine, fiction editor at The Rumpus, and a contributing editor at Catapult. She has published prose in numerous publications including Longreads, Gulf Coast, PEN America, and Guernica. She was awarded a Fulbright research grant to Taiwan in 2015–16.


Twitter Username: karissachen

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R178. Literary Agents 101: Insights and Tools for the Business of Writing. (, , , Serene Hakim, Julia Kardon) This panel will focus on the publishing process from the agent’s perspective, from a variety of literary agents who represent authors that publish with presses large and small. From the seed of an idea to the lead-up to book publication, we’ll be sharing business insight from the trenches far beyond the “dos and don’ts” in approaching agents. Come join us, and pivot your creative thinking to the business side, as we help you think like an agent developmentally and beyond.

Libby Burton is a senior editor at Henry Holt and her authors include Daniel Mallory Ortberg, Stacey Abrams, Chelsea Hodson, Melissa Broder, and D. Watkins, among others. She is the author of the poetry collection Soft Volcano, selected by Ross Gay.


Twitter Username: HenryHolt

Sarah Levitt is a literary agent at Aevitas Creative Management who specializes in narrative nonfiction and literary fiction. Her list includes journalists, academics, historians, scientists, and musicians, among others.


Twitter Username: slevittslevitt

Website: http://aevitascreative.com

Monika Woods is a literary agent at Curtis Brown, a writer whose work has been published by Joyland, Catapult, Tyrant, Brooklyn Magazine, and Lit Hub, and an editor at the Triangle House Review. She can be found @booksijustread.


Twitter Username: booksijustread

Website: www.booksijustread.com

Portland Ballroom 256, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R179. Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology Reading. (, , , , ) Eco-justice poetry embodies justice, culture, and the environment. It is poetry born of ecological and social crisis, poetry that holds memory, fed by a wealth of cultural traditions, urgent in our time. Come listen to contributing poets read from and discuss the ground breaking Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology, as each discusses their approach to writing in these troubled times and the traditions that feed their work.

Melissa Tuckey is poet, editor, and educator living in upstate New York. She's author of Tenuous Chapel, selected by Charles Simic for the ABZ First Book Award and editor of Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology. She is a cofounder of Split This Rock.


Twitter Username: melissaTuckey

Website: www.melissatuckey.net

Jennifer Elise Foerster is the author of two poetry collections, Leaving Tulsa and Bright Rafter in the Afterweather. She is a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and has a PhD in Literary Arts from the University of Denver. She teaches at the Institute of American Indian Arts Low-Residency MFA.

Ruth Irupé Sanabria received her MFA in Poetry from NYU. Her first book, The Strange House Testifies won second place for the 2010 International Latino Book Awards. Her second full-length collection of poems, Beasts Behave in Foreign Land, received the 2014 Letras Latinas/Red Hen Poetry Prize.

Tim Seibles has published several collections of poetry, including Buffalo Head SolosFast Animal—a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award—and, most recently, One Turn Around The Sun. He is a professor of English at Old Dominion University and the current Poet Laureate of Virginia.


Twitter Username: Timseibles77@gmail.com

Author of five books of poetry including the bestselling Emplumada, former Director of Creative Writing and Associate Professor of English at CU Boulder where she taught Creative Writing for nineteen years, Cervantes recently relocated to Olympia where she writes and revives her press, MANGO Publications.


Twitter Username: LornaDeeCe

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R180. Yoga for Writers. (Melissa Carroll) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come wearing comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary.

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R181. The Emerging Eco-Theatre. (, , , , ) The theatre has always been a reflection of and catalyst for cultural change, but at this critical moment in environmental history, the immediacy of live performance is more important than ever. How do we write for this moment? How do we convey issues of climate change, environmental protection, human and non-human interaction, social justice, and collective responsibility? How do we communicate science, evidence, and urgency through an art that demands that we’re all in the same space together?

Charissa Menefee, poet and playwright, is on the faculty of Iowa State's MFA Program in Creative Writing & Environment. A finalist for the Julie Harris Playwright Award, she recently published When I Stopped Counting: Poems and premiered Our Antigone, a new adaptation of the Sophocles classic.

Paula Cizmar is an award-winning playwright and librettist. Her plays have been produced at Portland Stage, Womens Project, Playwrights Arena, among others. She is a cowriter of the documentary play Seven, produced in thirty countries in twenty languages. She is an Associate Professor of Theatre at USC.


Twitter Username: paulacizmar

Elaine Romero is an award-winning US playwright. Her plays have been presented across the US and abroad. Title IX appeared in the 2017 Eugene O'Neill National Playwrights Conference. She is an Associate Professor at the University of Arizona in the School of Theatre, Film, and Television.


Twitter Username: ElaineRomero

E.M. Lewis is a playwright and opera librettist. Winner of the American Theater Critics Association's Steinberg Award and Primus Prize, a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, and the Oregon Literary Fellowship in Drama. Works include MagellanicaSong of Extinction, and The Gun Show.


Twitter Username: ellmarlew

Website: www.emlewisplaywright.com

Tira Palmquist is a playwright and dramaturg. Plays: The Way North, Two Degrees, Overburden, This Floating World, The Frequency of Stars and Other Matter, and Age of Bees. Dramaturgy: Moving Arts Theater's MADlab program, Seven Devils Playwrights Conference, and others.


Twitter Username: TiraPalmquist

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R182. Poetic Strategies for Raising the Dead. (, , , , ) The dead often walk in and out of poetry as if they were still alive. How do poets achieve a seamless transit between worlds? Five poets will discuss their own and others’ techniques for realizing resurrection on the page. Also considered: the many purposes for bringing back the dead. How do poems enable us to mourn and commune with those not here? We will examine poetry's role in shaping our public and private histories, allowing us to rewrite those histories and new meaning to the past.

Owen Lewis, winner of the 2016 International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry & Medicine and 2016 Jean Pedrick Chapbook Award, is a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, as well as author of four poetry collections poetry: March In San Miguel, Sometimes Full of Daylight, Best Man and Marriage Map.


Twitter Username: owenlewispoetry

Website: www.owenlewispoet.com

Kamilah Aisha Moon is the author of Starshine & Clay and She Has a Name. A Pushcart prize winner, Moon was also selected as a PSA New American Poet. Widely published in journals and anthologies, Moon holds an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and teaches at Agnes Scott College.


Twitter Username: kamoonshine

Website: http://www.kamilahaishamoon.org

Ben Purkert is the author of For the Love of Endings. His poems, essays, and book reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in the New Yorker, Ploughshares, Kenyon Review, AGNI, the Rumpus, and elsewhere. A contributing editor at Guernica, he teaches creative writing at Rutgers University–New Brunswick.


Twitter Username: BenPurkert

Kate Daniels is the author of five volumes of poetry, including In the Months of My Son's Recovery, forthcoming. She is Director of Creative Writing at Vanderbilt University, and also teaches writing at the Washington Baltimore Center for Psychoanalysis. She was a Guggenheim Fellow 2013–14.

Laure-Anne Bosselaar is the author of The Hour Between Dog & Wolf, Small Gods of Grief (Isabella Gardner Prize), and A New Hunger (ALA Notable Book). She taught at Sarah Lawrence College and teaches at the Solstice Low-Residency MFA Program. Her fourth collection is, These Many Rooms.

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R183. Who is “We?”: Invisibility and Representation in the Creative Writing Classroom. (, , , , ) Everyone's story matters in a classroom. So how does a teacher acknowledge issues of identity, while maintaining a focus on craft, so no story ever feels marginalized. How, by emphasizing craft, can a teacher prevent assumptions about background, privilege, and power to help make every work the brightest expression of itself. A diverse group of writers, students and teachers will navigate these questions and more in the format of a community forum involving the audience, after panelist remarks.

Sequoia Nagamatsu is the author of the story collection, Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone. His stories have appeared in Conjunctions, ZYZZYVA, Black Warrior Review, and Electric Literature, among others. He is an editor of Psychopomp Magazine and an assistant professor at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: sequoian

Website: http://sequoianagamatsu.net

Marie Mutsuki Mockett's memoir, Where the Dead Pause and the Japanese Say Goodbye, examines grief against the backdrop of the 2011 Great East Earthquake in Japan. It was a finalist for the 2016 PEN Open Book Award, 2016 Indies Choice Best Book of Nonfiction and 2016 Northern California Book Award.


Twitter Username: mariemockett

Website: www.mariemockett.com

Jordan K. Thomas is a black prose writer whose work has appeared in the Kenyon Review, Kweli Journal, The Toast, and elsewhere. He holds an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from the University of Minnesota.


Twitter Username: JKTWrites

Andrew Harnish is a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Dakota. He holds an MFA in Fiction from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. His work has been published in NDQ, the Journal of Mennonite Studies, Atticus Review, Disability and Society, and The Rumpus.


Twitter Username: andrewharnish

Roy G. Guzmán is pursuing a PhD in Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature at the University of Minnesota, where they also received an MFA in creative writing. They are a 2017 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellow.


Twitter Username: dreamingauze

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R184. Vietnam Is a 7 Letter Word. (, , , , Stacey Tran) Answering back to over-written narratives, these women of the Vietnamese diaspora offer insight into how writers may elasticize and complicate definitions of one’s various assigned “identities” and lend voice to the silenced, obscured, or overlooked. Addressing issues of craft and creative process in the elucidation of trauma, repercussions of war and colonialism, erasure and objectification, this panel’s topics will include narrative approach, collaboration, hybridity, and renewing the lyric.

Dao Strom is the author of You Will Always Be Someone From Somewhere Else, a bilingual poetry book, We Were Meant To Be A Gentle People, an experimental memoir and music album, and two books of fiction. She has received awards from the Creative Capital Foundation, NEA, and others.


Twitter Username: herandthesea

Website: www.daostrom.com

Aimee Phan is the author of two books of fiction: We Should Never Meet and The Reeducation of Cherry Truong. She has received fellowships from the NEA, the MacDowell Colony, the Rockefeller Foundation and Hedgebrook. She teaches in the MFA Program in Writing at California College of the Arts.


Twitter Username: aimeephan

Website: Aimeephan.com

Vi Khi Nao is the author of a novel, Fish in Exile, and a poetry collection, The Old Philosopher. She was the winner of 2014 Nightboat Poetry Prize and the 2016 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Contest for A Brief Alphabet of Torture, a collection of short stories.


Twitter Username: vikhinao

Thi Bui came to the United States in 1978 as part of the “boat people” wave of refugees from Southeast Asia. Her debut graphic memoir, The Best We Could Do, is a national bestseller and a National Book Critics Circle Awards Finalist in autobiography.


Twitter Username: MsThiBui

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R185. Writing the Body. (, , , , ) Writing the body can track and reveal narratives of health and illness, ground a narrator in place and time, and allow for examination of gender and identity. We discuss these three anchor points, share the ways our writing and living bodies have shaped our work, and consider the problems and opportunities of writing other bodies (aside from the self). We will also offer exercises for grounding writing in the body and discuss how this work can be a political act.

Kate Hopper is the author of Ready for Air: A Journey Through Premature Motherhood and Use Your Words: A Writing Guide for Mothers and coauthor of Silent Running, a memoir of running and autism. She teaches in Ashland University's Low-Residency MFA Program, online, and at the Loft Literary Center.


Twitter Username: mnkatehopper

Website: http://www.katehopper.com

Alex Lemon’s most recent books are Feverland: A Memoir in Shards and The Wish Book. He is the author of Happy: A Memoir and three other poetry collections: Mosquito, Hallelujah Blackout, and Fancy Beasts. A fifth poetry collection, Or Beauty, is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions. He teaches at TCU.


Twitter Username: Alxlemon

Website: www.alexlemon.com

Marsha Partington's writing about raising a gender-nonconforming child has been published in multiple journals and newspapers. She is an advocate for the LGBTQ+ community and speaks on this topic across the country. She has been the recipient of a Madeline Island School of the Arts Scholarship.

Adriana Páramo is a cultural anthropologist, writer, and women’s rights advocate. She is the author of award-winning personal essays and two creative nonfiction books: Looking for Esperanza and My Mother's Funeral. Her work on women's issues has had multiple Pushcart Prize nominations.

Bonnie J. Rough is the author of the 2011 Minnesota Book Award-winning memoir Carrier: Untangling the Danger in My DNA. She teaches in the Ashland University low-residency MFA program in nonfiction, and she is a prose editor for Versal

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R186. Sarabande Books Silver Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) For twenty-five years, Sarabande has been showcasing poetry, short fiction, and the essay—genres largely ignored by mainstream publishers. We seek out new talent in unusual places, launch debut collections, feature revivals and come-backs, and create a real “home” for authors. Our list offers both stylistic diversity and a balance of gender, race, and sexual identity. Now we celebrate our long history with readings in all three genres, by a range of readers in various stages of their careers.

Sarah Gorham is the author of four poetry collections. In 2013, she won the AWP Award in Creative Nonfiction for Study in Perfect. Her second work of creative nonfiction, Alpine Apprentice, appeared from UGA in 2017. She is founder and publisher of Sarabande Books, which won the inaugural AWP Small Press Award.


Twitter Username: sarabandebooks

Lia Purpura authored nine collections (essays, poems, and translations), most recently All the Fierce Tethers. Her awards include Guggenheim, NEA, and Fulbright fellowships, and four Pushcart Prizes. On Looking (essays) was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She teaches at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Ann Townsend is a poet and essayist, and author of Dear DelinquentThe Coronary GardenDime Store Erotics, and Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry (with David Baker). She directs the Creative Writing Program at Denison University; in 2009, she cofounded VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: anntownsendpoet

Website: www.anntownsend.com

Randa Jarrar is the author of the critically acclaimed novel A Map of Home and the short story collection Him, Me, Muhammad Ali. Her essays have appeared in The Sun, Guernica, Oxford American, New York Times Magazine, Utne Reader, and Salon. She is Associate Professor at Fresno State's MFA Program.


Twitter Username: randajarrar

Website: randajarrar.com

David Tomas Martinez is the author of Hustle and Post Traumatic Hood Disorder. Martinez is a Pushcart winner, NEA poetry grant recipient, Stanley P. Young fellowship from Breadloaf, and others.


Twitter Username: DTomasMartinez

Website: davidtomasmartinez.com

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R187. Literary Citizens of the World: The Practical Side of Writing Abroad. (, , , , ) What does it mean to be a US writer abroad in the era of Trump? More practically: how do you find grants to go abroad? Once there, how do you engage with the literary community and act as a good literary citizen, even across language barriers? How do you stay connected and make sure your work stays relevant in the US? Five writers who have led successful writing careers in the US while living and working abroad share their thoughts on these and other questions.

Emily Robbins is the author of the novel A Word for Love, inspired by her time as a Fulbright Fellow in Syria. She has written about Syria for the New York Times and received a second Fulbright Fellowship for Creative Writing in Jordan. She is a member of Oslo's Litteraturhuset.


Twitter Username: emilybethrobbin

Jennifer Kronovet is the author of two books of poetry, The Wug Test, which was selected for the National Poetry Series, and Awayward. She cotranslated Empty Chairs, poems by Chinese writer Liu Xia, and The Acrobat, poems by Yiddish writer Celia Dropkin. She edits Circumference Books.

Jennifer Steil is a novelist, memoirist, and journalist. Her third book, a novel about Austrian Jewish refugees in Bolivia, is forthcoming from Viking. Previous work includes The Woman Who Fell From the Sky, the tale of her tenure as editor of a Yemeni newspaper, and the novel The Ambassador's Wife.


Twitter Username: jfsteil7

Website: www.jennifersteil.net

Moira Egan’s seventh poetry collection, Synæsthesium, won The New Criterion Poetry Prize. Work has appeared in anthologies and journals on four continents. With Damiano Abeni, she has published volumes in Italian by Ashbery, Bender, Ferlinghetti, Lerner, Simic, Strand, Charles Wright, and Ocean Vuong.

Elisabeth Jaquette is a translator from Arabic. Her fourth book-length translation, a novel set amid the Syrian Civil War, is forthcoming from Harvill Secker. She also teaches translation, and is Executive Director of the American Literary Translators Association.


Twitter Username: lissiejaquette

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R188. Writing Away, Writing Toward: Belonging as a Narrative Force in Memoir. (, , , ) Memoirs often explore the territory of belonging, tracing journeys away from and toward communities, families, love affairs, and identities. How do you craft a narrative from the stance of an outsider in motion? And how does writing with a desire for belonging differ, stylistically and structurally, from writing with a desire for differentiation? This panel will examine memoirs of immigration, assimilation, transition, and conversion, and discuss belonging as a pivotal element of memoir.

Erin O. White received her MFA in fiction from the University of Massachusetts. She is the author of Given Up For You: A Memoir of Love, Belonging, And Belief.


Twitter Username: erin_erinowhite

Sejal Shah's work has appeared in Brevity, Conjunctions, the Kenyon Review, The Rumpus, among others. She writes often about race, gender, silence, and speech. 


Twitter Username: fictionalsejal

Website: www.sejal-shah.com

Carolina Hinojosa-Cisneros is a Tejana poet, freelance writer, and speaker. Her work explores the intersection of faith and Latinidad. She is currently working on a memoir of hybrid essays.


Twitter Username: Cisneroscafe

Website: http://cisneroscafe.org

Natalie Singer is the author of California Calling: A Self-Interrogation, a memoir of obsession, emigration, identity, the '80s, and family explosions. She is a longtime journalist and holds an MFA from the University of Washington. She is at work on a second book about her fear of the wilderness.


