2018 AWP Conference Schedule

Below is a list of AWP events for the #AWP18 Conference & Bookfair in Tampa, Florida. The schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. A version accessible to screen readers is also available. Visit the offsite event schedule for a listing of literary events taking place throughout the Tampa area during our conference. Offsite event listings may be submitted until Wednesday, February 21, 2018.

Scroll over participants’ names in blue to read their biographies. To create and save your own personalized conference itinerary, use the “Check here to add to my schedule” box, and then select the blue “my schedule” link to view the schedule you have created. The check box will prompt you to sign in to your AWP user account before you are able to add events to your schedule. You do not have to be an AWP member in order to create a user account. Your personalized schedule on the AWP website can be saved and printed, but it cannot be transferred to the digital conference app because the two systems are independent.

Official AWP events will take place at the Tampa Convention Center (333 S Franklin Street, Tampa, FL 33602) and the adjacent Tampa Marriott Waterside (700 S Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL, 33602). Unless otherwise noted, events outside these venues are not produced, moderated, or curated by AWP.

 

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Friday, March 9, 2018

7:30 am to 8:45 am

Room 11, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F100A. Sober AWP.

8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Registration Area, Tampa Convention Center, Second Floor

F100B. Conference Registration, Sponsored by Saint Leo University Master of Arts in Creative Writing. Attendees who have registered in advance, or who have yet to purchase a registration, may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in West Registration of the Tampa Convention Center, Level Two. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

Room 34, Tampa Convention Center, Fourth Floor

F101. Author Portraits by Adrianne Mathiowetz Photography. () Stop being embarrassed of your author photo! A great portrait is not only flattering, but actively invites your audience to get to know you and your work. Returning for a second year at AWP, photographer Adrianne Mathiowetz will be offering twenty-minute studio sessions on site. See your proof gallery of images immediately; any portrait you choose will be fully processed and digitally delivered in high res for $75. (Conference discount: sessions usually priced at $300.) Put your best face forward on websites, book covers, social media, and published interviews. Advanced sign-up required at https://am-photography.ticketleap.com/awp18/

Adrianne Mathiowetz is a Boston-based portrait and editorial photographer. She is a Spring 2010 photo graduate of The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Wired, and Entertainment Weekly, amongst others. She lives for the in-between moments, and loves to take photos of costume changes, interruptions, and delays.

8:00 am to 5:30 pm

Room 33, Tampa Convention Center, Fourth Floor

F102. Lactation Room. The Lactation Room is located in room 33 of the Tampa Convention Center. To access the Lactation Room, please see the AWP Help Desk to obtain the key. For reasons of privacy and security, access to the lactation room is granted with permission by AWP only.

Room 31 & 32, Tampa Convention Center, Fourth Floor

F103. Dickinson Quiet Space. A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and escape the literary commotion. Please consult the map in the conference planner for detailed location. "There is a solitude of space, / A solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, / Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity."  –Emily Dickinson

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floor

F104. Bookfair Concessions, Bar, & Lounge. Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Halls XX in the Tampa Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference planner or mobile app for location details.

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

AWP Bookfair, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floor

F105. AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Wilkes University Low-Residency MA/MFA in Creative Writing. With more than 800 literary exhibitors, the AWP bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

AWP Booth 834, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floor

F106. Writer to Writer Mentorship Program Booth. AWP's Writer to Writer Mentorship Program matches new writers with published authors for a three-month series on the writing life. Now in its fourth year, Writer to Writer is open to all members, but we particularly encourage applications from those writers who have never been associated with an MFA program and those writing from regions, backgrounds, and cultures that are typically underrepresented in the literary world. To learn more, visit AWP’s Bookfair booth, where you will be able to talk with past program mentors and mentees. Diane Zinna, the program’s director, will also be there to answer your questions.

Room 2, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F107. Traveling Stanzas Interactive Exhibit. With support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Wick Poetry Center’s Traveling Stanzas interactive exhibit allows users to browse poems and videos from the refugee and immigrant community in Akron, OH. Through Emerge,™ the Center’s app, users contribute their own stanza to an AWP Community Poem around socially relevant themes. Traveling Stanzas celebrates the diverse cultural identity of our democracy and engages AWP participants in a national civic dialogue through the intimate and inclusive voice of poetry. Visit www.travelingstanzas.com.

9:00 am to 10:15 am

Grand Salon A, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F108. Knowing Your Place: Identity and Space in Young Adult Fiction. (, , , , ) Whether it’s a landscape, a building, or a city, space is never just a physical thing in fiction nor is it an entirely blank canvas. In this panel, young adult authors of various publishing experiences will explore how physical spaces can impact identity and influence characterization. Discussions will include how places can become barriers or aspirations for characters and explore when setting fails to go beyond racist tropes. Authors will offer tips on how setting can become a rich character.

Andrew Boryga is a fiction writer and journalist who was born and raised in the Bronx, New York. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Fader, and other publications. He is currently a second-year MFA student in fiction at the University of Miami.


Twitter Username: borywrites

Lilliam Rivera is an award-winning writer and author of The Education of Margot Sanchez, a contemporary young adult novel. Recently named a "2017 Face to Watch" by The Los Angeles Times, Lilliam's work has appeared in Tin House, Los Angeles Times, and Latina.


Twitter Username: lilliamr

Website: http://www.lilliamrivera.com

Samantha Mabry is the author of the novels A Fierce and Subtle Poison and All the Wind in the World, both of which were published by Algonquin Young Readers. She teaches English and Latinx Literature at El Centro Community College in Dallas, Texas.


Twitter Username: samanthamabry

Website: samanthamabry.com

Ibi Zoboi is the author of the YA novel American Street. Her writing has been published in the New York Times book review, the Horn Book, and the Rumpus, among others. She holds an MFA in writing for children and young adults and her second book, Pride, is forthcoming. 


Twitter Username: ibizoboi

Dhonielle J. Clayton is the cofounder of CAKE Literary, a boutique book development company with a decidedly diverse bent. She is the coauthor of Tiny Pretty Things and Shiny Broken Pieces with Sona Charaipotra, and the author of The Belles. She is COO of We Need Diverse Books.


Twitter Username: brownbookworm

Website: www.CAKELiterary.com

Grand Salon B, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F109. Should I Stay or Should I Go: Re-visioning the Tenure Track. (, , , , ) Three fiction writers and two poets consider the pros and cons of entering, and staying on, the tenure track. In an increasingly competitive job market, when is chasing the tenure-track dream worth it, and when is it time to walk away? Topics include best practices for landing a tenure-track job, whether a PhD is necessary, negotiating job offers, teaching institutions versus research universities, when a visiting gig might be a better fit, and when to prioritize happiness over the tenure track.

Rebecca Lehmann is the author of the poetry collection Between the Crackups, winner of the Crashaw Prize. Her poems have appeared in numerous journals, including Ploughshares, Tin House, and Boston Review. She is an assistant professor of English at Saint Mary's College in Indiana.


Twitter Username: rebeccalehmann

Website: www.rebecca-lehmann.com

Joanna Luloff is the author of the short story collection The Beach at Galle Road and the forthcoming novel Remind Me Again What Happened. She is an assistant professor at The University of Colorado Denver where she edits fiction and nonfiction for Copper Nickel.


Twitter Username: joluloff

Website: www.joannaluloff.com

V.V. Ganeshananthan's debut novel, Love Marriage, was longlisted for the Orange Prize and named one of Washington Post Book World's Best of 2008. Her work has appeared in Granta and The New York Times, among others. She teaches at the University of Minnesota and was a 2014 NEA and Radcliffe Fellow.