Twitter Username: Natalie_Writes

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R189. Radiance versus Ordinary Light: A Tribute to Carl Phillips. (, , , , ) At a time when to speak candidly about the vagaries of erotic, sexual and moral life was still taboo, Carl Phillips broke into the American literary landscape to amass a signature body of work earning him near legendary critical acclaim and respect. Especially for queer poets of color who follow him, his influence and literary friendship spanning nearly thirty years is no less essential. This diverse panel of poets celebrates that radiating legacy, ending with a reading by Carl Phillips himself.

Lannan Fellow & Whiting Award winner, Rickey Laurentiis is the author of Boy with Thorn, winner of the Cave Canem Prize and the Levis Reading Prize, among other honors. Laurentiis is currently the inaugural Fellow in Creative Writing at the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics in Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: rckylrnts

Dawn Lundy Martin, PhD., is Professor in the English Department at the University of Pittsburgh. Her books include A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering; Discipline, finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize; Life in a Box is a Pretty Life; and Good Stock, Strange Blood.


Twitter Username: dawnlundy

Website: http://www.writing.pitt.edu/people/faculty/dawn-lundy-martin

Justin Phillip Reed is the author of Indecency.


Twitter Username: justafknminute

Erin Belieu is the author of four poetry collections, including Slant Six, chosen by The New York Times as one of the ten best books of 2014. Recent poems appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, and American Poetry Review. Belieu teaches in the Florida State CW MFA/PhD program, and Lesley University's low residency MFA.


Twitter Username: erinbelieu

Carl Phillips is the author of fourteen books of poetry, most recently Wild Is the Wind, as well as the book of essays The Art of Daring: Risk, Restlessness, Imagination. Phillips is Professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis.

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R190. When Your Characters Just Stand There Smoking & Staring: Translation & Invention, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , ) Novelist and translator Maureen Freely once noted that when translating an Orhan Pamuk novel set in Istanbul, the characters in her own Istanbul-set novel just stood there smoking, looking at her, while his had plenty to say. In translating his characters' words, she found her own. This panel explores translation as prompt and liberation for when one’s own words refuse to come. Each panelist provides a reflection and offers examples of how translating has enabled and inspired new work.

Russell Scott Valentino is an author, editor, and translator based in Bloomington, Indiana. He served as editor in chief at the Iowa Review (2009–2013), ALTA president (2013–2016), and is now professor of Slavic and comparative literature at Indiana University and senior editor at Autumn Hill Books.


Twitter Username: rsvalentino

Website: http://www.indiana.edu/~iuslavic/facProfile_RValentino2.shtml

Curtis Bauer is a poet, translator, letterpress printer, chapbook publisher and teacher. He lives in Lubbock, TX where he teaches Creative Writing & Comparative Literature at Texas Tech University, runs Q Avenue Press, and is Translations Editor for The Common.


Twitter Username: cwbauer

Website: http://curtisbauer.net/

Gregory Pardlo's ​collection​, Digest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. He has received Guggenheim, National Endowment for the Arts, and New York Foundation for the Arts fellowships. Author of the essay collection Air Traffic, he teaches in the Rutgers-Camden MFA program.


Twitter Username: pardlo

Website: www.pardlo.com

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R191. Let's Talk About Race, Baby; Let's Talk About You & Me. (, , , , ) This panel is for anyone, regardless of color, who wishes to improve the way they write about, teach or publish racially- or ethnically-charged issues in this complex time. How do we handle race and ethnicity with sensitivity, in real life and on the page? How can we overcome discrimination in workshops and the publishing world? May we write negatively about a character of a particular race? This panel of successful writers provides honesty and humor and suggests strategies for connection.

Jean Kwok is the New York Times and international bestselling author of the award-winning novels Girl in Translation and Mambo in Chinatown. Her work has been published in eighteen countries and is taught in schools across the world. She has spoken at Harvard, Columbia and many other schools and venues.


Twitter Username: jeankwok

Website: https://jeankwok.com/index.shtml

Mira Jacob is the author of the novel, The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing, which was shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award, honored by the APALA, and named one of the best books of 2014 by Kirkus Reviews, the Boston Globe, Goodreads, Bustle, and The Millions.


Twitter Username: mirajacob

Website: mirajacob.com

Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel The Residue Years won a Whiting Award and the Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence. It was also a finalist for the PEN / Hemingway Award, The Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel prize, and the Hurston Wright Legacy award.


Twitter Username: mitchsjackson

Website: www.mitchellsjackson.com

Irina Reyn is the author of the novels The Imperial Wife and What Happened to Anna K, as well as the anthology Living on the Edge of the World: New Jersey Writers Take on the Garden State. She teaches creative writing at the University of Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: IrinaReyn1

Devi S. Laskar has worked as a newspaper reporter covering crime and politics in North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Illinois and Hawaii. She holds an MFA from Columbia University, and an MA in South Asian Studies from UIUC, is a published poet and will publish her debut novel in February 2019.


Twitter Username: devislaskar

Website: devislaskar.com

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R192. Writing Into the Silences: A Reading of Recent Creative Nonfiction. (, , , , Melissa Grunow) Authors whose work is widely and wildly diverse will read from and discuss their recently published creative nonfiction. All include an uncovering of the hidden or lost, but the contents range from a Filipino American experience; different kinds of hauntedness; the search for an ancestor, once a slave, whose life became a prism of the author's own experience; the intersection of disability, queerness and desire; and a story about a 1970s kid's commune told through drawings and free verse.

LaTanya McQueen is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Coe College. She received her MFA from Emerson College, her PhD from the University of Missouri, and was the 2017–18 Robert P. Dana Emerging Writer Fellow at Cornell College. She is the author of the essay collection And It Begins Like This. 


Twitter Username: Ytsur82

Website: www.latanyamcqueen.com

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. She is the author of the essay collection Be with Me Always and the lyric essay chapbook Devotional. Other work appears in The New York Times, Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: randonnoble

Website: www.randonbillingsnoble.com

Grace Talusan teaches at Tufts University and Grub Street. Awards include the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing, a Fulbright to the Philippines, a Massachusetts Artist Grant, and residencies to Hedgebrook and Ragdale. Her debut, The Body Papers, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: gracet09

Rebecca Fish Ewan, poet/cartoonist/writer/founder of Plankton Press, where small is big enough. Her hybrid-form work appears in Brevity, Punctuate, Under the Gum Tree, Mutha, and Hip Mama. She teaches in The Design School at ASU. Her new book, By the Forces of Gravity, is a cartoon/free verse memoir.


Twitter Username: rfishewan

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R193. Putting Together a First Book: Kate Tufts Winners Tell How They Did It. (, , , ) How does a poet go about putting together a first book? Winners of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award will discuss the writing, compiling, and publishing of their first books, delving into the setbacks, failures, and rejections they experienced as well as the acceptances and successes.

Barbara Hamby is the author of six books of poems, most recently Bird Odyssey and On the Street of Divine Love from the Pitt Poetry Series. She was a 2010 Guggenheim fellow, and her book of short stories, Lester Higata’s 20th Century, won the 2010 Iowa Short Fiction Award.

Adrian Blevins’s third full-length collection of poems, Appalachians Run Amok, is the recipient of the Wilder Prize from Two Sylvias Press and was published in 2018. Blevins is also the author of Live from the Homesick Jamboree, The Brass Girl Brouhaha, and other books.

Cate Marvin teaches at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York. Her most recent book of poems is Oracle.


Twitter Username: catemarvin

Website: www.catemarvin.com

Phillip B. Williams is the author of the poetry collection Thief in the Interior. He currently teaches at Bennington College.


Twitter Username: pbw_poet

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R194. Change This, Not That: The Art of Revising . (, , , Serene Hakim, Maria Gagliano) You’ve drafted your manuscript—now it’s time to revise, thinking more about how a prospective agent or editor will be reading your work. How does the business of publishing factor into the revision process? Should you be writing for a specific audience? How do you make your work salable without compromising its artistry? In this panel, we’ll hear from a mix of editors and agents about how they approach the editing process and work with their authors to navigate these pitfalls.

Sonali Chanchani is an assistant and rising literary agent at Folio Literary Management, where she specializes in upmarket fiction and narrative nonfiction.

Sarah Bowlin joined Aevitas Creative Management as an agent in early 2017 after about a decade as an editor of bold new voices in literary fiction and nonfiction at Riverhead Books and most recently at Henry Holt & Co.


Twitter Username: svbowlin

Vivian Lee is an editor at Little A, Amazon Publishing's literary fiction and narrative nonfiction imprint. She graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a BA in Literary Journalism and from the New School University in New York with a MFA in Creative Writing (Nonfiction).


Twitter Username: vivianwmlee

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R195. When Harry Met Hermione: Fan Fiction in the Creative Writing Classroom. (, , , , ) If you’ve taught creative writing, you’ve likely encountered student writing inspired by media fandom. Rather than dismissing such writing as derivative or banning it from the classroom, this panel suggests ways to draw on students’ fan writing experiences when teaching craft. Panelists experienced in teaching beginning writers will share how and why they use fan fiction in their classes and discuss best practices for working with students who struggle to break out of fan fiction tropes.

Margaret Emma Brandl is a PhD candidate in fiction at Texas Tech University, where she is an associate editor for Iron Horse Literary Review. Her writing has appeared in The Cincinnati Review, Pithead Chapel, Gulf Coast, and Hobart, among others.


Twitter Username: margaret_emma

Website: http://margaretemmabrandl.tumblr.com/

Katharine Beutner is a writer, teacher, and organizer. She teaches at the College of Wooster; previously, she taught at UH Mānoa. Her novel Alcestis won the 2011 Edmund White Award, and her writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Toast, Public Books, TriQuarterly, and other publications.

Erika Staiger is a third-year MFA candidate at the University of South Florida. At USF, she taught and completed coursework in freshman composition, creative writing, and professional writing. She also interned for Spencerhill Associates and published writing on the pedagogical value of fanfiction.


Twitter Username: ErikaStaiger

Brooke Wonders’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Black Warrior Review, DIAGRAMCutbank, and elsewhere. She is nonfiction editor at North American Review, a founding editor of Grimoire Magazine, and an assistant professor at the University of Northern Iowa.


Twitter Username: BrookeJWonders

Website: http://girlwonders.wordpress.com/

Mark Lewandowski is the author of the story collection, Halibut Rodeo. His stories, essays and scripts have also appeared in dozens of literary journals and have been listed as "notable" in numerous Best American anthologies. Currently, he is a professor of English at Indiana State University.


Twitter Username: halibutrodeo

Website: halibutrodeo.com

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R196. Leaping off the Page: The Poet and the Picture Book. (, , , ) Poetry and picture books may seem like distinctly different worlds to some, but the authors on this panel have traversed the bridge between these genres with tremendous results. Lyricism, lively language, and compression are qualities that poets can bring to the picture book form, but what about the craft of character development and (gasp!) plot. We discuss our experience writing in both forms and share strategies for writers who wish to break into—or hone—the art of writing for children.

Laurel Snyder is the author of many books for young readers, most recently Orphan Island, which was longlisted for the National Book Award, and Charlie and Mouse, which won the Geisel Award. She teaches in the MFAC program at Hamline University.


Twitter Username: laurelsnyder

Website: http://laurelsnyder.com

Carole Boston Weatherford has authored more than fifty books including the Caldecott Honor winners Freedom in Congo Square, Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Het People to Freedom, and Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement. She teaches at Fayetteville State University.


Twitter Username: carolethepoet

Matthew Burgess is an Assistant Professor at Brooklyn College. He is the author of a poetry collection, Slippers for Elsewhere, and a picture book, Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings. Three new books are forthcoming.


Twitter Username: MatthewBurgessJ

Website: www.matthewjohnburgess.com

Bao Phi is Program Director of the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis. He has been a spoken word poet since the early '90s. He has performed in numerous venues all over the country, and, as an arts administrator, strives to serve different communities of writers locally and nationally.

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R197. The Minor is Major: Talking about the Creative Writing Minor. (, , , , ) Creative writing remains a tested avenue to attract and benefit students in a well-designed English department. The minor can preserve CW as an area of study, attract new majors, and, most importantly, act as a springboard for student success in a variety of ways. This panel, with teachers and administrators from an HBC, a state university, and a private university, offers ideas and answers questions about the creation, value, population, assessment, and fine-tuning of a quality CW minor.

John Hoppenthaler's books of poetry are Domestic Garden, Anticipate the Coming Reservoir, and Lives of Water. He has also coedited Jean Valentine: This-World Company. Editor of "A Poetry Congeries," he is a Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at East Carolina University.


Twitter Username: jhoppenthaler

Sharan Strange teaches at Spelman College and serves on the board of Poetry Atlanta. Her writings appear in numerous journals and anthologies, and in several museum exhibitions. Her honors include the Barnard Women Poets' Prize, Rona Jaffe Writers' Award, and Georgia Author of the Year Award.

Amber Flora Thomas is the author of The Rabbits Could Sing and Eye of Water, which won the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Thomas’s honors include the Richard Peterson Poetry Prize, the Dylan Thomas Prize, and the Ann Stanford Prize. Her third collection, Red Channel in the Rupture, is forthcoming in 2018.

Wayne Thomas writes fiction, nonfiction, and plays, and he's the recipient of many awards, including the Baltic Writing Residency. He is former Editor of The Tusculum Review and Managing Editor of Arts & Letters: Journal of Contemporary Culture. He is the Dean of the School of Arts & Sciences at Tusculum College.

Erin Murphy is the author of seven books of poetry and co-editor of three anthologies, most recently Bodies of Truth: Personal Narratives on Illness, Disability, and Medicine. She is Professor of English and Creative Writing at Penn State Altoona.

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R198. Page Meets Stage . (, , , , ) Where does poetry live? Where does it breathe? And what makes it dance? This reading will answer those questions insufficiently but entertainingly. Modeled after the popular 14-year-old series at the Bowery Poetry Club in New York City, four poets who occupy different places on the continuum from page to stage—from the National Book Award to the National Poetry Slam—read "popcorn style," with no set order and sometimes not even a set list in an ongoing poetic conversation.

Taylor Mali is one of the most well-known poets to have emerged from the poetry slam movement and one of the original poets to appear on the HBO series Def Poetry Jam. A four-time National Poetry Slam champion, he is the founder of the Page Meets Stage reading series in New York City.


Twitter Username: TaylorMali

Website: www.taylormali.com

Mark Doty's nine books of poems—most recently, Deep Lane—have received the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the T.S.Eliot Prize. A new prose study of Walt Whitman is forthcoming. A Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University, he lives in New York City.

Anis Mojgani


Twitter Username: mojgani

Shayla Lawson is the author of I Think I'm Ready to See Frank Ocean and the forthcoming essay collection Live Tonight Ms. Diana Ross. She serves as Writer-in-Residence at Amherst College.


Twitter Username: blueifiwasnt

Seema Reza is the author of When the World Breaks Open, a memoir in essays and poetry, and coordinates and facilitates a multi-hospital military arts program in Washington D.C. She is a VONA Alumna and serves as a council member-at-large for the Transformative Language Arts Network.


Twitter Username: seemareza

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R199. Standing Ovation: The Impact of Awards at All Stages of an Author’s Career. (, , , , ) How does winning a major literary award affect your career and writing? Join these prize-winning authors at various career stages for a discussion of what it means to win for the first time or for multiple times. Are there ways to capitalize on such success? Are there pitfalls to winning early? What advice do they wish they’d been given when they won? Is the system fair? They'll also discuss failures. How many contests do you have to enter before you win?

Courtney Miller Santo teaches writing at the University of Memphis, where she received an MFA. She has a BA in journalism from Washington and Lee University. Redbook selected her novel, The Roots of the Olive Tree, for its bookclub. Her second book, Three Story House was nominated for a SIBA Award.


Twitter Username: courtney_santo

Website: www.courtneysanto.com

John Blair has published six books, including the short story collection American Standard, which won the Drue Heinz Literature prize, and the poetry collection Playful Song Called Beautiful, which won the Iowa Prize. He directs the undergraduate creative writing program at Texas State University.

Selected for the National Poetry Series in 2017 and a recipient of the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets, J. Michael Martinez is the author of three collections of poetry. He is an Editor of NOEMI Press and is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Poetry at St. Lawrence University.

Lindsay Tigue is the author of System of Ghosts, winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize. She is a PhD student in Creative Writing at the University of Georgia and a graduate of the MFA program in Creative Writing and Environment at Iowa State University.


Twitter Username: lindsaytigue

Website: http://lindsaytigue.wordpress.com

Melissa Yancy is the author of the story collection Dog Years, winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize and California Book Award for First Fiction. Her work has appeared in One Story, Glimmer Train, Zyzzyva, and elsewhere, and she is the recipient of a 2016 NEA Literature Fellowship.


Twitter Username: melyancy

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R200. Show Me the Money: Making Ends Meet in the Literary World. (, , , , ) Five writers with experience in developing literary magazines, small presses, reading series, and other literary endeavors will have an in-depth discussion about the financial realities of the literary community that too often remain hidden. We’ll consider how these financial realities differ across race and gender, the importance of transparency, and how these disparities can be addressed within existing structures and outside of them.

Marisa Siegel lives, writes, and edits near New York City. She is Editor-in-Chief and owner of TheRumpus.net.


Twitter Username: marisasaystweet

Jennifer Baker is a publishing professional, creator of the Minorities in Publishing podcast, a 2017 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellow, contributing editor to Electric Literature, editor of Everyday People: The Color of Life - A Short Story Anthology, and team member of the nonprofit I, Too Arts.


Twitter Username: jbakernyc

Ashley Ford is an essayist, editor, and columnist with work in PANK magazine, The Rumpus, Crossed Genre's Magazine, ELLE Magazine, The Guardian, BuzzFeed.Com, and Literary Orphans.


Twitter Username: iSmashFizzle

Website: AshleyCFord.Net

Michele Filgate is the editor of What My Mother And I Don’t Talk About, forthcoming. She is a contributing editor at Literary Hub, and a board member of the National Book Critics Circle. She teaches creative nonfiction for Catapult and Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop.


Twitter Username: readandbreathe

Website: www.michelefilgate.com

Emily Gould is the author of And The Heart Says Whatever, Friendship, and the forthcoming Perfect Tunes. With Ruth Curry, she runs Emily Books, which sells and publishes books by women as an imprint of Coffee House Press. She teaches writing in New York City.


Twitter Username: emilygould

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R201. Books for a Well-Read Life: Celebrating Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. (, , , , ) Since its 1983 founding in a Chapel Hill backyard, Algonquin Books has enjoyed many notable years of publishing; however, 2017 and 2018 have proven to be extraordinary. The past two years produced the press's first National Book Award finalist, first Man Booker Prize finalist, and first Oprah Book Pick in almost two decades, among other successes. Join us at a reading to celebrate the North Carolina indie, featuring five Algonquin authors with work released during the press's latest banner years.

Lauren Grodstein is the author of five books, including Our Short History, A Friend of the Family, The Explanation of Everything, Reproduction is the Flaw of Love, and The Best of Animals. She directs the MFA Program at Rutgers University, Camden.


Twitter Username: laurengrodstein

Heather Abel is the author of the novel The Optimistic Decade. Her essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Slate, Paris Review online, Buzzfeed, and LitHub, among other places. She has taught writing at The New School, Smith College, and UMass Amherst.


Twitter Username: heatherkabel

Brock Clarke's eighth book of fiction, the novel I Am Calvin Bledsoe, will be published in August 2019. His award winning short shorties and essays have appeared in dozens of magazines, newspapers, and anthologies. He teaches at Bowdoin College.

Jonathan Evison is the New York Times Bestselling author of five novels: All About Lulu, The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, This is Your Life, Harriet Chance!, West of Here, and most recently, Lawn Boy.

Joanna Luloff is the author of the short story collection The Beach at Galle Road and the novel Remind Me Again What Happened. She is an Assistant Professor at The University of Colorado Denver where she edits fiction and nonfiction for Copper Nickel.


Twitter Username: joluloff

Website: www.joannaluloff.com

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R202. Whatever happened to class? Writing About & Across Socioeconomic Differences. (, , , , ) Literature enables readers to develop empathy, to experience the struggles of characters who may be quite different from themselves. While the stakes and consequences of these struggles can vary with socioeconomic class, suffering itself is universal. This panel discusses works in which authors navigate socioeconomic class lines and find the universal in the specific, which tropes about poverty and “working class” lives can be most damaging, and strategies for writers.

Bridget Hoida is an award-winning writer and educator. She is the author of the novel So L.A. and currently teaches writing and English Literature at Saddleback College.

Robin Farmer has written for the Washington Post, Publishers Weekly, and the Richmond Times-Dispatch, among other publications. Her fiction focuses on girls advocating for social justice. A recipient of residencies at Djerassi and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, she is writing a young adult novel.


Twitter Username: Sonewsy

Teresa Burns Gunther's fiction and nonfiction are published in numerous journals and anthologies, and recognized in many literary contests. Her story collection Hold Off the Night was a semi-finalist for the Iowa Fiction Award. She is the founder of Lakeshore Writers Workshop in Oakland, CA.


Twitter Username: TBurnsGunther

Website: www.teresaburnsgunther.com; www.lakeshorewriters.net

Nami Mun is the author of Miles from Nowhere and winner of a Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, and the Chicago Public Library’s 21st Century Award. Her work can be seen in The New York TimesGrantaTin House, and Tales of Two Americas. A former professor, she teaches at The Writers Room in Chicago.


Twitter Username: nami_mun

Jenn Stroud Rossmann is the author of the novel The Place You're Supposed to Laugh. She writes the essay series "An engineer reads a novel" for Public Books, and is a professor of mechanical engineering at Lafayette College.


Twitter Username: jenn_rossmann

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R203. Crafting the Short Form. (, , , , ) As a publisher of hybrid works, chapbooks, novels in stories, and experimental prose, Sarabande has championed the short form for a quarter century. The members of this panel will present and discuss original works of flash fiction, ten second essays, aphorisms, poetry chapbooks, and video essays. They will address structure, density, beginnings and endings, sudden moves, white space, and other tools in the short form writer's toolbox.

Kristen Renee Miller is the managing editor at Sarabande Books. Her poetry and translations have appeared or are forthcoming in Poetry, Kenyon Review, Guernica, The Offing, and elsewhere. Her book Spawn, a translation of poetry by Quebec poet Marie-Andrée Gill, is forthcoming in 2019.


Twitter Username: kristenmill

Website: kristenreneemiller.com

Kimiko Hahn finds material from disparate sources including: black lung, Japanese zuihitsu, and science, as in Brain Fever, one of her nine collections. Awards include a Guggenheim. She teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Translation, Queens College-CUNY and she is board president of Poetry Society of America.

Elena Passarello is the author of the essay collections Animals Strike Curious Poses and Let Me Clear My Throat. A recipient of a 2015 Whiting Award, she coedits the In Place book series for West Virginia University Press and teaches in the MFA program at Oregon State University.


Twitter Username: elenavox

Website: www.elenapassarello.com

Nona Caspers's The Fifth Woman received the Mary McCarthy award. Heavier Than Air received the Grace Paley Short Fiction Prize and was a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice. An NEA recipient, she is Professor of Creative Writing at San Francisco State University.

James Richardson's most recent collections of poetry and aphorisms are During (Poetry Society of America's 2015 Alice Fay Di Castagnola Prize), By the Numbers (National Book Award finalist), Interglacial (National Book Critics Circle finalist), and Vectors: Aphorisms and Ten-Second Essays. He is Professor of Creative Writing at Princeton University.

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R204. Ecstatic Ekphrastic: When Images Are More Than Inspiration. (, , , , ) How do vintage photographs, embroideries, collages, installations, comics, paintings, and technical diagrams transform into hybrid stories, poems, and essays? Panelists working in a variety of picture-and-text combinations will discuss strategies and techniques for going beyond image as mere illustration in order to explore how visual art can break creative writing out of traditional narrative forms and push it toward transcendent multimedia synthesis.


Twitter Username: bettasplenda

Bianca Stone is a poet and visual artist. Her books include Someone Else’s Wedding Vows, Poetry Comics From the Book of Hours, and The Mobius Strip Club of Grief. She is creative director at the Ruth Stone Foundation in Goshen, Vermont.


Twitter Username: biancastone

Website: poetrycomics.org

Sarah Minor is the author of The Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated, a digital chapbook. She runs a series on visual essays at Essay Daily and teaches as a doctoral candidate in Creative Nonfiction at Ohio University. Her recent work appears at The Normal School, Passages North, and Territory.


Twitter Username: sarahceniaminor

Dustin Parsons is the author of Exploded View: Essays on Fatherhood, with Diagrams. He is the winner of a New York Fine Arts grant and an Ohio Arts Grant in nonfiction. He teaches at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: DustinParsons07

Website: www.dustinparsons.info

Kelcey Parker Ervick is the author of The Bitter Life of Bozena Nemcova, a hybrid work of biography, memoir, and visual art. Her two previous fiction books are Liliane's Balcony and For Sale By Owner. She teaches at Indiana University South Bend and leads a study abroad program to Prague/Berlin.


Twitter Username: KelceyErvick

Website: http://kelceyervick.com

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R205. What's Missing: How Absence Can Drive Narrative. (, , , , ) A diverse group of fiction and memoir writers discuss the importance of what’s narratively not present—a missing parent, lost object, or unexpressed feeling—as a major theme in literature, and a creative spark in their own work, shaping plot, character, imagery, and dialogue. Panelists will offer examples from well-known books, share brief excerpts from their writing, and provide innovative craft techniques to illustrate how a focus on what’s missing can be transformative.

Laurie Ann Doyle's new book World Gone Missing was nominated for the California Book Award and praised for delivering “powerful portrayals of people desiring connection, hope, and renewal.” She is winner of the Alligator Juniper Fiction Prize and teaches writing at UC Berkeley.


Twitter Username: LaurieAnnDoyle

Website: https://www.laurieanndoyle.com

Louise Nayer is the author of five books of poetry and non-fiction. A writing workshop leader and retired community college professor, her book Burned: A Memoir won the Wisconsin Library Association Award for memoir and was an Oprah Great Read.


Twitter Username: lnayer1

Ingrid Rojas Contreras is the author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree, a Barnes & Noble Summer 2018 Discover Great New Writers selection. She is the book columnist for KQED, the Bay Area's NPR affiliate.


Twitter Username: ingrid_rojas_c

Eleanor Vincent is the author of the memoir Swimming with Maya, a New York Times e-book bestseller and finalist for the Independent Publisher of the Year award. A creative nonfiction teacher at the San Francisco Writer's Grotto, she was a visiting writer at Mills College.


Twitter Username: eleanorpvincent

Lyzette Wanzer has received writing residencies at the Blue Mountain Center (New York) and KHN Center for the Arts (Nebraska). She is the recipient of an Investing in Artists grant from Center for Cultural Innovation (2012) and an IAC grant from the San Francisco Arts Commission (2013).


Twitter Username: INTJs_rock

Website: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lyzettewanzer

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R206. Rewriting Wild Bodies. (, , , , ) In this session, writers and teachers of ecological literature will use theories of ecofeminism and environmental justice to consider how built urban and suburban spaces exclude or erase “others”—nonwhite, non-cisgendered, poor, disabled bodies. They will also address how female, nonwhite, disabled, queer, underprivileged bodies are stereotypically associated with wildness and discuss strategies for disrupting such traditional binaries as human/natural and civilized/wild.

Heidi Hutner, PhD, writes narrative nonfiction, memoir, and journalism on environmental, race, and ecofeminist themes. She has published many books and essays. She is an active public speaker. Hutner is associate professor of English at Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York.


Twitter Username: HeidiHutner

Chelsea Biondolillo is the author of The Skinned Bird, forthcoming in 2019 and two chapbooks, #Lovesong and Ologies. Her essays have appeared in Best American Science & Nature Essays, Orion, Brevity, River Teeth, Passages North, and others. She has a dual MFA in nonfiction and environmental studies.


Twitter Username: c_biondolillo

Website: http://roamingcowgirl.com

Marco Wilkinson is a lyric essayist whose hybrid pieces have appeared in Kenyon Review, Seneca Review, DIAGRAM, Terrain, Assay, and elsewhere. He is working on a lyric memoir using weeds as the framework for imagining a queer immigrant life. He is the managing editor at Oberlin College Press.

Olivia Olivia comes from the same place all sad things come from—the sea. Her writing has appeared in Salon, The Rumpus, The Establishment, and the Portland Mercury, among other places. She is the author of No One Remembered Your Name But I Wrote It Down, a speculative memoir set in the afterlife.


Twitter Username: writeswrongs

Website: www.oliviawrites.com

J. Drew Lanham is a Distinguished Professor of Wildlife Ecology at Clemson University. The author of  The Homeplace: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature and Sparrow Envy: Poems. He is intrigued with ethnic prisms bend perceptions of nature.

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R207. Poetry and Technology: Appendage, Mask, Voice, Body, and Song. (, , , , ) Five poets will perform and discuss the ways in which technology extends the content of their work and the reach of their practice. Along with print-based text, these poets make use of digital audio and video technologies. They will perform work that demonstrates how specific technologies serve as appendage, extension, organ, disguise, elemental sound, and chorus to facilitate the poet’s ability to relocate, re-contextualize, and investigate the infinite possibilities of language off the page.

Samuel Ace, poet and sound artist, is the author of Our Weather Our Sea, forthcoming. A Belladonna Germinal Texts author, he is a recipient of an Astraea Lesbian Writer's Award and a two-time finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in poetry. He teaches writing at Mt. Holyoke College.


Twitter Username: samuel_ace

Douglas Kearney, poet, teaches at the University of Minnesota. His most recent collection, Buck Studies, received the Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize, the CLMP Firecracker Award, and a California Book Award Silver Medal. He has also published a collection of libretti and writings on performativity.

Amaranth Borsuk's most recent book is The Book. Previous books include Pomegranate Eater; Handiwork; and the collaborations ABRA, As We Know, and Between Page & Screen. She is associate director of the MFA in Creative Writing and Poetics at the University of Washington, Bothell.


Twitter Username: amaranthborsuk

Website: www.amaranthborsuk.com

Ronaldo V. Wilson, PhD, is a poet, interdisciplinary artist, and cultural critic. His latest book is Lucy 72. He is an Associate Professor of Literature and Creative Writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs is a writer, vocalist and author of TwERK. Her poetry has been widely published. She has received awards from New York Foundation for the Arts, Jerome Foundation, Japan - US. Friendship Commission, Creative Capital, National Endowment for the Arts, and the Whiting Foundation.


Twitter Username: LaDiggaReport

Website: http://latashadiggs.tumblr.com/

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R208. Reclaiming the Mine: Nonfiction Writers Explore Mining as Method and Metaphor. (, , , , ) What can we learn by stepping into the mine? What does it mean that the work of writing nonfiction is so often compared to excavation? What shapes can we make of the holes and fragments left by mining? What do bodies broken in pursuit of ore have to tell us? When does the unearthing we do as writers become unsustainable? Nonfiction writers with diverse connections to mining explore the payoffs and dangers of digging into a cultural and environmental inheritance.

Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and the author of two books, My Body Is a Book of Rules and Starvation Mode. She is an assistant professor at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: elissawashuta

Website: http://washuta.net

Ander Monson is the author of eight books of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, including the forthcoming I Will Take the Answer and The Gnome Stories. He teaches at the University of Arizona and edits the magazine DIAGRAM, the website Essay Daily, and the New Michigan Press.


Twitter Username: angermonsoon

Website: http://otherelectricities.com

Katherine E. Standefer’s debut book, Lightning Flowers, was shortlisted for the 2018 J. Anthony Lukas Works-in-Progress Prize from Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. Her work won the 2015 Iowa Review Award in Nonfiction and appears in The Best American Essays 2016.


Twitter Username: girlmakesfire

Byron F. Aspaas is Diné. He earned a BFA and MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. His work is scattered throughout various journals and anthologies. His clans are Red Running Water and is born for Bitter Water. He resides in Colorado Springs


Twitter Username: ByRad

Jessica Johnson’s In Absolutes We Seek Each Other was an Oregon Book Award finalist. She teaches creative nonfiction, poetry, and environmental literature at Portland Community College.


Twitter Username: jjopdx

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R209. A Reading with Maxine Hong Kingston, Marilyn Chin, and Carmen Gimenez Smith, Sponsored by Kundiman. (, , , ) Three prominent and essential writers take the stage to give readings of their work. A discussion follows on a variety of topics, ranging from craft to practice to activism, as we celebrate and further a discussion of Asian American and Latinx identity and solidarity. This event is moderated by CantoMundo cofounder Deborah Paredez.

Maxine Hong Kingston writes and teaches fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. She's received a National Book Critics Circle Award, two National Book Awards, and a Writers for Writers Award. She has taught for fifty years, including twenty years at a workshop for vets, which resulted in Veterans of War, Veterans of Peace.

Marilyn Chin's award-winning poems and tales have become Asian American classics and are taught all over the world. Her latest book—A Portrait of the Self as Nation: New and Selected Poems—celebrates thirty years of activist writing. She serves as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.


Twitter Username: poetmarilynchin

Website: marilynchin.org

Carmen Giménez Smith, Publisher of Noemi Press, is Professor of English at Virginia Tech. Most recently, she is author of Cruel Futures and Be Recorder. Her last poetry collection, Milk and Filth, was a finalist for the NBCC Award.


Twitter Username: lizitasmith

Deborah Paredez is the author of the poetry collection This Side of Skin and the critical study Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory. She is an Associate Professor at Columbia University and cofounder of CantoMundo, a national organization for Latina/o poets.

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R210. Literary Changemakers: Representation & Visibility in the Writing World. (, , , , ) How can writers craft a world in which diverse voices are heard, especially in institutions without diverse leadership? This panel brings together writers and editors to discuss the ways in which they have advocated for a range of voices in the arenas of publishing, prizes, and the university, and the successes and challenges they’ve experienced along the way.

Tina Cane is a poet, teacher, and the founder/ director of Writers-in-the-Schools, RI. Her books include The Fifth Thought, Dear Elena: Letters for Elena, and Once More With Feeling. She serves as Poet Laureate of Rhode Island.

Christopher Soto is the author of Sad Girl Poems and the editor of Nepantla: A Journal Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color. In 2017, he was awarded the Freedom Plow Award for Poetry & Activism by Split This Rock. He cofounded the Undocupoets.


Twitter Username: loma-poetry

Suzi F. Garcia has an MFA in poetry with minors in Gender Studies and Screen Cultures. She is a poetry editor at Noemi Press, a CantoMundo Fellow, Macondonista and her work is published or forthcoming from the University of Arizona Poetry Blog, Vinyl, Fence, the Offing, Drunken Boat, and more.


Twitter Username: SuziG

Website: http://suzifgarcia.tumblr.com/

Farid Matuk is the author of This Is a Nice Neighborhood and The Real Horse. Matuk serves on the editorial team at Fence and on the faculty of the MFA program at University of Arizona.