Twitter Username: V_V_G

Website: www.vasugi.com

Valerie Wetlaufer holds a PhD from the University of Utah and an MFA from Florida State University. She is the author of Call Me by My Other Name and the Lambda Award-winning poetry collection Mysterious Acts by My People. She is an adjunct professor of English at Mount Mercy University in Iowa.


Twitter Username: v_phd

Website: www.valeriewetlaufer.com

Sara Schaff is the author of Say Something Nice About Me. A graduate of Brown University and the University of Michigan, she has taught at the University of Michigan and Oberlin College and currently teaches fiction, creative nonfiction, and playwriting at St. Lawrence University.


Twitter Username: schaff_sara

Grand Salon C, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F110. Digitizing the MFA: In Support of Diversity, Practicality, and the Facilitative Workshop Model. (, , , ) Digitizing the MFA offers a robust opportunity to historically underserved writers hindered by financial and geographical limitations. In this session, panelists will discuss their experience transforming the traditional MFA program by integrating digital tools, shifting the power dynamic of the creative workshop, and building an engaging writing community into an evolved, fully online MFA, addressing practical strategies to support attending writers in sustaining a fulfilling writing career.

Joan F. Smith is the lead faculty for creative writing at Southern New Hampshire University. Her fiction and creative nonfiction appear in national and local publications throughout the country.


Twitter Username: jf_smit

Sharon Kehl Califano, PhD, is the associate Dean for fully-online graduate and undergraduate English creative writing and literature programs at SNHU. She has 17 years of higher education experience, including online program development. She sits on the editorial board for The Edith Wharton Review.


Twitter Username: SharonKCalifano

Brooke McIntyre founded writing groups platform Inked Voices in 2013 to help writers workshop and build community online, overcoming the challenges of distance and schedules. She coaches writing groups, helps individuals find groups, and runs online critique events with agents.


Twitter Username: InkedVoices

Weina Randel is the author of The Moon in the Palace and The Empress of Bright Moon, historical novels of Wu Zetian, China’s only female emperor. Randel is the winner of RWA RITA® Award 2017. Her novels are to be translated into seven languages. She is the SME at Southern New Hampshire University.


Twitter Username: weinarandel

Website: www.weinarandel.com

Grand Salon D, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F111. Born on the Bayou: Five Fiction Writers with Southern Ties. (, , , , ) To label a writer “Southern” creates polarizing reactions: from endorsement to denial. Yet writers continue to explore the extraordinary cultural and physical geography of the American South. This panel gathers five fiction writers with distinct connections to different Southern states. Panelists discuss how growing up in, moving to, or leaving the South has diversely influenced their literary identities, their evolutions of creative aesthetics, and their varied reactions to external labels.

Alexander Lumans was the Spring 2014 Philip Roth Creative Writing Resident. He has received fellowships and scholarships to MacDowell, Yaddo, VCCA, Brush Creek, Blue Mountain, ART342, Norton Island, Sewanee, Bread Loaf, and The Arctic Circle Residency. He received the 2015 Wabash Prize in Fiction.


Twitter Username: oldmanlumans

Website: http://www.alexanderlumans.com/

Yuri Herrera's novels Trabajos del reino, Señales que precederán al fin del mundo, and La transmigración de los cuerpos have been translated into several languages; in English they are published by And Other Stories. He is currently an assistant professor at Tulane University.


Twitter Username: yuri_herrera

Emily Nemens is coeditor and prose editor of The Southern Review, a literary quarterly published at Louisiana State University. Her writing has appeared in LA Review of Books, n+1, and The Gettysburg Review, and her drawing has been featured in The New Yorker and in collaboration with Harvey Pekar.


Twitter Username: emilynemens

Website: www.nemens.com

Mary Miller is the author of two collections of stories, Big World and Always Happy Hour, as well as a novel, The Last Days of California. She is a former James A. Michener Fellow in Fiction at the University of Texas and John and Renée Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: maryumiller

Website: maryumiller.tumblr.com

Crystal Wilkinson is the author of The Birds of Opulence, winner of the 2016 Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence; Blackberries, Blackberries; and Water Street, which was nominated for both the Orange Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award.


Twitter Username: crystalwilki

Florida Salon 1, 2, & 3, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F112. Forthcoming: Debut Novelists on What They Wish They’d Known Before Publication. (, , , , ) You have a book contract—now what? What can you expect and how can you make your book stand out in a noisy, crowded market? Recent debut novelists—of adult and YA, published by large and small houses—share advice on the run-up to publication, from the nuts and bolts of the process to savvy marketing. Topics include: publication timeline; navigating editorial and marketing conversations; websites; blurbs; reviews; independent publicists; creative promotion; book tours; and finding your readers.

Jessie Chaffee is the author of the debut novel Florence in Ecstasy. She was awarded a Fulbright grant to Italy to complete the novel and she was the writer in residence at Florence University of the Arts. She is an editor at Words Without Borders, a magazine of international literature in translation.


Twitter Username: JessieLChaffee

Lisa Ko is the author of The Leavers, a novel which won the 2016 PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction and will be published by Algonquin Books in 2017. Her fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories 2016, Apogee Journal, Narrative, One Teen Story, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: iamlisako

Tiffany D. Jackson is the author of the dark contemporary YA thriller, Allegedly and the forthcoming Monday's Not Coming. A television production manager and producer, she received her BA in film from Howard University and her MA in media studies from The New School University.


Twitter Username: writeinbk

Rachel Lyon's forthcoming debut novel is Self Portrait with Boy. Her shorter work has appeared in Iowa Review, Joyland, McSweeney's, and elsewhere. She teaches at Sackett Street Writers, Catapult, and Slice, and cohosts the series Ditmas Lit. Visit her at www.rachellyon.work.


Twitter Username: manateesintrees

Website: www.rachellyon.work

Patricia Park is the author of the novel RE JANE. A former Fulbright scholar and Center for Fiction fellow, she has written for The New York Times, Guardian, Salon, and others. She is assistant professor in the MFA program at American University.


Twitter Username: patriciapark718

Website: www.patriciapark.com

Florida Salon 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F113. Writing That Raids the Real: Research in Three Genres . (, , , , ) All writers reconstruct the world. Often we use imagination, but mining science, family history, interviews, or Project Muse can add context and metaphor. Panelists with books in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction discuss ways to investigate, including how to determine what research might be productive, such as interviewing George W. Bush, hanging around fracking sites, following arsonists, or milking libraries. They offer practical advice for crafting distinctive writing using factual materials.

Clinton Crockett Peters is author of Pandora's Garden (essays), forthcoming. He's won prizes from Shenandoah, North American Review, Columbia Journal, and Crab Orchard Review. He holds an MFA from Iowa and has work in Orion, Southern Review, The Rumpus, Fourth Genre, and Hotel Amerika.


Twitter Username: ClintCrockettP

Website: http://clintoncrockettpeters.com/

Stephanie Elizondo Griest is the author of four books, including Around the Bloc: My Life in Moscow, Beijing, and Havana; Mexican Enough; and All the Agents & Saints: Dispatches from the U.S. Borderlands. Assistant professor of creative nonfiction at UNC-Chapel Hill, she lectures around the globe.


Twitter Username: SElizondoGriest

Website: www.MexicanEnough.com

Toni Jensen is the author of the story collection From the Hilltop. Her stories and essays have been published in journals and anthologies, including Catapult, Ecotone, and Denver Quarterly. She teaches creative writing at the University of Arkansas. She is Métis.


Twitter Username: ToniJens

Phong Nguyen is the author of The Adventures of Joe Harper, Pages from the Textbook of Alternate History, and Memory Sickness. He is coeditor of Pleiades. He coedited the book Nancy Hale: The Life and Work of a Lost American Master. He teaches creative writing at the University of Central Missouri.