Eloisa Amezcua's debut collection, From the Inside Quietly, is the inaugural winner of the Shelterbelt Poetry Prize selected by Ada Limón. She is the author of three chapbooks, is the founder and editor of The Shallow Ends: A Journal of Poetry, and the founder of Costura Creative.


Twitter Username: Eloisa_Amezcua

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R211. Writers Centers, Conferences, & Retreats: Write, Teach, & Work After the MFA. (, , , , ) Many independent writers centers are creating community across the nation. In addition to literary centers, retreats and conferences offer connections for writers while they hone their craft. For MFA graduates, teaching at a center can be an artistically and economically enriching alternative to academia. Panelists from a variety of literary centers explore the unique opportunities writers centers, conferences, and retreats provide for all writers and teachers of writing.

Melissa Wyse is a fiction writer and essayist. She has held residencies at MacDowell, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Ragdale. Her work appears in publications including Shenandoah, the RumpusMomus, and Urbanite, and her first book is forthcoming from Chronicle. She founded and directs the Idlewild Writers Retreat.


Twitter Username: melissa_wyse

Website: www.MelissaWyse.com

Andrea Wilson is the Founding Director of the Iowa Writers' House based in Iowa City, Iowa. IWH's mission is to extend the Iowa literary legacy, building community among writers, editors, readers, audiences, and all those who honor the power of words.


Twitter Username: iawritershouse

Website: www.iowawritershouse.org

Shawn Girvan received his MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College. His work has appeared in The Pitkin Review, Wraparound South, and West Texas Literary Review. Shawn currently teaches and works at the Muse Writers Center in Norfolk, Virginia and is finishing his first memoir.

Maggie Marshall is a novelist and award-winning screenwriter, and is the co-founder of the Flatiron Writers Room in Asheville, NC. She has written for numerous 1-hour TV dramas, and has had fiction and nonfiction pieces published in The Great Smokies Review.


Twitter Username: FWRAsheville

Website: www.flatironwritersroom.com

Andrea Dupree is program director for Lighthouse Writers Workshop, a nonprofit literary center she co-founded in 1997. A recipient of two MacDowell fellowships, her fiction has appeared in places including Ploughshares, VQR, Colorado Review, and the Normal School.

Portland Ballroom 253-254, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R212. A Reading and Conversation with Paul Guest, Aisha Sasha John, Aldrin Valdez, Sponsored by Poets House. (, Paul Guest) Three award-winning poets--Paul Guest, Aisha Sasha John, and Aldrin Valdez--representing the rich diversity and range of contemporary poetry, read from their work and discuss the roles of mentorship, accessibility, and the inter-disciplines in poetry.

Aisha Sasha John is a poet and choreographer. Her most recent book, I have to live., was a finalist for the 2018 Griffin Poetry Prize. Previous books include The Shining Material and THOU—finalist for the Trillium and Relit Book Awards. Her solo show, the aisha of is, premiered at the Whitney Museum in 2017.


Twitter Username: metheaisha

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R213. Traveling Stanzas & Poets For Science Reading: Jane Hirshfield, Mark Jarman, Dan Beachy-Quick. (, , , ) In conjunction with the proposed Traveling Stanzas: Poets for Science exhibit of science-poem banners and interactive digital writing tools, in this one-hour session, project cofounder Jane Hirshfield reads from her own science-based work alongside others included in this ongoing interdisciplinary and multi-venue project, which began as a featured exhibit at the 2017 March for Science on the National Mall in collaboration with the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University.

David Hassler is director of the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University. His poetry collection, Red Kimono, Yellow Barn, was awarded Ohio Poet of the Year 2006. His nonfiction works include the play, May 4th Voices, based on the Kent State Shootings Oral History Project and Growing Season: The Life of a Migrant Community.


Twitter Username: DavidWickPoetry

Jane Hirshfield's eight books of poetry include The Beauty, long-listed for the 2015 National Book Award. Her work appears in The New Yorker, Poetry, TLS, NYRB, and eight editions of The Best American Poetry. An Academy of American Poets chancellor emerita, she founded Poets For Science in 2017.

Dan Beachy-Quick is the author of six books of poems, most recently Gentlessness, and three collection of prose, including literary reveries on Melville and Keats. His work has been supported by the Lannan and Guggenheim foundations, and he teaches in the MFA Program at Colorado State University.

Mark Jarman is the author of The Heronry and Bone Fires: New and Selected Poems, both from Sarabande Books. He has also published two books of essays about poetry, The Secret of Poetry and Body and Soul: Essays on Poetry. He is Centennial Professor of English at Vanderbilt University.


Twitter Username: mfjarman

Portland Ballroom 256, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R214. The Critical Creative: The Editor-Poet. (, , , , ) This panel will offer an insiders' look into poetry editorship and publication from poets who edit prominent journals and presses. How do these tandem roles, poet and editor, influence one another? Do they detract from or enhance poetry publishing? Does the critical mind impede the creative mind or strengthen it? How? Are certain poetic schools favored? Where does preference end and narrowness begin? Panelists will offer real-life anecdotes and insights on poetry selection and editing.

Marc Vincenz’s tenth collection of poetry is Leaning into the Infinite. He has translated many Romanian-, French- and German-language poets, including Herman Hesse Prize-winner Klaus Merz. An Executive Editor of MadHat Press, he serves on the editorial boards of Plume and Fulcrum.

Larissa Shmailo's latest book of poetry is Medusa's Country and her latest novel is Patient Women. She is an anthologist of Russian poetry in translation and the original English translator of the avant-garde opera Victory over the Sun. She also is a critical writer on poetry and poetics.


Twitter Username: larissashmailo

Michael Anania is a poet, essayist and fiction writer. His work is widely anthogized and translated. Recent poetry books include Nightsongs and ClamorsContinuous Showings, and Heat Lines. He has taught at Northwestern, University of Chicago, and the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Amy King's The Missing Museum is a winner of the 2015 Tarpaulin Sky Book Prize. She is on the executive board of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, received the 2015 WNBA Award, co-edits Bettering American Poetry and Big Energy Poets anthologies, and teaches creative writing at SUNY Nassau Community College.


Twitter Username: amyhappens

Website: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/amy-king

Kwame Dawes is author of eighteen collections of poetry, two novels, several anthologies, and plays. He has won a Pushcart Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an Emmy. At the University of Nebraska he is a Chancellor's Professor of English and Glenna Luschei Editor of Prairie Schooner.


Twitter Username: kwamedawes

Website: www.kwamedawes.com

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R214B. History of Myself: Approaches to Research in Fiction/Creative Nonfiction. (Adam Nemett) California College of the Arts, San Francisco, MFA Faculty
Panel: Tom Barbash, Jasmin Darznik, Adam Nemett, Leslie Carol Roberts

Zachary A. Doss Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R215A. Salmon Poetry Presents its Powerful Spring List of Irish and American Poets. (Jessie Lendennie, Alice Pettway, Bertha Rodgers, Carolyn Tipton, Drew Blanchard) Join us for Book Signings, Chat, and Craic! (Craic - Irish for Fun!) Poets include : Alice Pettway, Bertha Rogers, Carolyn Tipton, Drew Blanchard, Ethna McKiernan, J.P. Dancing Bear, Jean Kavanagh, Jeffrey Levine, John Morgan, Kathryn Kirkpatrick, Lea Graham, Marc Vincenz, Patrick Chapman, Patrick Hicks, Paulann Petersen, Richard Peabody, Robert Fanning, Sandra Yannone, Stephen Powers, Su Smallen Love, Susan Millar DuMars!

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R215B. Where Literary and Professional Translation Meet. (, , , , ) Panelists will discuss the merits of including literary translation in the graduate professional translation curriculum. Literary translators who teach in these programs find that their knowledge and skills transfer readily to professional translation. These include writing practice, close reading of master translators' works, and studying the models offered by award-winning translations. Panelists will focus on specific examples from their respective teaching and translation practices.

Elizabeth Lowe, founder of the University of Illinois Center for Translation Studies, is professor in the New York University M.S. in Translation. She translates fiction from Spanish and Portuguese to English. Elizabeth is translation editor for fiction at Kenyon Review and on the board of Delos.


Twitter Username: eslowe

Jenny McPhee’s translations from Italian include books by Natalia Ginzburg, Primo Levi, Giacomo Leopardi, Curzio Malaparte, Anna Maria Ortese, Paolo Maurensig, and Pope John Paul II. She is the Director of the Center for Applied Liberal Arts at NYU, where she teaches in the MS in Translation.


Twitter Username: Jennymcphee

Joyce Tolliver is a specialist in modern Iberian literatures and cultures at the University of Illinois–Urbana, where she directs the Center for Translation Studies.

Aron Aji is the Director of MFA in Literary Translation. He has translated works by Bilge Karasu, Murathan Mungan, Elif Shafak, Latife Tekin, and other Turkish writers, including three book-length works by Karasu: Death in TroyThe Garden of Departed Cats, (2004 National Translation Award); and A Long Day’s Evening

Becka Mara McKay directs the Creative Writing MFA at Florida Atlantic University. Her chapbook of prose poems is, Happiness Is the New Bedtime. Other publications include a book of poetry, A Meteorologist in the Promised Land, and several translations of fiction and poetry. Her work can be found in recent issues of Bennington Review, Copper Nickel, Ghost Town, Ploughshares, and Post Road.

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R216. Lit Mag Editors in Academia, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , , , ) How might university literary magazine editors generate more value for what they do? Editing a university-affiliated magazine presents unique challenges well beyond those of simply publishing a magazine. This roundtable discussion will cover everything from course release time, research credit, and staffing issues, to working with or around academic development departments and building circulation through university websites.

Stephanie G'Schwind is the editor of Colorado Review and director of the Center for Literary Publishing at Colorado State University. She is also coeditor, with Donald Revell, of the Mountain West Poetry Series and editor of the anthology Man in the Moon: Essays on Fathers and Fatherhood.

Lisa Roney is editor in chief of the Florida Review and Aquifer: TFR Online. Author of Sweet Invisible Body (memoir), The Best Possible Bad Luck (poetry), and craft guide Serious Daring: Creative Writing in Four Genres, she is Associate Professor of English at University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: seriousdaring1

Website: http://lisaroney.com

Jodee Stanley is the editor of Ninth Letter, published by the Creative Writing Program at the University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign. She has worked in literary publishing for over twenty years, and her fiction, essays, and book reviews have appeared in numerous publications.


Twitter Username: jodeestanley

David Lynn has been the Editor of The Kenyon Review since 1994. He has a BA from Kenyon College, and an MA and PhD from the University of Virginia.

Jennifer Acker is founder and Editor in Chief of The Common. Her debut novel The Limits of the World will be published in 2019, along with a nonfiction title. She has an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars, and she teaches and directs the Literary Publishing Internship at Amherst College.


Twitter Username: jen_acker

Website: jenniferacker.com

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R217. Race, Gender, Politics, and The American Dream. (, , , , K Thompson) How do narratives of youth become intertwined nationally with narratives of race, gender and culture, each shaping the other? How do ideas about race, gender and culture turn into national policies – i.e. the removal of Native Americans from national parks, the marginalization of people of color and LGBTQ communities? How do these racially charged, gender-biased policies in turn impact the destinies of individuals, families and cultures?

Shaniya Smith was born and raised near the heart of the Navajo Nation. She received her bachelor’s degree in exercise science at Northern Arizona University (NAU). Currently, she is continuing her studies as a graduate student in NAU’s Master of Fine Arts writing program.

Ann Cummins is the author of the story collection Red Ant House, and a novel, Yellowcake. Her stories have appeared in McSweeney’s, Zyzzyva, Best American Short Stories, and elsewhere. She teaches at Northern Arizona University and in the low-residency MFA program at Queens University of Charlotte.

Andrew Levy is Edna Cooper Chair in English at Butler University, where he has served as MFA Director and currently as English Department Head. He is the author of The First Emancipator, A Brain Wider Than The Sky, and co-editor of The Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Fiction.

Annette McGivney is the longtime Southwest Editor for Backpacker magazine and a Journalism professor at Northern Arizona University. She writes often for outdoor magazines and is the author of five books including her most recent true-crime/memoir Pure Land from Aquarius Press.


Twitter Username: annettemcgivney

Website: www.annettemcgivney.com

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R218. The Challenges of Running a University Reading Series in the 21st Century. (, , , , ) This panel will focus on curating a university reading series. Our panelists will discuss topics such as obtaining funding, planning long-term, marketing and outreach, engaging diverse populations, assessing programs, turning readings into events, and more. We’ll share perspectives from small liberal arts colleges to HBCUs to large state universities and points in between from across the county. And many stories of screw-ups and successes.

Barney T. Haney teaches English at the University of Indianapolis where he is cochair of the Kellogg Writers Series. His fiction has appeared in or is forthcoming from Mid-American Review, Marathon Literary Review, and Barely South Review, among others.

Shonda Buchanan is the former Interim Chair/Assistant Professor for the Dept. of English & Foreign Languages at Hampton University. 


Twitter Username: shondabuchanan

Website: shondabuchanan.com

Jameelah Lang is the Graduate Writing Specialist at UMKC. Her fiction appears in the Kenyon Review, Cincinnati Review, Pleiades and Witness. She has received awards from Bread Loaf, Sewanee Writers Conference, VCCA, & Hub City Writers Project. She's a board member for Radius of Arab American Writers.

Christopher Coake is the author of the novel You Came Back and the story collection We're in Trouble, for which he won the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship. In 2006 he was named a Best Young American Novelist by Granta. He teaches and directs the MFA program at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Ania Spyra is an Associate Professor of English at Butler University and a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at Bath Spa University. She teaches Transnational and Postcolonial Literature, Translation, and Creative Writing. She directs the Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series at Butler.

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R219. Voice, Style, Difference. (, , , ) Find your voice! But how? Where is it? We hold that voice is a result rather than a means. So we look at the relation of voice to style, as we consider how a poet's stance and "voice" are enabled--even created--by compositional features like idiom, syntax, form, and measurement, as these "technical" practices lead toward both poetry and personality. In other words, how is voice an accomplishment of style? Panelists will range through history and their own experience as critics and poets.

David Baker is a poet, critic, and editor whose recent books include Swift: New and Selected Poems (forthcoming), Show Me Your Environment (essays), and Never-Ending Birds, winner of the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize. The Poetry Editor of Kenyon Review, he teaches at Denison University.


Twitter Username: davidbakerpoet

Website: davidbaker.website

Ann Townsend is a poet and essayist, and author of Dear Delinquent, The Coronary Garden, Dime Store Erotics, and Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry (with David Baker). She directs the Creative Writing Program at Denison University; in 2009, she cofounded VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: anntownsendpoet

Website: www.anntownsend.com

Jos Charles is author of feeld, a winner of the 2017 National Poetry Series, and Safe Space, a finalist for the 2016 Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Poetry. She is a recipient of the 2016 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship. Charles has an MFA from the University of Arizona and is pursuing a PhD in English from UC Irvine.


Twitter Username: josdcharles

Solmaz Sharif is the author of Look, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her poems have appeared in Granta, the New Republic, Poetry, and elsewhere. She is currently a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University.


Twitter Username: nsabugsme

Website: solmazsharif.com

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R220. Come Celebrate With Me: Women of Color Writers and Literary Lineage. (, , , ) Poet Lucille Clifton writes: “come celebrate / with me that everyday / something has tried to kill me / and has failed.” Five women of color trace their literary lineages and celebrate narratives of survival and resilience. Reading their writing and the work of women of color who have shaped their lives, this event draws constellations of inspiration and connection—  across time, genre, and resonant histories. This reading seeks to use language as a space for intervention, activism, and visibility.

Catina Bacote’s nonfiction has been published in Ploughshares, Tin House, The Gettysburg Review, TriQuarterly, The Common, The Sun, Southern California Review, and the anthology This Is The Place: Women Writing About Home. She is an assistant professor at St. John's University in New York City.

Jane Wong's poems can be found in Best American Poetry 2015, American Poetry Review, jubilat, and others. A Kundiman fellow, she is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and fellowships from the US Fulbright Program, the Fine Arts Work Center, and Hedgebrook. She is the author of Overpour.


Twitter Username: officialjwong

Ysabel Y. Gonzalez works as the Assistant Director for the Poetry Program at the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation in New Jersey. She is a CantoMundo Fellow, co-founder of the Brick City Collective, and author of Black Unicorn & Other Wild Invocations.


Twitter Username: YsabelYGonzalez

Anastacia Tolbert is a writer, Cave Canem Fellow, Hedgebrook alumna, EDGE Professional Writers Graduate, VONA alum, creative writing workshop facilitator, documentarian, and playwright. Her fiction and nonfiction has been published widely.

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R221. Poets Out of Place. (, , , , ) Displacement can be another way to think of immigration, exile, and the longing they carry. Poets from five countries question what it means to write about somewhere from somewhere else. We investigate splitting "expatriates" and "migrants," negotiating the bureaucratic-ease of asylum, and questioning when home suddenly finds you too queer, too loud, too too.... In this itinerant age, how do we find home? And how do we sing it?

Elizabeth Senja Spackman is a poet and playwright. Her poetry and prose can be found in Guernica, Fence, Enzigam, Post Road, and Cosmonaut's Avenue, among other places. Her play on censorship and news, Radio Play, has toured to seven countries.


Twitter Username: esenjas

Holnes's poetry has appeared in PoetryAmerican Poetry ReviewCallaloo, and elsewhere. His plays have been read, produced, presented at the Kennedy Center, Second Stage Theater, National Black Theater, Kitchen Theater, and elsewhere. He teaches at Medgar Evers College and NYU.

Ngwatilo Mawiyoo is a poet and performer. The author of two chapbooks—Dagoretti Corner and Blue Mothertongue—received her MFA from the University of British Columbia. Twice shortlisted for the Brunel International African Poetry Prize, the Callaloo Fellow is a copywriter at a Nairobi Ad Agency.


Twitter Username: ngwatilo

Ketty Nivyabandi is a poet and human activist from Burundi. In May 2015 she became a refugee after she led women-only protests against the violation of her country's constitution. Ketty writes, speaks, and advocates regularly on women in conflict zones, human rights defenders and displacement.


Twitter Username: kettynivyabandi

María Fernanda (Chamorro) is a writer whose poems and translations have appeared in Kweli Journal, The Wide Shore, Luna Luna Magazine, and elsewhere. A Candela founder, she has performed at MoMA PS1, Hudson Valley Writers Center, and various colleges. She has received fellowships from Callaloo and CantoMundo.


Twitter Username: trochaicpoet

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R222. Readings from New Micro: Exceptionally Short Fiction. (, , , , ) The story seems to be getting shorter and shorter. From sudden fiction to flash fiction to microfiction this trend has only accelerated, and now this highly compressed narrative form of no more than 300 words has found both popular and critical acclaim. It is no surprise that microfiction is often compared with prose poetry in its use of metaphor and inventive language. These readers from New Micro will show how intensity commands attention, and how they came to write with such precision.

James Thomas has coedited all of the Sudden and Flash Fiction anthologies, and authored Pictures, Moving. He has received two NEA grants, a Stegner Fellowship, founded Quarterly West, and started the Writers At Work conference. He has taught at Wright State University and the University of Utah.

Kim Chinquee is the author of the collections Oh BabyPrettyPistol, and Shot Girls. Her work has been published in journals including The NationNOONConjunctionsPloughshares, and others. She is Senior Editor of New World Writing, and she codirects the writing major at SUNY-Buffalo State.


Twitter Username: kimchinquee

Website: www.kimchinquee.com

Mary Miller is the author of two collections of stories, Big World and Always Happy Hour, as well as a novel, The Last Days of California. She is a former James A. Michener Fellow in Fiction at the University of Texas and John and Renée Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: maryumiller

Website: maryumiller.tumblr.com

Kim Addonizio's latest books are a collection of poems, Mortal Trash, and a memoir, Bukowski in a Sundress. She is the author of six other poetry collections, two novels, and two books on writing poetry: The Poet's Companion (with Dorianne Laux) and Ordinary Genius.


Twitter Username: kim_addonizio

Website: www.kimaddonizio.com

Grant Faulkner is executive director of National Novel Writing Month and the cofounder of 100 Word Story magazine. His writing has appeared in dozens of publications, including The New York Times and Poets & Writers. His collection of one hundred 100-word stories is Fissures.


Twitter Username: grantfaulkner

Website: http://www.grantfaulkner.com/

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R223. Hybrid Sex Writing: What's Your Position?. (, , , , ) In The History of Sexuality, Michel Foucault argues that sex was not repressed in past centuries, but codified. How does contemporary hybrid sex writing crack these codes? Is there a relationship between gender politics and hybrid writing? How does hybrid writing give voice to marginalized gender identities? What is hybrid ecstasy? Is there a special connection between transgressive sex and hybrid writing? Panelists will discuss these questions with a focus on 21st-century writers.

Larissa Shmailo's latest book of poetry is Medusa's Country and her latest novel is Patient Women. She is an anthologist of Russian poetry in translation and the original English translator of the avant-garde opera Victory over the Sun. She also is a critical writer on poetry and poetics.


Twitter Username: larissashmailo

Jonathan Penton edits the journal Unlikely Stories and its print arm, Unlikely Books. He has worked in management and technical roles for publishers, arts organizations, and literary workshops, such as the New Orleans Poetry Festival and Big Bridge. His most recent chapbook of poetry is Backstories.


Twitter Username: USDotOrg

Thaddeus Rutkowski is author of six books, most recently Border Crossings, a poetry collection. He teaches at Sarah Lawrence, Medgar Evers, and the YMCA. He received a fiction fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts and served as a panelist for the NYFA nonfiction fellowship.


Twitter Username: thadrutkowski

Website: www.thaddeusrutkowski.com

Cecilia Tan is the award-winning author of three collections of short stories, three web serials, and many novels, in genres spanning literary erotica, science fiction, and baseball fabulism. She is also the founder of erotic science fiction publisher Circlet Press, which she has directed since 1992.


Twitter Username: ceciliatan

Erica Jong, celebrated poet, novelist, and essayist with over twenty-five books published in forty-five languages, including international best-sellers, Fear of Flying & Fear of Dying. She’s adapting her favorite novel, Fanny: Being the True History of the Adventures of Fanny Hackabout-Jones for an unlimited television series and has a new poetry volume due for release.


Twitter Username: EricaJong

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R224A. Light is the Left Hand of Darkness: A Tribute to Ursula K. Le Guin. (, , , , Kelly Link) “Truth,” Ursula K. Le Guin wrote in her novel The Left Hand of Darkness, “is a matter of the imagination.” In 2018, one of America’s greatest science fiction writers passed on, leaving behind a library of literary and social achievements. Through her imaginative narratives, she scrutinized politics, gender, and the environment, creating alternate worlds and new societies as a means to convey deeper truths about our own. This panel celebrates her influential work and pays tribute to her legacy.

Alexander Lumans was awarded a 2018 NEA Grant in Prose. He was the Spring 2014 Philip Roth Resident at Bucknell. He has received scholarships to MacDowell, Yaddo, VCCA, Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and The Arctic Circle Residency. 


Twitter Username: oldmanlumans

Website: http://www.alexanderlumans.com/

Emma Copley Eisenberg's writing has appeared in Granta, Tin House, VQR, ZYZZYVA, Agni, The Common, The New Republic, Splinter, and others. She is author of The Third Rainbow Girl, forthcoming from Hachette Books in 2020.


Twitter Username: emmaeisenberg

C Pam Zhang's debut novel, How Much of These Hills is Gold, is forthcoming. Her speculative and realist fiction appears in Fairy Tale Review, Kenyon Review, McSweeney's, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from Bread Loaf, Tin House, Aspen Words, and the Iowa Writers' Workshop.


Twitter Username: cpamzhang

David Naimon is co-author of Ursula K. Le Guin: Conversations on Writing and host of the literary podcast Between the Covers. His work can be found in AGNIBoulevardVQRTin HouseFourth GenreZyzzyvaStoryQuarterly, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: davidnaimon

C121-122, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R224B. The Wandering Stops Here: Place as Central in Recent Jewish American Fiction. (, , , , ) Whether it be coastal New England, steamy Savannah, or western Oregon, a strong sense of place is central in recent Jewish American novels. These panelists explore place as inextricable to the particular, varied, and often tenuous Jewish American experiences they chronicle. With a focus on Jewish American fiction, this panel is for anyone seeking to better integrate place into their stories, and for those interested in how place can reflect the immigrant and/or outsider experience.

Elizabeth Poliner is the author of the novel As Close to Us as Breathing (winner of the 2017 Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize), Mutual Life & Casualty (linked stories), and What You Know In Your Hands (poems). She teaches in the MFA and undergraduate creative writing programs at Hollins University.

Marjorie Sandor has written four books, including the recent memoir The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction. She is also the editor of the recent international short story anthology, The Uncanny Reader. She teaches in the MFA program at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.

Eileen Pollack is the author, most recently, of the novels The Bible of Dirty Jokes and A Perfect Life and the memoir The Only Woman in the Room. Her story collection In the Mouth was a New York Times Editors' Choice selection and won the Wallant Award. She teaches at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: EileenPollack

Website: www.eileenpollack.com

Jonathan Rabb is the author of the novels Among the Living (a finalist for the 2018 Townsend Prize for Fiction), The Second Son, Shadow and Light, Rosa (winner of the Director’s Prize at Semana Negra, 2006), The Book of Q, and The Overseer. He is a professor of writing at Savannah College of Art and Design.


Twitter Username: jrrabb

Scott Nadelson is the author of six books, most recently a story collection, The Fourth Corner of the World, and a novel, Between You and Me. He teaches at Willamette University and in the Rainier Writing Workshop MFA Program at Pacific Lutheran University.


Twitter Username: ScottNadelson

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R225. Teaching Alternative Writing Workshop Models . (, , , ) Writing workshops often default to a traditional model of “workshopping,” where the class discusses work while pretending the author is absent. This panel explores how newer technologies and increasing emphasis on the interdisciplinarity have led to experiments with alternative models that allow students to take risks and tackle projects that wouldn’t otherwise be feasible within the workshop setting.

Louise Krug is an assistant professor at Washburn University. Her memoir, Louise: Amended, was named by Publishers Weekly as a Top 20 Nonfiction Book of the Year, and her memoir Tilted: The Post-Brain Surgery Journals received the Kansas Book Award.

DaMaris B. Hill, Assistant Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Kentucky, earned a PhD in Creative Writing and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from the University of Kansas. She was a program assistant at the Institute on Digital Research in the Humanities.

Ben Cartwright is the author of the poetry collection After Our Departure and the chapbook The Meanest Things Pick Clean. He teaches composition, literature, and creative writing at Spokane Falls Community College, and also teaches for the Center for the Study of Science Fiction.


Twitter Username: bcartw

Website: https://benjamindcartwright.wordpress.com/

Ande Davis is a PhD candidate at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. His fiction and poetry have recently appeared in PANK, cream city review, South Dakota Review, and Hawai'i Review, among others. He teaches writing and literature at UMKC and Washburn University.


Twitter Username: andedavis

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R226. From Slavery to Immigration: Poets on the American Family, a Site of Struggle. (, , , ) The American family as an array of diverse, nationalized bodies has been a work in progress since its inception, with many people of color unable to buy into its elusive promise of social stability. Amid an historical and present-day backdrop of vacillating protections governing civil rights and immigration status, four poets examine the American family as a dream deferred.
 

Artress Bethany White is the winner of the 2018 Trio Award from Trio House Press for her forthcoming poetry collection, My Afmerica. She is also the author of the collection Fast Fat Girls in Pink Hot Pants. Her nonfiction has recently appeared in Tupelo Quarterly and the Hopkins Review.


Twitter Username: Artresswhite

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers has published four books of poetry, including The Glory Gets. Most recently, she received a poetry fellowship from the Witter Bynner Foundation and a fiction fellowship from Aspen Summer Words Conference. She is Professor of English at the University of Oklahoma.


Twitter Username: blklibrarygirl

Website: http://www.honoreejeffers.com

Ananda Lima's work has appeared in The American Poetry Review, Rattle, The Offing and elsewhere. She has an MA in Linguistics (UCLA), was an AWP Writer to Writer mentee and has attended workshops at Bread Loaf, Sewanee and Tin House. She working on a poetry collection on immigration and motherhood.


Twitter Username: anandalima

Website: www.anandalima.com

Esther Lin lived in the United States as an undocumented immigrant for 21 years. She is the author of The Ghost Wife, winner of the 2017 PSA Chapbook Fellowship and the Crab Orchard Review’s 2018 Richard Peterson P. She is a 2017–19 Wallace Stegner Fellow and is an organizer for Undocupoets.


Twitter Username: Whalebaby

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R227. The Future is Fabulist: Crafting Fantastic Fiction at the Margins. (, , , , ) Can embracing the unreal help writers at the margins tell stories that feel even more true to their experience? The contemporary literary landscape has maintained exclusive distinctions about where stories with speculative elements are published, as well as how seriously they are received. But as these boundaries disintegrate in concurrence with a larger narrative of cultural inclusion, these emerging writers are exploring issues of race, sexuality, and gender through the lens of the fantastic.

Amira Pierce received her MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and teaches freshman composition at New York University. Her nonfiction and fiction have appeared in publications including Colorado Review and Cream City Review.

R. Lemberg's debut poetry collection Marginalia to Stone Bird was a Crawford Award finalist in 2017. They also edited two LGBTQIA+ and feminist speculative poetry anthologies. As R. Perelmutter, they are an associate professor of Slavic and Jewish Studies at the University of Kansas.


Twitter Username: roselemberg

Melissa R. Sipin is cofounder of TAYO Literary Magazine and partnered with the Feminist Press to establish the Louise Meriwether Prize. She has published in Prairie Schooner, Slice Magazine, and Guernica, and is hard at work on a novel about her grandmother's capture in WWII. msipin.com


Twitter Username: _insiang

Website: http://msipin.com/

Brooke C. Obie, JD, MFA, is the author of the speculative novel Book of Addis: Cradled Embers, which won the 2017 Phillis Wheatley Book Award for First Fiction and the 2017 Black Caucus of the American Library Association Award for Self-Published Fiction.


Twitter Username: brookeobie

Richard Scott Larson earned his MFA at New York University, where he currently works for the Expository Writing Program. His fiction and essays have appeared in Electric Literature, Joyland, Hobart, and elsewhere. He's currently writing a novel and a memoir.

D131-132, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R228. Writing the Rift: Left Coast Poetries, Left Coast Poetics. (, , , , ) We call it "the West," but it’s only the West if you come from the East. To some, it’s North; to others, East; to others, simply home. How do the particular histories, crises, fault-lines, and violence of the far side of the continent play into our forms? This panel convenes west coast poets to explore the necessary work of forging a poetics of place in a place of recent arrival. Each poet will ask: what does it mean to write the left coast now?

Dean Rader's recent books include Self-Portrait as Wikipedia Entry, Suture (written with Simone Muench), and Bullets Into Bells: Poets and Citizens Respond to Gun Violence in the U.S. (with Brian Clements and Alexandra Teague). He is a professor at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: deanrader

Website: http://deanrader.com

Brynn Saito is the author of two books of poetry, Power Made Us Swoon and The Palace of Contemplating Departure. Brynn is an Assistant Professor in the MFA program at California State University, Fresno.


Twitter Username: brynnsaito

Website: http://brynnsaito.com

Tess Taylor’s work has appeared in the AtlanticPoetry, the Kenyon Review, and the New Yorker. She is the on-air poetry reviewer for NPR's All Things Considered and has taught at Whittier College, University of California Berkeley, and Queen's University Belfast. Her books are The Forage House and Work & Days.


Twitter Username: tessathon

Website: www.tess-taylor.com

Jennifer Elise Foerster is the author of two poetry collections, Leaving Tulsa and Bright Rafter in the Afterweather. She is a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and has a PhD in Literary Arts from the University of Denver. She teaches at the Institute of American Indian Arts Low-Residency MFA.

Marcelo Hernandez Castillo is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the author of Cenzontle, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Prize, Dulce, and Children of the Land. A Canto Mundo Fellow, he cofounded the Undocupoets campaign.


Twitter Username: marcelo_H_

D133-134, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R229. The Big Black Dog: Children's Literature Takes on Mental Illness. (, , , , ) From schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to anxiety, depression, self-harm, substance abuse, and suicide—YA and middle-grade novels are increasingly taking mental illness head-on. We'll discuss how these issues are being portrayed in books for younger readers, why it’s so important, and how to do it right. We'll also cover coping skills and self-care as tools for both successful characters and writers.

Ann Jacobus is the author of young adult novel, Romancing the Dark in the City of Light. She earned her MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from Vermont College of Fine Arts and is a volunteer crisis-line and outreach counselor for San Francisco Suicide Prevention.


Twitter Username: AnnJacobusSF

Website: www.annjacobus.com

Nancy Bo Flood received her PhD in Neuro-Pyschology and Child Development from the University of Minnesota followed by post-graduate studies researching motivation and memory. Award-winning books include middle grade novel, Soldier Sister, Fly Home, depicting multi-generational ways war and affects every family.

Karen Fortunati’s debut, The Weight of Zero, received the Connecticut Book Award and was recognized by the International Literacy Association. A former attorney, Karen serves on her city's Board of Aldermen and works part time as a museum educator. She lives in Connecticut with her family.


Twitter Username: karenfortunati

Brandy Colbert is the award-winning author of the young adult novels Pointe, Little & Lion, and Finding Yvonne, as well as the forthcoming The Revolution of Birdie Randolph and critically acclaimed essays and short fiction that have been published in various anthologies.


Twitter Username: brandycolbert

Martine Leavitt is the author of ten novels for young adult readers, including the following: Calvin, winner of the Governor General’s Award of Canada; My Book of Life by Angel, finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; and Keturah and Lord Death, finalist for the National Book Award.

D135, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R230. The Experiment: Density, Intensity and Identity of Innovative Writing Forms. (, , , , ) Acknowledging the broadness of “experimental writing,” our panel's goal is to discuss how the term generates a set of interlaced questions about art as it lives on maps, in texts, and even in bodies that produce their own readings: our BODY as artists. We publish hybrid texts and write on disabled, veteran-adjacent political identity, Black, Turkish, Mexican, American, and imagined homelands engaged in various conceptualizations and practices conditioned within and outside the university.

Cathy Thomas is a University of California President's Dissertation Year Fellow examining carnivalesque in Caribbean literature and comics. On her 10th birthday, she received a microscope and a journal. She wonders if she’s a scientist writing poems or a poet doing science—likely neither or both happens in her fiction.


Twitter Username: iamcathywithac

Etkin Camoglu is a Turkish American writer whose short fiction has appeared in Sonora Review, Meridian, and Blackbird among others. A PhD fiction candidate at Florida State University, Etkin is working on a novel while living in Dublin, Ireland.