Twitter Username: AlternaHistory

Website: http://www.phongvnguyen.com

Kathryn Nuernberger is the author of two poetry collections, The End of Pink and, and Rag & Bone. Her collection of lyric essays is Brief Intrerviews with the Romantic Past. An associate professor of creative writing at University of Central Missouri, she also serves as director of Pleiades Press.

Florida Salon 5, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F114. Slam Academy: The Importance of Spoken Word in the Poetry Curriculum. (, , , , ) While slam poetry and spoken word have become increasingly popular, it’s rare to have them taught in poetry curricula. How do these spoken forms benefit students’ poetic craft? How can educators introduce a movement that is traditionally independent? Panel members (including high school teachers, professors, and teaching artists) will discuss how educators can teach an intersection of written and spoken word, and how balance between the poetic forms creates a well-rounded knowledge of poetry.

Dominique Christina, author of three poetry collections, believes words make worlds. She is willful about insisting on herself and that the display of her mad history is more medicine than macabre, for herself, for women, and for historically and contemporarily marginalized people.


Twitter Username: Nyarloka

Sarah Kay is perhaps best known for her 2011 TED talk, which has been seen over ten million times online. She is the author of three books of poetry: B, No Matter the Wreckage, and The Type. She is a passionate educator and the founder of Project VOICE.


Twitter Username: kaysarahsera

Website: www.kaysarahsera.com

J.L. Torres is the author of The Family Terrorist and Other Stories; The Accidental Native; and the poetry collection, Boricua Passport. A Fulbright recipient, he teaches literature and creative writing at SUNY, Plattsburgh, where he is Executive Editor of the Saranac Review.


Twitter Username: Rican_Writer

Website: http://jltorres.net/wp

Levi Todd is a poet and creative curator. He is the founder of Reacting Out Loud, an organization devoted to uplifting poetry and affirming community. He is also a reader for Tinderbox Poetry Journal and will graduate Ball State in December 2017.


Twitter Username: levicitodd

Florida Salon 6, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F115. Going Viral: Marketing and Promotion in the Digital Age. (, , , , ) Directors of sales and marketing, editors, and publishers from the Missouri Review, Southern Indiana Review, Tupelo Press, Vinyl, Willow Springs magazine, and YesYes Books will interrogate habitual industry promotional practices and address both expected and unexpected changes in the publicity landscape. Topics will include maximizing social media platforms, booking reading tours, building relationships with critics and reviewers, and developing unique advertising and marketing campaigns.

KMA Sullivan is the author of two poetry collections: Inclined to Riot (forthcoming) and Necessary Fire. Poems and essays have appeared in Boston Review, The Rumpus, Southern Humanities Review, diode, and elsewhere. She is the publisher at YesYes Books and the coeditor in Chief of Vinyl.


Twitter Username: kmasullivan

Website: kmasullivan.com

Kristine Somerville is the Missouri Review's marketing coordinator and a faculty member at Stephens College. Her writing has appeared in various magazines, including North American Review, Passages North, and Quarterly West. Two of her essays received notable mentions in the Best American series.

Marie Gauthier is the author of a chapbook (Hunger All Inside); her poems have appeared in The Common, Poetry Northwest, and elsewhere. A 2008 Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Prize recipient, she serves as director of sales and marketing for Tupelo Press, and she runs the Collected Poets Series.


Twitter Username: tupelopress

Website: http://mariegauthier.wordpress.com

Ron Mitchell is formerly muscle for the IRS and the editor of Southern Indiana Review and SIR Press. He teaches literary publishing and helps run the Southern Indiana Reading Series and New Harmony Writer's Residency at the University of Southern Indiana.

Chris Maccini is managing editor of Willow Springs magazine which publishes fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and interviews. Willow Springs is published by the MFA program at Eastern Washington University.


Twitter Username: ChrisMaccini

Meeting Room 1, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F116. Don’t Ask Me Where I’m From: Exploring Beauty and Bravery in Stories About Muslims. (, , , , Zahra Noorbakhsh) In response to the current political climate, writers from Muslim backgrounds, especially women, are often called on to discuss who they are rather than what they do. This panel will talk less about hijabs and regimes and more about the courage to write freely and the transformative power of art. Discussion will focus on the telling of daring, beautiful, and impactful stories about Muslims, asking the question: Can stories about people from marginalized communities ever be viewed as universal?

Kirin Khan is a fiction writer/poet based in Oakland, California. A 2016 VONA Voices alum, 2017 PEN Center USA Emerging Voices Fellow, and 2017 Grotto Fellow, her work has appeared in many publications, including Uproot, sPARKLE & bLINK, Your Impossible Voice, and 7x7.LA. Kirin is working on her first novel.


Twitter Username: kirinjaan

Sarah A. Harvard is a reporter at Mic, covering religion, race, and politics. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Atlantic, and Slate. Sarah has appeared on CBS, BBC, HuffPost Live, The Intercept, and Columbia Journalism Review. She is the cofounder of the Muslim American Journalism Association.


Twitter Username: amyharvard_

Taz is an activist, storyteller, and politico. She cohosts #GoodMuslimBadMuslim Podcast and was honored in 2016 as a White House Champion of Change for AAPI Art and Storytelling. She is published in Modern Loss; Good Girls Marry Doctors; Love, Inshallah; and Coiled Serpent.


Twitter Username: tazzystar

Website: www.tazzystar.blogspot.com

Mohja Kahf’s books of poetry are Hagar Poems and E-mails from Scheherazad. She is the author of a novel, The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf. Kahf, who teaches at the University of Arkansas, has a manuscript of essays on Syria and two poetry manuscripts ready for publication.

Meeting Room 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F117. Writing the Revolutions. (, , , , ) Revolutions are not accidents of history. Behind every act of resistance stand the writers and writing that inspired, shaped, transformed, and actualized them—Rousseau, Paine, Hamilton, Madison, Marx, Anthony, King, Friedan, Havel. From these historical lessons we turn to the current battles for LGBTQ, women, immigrants, and the environment and discuss the role and tactics that we will need to write today’s revolution.

Paul Ketzle is the author of a novel, The Late Matthew Brown. A former editor of Quarterly West and at Western Humanities Review, he is an associate professor (lecturer) at the Honors College at the University of Utah, where he teaches humanities and writing, including Writing the Revolutions.


Twitter Username: paulketzle

Simmons B. Buntin is the founder and editor-in-chief of Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments. His books of poetry are Bloom and Riverfall, and his newest book is Unsprawl: Remixing Spaces as Places. His work has appeared in Orion, Kyoto Journal, Versal, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: terrainorg

Website: http://www.simmonsbuntin.com/

Juan Morales is the author of the poetry collections The Siren World, Friday and the Year That Followed, and The Handyman's Guide to End Times (forthcoming). He is a CantoMundo Fellow, the editor of Pilgrimage magazine, and the English department chair at Colorado State University-Pueblo.


Twitter Username: moralesjuanj

Andy Hoffmann edits and publishes Elik Press, Salt Lake City. His fiction, nonfiction, and poetry has appeared in national literary journals since 1988. He is currently working on projects focusing on the drunk and the contemplative in poetry, and the poetics of exile inspired by Latin American lit.

Heather Hirschi’s edited What There Is: The Crossroads Anthology and Writing with New Eyes: Three Years in the Czech Republic. Former fiction editor of Quarterly West and assistant professor in the University of Utah writing department, she teaches Underrepresented Rhetorics: Writing & Social Justice.

Meeting Room 9 & 10, Marriott Waterside, Third Floor

F118. Re-Membering: The Work and Legacy of Jake Adam York. (, , , , ) When we reflect on memory, we put back together the past. Jake Adam York’s poetry is memory, artfully rendered, of people and places often forgotten. The work of elegy, memoriam, and poetic biography, revises and expands our cultural memory. Five years after his sudden passing, we reflect on York’s complex and crucial contribution of re-membering. Panelists will share about their relationships with York and his work, offer their own approach to the past and our responsibility to re-member it.