Kelly Dulaney is the author of the hybrid novella Ash. Her writing appears in various journals. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Colorado in Boulder and is the editor of The Cupboard Pamphlet.


Twitter Username: kcd313

Whitney DeVos is a PhD candidate in Literature at UC Santa Cruz, with a creative/critical concentration, where she studies experimental poetics of the Americas. She is the author of a chapbook, On Being Blonde, and has published creative work in Whiskey Island, lo-ball, Spork online, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: whitnefied

Christopher David Rosales is the author of the novel Silence the Bird, Silence the Keeper, which won the McNamara Creative Arts Grant. An assistant professor at the Jack Kerouac School, he received his doctorate from the University of Denver.


Twitter Username: cdrosales

D136, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R231. Suburban Deserts: Creating Literary Oases Outside the City. (, , , ) Running a literary center or festival anywhere is difficult, but organizations located outside major cities face unique circumstances. This panel will discuss the marketing and organizational challenges of building a literary community in non-centralized locations. Learn about building a brand and attracting diverse audiences, as well as creating sustainable funding streams based on the experiences of a rural public library, a small city writing center, and a suburban literary festival.

Suzanne Rigdon manages the annual Fall for the Book festival in Fairfax, Virginia, where she also teaches undergraduate literature and digital creative writing. She is the author of the novel Into the Night.


Twitter Username: SuzyRigdon

Kara Oakleaf directs the Fall for the Book festival and teaches English at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Her work appears or is forthcoming in Wigleaf, SmokeLong Quarterly, Monkeybicycle, Jellyfish Review, Nimrod, Stirring, Tahoma Literary Review, and others.


Twitter Username: karaoakleaf

Kurt Zwolfer is the executive director of the Cabin Center for Readers and Writers in Boise, Idaho. He has over eighteen years of experience creating and administering public education programs including previous work at Idaho State Parks and the Idaho State Historical Museum.

Chantal Strobel is the Communications and Development Director for the Deschutes Public Library and has organized literary events for twenty-five years. Prior to working at the Deschutes Public Library, she served as an account executive at Hill & Knowlton and an assistant editor at San Diego Magazine.

D137-138, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R232. 25 Years of Creative Nonfiction: An Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) Since 1994, Creative Nonfiction magazine has inspired and supported writers of true stories and has been a tireless advocate for the genre. The magazine showcases a diverse range of writers and writing, and almost every issue features at least one writer’s first publication. Help celebrate a quarter-century of Creative Nonfiction with brief readings by four contributors and contest winners and founding editor Lee Gutkind's reflections on a quarter century of publishing.

Lee Gutkind, founding editor of Creative Nonfiction magazine, is the author or editor of many books, including Many Sleepless Nights: The World of Organ Transplantation and Stuck in Time: The Tragedy of Childhood Mental Illness. He is Distinguished Writer in Residence at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: leegutkind

Dinty W.Moore is author of The Story Cure: A Book Doctor's Pain-Free Guide to Finishing Your Novel or Memoir, the memoir Between Panic & Desire, and numerous other books of nonfiction. 


Twitter Username: brevitymag

Website: www.dintywmoore.com

Brenda Miller is the author of five essay collections, and co-author of Tell It Slant: Creating, Refining, and Publishing Creative Nonfiction and The Pen and The Bell: Mindful Writing in a Busy World. Her work has received six Pushcart Prizes. She teaches English at Western Washington University.

Brian Broome is the 2018 K. Leroy Irvis MFA Fellow at the University of Pittsburgh. His work can be found in The Guardian, Hippocampus and Creative Nonfiction. His work deals primarily with navigating the world as an African American, gay man. More at brianbroome.com

Suzanne Roberts is the author of the memoir Almost Somewhere: Twenty-Eight Days on the John Muir Trail (winner of the National Outdoor Book Award), as well as four collections of poetry. She teaches for the MFA program in creative writing at Sierra Nevada College at Lake Tahoe.


Twitter Username: SuzanneRoberts

Website: http://www.suzanneroberts.net

D139-140, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R233. Bridging The Gap: How & Why Historical Writers Build Bridges To The Past . (, , , Jen Julian) What makes historical writers unique is our desire to bridge gaps from our current world to worlds we left behind in the past. Through the lens of single lives, we tell the stories of the past's constructive/destructive impact on the present, moments of change, and battles between Old World and New. We explore moral history, the evolution of ideas, and the tantalizing could-have-beens. A panel of writers with diverse visions discuss the hows and whys of their mission to bridge history's gaps.

Michael Pritchett is author of The Melancholy Fate of Capt. Lewis and The Venus Tree and winner of an Iowa Short Fiction Award and a Dana Award. He recently received a Pushcart Prize nomination from New Letters. He teaches fiction writing at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Amy Brill is the author of The Movement of Stars and a 2015 NYFA fiction fellow. Her fiction and essays have been appeared in One Story, The Common, Guernica, and several anthologies, and she has been awarded residencies at Millay Colony, Jentel, the American Antiquarian Society, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: amy_brill

Website: http://www.amybrill.com

Phong Nguyen is the author of The Adventures of Joe Harper, Pages from the Textbook of Alternate History, and Memory Sickness. He is coeditor of Pleiades. He coedited the book Nancy Hale: The Life and Work of a Lost American Master. He teaches creative writing at the University of Central Missouri.


Twitter Username: AlternaHistory

Website: http://www.phongvnguyen.com

E141-142, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R234. Give a Good Reading. (, , , ) Writers are entertainers. And yet, sometimes we're the worst presenters of our own writing. Why do we spend so much time composing and editing and so little time practicing reading our work? Who are readers we love and what can we learn from them? How can we better prepare, more frequently share, and give life to our work off the page?

Angel Nafis is the author of BlackGirl Mansion. With poet Morgan Parker, she is The Other Black Girl Collective, an internationally touring Black Feminist poetry duo. Nafis was a recipient of the 2016 Ruth Lilly & Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation and a 2017 NEA.


Twitter Username: angelnafis

Website: http://angelnafis.tumblr.com/

Hieu Minh Nguyen is a Kundiman fellow, a National Endowment for Arts Literature Fellow, a poetry editor for Muzzle Magazine, & the author of This Way to the Sugar, and Not Here. His poems have appeared in publications such as Poetry Magazine, Guernica, Indiana Review, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: hieuminh

Website: hieuminhnguyen.com

Leigh Lucas has a BA in Creative Writing from Stanford and an MFA in Creative Writing from Warren Wilson. She is a regular contributor to literary journal A Women's Thing and is part of comic-making duo Sqid Inc with illustrator David Lanham. She is working on her first book.


Twitter Username: leighluc

Michael Goetzman is an editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and a graduate of Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers.


Twitter Username: m_goetz

E143-144, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R235. Reading in an Age of Chaos. (, , , , ) Transgender civil rights and funding for the arts are, not coincidentally, both under attack by the United States government. These attempts at restricting access in society for trans and nonbinary people, and the calls to end the NEA are both neofascist tactics to narrow culture itself. Hear from transgender and nonbinary writers and poets who are producing work outside of the staid "coming out" story. Speculative fiction, experimental and narrative poetry, and literary fiction are all represented.

Everett Maroon is a memoirist, humorist, and fiction writer. He is a member of the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association and was a finalist in their 2010 literary contest for memoir. Everett is the author of a memoir, Bumbling into Body Hair, and a young adult novel, The Unintentional Time Traveler.


Twitter Username: everettmaroon

Website: www.transplantportation.com

Carter Sickels is the author of the novel The Evening Hour, and the editor of Untangling the Knot: Queer Voices on Marriage, Relationships & Identity. He is Assistant Professor of Creating Writing at Eastern Kentucky University.


Twitter Username: cartersickels

Website: cartersickels.com

Katie Kaput is a queer poet, a zinester, and the kind of mother who makes a pretty bad-ass home. She has had work published in numerous anthologies. You can find her performing her poetry anywhere they will let her and some places they might not if they knew.

Trace Peterson is a trans woman poet critic. Author of the poetry collection Since I Moved In, she is also founding editor/publisher of EOAGH Books, which has won two Lambda Literary Awards, and coeditor of the anthology Troubling the Line, which was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in 2014.


Twitter Username: tracepeterson

Website: http://eoagh.com

Ashley Young is a Black, Queer and genderqueer, poet, writer, tarot reader, and witch. They are a contributor to GO Magazine and have been featured in three anthologies. They are currently working on their first novel, an Audre Lorde-inspired biomythography, as well as a collection of poetry.

E145, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R236. Maintaining Beginner's Mind in Your Own Classroom: A Poetry Reading. (, , , , ) “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities,” Shunryu Suzuki writes in Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, “but in the expert’s there are few.” This panel refutes this dichotomy by featuring expert poets at play and inviting the audience to join the fun. Panelists will read poems inspired by prompts they have assigned each other, discussing the prompts as avenues to beginner’s mind. Then the audience will try a prompt on the spot, bringing the rest home for personal or classroom use.

Amie Whittemore is the author of Glass Harvest and an educator. Her poetry has been recognized with a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize and featured in North American Review, Smartish Pace, Gettysburg Review, the Missouri Review Poem of the Week, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: amiewhittemore

Mary Biddinger's most recent collection of poems are Small Enterprise and The Czar. A Professor of English at the University of Akron and NEOMFA program, she edits the Akron Series in Poetry at the University of Akron Press. Biddinger is the recipient of a 2015 poetry fellowship from the NEA.


Twitter Username: marybid

Website: marybiddinger.com

Adrienne Su is the author of four books of poems, most recently Living Quarters. A 2007 NEA fellow, she is the poet in residence at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania.


Twitter Username: adriennesu

Website: adriennesu.ink

Keith S. Wilson is an Affrilachian Poet, Cave Canem fellow, graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and recipient of three Bread Loaf scholarships. He holds an MFA in poetry from Chicago State University. Keith works as a writer and game designer in Chicago.


Twitter Username: robottomulatto

Cameron Barnett holds an MFA from the University of Pittsburgh, and is the author of The Drowning Boy's Guide to Water. He teaches middle school language arts in Pittsburgh, PA, and works with various journals and reading series in the city.


Twitter Username: cambarnett89

Website: www.cameronbarnett.net

E146, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R237. So You Think You Need a Website: A Tech-Wonk(ish) Lesson for DIYers. (, , , , ) You know you need an author site, but you don’t want to pay a designer, because you’re a writer and can’t afford such extravagances. Or you’re thinking of launching an online journal, but you have no idea where to start. If either description sounds familiar, then this is the panel to visit for a down-and-dirty tutorial for using web-publishing apps such as Wordpress, Squarespace, and others. Tips will be offered for creating a dynamic Internet presence without losing your mind or your shirt.

Sonia Greenfield is the author of three poetry books, Circus Gravitas, American Parable, and Boy with a Halo at the Farmer's Market, winner of the 2014 Codhill Poetry Award and a 2015 Poetry Foundation Staff Pick. Editor of Rise Up Review, she directs the Southern California Poetry Festival.


Twitter Username: SoniaGreenfield

Website: soniagreenfield.com

Corrie Williamson is the author of Sweet Husk, winner of the 2014 Perugia Press Prize, and, forthcoming, The River Where You Forgot My Name, winner of the 2018 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Competition. Her poems have appeared in the Missouri Review, AGNI, West Branch, and elsewhere.

Candace Williams is a black queer nerd, poet, and middle school educator. Her chapbook, Spells for Black Wizards, won the TAR Series. She’s appeared in Sixth Finch, Bennington Review, and Bettering American Poetry 2016. In a past life, she was in charge of digital marketing at tech startups.


Twitter Username: teacherc

Michelle Menting is poetry and nonfiction editor of Split Rock Review and the author of three poetry collections. The recipient of awards from Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and the National Park Service, she holds an MFA and PhD in literature & creative writing, and is a YA librarian in Belfast, Maine.

Nicole Byrne is a queer poet who earned her MFA degree from Wichita State University. She is the editorial assistant for SFK Press and The New Southern Fugitives. She has previously worked in marketing, social media management, and digital editing. Her work has appeared in several literary journals.


Twitter Username: nicolebyrnepoet

E147-148, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R238. Wild Girl Poets: A Reading and Reckoning. (, , , , ) This reading and conversation features a new generation of Asian American women poets who declare themselves “wild girl poets,” a term Marilyn Chin used during a Kundiman gathering to signify the spirit of Asian American women who defy stereotypes. Being a wild girl poet is having a crew of wild girls fighting with you. It’s about resistance, about taking risks, about matrilineal and literary lineage, about laughter, about not being afraid of being too loud or too quiet.

Michelle Penaloza is the author of landscape/heartbreak and Last Night I Dreamt of Volcanoes. A Kundiman fellow, Penaloza has been published by New England ReviewPleiades, and Vinyl, with poems forthcoming in Prairie Schooner and Third Coast


Twitter Username: pennyzola

Jennifer S. Cheng writes poetry, lyric essay, and image-text. She is the author of Moon: Letters, Maps, Poems and House A. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Hong Kong and received fellowships and awards from Brown University, University of Iowa, Kundiman, Bread Loaf, and the Academy of American Poets.


Twitter Username: mooncake

Website: www.jenniferscheng.com

Sally Wen Mao is the author of two poetry collections, Oculus and Mad Honey Symposium. She is the recipient of fellowships from the New York Public Library Cullman Center and the Jenny McKean Moore program at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: sallywenmao

Soham Patel is a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee where she also serves as a poetry editor for cream city review.

Diana Khoi Nguyen’s debut collection, Ghost Of (Omnidawn, 2018), was selected by Terrance Hayes for the Omnidawn Open Contest. She is a poet and multimedia artist based in Denver where she is pursuing a PhD in creative writing from the University of Denver.


Twitter Username: fitproblems

Website: www.dianakhoinguyen.com

F149, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R239. Playwriting in the Pacific Northwest: Unique Region, Unique Craft 2.0. (, , , ) Playwrights in the Pacific Northwest share many commonalities: rainforest weather, ocean, snowcapped mountains, coffee and earthquakes. But is there a cultural commonality that exists amongst playwrights in the region a.k.a. Cascadia? If there is, how has it affected their development as playwrights and in particular, their plays? Can they stay local, connect North, South? Should they look West, to Asia? Or should their focus remain with the East, and its traditional, national theater faultlines?

Bryan Wade is a playwright, radio writer, and novelist. Scavenge is a recent audio drama Chatterbox Audio Theater podcast. He teaches stage play/podcasting in UBC’s Creative Writing. 

Ramón Esquivel teaches playwriting and theatre education Central Washington University. Recent premieres include The Hero Twins: Blood Race  and Above Between Below. Published plays include: Luna, Nasty, and Nocturnal.


Twitter Username: Bub1974

Website: https://www.dramaticpublishing.com/authors/profile/view/url/ramon-esquivel

Cathy Tagnak Rexford is a playwright, poet, and fiction writer. She is a Full Circle Aboriginal Ensemble Member and an Aboriginal Graduate Fellow at the University of British Columbia's Joint MFA in Creative Writing and Theatre Program.

E.M. Lewis is a playwright and opera librettist. Winner of the American Theater Critics Association's Steinberg Award and Primus Prize, a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, and the Oregon Literary Fellowship in Drama. Works include Magellanica, Song of Extinction, and The Gun Show.


Twitter Username: ellmarlew

Website: www.emlewisplaywright.com

F150, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R240. Revelation or Resistance? Form and Narrative at the End of the World. (, , , ) Cyberwar, superviruses, climate change, AI uprising, nuclear armageddon: the future grows ever more uncertain, the end ever nearer. We write today under the shadow of an impending, inchoate, dystopian doom. Three innovative, genre-bending novelists ponder the aesthetics of disaster, the ethics of witnessing, and the question of what narrative and form mean at the end of the world. Is writing fiction escapist fantasy, an act of prophecy, or a kind of interruption? Revelation, or resistance?

Roy Scranton is the author of Learning to Die in the Anthropocene, the novel War Porn, and the essay collection We're Doomed. Now What? He teaches at the University of Notre Dame.


Twitter Username: royscranton

Website: http://www.royscranton.com/

Hilary Plum's books include Strawberry Fields, winner of the Fence Modern Prize in Prose, and Watchfires, winner of the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award for Creative Nonfiction. She teaches at Cleveland State University and in the NEOMFA program, and she is associate director of the CSU Poetry Center.

Mark Doten is the author of two novels, Trump Sky Alpha and The Infernal. He was named in 2017 to Granta’s once-a-decade list “Best of Young American Novelists." He is the literary fiction editor at Soho Press, teaches in Columbia's MFA program, and lives in New Jersey.


Twitter Username: markedoten

Eugene Lim is the author of the novels Fog & Car, The Strangers, and Dear Cyborgs. His writings have appeared in Fence, Little Star, The Denver Quarterly, The Brooklyn Rail, Jacket2, Your Impossible Voice, and elsewhere. He runs Ellipsis Press and works as a librarian at a high school.


Twitter Username: lim_eugene

F151, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R241. Reimagining disABILITY Through Literature. (, , , , ) This event features four diverse, well-published, award-winning writers of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction discussing and reading excerpts of their writing that moves beyond stereotypes and stigmas to reimagine a variety of disabilities: physical, mental, and emotional.

Marianne Murphy Zarzana is an associate professor of English at Southwest Minnesota State University. For the past three years, she has taught a multidisciplinary Contemporary Issues in Society class that she created: Re-imagining disABILITY through Literature, Film & Media.