Wesley Rothman, author of Subwoofer, has published work in Boston Review, Callaloo, Gulf Coast, New England Review, Prairie Schooner, Publishers Weekly, and The Golden Shovel Anthology. Recipient of a Vermont Studio Center fellowship, he is a teaching artist for the National Gallery of Art.


Twitter Username: wesleyrothman

Website: http://wesleyrothman.wordpress.com/

Major Jackson is the author of four collections, most recently, Roll Deep. A recipient of a Whiting Writer's Award, Pushcart Prize, and Guggenheim Fellowship, Jackson is the Richard A. Dennis Professor at University of Vermont. He serves as editor of Harvard Review.


Twitter Username: Poet_Major

Website: majorjackson.com

Ailish Hopper is the author of Dark~Sky Society and the chapbook, Bird in the Head. Poems have appeared in APR, Ploughshares, Poetry, and Tidal Basin Review; essays on racism in the poetry world in Boston Review and elsewhere. A MacDowell Fellow and Yaddo grantee, she teaches at Goucher College.


Twitter Username: ailishhopper

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers has published four books of poetry, including The Glory Gets. Most recently, she received a poetry fellowship from the Witter Bynner Foundation and a fiction fellowship from Aspen Summer Words Conference. She is professor of English at the University of Oklahoma.


Twitter Username: blklibrarygirl

Website: http://www.honoreejeffers.com

Jon Tribble teaches at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, where he is the series editor of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry published by Southern Illinois University Press and the managing editor of Crab Orchard Review.

Ballroom A, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F119. Power, Change, and the Literary Establishment. (Katharine Coles, Lucinda Roy, Brynn Saito, Peter Covino, Lillian-Yvonne Bertram) As women, LGBTQ individuals, and people of color move into positions of power in literary culture, we may imagine we are ahead of other professions in addressing gender and racial inequities. In a cultural climate that makes these inequities urgently visible, the participants in this roundtable will open a discussion about whether power dynamics and double standards that lay the ground for mistreatment are more deeply entrenched than we think, expressed in routine interactions too subtle to take on directly, and we will ask how we might work to make these dynamics visible, and so, subject to change.

Room 1, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F120. Women, War, and the Military: How to Tell the Story. (, , , , ) Five writers—three military veterans and two civilians—weigh the pros and cons of telling military women’s stories through fiction versus memoir. Is the novel still better, as Virginia Woolf argued, at representing the private discourses of women’s lives to the public? Or does the memoir better afford women the opportunity to write themselves into history? What can a novel do that a memoir cannot, and vice versa? Is there a reason why more women veterans have turned to memoir than to fiction?

Mariana Grohowski is an assistant professor of writing at Indiana University Southeast. She is the founding editor of the Journal of Veterans Studies, a refereed, open access, interdisciplinary journal.


Twitter Username: mcgrohowski

Helen Benedict is the award-winning author of seven novels, including two about women and war, the recent Wolf Season and Sand Queen, a Publishers Weekly “Best Contemporary War Novel.” A professor at Columbia University, she has also written five nonfiction books and a play. 


Twitter Username: helenbenedict

Website: www.helenbenedict.com

Tracy Crow, president/CEO of MilSpeak Foundation, is the author/editor of five books to include It's My Country Too: Women's Military Stories from the American Revolution to Afghanistan with coauthor Jerri Bell, and the award-winning memoir, Eyes Right: Confessions from a Woman Marine.


Twitter Username: tracycrow1

Website: www.writingformercy.blogspot.com

M.L. Doyle has served in the US Army at home and abroad for more than three decades as both a soldier and civilian. She calls on those experiences in her award-winning military-based mystery series, her urban fantasy, romance writing, and coauthored memoirs which feature women who wear combat boots.


Twitter Username: mldoyleauthor

Website: www.mldoyleauthor.com

Jerri Bell, a retired naval officer and instructor/editor for the Veterans Writing Project, has published short fiction and nonfiction. She and Tracy Crow are the authors of It's My Country Too: Women's Military Stories from the American Revolution to Afghanistan.

Room 3 & 4, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F121. Finding Funding for Your Writing: Grants, Fellowships, and Other Ways to Get That Cash. (, , , Thaddeus Rutkowski, John Domini) How do you get paid to write? If you’re writing fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry, the question seems moot: everyone knows there’s no money in literature. But this panel offers an answer. Writers explain how they secured grants, fellowships, and arts funding from sources ranging from nonprofits to universities to the federal government. They share ways to strengthen your applications for funding at every stage of your writing career, from emerging to established.

Julia Phillips's debut novel is forthcoming. Her fiction appears in Glimmer Train and The Antioch Review, while her nonfiction appears in The Atlantic, Slate, Jezebel, and BuzzFeed News. Her writing has been supported by a Yaddo residency and a Fulbright grant.


Twitter Username: jkbphillips

Darley Stewart is a Scottish-Korean fiction writer based in Brooklyn. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Funhouse, The Ocean State Review, Flapperhouse, The Brooklyn Rail, Electric Literature, and elsewhere. She won a 2016 Fiction International Fellowship from Seoul Art Space, among other awards.


Twitter Username: darley_stewart

Brittany K. Allen's short essays and fiction have appeared in Catapult, The Toast, The Tishman Review (Pushcart Prize Nominee), and elsewhere. She's a member of Youngblood, the Obie-award-winning playwrights group at Ensemble Studio Theater, and is the Lark's 2017 Van Lier Playwriting Fellow.


Twitter Username: Britt_Kathryn

Room 5 & 6, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F122. Sound Makes Sense: Reading the Lyric Sentence. (, , , , ) Poets think in lines, prose writers in sentences; the best of both work from sound to sense, with an ear for the music in their compositions. This panel celebrates lyricism in prose, the play and craft at work in the artful sentence. Panelists perform close readings of great favorite sentences, discussing rhythm and breath, pauses and stops, and then on to the rhetorical strategies at work, the use of repetition, inversion, interruption, afterthought, pile-up, aside, and more.

Pearl Abraham is the author of four novels: the international bestseller The Romance Reader, Giving Up America, The Seventh Beggar, and American Taliban. The Seventh Beggar was a finalist for the Koret International Award in Fiction. Abraham is the editor of the webpage SforSentence.com.

Annie DeWitt's work appears in Granta, Tin House, Esquire, The Iowa Review, Guernica, The Believer, Los Angeles Review of Books, NOON, The American Reader, among others. She is the author the novel White Nights In Split Town City and the collection Closest Without Going Over, shortlisted for the Mary McCarthy Award.


Twitter Username: talllike3apples

Alan Sincic earned his MFA at Columbia and WNE. His novella The Babe won the 2014 Knickerbocker Prize, the short story "Sugar" aired on Seattle's Hollow Earth Radio, and recent stories have appeared in Hunger Mountain and The Greensboro Reveiw. Sincic teaches at Valencia College.

Barbara Jones is an executive editor at Henry Hold & Company, where she acquires and edits fiction, memoir, and narrative nonfiction. She was previously the editorial director at Hyperion Books, and previous to that, a longtime magazine editor at Harper's, Vogue, Real Simple, and elsewhere.

Ephraim Scott Sommers is a singer-songwriter and the author of The Night We Set the Dead Kid on Fire, winner of the 2016 Patricia Bibby First Book Award. He received his PhD from Western Michigan University and is assistant professor of creative writing at WInthrop University.


Twitter Username: ephraim_sommers

Room 7, 8, & 9, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F123. Publishing Pulse: Anthologies for Orlando. (, , , , ) June 12, 2016. Pulse Nightclub. Orlando, FL. As writers responded to the mass shooting by creating work honoring lost LGBTQ voices, two anthologies arose: Pulse/Pulso and The Brillantina Project. This panel details how editors defined and organized their projects focusing on healing and community while navigating the initial crisis and the troubling aftermath. Learn how these sister projects continue to support one another and united for a reading at AWP. Panel will also share contributor poems.