Twitter Username: prairiepoet

Website: www.mariannezarzana.com

Christine Stewart-Nuñez wrote Snow, Salt, Honey; Keeping Them Alive; Postcard on Parchment; Unbound & Branded; and The Love of Unreal Things. Her piece “An Archeology of Secrets” was a Notable Essay in Best American Essays 2012. She teaches at South Dakota State University.

Dana Yost was an award-winning daily newspaper journalist for twenty-nine years, until a severe increase in mental health problems led him to leave the industry. He is the author of five books. His poems often are about mental illness and mental health care. He is a three-time Pushcart nominee.

Christine Stark is an award-winning writer and visual artist of Anishinaabe/Cherokee ancestry. Her essays, poems, and creative nonfiction have appeared in numerous publications. Her first novel, Nickels: A Tale of Dissociation, was a Lambda Literary Finalist. 

Cassie J. Williams earned a BA in Creative Writing and an MA in Education (English emphasis) from Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota. She has presented at schools and events in the Twin Cities and Marshall. She has published her work in a variety of literary journals.

F152, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R242. Reviewing the Review: Literary Journals as Student Professional Development . (, , , , ) While literary journals have been a tradition in academia, there has been increased pressure in the Humanities to provide vocation-oriented opportunities. Panelists will discuss their experiences in undergraduate, graduate, and organizational support contexts as they describe the student-centered literary landscape and how their editorial and pedagogical philosophies have evolved to address technological, financial, and cultural shifts in the spirit of high impact student experiences.

Sequoia Nagamatsu is the author of the story collection, Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone. His stories have appeared in ConjunctionsZYZZYVABlack Warrior Review, and Electric Literature, among others. He is an editor of Psychopomp Magazine and an assistant professor at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: sequoian

Website: http://sequoianagamatsu.net

Patricia Ann McNair is the author of And These Are The Good Times and The Temple of Air, winner of Chicago Writers Association Book of the Year. She directs the undergraduate programs in Creative Writing at Columbia College Chicago where she is an Associate Professor in Fiction and Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: PatriciaAMcNair

Website: www.PatriciaAnnMcNair.com

MIchael Czyzniejewski is the author of three collections of stories: I Will Love You for the Rest of My Life: Breakup Stories, Chicago Stories, and Elephants in Our Bedroom. He teaches at Missouri State University, where he edits Moon City Review. In 2010, he received an NEA Fellowship in fiction.

Sarah Einstein is an Asst. Professor of Creative Writing at UT Chattanooga. Her book, Mot: A Memoir was selected for the AWP Prize in Creative Nonfiction for 2014. She's the Special Projects Editor for Brevity and her work has appeared in The Sun, Ninth Letter, and other journals and been awarded a Pushcart Prize.


Twitter Username: sarahemc2

Website: http://saraheinstein.com/

Natalie Mesnard is a writer and game designer currently employed at Grove Atlantic as a digital media strategist. She has worked with numerous literary magazines as an editor, teacher, volunteer, and advocate. Her award-winning board game, DemocraSea, is forthcoming from Game Salute.


Twitter Username: nataliemesnard

Oregon Ballroom 201-202, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R243. Writing the Personal Through Fiction and Nonfiction, Sponsored by Grove/Atlantic, Hugo House, and Seattle Arts & Lectures. (, , , G. Willow Wilson) Join three highly acclaimed, award-winning writers—New York Times bestselling author Terese Marie Mailhot, New York Times notable author Pam Houston, and Hugo Award-winner G. Willow Wilson—as they discuss the rewards and challenges of depicting culture, landscape, trauma, and family across genres.

Terese Mailhot is from Seabird Island Band. Her writing appears in West Branch, Guernica, Pacific Standard, Elle, and elsewhere. She is the author of the New York Times bestselling Heart Berries: A Memoir. She is a Tecumseh Postdoctoral Fellow at Purdue University.


Twitter Username: TereseMarieM

Katie Raissian is an Associate Editor at Grove Atlantic. She is also the publisher and editor in chief of Stonecutter Journal, based in Brooklyn, New York.


Twitter Username: stonecuttermag

Pam Houston is the author of five books of fiction and nonfiction including Cowboys Are My Weakness and Contents May Have Shifted. She teaches in the CW programs at the Institute for American Indian Art and UC Davis and she directs the literary nonprofit Writing By Writers. 


Twitter Username: pam_houston

Website: pamhouston.wordpress.com

Portland Ballroom 251, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R244. Still Here: Writing Against Gentrification, Displacement and Erasure. (, , , , ) How do you tell the whole story of city like Portland—not just food trucks, lattes, and the dream of the '90s, but decades of racial exclusion, land theft, and violence? On this panel, five writers will describe how they've reclaimed the lost or erased histories of their communities through imaginative writing and literary activism, from Portland to Staten Island to the Blackfeet Nation.

Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine and the story collections The Train to Lo Wu and Nobody Ever Gets Lost. His first book of essays, White Flights: Race, Fiction, and the American Imagination, is forthcoming. He teaches at the College of New Jersey.


Twitter Username: rowjess

Website: www.jessrow.com

Samiya Bashir’s three books of poetry, Field Theories, Gospel, and Where the Apple Falls. She teaches at Reed College.


Twitter Username: scryptkeeper

Website: http://www.samiyabashir.com

Jen Fitzgerald is a poet/writer/photographer. Author of The Art of Work and a member of N.Y. Writers Workshop. She teaches writing workshops online and around NYC. Work featured on and in: PBS Newshour, Tin House, Boston Review, New England Review, and Salon, among others.


Twitter Username: bestfitzgerald

Website: www.jenfitzgerald.com

Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel The Residue Years won a Whiting Award and the Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence. It was also a finalist for the PEN / Hemingway Award, The Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel prize, and the Hurston Wright Legacy award.


Twitter Username: mitchsjackson

Website: www.mitchellsjackson.com

Portland Ballroom 252, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R245. Applying for an Individual NEA Creative Writing Fellowship. (, , , ) Want to know what the National Endowment for the Arts fellowships are all about? Staff members from the NEA’s Literature Division discuss and advise on all aspects of the program, including how to submit an application, how winning poets and prose writers are selected, and the impact the fellowships have had on the literary landscape. Plenty of time will be allotted for questions.

Mohamed Sheriff is a Literature Specialist at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Jessica Flynn is a Literature Specialist at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Amy Stolls is the Director of Literature at the National Endowment for the Arts.


Twitter Username: amystolls

Katy Day is the Assistant Grants Management Specialist for Literature at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Portland Ballroom 253-254, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R246. A Reading & Conversation with Dawn Lundy Martin, Morgan Parker, and Evie Shockley, Sponsored by Cave Canem. (, , , ) Three award-winning poets give brief readings, followed by a moderated conversation about poetry as a space for complex negotiations and radical reimaginings. While the meaning of diversity is being debated, these poets' unique voices and varied strategies expand the discourse beyond considerations of race and ethnicity. Their views of the poet as artist and social being disrupt familiar tropes assigned to “the writer of color.”

Evie Shockley is author of the poetry books semiautomatic (Pulitzer Prize finalist) and the new black (Hurston/Wright Legacy Award winner), and the critical study Renegade Poetics: Black Aesthetics and Formal Innovation in African American Poetry. She is Professor of English at Rutgers University.

Morgan Parker is the author of There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé and Other People’s Comfort Keeps Me Up At Night. She is the recipient of a 2017 National Endowment of the Arts Literature Fellowship, winner of a 2016 Pushcart Prize, and a Cave Canem graduate fellow.


Twitter Username: morganapple

Website: www.morgan-parker.com

Dawn Lundy Martin, PhD, is Professor in the English Department at the University of Pittsburgh. Her books include A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of GatheringDiscipline, finalist for the LA Times Book Prize; Life in a Box is a Pretty Life; and Good Stock, Strange Blood.


Twitter Username: dawnlundy

Website: http://www.writing.pitt.edu/people/faculty/dawn-lundy-martin

Fatimah Asghar is a nationally touring poet, photographer, and performer. She has received fellowships and residencies from Fulbright, Millay, University of Michigan, and Kundiman. Her work has appeared in many journals. Her chapbook After is a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book Award.


Twitter Username: asgharthegrouch

Website: www.fatimahasghar.com

Portland Ballroom 255, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R247. Dear Lit Mag Editors: Now What?. (, , , Phillip B. Williams, Luther Hughes) When writers send their work to magazines, they know it will be just one in thousands. What makes one submission stand out from all the others? At this panel, five lit mag editors talk about what they want from a submission—and what they don’t want. They cover the practical as well as the more elusive questions, giving writers a chance to get beyond the guidelines and ask questions of their own. Journals represented include Ecotone, Epiphany, Iowa Review, New England Review, and Poetry.

Carolyn Kuebler is the editor of New England Review. Before coming to NER as managing editor in 2004, she was an editor at Library Journal and founding editor of Rain Taxi. She has published her writing in various magazines, literary and otherwise.


Twitter Username: NERweb

Anna Lena Phillips Bell is the author of Ornament, winner of the 2016 Vassar Miller Prize, and the artist's book A Pocket Book of Forms. The recipient of a North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship in literature, she is editor of Ecotone and Lookout Books, and she teaches at University of North Carolina Wilmington.


Twitter Username: thenewnewyear

Website: http://todointhenewyear.net

Lindsay Garbutt is the associate editor of Poetry and one of the judges of the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowships. She cohosts the Poetry Magazine Podcast with Don Share.


Twitter Username: garbls

Portland Ballroom 256, Oregon Convention Center, Level 2

R248. Furies for Muses: The Poetry of Anger. (, , , , ) In an era of upheaval, outrage, and resistance, some of the best poems of our time are fueled by anger. Anger can be mobilizing and transformative, and destructive without an viable outlet for expression. How do poets write into, out of, and through anger? The panel discusses anger as a generative and even necessary creative force and explores complexities and implications of voice, identity, power, transgression, and transformation in poetry that invokes, and sometimes evokes, fury.

Heather June Gibbons is the author of Her Mouth as Souvenir, winner of the 2017 Agha Shahid Ali Poetry Prize and forthcoming from the University of Utah Press. A graduate of the Iowa Writers Workshop, she teaches at San Francisco State University and in the community.


Twitter Username: HJune4

Website: http://www.heatherjunegibbons.com/

Vievee Francis is the author of three poetry collections, Blue-Tail Fly, Horse in the Dark, and Forest Primeval. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry (2010, 2014, 2017), and Angles of Ascent: A Norton Anthology of Contemporary African American Poetry among other places.

Barbara Jane Reyes is the author of Invocation to DaughtersDiwataPoeta en San Francisco, and others. She teaches in the Yuchengco Philippine Studies Program at University of San Francisco.

Cate Marvin teaches at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York. Her most recent book of poems is Oracle.


Twitter Username: catemarvin

Website: www.catemarvin.com

Vanessa Angélica Villarreal was born in the Rio Grande Valley, borderlands to formerly undocumented Mexican immigrants. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Southern California, a CantoMundo Fellow, and the author of the mythic hybrid poetry collection, Beast Meridian.


Twitter Username: Vanessid

Zachary A. Doss Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R249. A Woman's Place. (Katrina Carrasco, Madeline ffitch, Tessa Fontaine, Chia-Chia Lin, ) What happens when you let your strong female characters step outside their boxes? Four writers talk about working with places and situations not often found in literature and the ways in which these energize and inform their storytelling. Also featuring Lydia Kiesling and Jenna Johnson.

Ling Ma is the author of Severance. She received her MFA from Cornell University. Her writing has appeared in Granta, Vice, Playboy, Chicago Reader, Ninth Letter and elsewhere. She lives in Chicago.

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R249B. North of the 49th: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relations in Creative Writing. (Jill Yonit Goldberg, Dorothy Palmer) What happens when our institutions crack open to reveal the damage that lies beneath the facade? On many social and political fronts North of the 49th, writers, students, and academics are taking a hard look at the legacy of colonization and the systemic ways it undermines the full humanity of all writers. In this panel and reading, creative writing students and members of the Board of Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs will share our experiences advocating for change in our institutions and individual practices, and learning from the cultural shifts around us. Collectively, we’ll take on questions of disability/accessibility, Indigenization, race, gender, sexuality, and the ways our relationships with each other are altered when we acknowledge the generations-long influences of colonization and capitalism and their patriarchal origin stories.

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

D129, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R250. Narrative Healing: Yoga & Writing Workshop. (Lisa Weinert) Open to all! This full-body, full-spirit storytelling experience will use yoga, writing and listening exercises to inspire a holistic and freeing storytelling experience. This 75-minute afternoon workshop will include a gentle yoga practice, writing prompts and listening exercises. These classes will build off each other; come for the entire series or drop in for a single class. Wear comfortable clothing and bring a pen and paper.

A103-104, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R251. A Flash of Difference: Diversity and Inclusion in Flash Fiction. (, , , , ) Flash fiction is having a moment, but how diverse is the field? What is the state of flash in terms of race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual identity/orientation, and disability? Panelists will introduce underrepresented flash writers and resources that amplify traditionally marginalized voices. This panel is suitable for multiple audiences: educators who want to diversify their curricula, readers who want to broaden their reading lists, and publishers who want to enrich their author rosters.

Tara Campbell is a fiction editor at Barrelhouse, a Kimbilio Fellow, and an MFA candidate at American University. She is the author of TreeVolution (novel) and Circe’s Bicycle (fiction and poetry collection). She teaches fiction at American University, the Writer’s Center and the National Gallery of Art.


Twitter Username: TaraCampbellCom

Website: www.taracampbell.com

Marlena Chertock has two books of poetry: Crumb-sized and On that one-way trip to Mars. She uses her skeletal dysplasia as a bridge to scientific poetry. Marlena lives in Washington, DC and serves as Communications Coordinator for the LGBTQ Writers Caucus.


Twitter Username: mchertock

Website: http://marlenachertock.com/

Christopher Gonzalez serves as a fiction editor at Barrelhouse. His fiction has appeared in Split Lip, Pithead Chapel, The Acentos Review, JMWW Journal, Spelk, and elsewhere. He currently works in book publishing and lives in New York.


Twitter Username: livesinpages

Erinrose Mager's work appears in The Collagist, Passages North, DIAGRAM, The Adroit Journal, New South, Hyphen, BOMB, and elsewhere. She is a Creative Writing/Literature PhD student at the University of Denver. She received her MFA from Washington University in St. Louis.


Twitter Username: erinrose_mager

Megan Giddings is a fiction editor at The Offing and a contributing editor at Boulevard. Her work has been in Black Warrior ReviewGulf Coast, and The Iowa Review among other places. Her debut novel, Lakewood, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: megiddings

A105, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R252. Writing the Mother Wound. (, , , , ) We live in a culture that idealizes mother love, and shames those who question it. Five multi-genre writers share how they address and interrogate the complex realities of mother-daughter relationships. How do we push back on the silence imposed on those who are un-mothered, abused, or choose to not be mothers themselves? How do we use our lives as fodder to create stories that are realistic and not overly sentimental, with the audacity of truth?

Vanessa Martir has been published in The Rumpus and Roxane Gay’s anthology Not That Bad, among others. She is the founder of the Writing Our Lives Workshop which she teaches online and in person in NYC. Vanessa is working on finishing her memoir A Dim Capacity for Wings.


Twitter Username: Vanessa_LaLoba

Website: vanessamartir.wordpress.com

Jaquira Díaz is the author of Ordinary Girls, forthcoming from Algonquin, and recipient of fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, and the Kenyon Review. Her work appears in The Best American EssaysLongreads, and The New York Times Style Magazine.


Twitter Username: jaquiradiaz

Website: www.jaquiradiaz.com

Elisabet Velasquez is Latina writer from Bushwick, Brooklyn. Her work has been published by NBC, WeAreMiTu, and AJ+. She is the 2017 Button Poetry Video Prize Winner. She is the author of the chapbook PTSD.

Rene Denfeld is the bestselling author of The Enchanted and The Child Finder, novels inspired by her work on death row and with sex trafficking victims. Her work has won numerous prestigious awards. In addition to her activism and writing, she has been a foster-adoptive mother for over twenty years.


Twitter Username: ReneDenfeld

Website: www.renedenfeld.com

Michele Filgate is the editor of What My Mother And I Don’t Talk About, forthcoming. She’s a contributing editor at Literary Hub, and a board member of the National Book Critics Circle. She teaches creative nonfiction for Catapult and Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop.


Twitter Username: readandbreathe

Website: www.michelefilgate.com

A106, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R253. Women Editors on the Power of Change. (, , , Luciana Ricciutelli, ) Female, feminist, and womanist editors from a variety of contexts discuss the perceived and real power they hold and how they wield their actual power for a more just publishing environment. With experience across book publishing, literary magazines, a popular culture magazine, freelancing, and VIDA, which supports gender representation in media, these editors discuss the trials and joys of working for a more gender and racially diverse publishing world within a range of boundaries and purposes.

Lisa Roney is editor in chief of the Florida Review and Aquifer: TFR Online. Author of Sweet Invisible Body (memoir), The Best Possible Bad Luck (poetry), and craft guide Serious Daring: Creative Writing in Four Genres, she is Associate Professor of English at University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: seriousdaring1

Website: http://lisaroney.com

Kim Brown is the Founder and Editor of Minerva Rising Literary Journal. Her work has appeared in Black Lives Have Always Mattered, The Feminine Collective, Mused BellaOnline Literary Review, Compass Literary Magazine, and Chicago Tribune. Kimberly has MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College.


Twitter Username: kimgarrettbrown

Lauren Rosemary Hook is senior editor at the Feminist Press. She seeks to continue FP's legacy of publishing diverse international works by women and has acquired fiction titles in translation from Equatorial Guinea, Thailand, Poland, Uruguay, and Martinique, among others.