Miguel M. Morales grew up as a migrant farmworker. A Lambda Literary Fellow and alum of VONA/Voices and Macondo Writers Workshop, his work appears in several anthologies and literary journals. Miguel is coeditor of Pulse/Pulso anthology for Orlando. He also serves as VP of the LGBTQ Writers Caucus.


Twitter Username: TrustMiguel

Roy G. Guzmán received an MFA in creative writing from the University of Minnesota. He will pursue a PhD in cultural studies and comparative literature in fall 2017. Roy received his BA from the University of Chicago and his MA from Dartmouth. His work has been published in Poetry.


Twitter Username: dreamingauze

David Lopez is a writer and librarian from Orange County, California. He received an MFA from UC Riverside and an MLIS from San José State University. He is coeditor of Under the Disco Ball: Poetry for Orlando.


Twitter Username: davidlopez85

Luis Lopez-Maldonado is a Xican@ poeta, choreographer, and educator with an MFA in creative writing from the University of Notre Dame and an MA in dance from the Florida State University.


Twitter Username: LDintheOC

Maya Chinchilla, author of The Cha Cha Files: A Chapina Poética, has an MFA in English and creative writing from Mills College. She is a poet, writer, and educator, who has taught English, creative writing, Latina/o, and ethnic studies at San Francisco State University, UC Davis, CIIS, and UC Santa Cruz.


Twitter Username: chachachapina

Website: www.mayachapina.com

Room 11, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F124. Writing LGBTQ Fiction Based on Real People. (, , ) Novels and short stories are often shaped by real events happening to real people that they know. Three LGBTQ writers will talk about the real people within their stories and how the creative process changed both the characters and ultimately the authors themselves. For LGBTQ writers, exploring these stories become an exploration of our larger community and the known and unknown histories of our lives. Each of our writers will discuss these themes and read from their works.

Alan Lessik is a novelist, a zen practitioner LGBT activist. His debut novel, The Troubleseeker, was a finalist for Publishing Triangle 2017 LGBTQ Fiction Award. Nonfiction works published in Lambda Literary, Advocate, San Francisco Bay Guardian, Frontiers, and KQED Radio Perspective.


Twitter Username: alanlessik

Website: alanlessik.wordpress.com

Kathy Anderson is the author of Bull and Other Stories, which won the Autumn House Press Fiction Prize. Bull and Other Stories was longlisted for The Story Prize and was a finalist for Publishing Triangle's Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction, Lambda Literary Awards, and Foreword INDIES awards.


Twitter Username: anderson_kathy

Larry Benjamin is the author of the novels: In His Eyes, Unbroken, and What Binds Us; the short story collection, Damaged Angels; and a novella, Vampire Rising. He tends to draw his stories from real life focusing on themes of love and loss, mental illness, domestic violence, and invisibility.


Twitter Username: WriterLarry

Website: www.larrybenjamin.com

Room 12, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F125. There’s Waldo!: Marketing a First Book, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , , ) Marketing an author’s first book presents particular challenges. Hear industry experts and a successful emerging writer share strategies on creating author platforms utilizing both new digital tools and tried-and-true approaches, as well as tips for writers and publishers on how they can best work together to make a new book known.

Rosamond S. King’s poetry is in Rock|Salt|Stone and dozens of journals and anthologies. A creative and critical writer and performance artist, she is inspired by her cultures, history, and a sense of play, and is creative editor of sx salon and associate professor at Brooklyn College.


Twitter Username: RosamondDrKing

Website: www.rosamondking.com

Jane Friedman has more than 20 years of publishing industry experience, and she has taught writing and digital media at the University of Cincinnati and University of Virginia. Her new book, The Business of Being a Writer, will be released by University of Chicago Press in spring 2018.


Twitter Username: JaneFriedman

Website: http://janefriedman.com

Nicole Dewey is managing director of Shreve Williams Public Relations. A 20-year veteran of the book publishing industry, she was most recently associate publisher for Little, Brown and Company. She is coboard president of the Community of Literary Magazines and Presses (CLMP).


Twitter Username: ndewey

Jeffrey Lependorf serves as the shared Executive Director of our two national service organizations for independent literary publishing—the Community of Literary Magazines and Presses (CLMP) and Small Press Distribution (SPD)—providing technical assistance to and advocating on behalf of the indies.


Twitter Username: jefflependorf

Website: http://www.jeffreylependorf.com

Room 13, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F126. WITS Alliance Meeting. (, ) Writers in the Schools (WITS) Alliance invites current and prospective members to attend a general meeting led by Robin Reagler, Executive Director of WITS Houston. We will discuss how to start and/or expand a WITS program in your community, exploring fundraising, strategies for growth, summer camps, and more.

Jack McBride is associate director for Writers in the Schools in Houston. He designs creative writing school programs, collaborations with community organizations, and teaching opportunities for creative writers. Jack earned a masters of nonprofit administration from the University of Notre Dame.

Room 14, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F127. Let the Games Begin: Translating Wordplay in World Literatures, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , , , ) Writers around the globe love to employ wordplay, such as puns and neologisms. Translating wordplay presents unique challenges and a certain amount of risk taking. This panel of poets and scholars, translating from such languages as Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, French, Hebrew, and Spanish, will share creative strategies for keeping the wordplay alive in their translations.

Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored eight titles, including five books of translations from French, and has been both a BTBA and CLMP Firecracker Poetry Award finalist. She is a recipient of grants from the NEA, Maryland Arts Council, and Arts & Humanities Council of Montgomery County.

Jeanne Garane is professor of French and comparative literature at the University of South Carolina, Columbia. She has published a number of essays on French and Francophone literature and film, and she has also published two literary translations. She is currently translating the memoirs of Amadou Hampâté Bâ

Marcela Sulak has published two poetry collections, Decency and Immigrant, and coedited Family Resemblance: An Anthology and Exploration of 8 Hybrid Literary Genres; her fourth book-length poetry translation received a PEN Award nomination. She is associate professor at Bar-Ilan University.

Russell Scott Valentino is an author, editor, teacher, and translator based in Bloomington, Indiana. He is a professor of Slavic and comparative literature at Indiana University and senior editor at Autumn Hill Books. His most recent book is The Woman in the Window.


Twitter Username: rsvalentino

Website: http://www.indiana.edu/~iuslavic/facProfile_RValentino2.shtml

Barbara Goldberg, author of five prizewinning poetry books including the Felix Pollak Prize for Royal Baker's Daughter, also translates from the Hebrew. As series editor, the Word Works' International Editions, her selections include translations from Ancient Greek, Kurdish, French and Spanish.


Twitter Username: babagoldberg

Website: www.barbaragoldberg.net

Room 15, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F128. How We (Creative) Teach: Close Hyper Machine. (, , , , ) The web is where today’s students do some of their most creative thinking. Yet most creative writing pedagogy stays fixed on static fields of text. Can instructors stay true to the field’s text-based fundamentals while also experimenting with the digital world’s generative, diverse, and multiple sensory streams? Bringing together secondary, college, and graduate-level instructors, this panel will explore the opportunities and challenges of expanding creative writing pedagogy’s semiotic reach.

Ben Gunsberg is an assistant professor of English at Utah State University. His poetry and scholarship appears in Mid-American Review, CutBank, Computers and Composition, and Journal of Electronic Publishing, among other magazines. He is the author of Rhapsodies with Portraits, a poetry chapbook.


Twitter Username: BenGunsb

Website: http://www.bengunsberg.com/

Lizzie Hutton is a PhD candidate in English and education at the University of Michigan, specializing in writing and transfer studies, and a longtime college writing instructor in creative, critical, and hybrid forms and their practices. She is author of She’d Waited Millennia, a book of poetry.

Abraham Smith teaches at the University of Alabama. With poet Shelly Taylor, he edited Hick Poetics, an anthology of rural American poetries. His fourth book of poems, Ashagalomancy, is forthcoming. He spends his summers as a farmhand on a northwest Wisconsin sheep dairy.

Sarah Blackman is the author of two books of fiction, Mother Box and Hex. She is the fiction coeditor of Diagram and the founding editor of Crashtest, an online journal for high school writers and artists. She directs the creative writing program at the Fine Arts Center, a magnet arts high school.

Jennifer Colville is the founding editor of PromptPress, an online and book arts journal for writing in response to visual art. She is the author of the short story collection Elegies for Uncanny Girls. She organizes the Free Generative Writing Workshops in Iowa City.

Room 16, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F129. Screenwriting: Introducing Your Protagonist. (, , ) One of the most important moments in any screenplay is the introduction of the protagonist. On this panel, we show examples of great character introductions in films as well as examine how those moments relate to plot, theme, and character arc. Screenwriters and instructors leave with a new arsenal of examples to help them improve their own work and the work of others.

Leslie Kreiner Wilson, PhD, is a produced screenwriter and directs the MFA Program in Writing for Screen and Television at Pepperdine University. Her recent publications include fiction as well as essays on screenwriters Frances Marion and Anita Loos in several academic journals.

Andrés Orozco is the writer/director of various award-winning films, including Yo Soy Tu Niña, God Speaks Spanish, and 16 Summers. He is currently an assistant professor at Weber State University, where he teaches digital media courses and oversees film production. He is also a SAG actor.


Twitter Username: orozcofilms

Tom Provost wrote Under Suspicion starring Oscar winners Morgan Freeman and Gene Hackman. It was nominated for an Edgar Award. He wrote and directed The Presence starring Oscar winner Mira Sorvino. The film won numerous Best Picture and Best Director awards. He is an honors graduate from UT Austin.


Twitter Username: provostom

Website: cinemalanguage.org

Room 17, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F130. Beyond Measure: Experiments in the Music of Poetry. (, , , , ) Investigating the potent realms between language, the body, and sound, the panelists will explore how voice, silence, improvisation, and elements of time are vital to a poem’s performance, power and content. Panelists will perform, as well as speak to the overlapping influences of spoken language, song, music, and sound, in the service of poem-making.

Orlando White is the author of two books of poetry: Bone Light and LETTERRS. He is the recipient of a Lannan Foundation Residency and Bread Loaf John Ciardi Fellowship. He teaches at Diné College and in the low-residency MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts.

Harmony Holiday is the author of Negro League Baseball, winner of the Motherwell Poetry Prize. She has a BA from UC Berkeley and an MFA from Columbia University, and she runs a boutique production house devoted to the crossing between archiving, improvisation, myth, and black music.

Samuel Ace is the author of Normal Sex, Home in Three Days, Don’t Wash, and, most recently, Stealth, with poet Maureen Seaton. He is a recipient of an Astraea Lesbian Writer's Award in Poetry, and a two-time finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in poetry. He teaches writing at Mt. Holyoke College.


Twitter Username: samuel_ace

Duriel E. Harris is the author of the solo play Thingification and three books of poetry, including Drag, Amnesiac, and the prize winning No Dictionary of a Living Tongue. Editor of Obsidian and cofounder of the Black Took Collective, she is an associate professor of English at ISU in Normal, Illinois.


Twitter Username: DrPoMo

Website: thingification.org

Tracie Morris holds an MFA in poetry from Hunter College, and a PhD in performance studies from NYU. Her most recent book is handholding: 5 kinds. She is coeditor of Best American Experimental Writing (2016). Morris is coordinator of the MFA in performance and performance studies at Pratt Institute.


Twitter Username: mstraciemorris

Room 18 & 19, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F131. Past as Present: The Relevance of History in Fiction. (, , , , Yoojin Grace Wuertz) Historical fiction may conjure an image of a swooning Victorian lady or hardscrabble homesteader, but the contemporary meaning and urgency of novels set in the past is complex and often overlooked. This panel explores how the prism of history enables reflection that’s impossible in contemporary settings; how the subjectivity of interpreting history leads to innovation and discovery; the line between revising history and reimagining lives; and whether history may "belong" to anyone.

Amy Brill is the author of The Movement of Stars and a 2015 NYFA fiction fellow. Her fiction and essays have been appeared in One Story, The Common, Guernica, and several anthologies, and she's been awarded residencies at Millay Colony, Jentel, the American Antiquarian Society, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: amy_brill

Website: http://www.amybrill.com

Alexander Chee is the author of the novels Edinburgh and The Queen of the Night. Recipient of the Whiting Writers Award and a NEA in fiction, he is an associate professor of English at Dartmouth College.


Twitter Username: alexanderchee

Website: http://alexanderchee.net

Allison Amend is the award-winning author of the short story collection Things That Pass for Love, and the novels Stations West, A Nearly Perfect Copy, and Enchanted Islands.


Twitter Username: allisonamend

Website: http://www.allisonamend.com

Dolen Perkins-Valdez is the author of The New York Times bestselling novel Wench. Her second novel Balm was published May 2015. Her stories have appeared in The Kenyon Review and elsewhere. She teaches in the American University MFA program.


Twitter Username: Dolen

Website: www.DolenPerkinsValdez.com

Room 20 & 21, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F132. Writing Through the Immigrant Lens. (, , , , Eugene Gloria) First and second generation immigrants represent a growing demographic in the writing community, and their backgrounds influence their work on many levels. Writing through the lens of an immigrant or child of immigrants can offer a unique perspective in content and voice, but also complicate a writer’s sense of identity, loyalty, place, and beliefs. Multigenre panelists will share ways that their writing has been influenced by identities that straddle cultures, and offer strategies for challenges.

José M Orduña is a graduate of the Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa. His first book, The Weight of Shadows: A Memoir of Displacement is about race, class, and citizenship. He joined the creative writing faculty at the University of Nevada Las Vegas in 2017.


Twitter Username: JoseMOrduna

Marie Myung-Ok Lee is the author of the novel Somebody's Daughter and one forthcoming. Fiction has appeared Kenyon Review, FiveChapters, TriQuarterly, Witness, Joyland, Guernica. Nonfiction has appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, and The New York Times. She teaches creative writing at Columbia.


Twitter Username: MarieMyungOkLee

Website: https://www.facebook.com/MarieLeeWriter

Ayşe Papatya Bucak teaches in the MFA program at Florida Atlantic University. She has published fiction and nonfiction in a variety of journals, including Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, The Iowa Review, and Kenyon Review. Her short fiction has been selected for the O.Henry and Pushcart Prizes.


Twitter Username: thefreemfa

Xhenet Aliu is author of the forthcoming novel Brass and the story collection Domesticated Wild Things and Other Stories, winner of the Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Fiction. She works as an academic librarian in Athens, Georgia.

Room 22, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F133. The Semi-Formal: Hybrid Free and Formal Verse. (, , , , ) Between the polarities of free and formal verse is a spectrum of hybrid poetry that utilizes the treasures of both: inventiveness, innovative structures, rhyme, and rhythm. This panel will present and analyze such hybrid poems, classic and contemporary, including work by Gerard Manley Hopkins, Patricia Smith, and Claudia Rankine. We will "out" free verse poets in their use of formal elements, discovering their metric codes, and discuss the impact of free verse on the evolution of form.

Marc Vincenz’s eighth collection of poetry is Becoming the Sound of Bees. He has translated many German-language poets, including Herman Hesse Prize winner, Klaus Merz. He is Executive Editor of MadHat Press and serves on the editorial boards of Plume and Fulcrum.