Twitter Username: laurenrosamaria

Jill Bialosky’s four poetry collections include the recent The Players. She’s authored three novels, recently The Prize, and two memoirs, NYT Bestseller History of a Suicide and Poetry Will Save Your Life. Her writing appears in the New Yorker, Paris Review and more. She is an editor at W.W. Norton.

A107-109, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R254. Matter of Craft: Aesthetic Choices & Consequences in Diaspora Narratives. (, , , , ) Can complex social concepts like transnational identity be represented effectively through narrative tools such as voice? What are the aesthetic and ethical considerations to keep in mind when using such tools? Our multi-genre, multi-national panel will discuss the power of point-of-view, code-switching, genre-manipulation, character, and other aesthetic choices when addressing issues of immigration and displacement in writing.

David N. Odhiambo is the author of three novels: diss/ed banded nation, Kipligat's Chance, and The Reverend's Apprentice. His next novel, Smells Like Stars, will be published in the Fall. He is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Hawai'i, West O'ahu.


Twitter Username: Nandi Odhiambo

Ranjan Adiga is a fiction writer whose stories have appeared in Story Quarterly, South Asian Review, and 34th Parallel, among others. His upcoming story collection explores the nature of desire and tradition in changing societies of Kathmandu, Nepal. He teaches creative writing at Westminster College.

Anna Ling Kaye’s fiction has been published internationally and short-listed for The Journey Prize. Former editor at PRISM International and Ricepaper magazines, she guest edited The New Quarterly's issue #143. She sits on the board of Project Bookmark Canada and directs Hapa-palooza Festival.


Twitter Username: annalingkaye

Leanne Dunic is a biracial multi-disciplinary artist and musician, and the author/composer of the trans-media work To Love the Coming End. In 2018, she received the Ema Saiko Poetry Fellowship. Leanne leads the band The Deep Cove and is the artistic director a Japanese Canadian arts organization.


Twitter Username: leannedunic

Website: www.leannedunic.com

Khaty Xiong is the author of Poor Anima, which is the first full-length collection of poetry published by a Hmong American woman in the United States. A recipient of the MacDowell Colony fellowship, Xiong has been featured in Poetry, the Academy of American Poets, the New York Times, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: khatyxiong

Website: khatyxiong.com

B110-112, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R255. Debut Authors: Navigating All the Seasons of Book Publication. (, , , , ) Navigating the time before and after book publication can be a daunting task, one that you'd do well by traversing with the support of your community. This panel of immigrant and working debut women authors who created an email thread six months before their book publications share lessons learned about navigating relationships with publicists, marketers, and editors, using connections to support each other, advocating for yourself, and asking for what you want.

Ingrid Rojas Contreras is the author of Fruit of the Drunken Tree, a Barnes & Noble Summer 2018 Discover Great New Writers selection. She is the book columnist for KQED, the Bay Area's NPR affiliate.


Twitter Username: ingrid_rojas_c

Crystal Hana Kim is the author of debut novel If You Leave Me. A 2017 PEN America/Dau Short Story Prize winner, she has received scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Jentel, and more. She is a contributing editor at Apogee Journal.


Twitter Username: crystalhanak

Website: www.crystalhanakim.com

Lillian Li is the author of the novel Number One Chinese Restaurant. Her work has been published in Guernica, Granta, Glimmer Train, and Jezebel. Originally from the D.C. metro area, she lives in Ann Arbor.


Twitter Username: zillianzi

Lucy Tan is the author of the novel What We Were Promised. She is a Kundiman Fellow, a Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellow, a University of Wisconsin–Madison MFA graduate, and winner of the 2015 Ploughshares Emerging Writer's Contest.

Lydia Kiesling is the author of a novel The Golden State and the editor of The Millions.


Twitter Username: lydiakiesling

B113, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R256. Can a Character “Happen To Be Queer?”: Writing Diverse vs. Token Characters. (, , , ) How can we avoid writing “token” queer characters and instead create people who participate in our narratives with full complexity and wholehearted representation? How can writers truly enact their best intentions? How can writers ensure that their queer characters (especially POC, disabled, etc.) have a real equity stake in their stories? If it is still controversial to include queer characters, how can we create a practice and a community that makes genuine diversity the norm?

Julia Leslie Guarch's poems appear in The MarquisRain Party & Disaster SocietyThe Vending MachineSunset LiminalPulse/Pulso AnthologyImpossible Archetype, and Triadæ Magazine. She was a finalist for the Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award and cowinner of the MacKnight Black Poetry Award.


Twitter Username: juliaguarch

Thomas Dane is a New York/Florida based playwright and actor. Several of his one act plays have been produced nationally. He holds a BA from the International Fine Arts College in Miami. Currently he writes for The Social Edge, as well as  on the sites of Knowable and Guacamoley.

Jess Silfa is an Afro-Latinx disability and LGBTQ rights advocate. They are working on their first novel about an immigrant community in the South Bronx. 


Twitter Username: jesilfa

Deanna M. Rasch, a recent graduate of the Mile High MFA in Creative Writing Program (Fiction and Poetry) is the author of a young adult fiction novel, Freedom's Cost, and a chapbook, Things I Won't Deny

B114, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R257. New Poets of Native Nations. (, , , , ) Graywolf Press is proud to celebrate the landmark anthology, New Poets of Native Nations, edited by Heid E. Erdrich. Featuring twenty-one poets of Native Nations whose first books were published in the twenty-first century, the anthology highlights a resurgence of Native American poetry publications since the year 2000. Five poets from the Lakota, Dakota, Shawnee, Dine, and Mojave nations perform poetry readings on Indigenous languages, lands, literatures, and more.

Heid E. Erdrich edited New Poets of Native Nations from Graywolf Press. Heid is Ojibwe, enrolled at Turtle Mountain. She authored seven books including Curator of Ephemera at the New Museum for Archaic Media. Heid teaches poetry/mixed genre at the Low Residency MFA Program of Augsburg University.


Twitter Username: HeidErdrich

Website: heiderdrich.com

Tacey M. Atsitty, Diné, is a recipient of numerous prizes and awards. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Poetry Magazine, Kenyon Review Online, Prairie Schooner, Crazyhorse, Literary Hub, and other publications. Her first book is Rain Scald.

Laura Da’ is a poet and teacher. Da’ studied creative writing at the University of Washington She is Eastern Shawnee. Her first book, Tributaries, won a 2016 American Book Award. In 2015, Da’ was a Made at Hugo House Fellow and a Jack Straw Fellow. 

Gwen Nell Westerman is a poet and visual artist. She is Dakota, enrolled with Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate. Her work appears in Yellow Medicine Review, Water-Stone Review, Natural Bridge, and on the Poetry Foundation website. She is the author of Follow the Blackbirds and War Mothers Song (forthcoming).


Twitter Username: GwenWesterman

Trevino L. Brings Plenty is a poet, musician, and multi-media artist. He received his MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. His books include Wakpá Wanáǧi, Ghost River, Real Indian Junk Jewelry, and Shedding Skins: Four Sioux Poets.

B115, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R258. The Cuba Writers Program Faculty and Alumni Reading. (, , , , ) The Cuba Writers Program launched during the Obama administration to bring writers to Cuba for workshops and engagements with Cuban artists. Its mission is to encourage meaningful interactions between the US and Cuba, and to generate writing that opens transnational dialogue. Join faculty and alumni with various perspectives—Cuban, American, Canadian, citizen, expatriate, traveler—as they share their work exploring issues specific to the Cuba/US dynamic and beyond these boundaries.

Alden Jones is the author of The Wanting Was a Wilderness, Unaccompanied Minors, and The Blind Masseuse, finalist for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award. She is codirector of the Cuba Writers Program and teaches at Emerson College and the Newport MFA Program.


Twitter Username: jones_alden

Website: aldenjones.com

Tim Weed is the author of a novel, Will Poole’s Island—named to Bank Street College of Education’s Best Books of the Year—and a short fiction collection, A Field Guide to Murder & Fly Fishing. He teaches at GrubStreet and in the Newport MFA, and is the cofounder of the Cuba Writers Program.


Twitter Username: weedlit

Ann Hood is the author of thirteen books, including most recently the novels The Obituary Writer and The Knitting Circle, as well as the memoir, Comfort: A Journey through Grief. She has been the recipient of two Pushcart Prizes and Best American Spiritual, Travel and Food Writing Awards.

Dariel Suarez is the Cuban-born author of the story collection A Kind Of Solitude, winner of the 2017 Spokane Short Fiction Prize. Dariel is Director of Core Programs and Faculty at GrubStreet, the nation's leading independent creative writing center.


Twitter Username: https://twitter.com/Darie

Suchita Chadha is a poet with a BFA in Writing, Literature, and Publishing from Emerson College, recipient of two senior writing awards: High Distinction in Poetry, and Honorable Mention in Nonfiction. She also represented Emerson at the Greater Boston Intercollegiate Poetry Festival.


Twitter Username: sucheetah

B116, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R259. How Literary Magazines Cultivate Meaningful Inclusivity. (, , , , ) So you’re looking to publish a more diverse array of voices. Is your branding conveying unintentional biases? How do you broadcast a meaningful message of inclusivity? Our panel, comprised of editors of color from a variety of literary organizations, will describe how to build an infrastructure of inclusivity that considers staffing, mentorship opportunities, and editorial choices as well as other inward- and outward-facing strategies that will actively support and attract writers of color.

Jenn Scheck-Kahn founded Journal of the Month, a service that mails a different literary magazine on a regular basis. Her prose has placed contests hosted by the Atlantic and Glimmer Train, and appeared in a number of literary journals. She earned her MFA in fiction from Bennington College.

Andrew Jimenez is a writer, editor, and literary journal publishing consultant. Former Circulation and Marketing director at The Paris Review, he is now Publishing Director at F(r)iction.

Joyce Chen is a cofounder of The Seventh Wave, a nonprofit arts and literary organization that tackles the most pressing social issues of our time through editorial work, community engagement, and education in classrooms. She has been published in Rolling Stone, People, Paste, LitHub, Narratively, and more.


Twitter Username: joycechenchen

Geeta Kothari is the nonfiction editor at The Kenyon Review. Her writing has appeared in various anthologies and journals, including Best American Essays. Her book, I Brake for Moose and Other Stories, was published last year. She teaches at the University of Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: Kothari_Geeta
Rosalyn Spencer.

B117-119, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R260. Ain’t Got Time to Die: Immortality in the New World . (, , , ) Is it still true that poets are moved by glory, the hope “that in black ink my love may still shine bright,” as Shakespeare put it in Sonnet 65? Do poets still seek the immortality of their works? Should they? Does the immortality of poems matter in a world in which the value of a human life (especially if that life is black, disabled, gay, or a non-English speaker) is so often in danger? This panel considers the value of the idea of immortality to poem and person.

Matthew Zapruder is editor at large for Wave Books, and teaches poetry in the Saint Mary's College of California MFA. His most recent book of poems is Sun BearWhy Poetry, is his book of prose. 


Twitter Username: matthewzapruder

Safiya Sinclair is the author of Cannibal, winner of the Metcalf Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Whiting Writers' Award, and named an American Library Association Notable Book of the Year. She has won a Pushcart Prize, fellowships from Yaddo, Bread Loaf, and the Poetry Foundation.


Twitter Username: SafiyaSinclair

Jericho Brown celebrates his latest book, The Tradition, at this year's AWP. A Guggenheim fellow and the Director of the Creative Writing Program at Emory University, he also wrote Please and The New Testament. His poems have appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, and TIME magazine.


Twitter Username: jerichobrown

Website: jerichobrown.com

Katie Peterson is the author of four books of poetry including The Accounts (winner of the 2014 University of North Texas Rilke Prize) and A Piece of Good News. She directs the Creative Writing Program at the University of California, Davis.

C121-122, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R261. Power, Privilege and Progress: #MeToo and the Impact on Film and Media. (, , , , ) This panel will address how #MeToo has forever changed the landscape of film production, criticism, and pedagogy. Five panelists all involved in some aspect of film and media – producers, writers, critics and academics – discuss recent changes in the industry and what new approaches should be taken to broaden our conversations around film and to encourage responsibility, inclusivity, healing and transformation.

Kavelina Torres is an MFA candidate, a Sundance Native Film alum, and an Alaska Native Playwright's Program alum. Her film, Yugumalleq, is with FNX television and the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. Her play, Something in The Living Room, raised funds for charity in Vancouver, British Columbia.


Twitter Username: SnowGigglesAK

Andi Zeisler is a writer, editor, cultural critic, and cofounder of the feminist media nonprofit Bitch Media. Her most recent book is We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrrl to CoverGirl®, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement. She works in Portland, Oregon.


Twitter Username: andizeisler

Dorothy Woodend has been the film critic for The Tyee since 2004. Her work has been published in magazines, newspapers, and books across Canada and the US, as well as a number of international publications.


Twitter Username: DorothyWoodend

Maureen Medved is a writer of fiction, stage, and screen, a film reviewer and Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia. Her writing has been published and produced internationally. Her film adaptation of her novel won a prize at the 57th Berlinale. Black Star is her second novel.


Twitter Username: maureenmedved1

Maureen Bradley is a Professor at the University of Victoria and teaches screenwriting and film production. Bradley has written and directed over forty short films that have have screened at festivals around the globe. Her award-winning feature film, Two 4 One, is available in six languages on iTunes.

C123, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R262. More Than a Witness: Writing Social Change. (, , , , ) An increasing body of literature not only blurs the boundaries between art and activism, but also transcends our most basic assumptions about what role writers might play in an unjust world. Creative nonfiction—a genre driven by truth and change—is particularly well suited to not only bear witness to injustice, but also to move readers to confront the worst societal wrongs. These writers discuss how they read, teach, write, and publish work that calls us to the art of social change.

Lacy M. Johnson is a Houston-based professor, curator, activist, and is author of the essay collection The Reckonings, the widely-acclaimed memoir The Other Side, and Trespasses: A Memoir. She teaches creative nonfiction at Rice University.


Twitter Username: lacymjohnson

Website: www.lacymjohnson.com

V.V. Ganeshananthan's debut novel, Love Marriage, was long-listed for the Orange Prize and named one of Washington Post Book World's Best of 2008. Her work has appeared in Granta and The New York Times, among others. She teaches at the University of Minnesota, and she was a 2014 NEA and Radcliffe Fellow.


Twitter Username: V_V_G

Website: www.vasugi.com

Kiese Laymon is a black southern writer, born and raised in Jackson. He is a Professor English and Creative Writing at University of Mississippi and is the author of Long Division and How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America. His memoir Heavy is forthcoming from Scribner in October 2018.

Wendy S. Walters is the author of Multiply/Divide: Essays on the American Real and Surreal and two books of poetry: Troy, Michigan and Longer I Wait, More You Love Me. She is Associate Dean of Art and Design History and Theory at Parsons, The New School.


Twitter Username: walterspot

Website: www.wendyswalters.com

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich is the author of The Fact of a Body: A Murder & A Memoir, which received a 2018 Lambda Literary Award and the Chautauqua Prize, and was named one of the best books of 2017 by The GuardianEntertainment Weekly, and Audible.com. She is an assistant professor at Bowdoin.


Twitter Username: alexandriaml

Website: http://www.alexandria-marzano-lesnevich.com/

C124, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R263. What's Craft Got to Do With It?: On Craft, Race, and the Black Imagination. (, , , , ) In an age when Black authors are on the rise, why is craft still dismissed as "bougie" or adjacent to whiteness? Why are Black narratives analyzed primarily through a sociological or anthropological lens rather than one of literary craft? Why do so many readers and writers still resist the merit of craft when it comes to Black literature? This dialogue examines, confronts, and unpacks the creative and cultural implications and potential of craft within the contemporary Black literary canon.

Dianca London Potts earned her MFA in fiction from the New School and is the former online editor of Well-Read Black Girl. Her work has been featured in Vice, Lenny Letter, Obsidian, and the Village Voice. She is a Kimbilio Fiction Fellow, VONA Voices alumna, and a Pushcart Prize nominee.


Twitter Username: diancalondon

Jessica Lanay is a poet, short fiction, and art writer. Her poetry has appeared in Fugue, THE COMMON, Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, and others. Her art writing can be found online at BOMB and ArtSlant. She is a 2018 recipient of a Millay Colony Residency. She is also a Cave Canem Fellow.


Twitter Username: jessi_lanay

Dennis Norris II is a 2017 MacDowell Colony Fellow, a 2016 Tin House Scholar, and a 2015 Kimbilio Fiction Fellow. His writing appears in SmokeLong Quarterly and Apogee Journal, where he currently serves as Fiction Editor. He holds degrees from Haverford College and Sarah Lawrence College.


Twitter Username: theearldenden

Cole Lavalais received her MFA from Chicago State University. She is a fellow of the Callaloo, VONA, and Kimbilio Writer’s Workshops. Her work has appeared in several print and online literary journals. 


Twitter Username: colelavalais

Website: www.Colelavalais.com

C125-126, Oregon Convention Center, Level 1

R264. Companioning Loss: The Role of Children’s Books in Difficult Times. (, , , , ) A young reader writes to an author, “Before I read your book, I thought I was alone.” An author asks, “What book do we write for that child living in the back seat of a dark world?” From death to divorce, books have always helped young people grieve and find the way forward by mirroring and legitimizing their feelings. In these times of heightened crisis, such companionship is needed more than ever. Kid lit authors discuss writing books as witness, bibliotherapy, and lights in the darkness.