Larissa Shmailo's latest book of poetry is Medusa's Country and her latest novel is Patient Women. She is an anthologist of Russian poetry in translation and the original English translator of the avant-garde opera, Victory over the Sun. She also is a critical writer on poetry and poetics.


Twitter Username: larissashmailo

Dean Kostos is the author of eight books. His forthcoming collection is Pierced by Night-Colored Threads. His previous book—This Is Not a Skyscraper—won the Benjamin Saltman Award, selected by Mark Doty. Kostos was invited to present his work at The Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University.


Twitter Username: dkostos21

Website: http://deankostos.com/

Elizabeth L. Hodges is a literary activist and editor of the print journal, St. Petersburg Review, and the web journal, Springhouse Journal. Her latest collection of poetry is Witchery.

Michael Anania is a poet, essayist, and fiction writer. His work is widely anthogized and translated. Recent poetry books include Nightsongs and Clamors, Continuous Showings, and Heat Lines. He has taught at Northwestern, the University of Chicago, and the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Room 23, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F134. Her Poetic Voice: Women Translating Women . (, , , , ) Questions about how and why gender matters in translation are current, yet far from exhausted, in field-wide conversations. This panel contributes to the dialogue by gathering women translators of Spanish language women poets to consider the complexities of bringing female poetic subjectivity into English. Topics to be discussed include poetic expression, gendered language, the ideological implications of our choices, and the role of woman translators as both creators and promoters.

Katherine M. Hedeen is professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. She has published over twenty books of Spanish and Spanish American poetry in translation. She is translation editor at Kenyon Review and a two-time recipient of a NEA Translation Project Grant.


Twitter Username: kmhedeen

Kristin Dykstra's recent translations include work by Amanda Berenguer, Alvaro Mutis, Omar Perez, Rito Aroche, and Tina Escaja, as well as a series of four contemporary Cuban editions (with her critical introductions) by Reina María Rodriguez, Juan Carlos Flores, Angel Escobar, and Marcelo Morales.

Michelle Gil-Montero is a poet and translator. She has translated several books of poetry by contemporary Latin American writers, including Maria Negroni, Valerie Mejer Caso, and Andres Ajens. Her work has been supported by the NEA, Howard Foundation, and Fulbright.

Jeannine Marie Pitas is a teacher, writer, and translator currently teaching at the University of Dubuque. She is the author of two poetry chapbooks and the translator of poetry by Uruguayan writer Marosa di Giorgio.

Carina del Valle Schorske is a translator, poet, and essayist. She won Gulf Coast's 2016 prize in translation, and her work has appeared in Boston Review, The Offing, Lit Hub, and elsewhere. She is the happy recipient of fellowships from CantoMundo, the MacDowell Colony, and Bread Loaf.


Twitter Username: fluentmundo

Room 24, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F135. Side-Hustle Publishing: Sustaining a Small Press in Austere Times. (, , , , ) How do small presses confront issues of sustainability in an era when available resources like funding, time, energy, and people power for literary publishing are spread thinner than ever? Representatives from The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective, co•im•press, Noemi Press, Shelterbelt Press, and Veliz Books focus on practical lessons they’ve learned along the way, including critical decisions and essential techniques for building a thriving, community-driven organization with limited means.

Steve Halle is the director of the publications unit in the Department of English at Illinois State University. Author of Map of the Hydrogen World, The Collectors, and Cessation Covers, he directs co•im•press, edits Downstate Legacies and PRESS 254, and hosts the Re:Verse Reading Series.


Twitter Username: sevencorners

Laura Cesarco Eglin, poet and translator, is author of Calling Water by Its Name, trans. Spanbauer, Sastrería, Los brazos del saguaro, Occasions to Call Miracles Appropriate, and Tailor Shop: Threads. She translates from Portuguese, Portuñol, Galician, and Spanish. She is the publisher of Veliz Books.

Adam Clay is the author of Stranger. Book review editor at Kenyon Review, he teaches at the University of Southern Mississippi.


Twitter Username: adam__clay

Website: http://www.adamclay.org

Sarah Gzemski is the managing editor of Noemi Press and the publicity and publications coordinator at the University of Arizona Poetry Center. She participated in the artist collaboration project In Sight II, and her poetry can be found in Four Chambers and Bone Bouquet, among others.


Twitter Username: sargzem

Ellen Kombiyil is a recent transplant from Bangalore, India, where she lived for nearly eleven years. She is the author of Histories of the Future Perfect and a cofounder of The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective, a mentorship-model collective press publishing poets from India and the diaspora.


Twitter Username: ellenkombiyil

Room 25, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F136. Required Reading: Authors, Editors, and Publishers Talk Textbooks for Creative Writers. (, , , , Amorak Huey) This panel of publishers, editors, and writers examines the [adjective: dynamic, sexy, arduous] process of writing textbooks—from conception, to finding a publisher, to building the book, to, even, creating an entire textbook series. This panel will include nuts and bolts, but much of it will investigate how writers, editors, and publishers dream up new ways to write for the college student and to carve out a niche in the competitive textbook marketplace.

Sean Prentiss is the author of Finding Abbey: A Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave, coauthor of Nature and Environmental Writing: A Guide and Anthology, and coeditor of The Fourth Genre: Explorations in Creative Nonfiction.

Stephanie Lenox is the author of The Business, Congress of Strange People, and The Heart That Lies Outside the Body. She is cowriting a textbook on short-form creative writing, forthcoming. She is cofounder of Blood Orange Review and teaches creative writing at Willamette University.


Twitter Username: StephLenox

Website: www.stephanielenox.com

H.K. Hummel is the author of Short-Form Creative Writing: A Writers Guide and Anthology, Handmade Boats, and Boytreebird. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

David Avital is senior publisher at Bloomsbury. He is responsible for commissioning in the areas of literary studies and creative writing.

9:00 am to 10:00 am

Room 10, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F137. Yoga for Writers. () Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come in comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary. Chairs will be provided and advance sign-up is required. Sign up will be available beginning on Monday, 11/13/17, 12 noon EST.

Marisa Iglesias is a certified 500-hr Hatha yoga instructor and Kriya meditation teacher. Her classes combine breath with strong, flowing movement. Expect to sweat and feel rejuvenated. Find her online at marisaiglesiasyoga.com and on Instagram at marisaiglesiasyoga.

10:30 am to 11:45 am

Grand Salon A, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F138. Creatures from the Black Lagoon: Feminist Writing from the Deep South of Florida. (, , , , ) Moving beyond the legacies of Zora Neale Hurston and Marjory Kinnan Rawlings, this panel of feminist writers from Florida explore what is it like to write from one of the most reactionary parts of the country. This diverse panel of women writers will discuss what the deep south looks like and how it's perceived from its contemporary women writers. This panel will explore how the current socio- and geopolitical climate of Florida affects the feminist hivemind, voice, and literature.

Laura Minor is the recipient of the 2016 Emerging Writers Spotlight Award, chosen by D.A. Powell. Her poetry has most recently appeared in Berfrois, Queen Mob's Tea House, Hobart, and Spring Gun Press. She is currently a doctoral candidate in poetry at Florida State University.


Twitter Username: lauralminor

Avni Vyas, along with Anne Barngrover, is the author of the chapbook, Candy in Our Brains. She writes and teaches in Tallahassee, Florida.

Alissa Nutting is author of the novels Made for Love and Tampa, as well as the story collection Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls. Her work has recently appeared in The New York Times, Salon, and the Indiana Review. She is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at Grinnell College.


Twitter Username: alissanutting

Anton DiSclafani is the author of The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls and The After Party. A finalist for the Flaherty-Dunan First Novel prize, her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Washington Square, Biographile, and This American Life. She teaches creative writing at Auburn University.

Tana Jean Welch is the author of the poetry collection Latest Volcano. Her poetry has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Colorado Review, The Southern Review, and other national journals. She is assistant professor of medical humanities at the Florida State University College of Medicine.


Twitter Username: cannonsplinter

Website: tanajeanwelch.com

Grand Salon B, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F139. New Fiction from Atlanta. (, , ) During the past thirty years, Atlanta, the Southeast’s largest metropolitan, has seen an explosion in the literary arts. It is home to prizewinning writers, journals, and centers. This panel presents new works from three diverse novelists. With fresh insight and innovative form, they explore family, the South’s racial tensions, and storytelling itself

Anthony Grooms directs the MA in Professional Writing Program at Kennesaw State. He has won awards from Fulbright, Yaddo, NEA, Bread Loaf, and Hurston-Wright, and is the author of Bombingham, a novel, and Trouble No More, stories. His novel, The Vain Conversation, is forthcoming.

Gray Stewart is on core faculty at the Etowah Valley MFA Program at Reinhardt University. He led the fiction workshop at Morehouse College from 2000–2010. A former fiction editor, Fulbright beneficiary, and Hambidge Fellow, his first novel Haylow won the 2017 Georgia Author of the Year Award.

Anna Schachner is the author of the novel You and I and Someone Else. Professor of English at GSU's Perimeter College, she also teaches writing in the Georgia prison system and organizes writing workshops for student and community veterans. She is the editor of The Chattahoochee Review.


Twitter Username: anna_schachner

Grand Salon C, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F140. Writing Revolution: Not Why, but How. (, , ) What are the specific challenges of writing about resistance and protest movements? How do we balance ethics, polemics, and aesthetics? How do we portray the labor—emotional and otherwise—of change-makers? When depicting historical movements, what are the obligations to reality and the obligations to the imagination? This panel brings together writers for a craft discussion of how to write fiction about revolution, political violence, and entangled histories.

Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes is the author of the novel The Sleeping World. She has received fellowships from Yaddo, Blue Mountain Center, and the Millay Colony. She teaches creative writing and English literature at the University of Maryland.


Twitter Username: ludyfederales

Peter Mountford is the author of the novels A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism and The Dismal Science. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Granta, Best New American Voices 2008, The Sun, and The Atlantic. He is events curator at Hugo House, and teaches at Sierra Nevada College's MFA.


Twitter Username: petermountford

Website: www.petermountford.com

Nayomi Munaweera's debut novel, Island of a Thousand Mirrors, won the 2013 Commonwealth Prize for Asia. The New York Times called it "incandescent." Her second novel, What Lies Between Us, drew comparisons to the voices of Michael Ondatjee and Jumpha Lahiri.

Grand Salon D, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F141. Defining Native Poetics, Genre, and Criticism. (, , , , ) Alumni from the Institute of American Indian Arts will discuss indigenous poetics, exploring the connection between literary elders and our own current work, with a particular focus on form. The panel will offer readings from our key influencers and explicate the connection to our own writing. This question will be at the core of the panel: looking at influence, how do we acknowledge our language and way of life in our creations?

Charlotte Gullick grew up in Northern California, during much of the area’s transition from logging to marijuana, and the resulting tensions inform much of her fiction and essays. She is chair of the creative writing department at Austin Community College in Austin, Texas, and is the author of By Way of Water.


Twitter Username: gullickwriter

Website: www.charlottegullick.com

Darlene Naponse is an Anishinaabe from Atikameksheng Anishnawbek–Northern Ontario, where she was born and raised. She is a writer, independent film director, video artist, and community activist. She completed her MFA in creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe.


Twitter Username: darlenenaponse

Gerry Himmelreich was awarded a Mellon Fellowship through the American Indian College Fund to complete his MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. When not hunting and foraging for food or stories, he teaches for Diné College. He's one of a lucky few to have seen Schrödinger's cat twice.

Michaelsun Stonesweat Knapp, of the Costanoan-Rumsen Carmel Band of Ohlone Indians, graduate of the IAIA's low-residency MFA program, is the winner of the Muse Times Two poetry contest, 2016, nominated for a pushcart, as well as a Periphery Poets Fellow, and former editor of poetry for Mud City.

Terese Marie Mailhot graduated from the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her memoir Heart Berries is forthcoming. She is the first Tecumseh Post Doctoral Fellow at Purdue.


Twitter Username: TereseMarieM

Florida Salon 1, 2, & 3, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F142. Beyond "Add one and stir": Negotiating Race, Gender, and Class as Female Faculty of Color. (, , , ) As of 2013, only 9% of full-time faculty positions in the US were held by women of color and the percentage who are creative writers is even lower. How do these women navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education? Panelists will discuss experiences in the classroom, hallways, and meeting rooms, as well as in the hiring, promotion, and tenure process. Together we will develop strategies to build community and challenge institutional biases on the bases of race, gender, and class.

Val Wang is the author of the memoir Beijing Bastard. She lives in Cambridge and is an assistant professor in the English and media studies department of Bentley University.


Twitter Username: chingchong

Ru Freeman is an award-winning Sri Lankan and American writer, a national speaker, and social justice activist. Author of the novels, A Disobedient Girl and On Sal Mal Lane, a New York Times Editor's Choice, she is editor of Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers on Palestine.


Twitter Username: rufreeman

Website: www.rufreeman.com

Danielle Evans is the author of the short story collection Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self. She teaches creative writing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Twitter Username: daniellevalore

Website: http://daniellevaloreevans.com/

Jennifer De Leon is the editor of Wise Latinas: Writers on Higher Education. Recipient of a City of Boston Artist in Residence fellowship in 2016–2017, she is a member of the Grub Street board of directors. She is an assistant professor of English at Framingham State University.


Twitter Username: jdeleonwriter

Florida Salon 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F143. A 25th Anniversary Reading by Kate Tufts Discovery Award Winners. (, , , , ) Claremont Graduate University’s Kate Tufts Discovery Award, presented annually for “a first book of genuine promise,” was created in 1994 to honor poets in the initial stages of their careers and encourage their future writing. These past recipients of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award demonstrate how early career prizes have a positive creative impact. Too, their readings will showcase the breadth, depth, and diversity of the poetry that CGU’s Tufts Awards supports and celebrates.

Lori Anne Ferrell is director of the Kingsley and Kate Tufts Poetry Awards and John D. and Lillian Maguire Distinguished Professor in the Humanities at Claremont Graduate University.

Adrian Blevins’s third full-length collection of poems, Appalachians Run Amok, is the recipient of the Wilder Prize from Two Sylvias Press and will be published in the spring of 2018. Blevins is also the author of Live from the Homesick Jamboree, The Brass Girl Brouhaha, and other books.

Janice N. Harrington has published three books of poetry, including Primitive: The Art and Life of Horace H. Pippin. Harrington also writes children’s books, most recently Catching a Storyfish. She teaches creative writing at the University of Illinois.

Phillip B. Williams is the author of the poetry collection Thief in the Interior. He teaches at Bennington College.


Twitter Username: pbw_poet

Catherine Bowman is the author of 1-800-HOT-RIBS, Rock Farm, Notarikon, The Plath Cabinet, and Can I Finish, Please? and editor of Word of Mouth: Poems Featured on NPR's All Things Considered. She teaches in the creative writing program at Indiana University.

Florida Salon 5, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F144. Speculative Nonfiction: The Act of Invention in the Context of Reality. (, , , , ) The panel will define speculative nonfiction as writing in which actual or verifiable material is not at war with material invented/extrapolated/speculated/fantasized. In this nonfiction territory, invention does not negate actuality, but expands its truth and its uses. The authors will examine why and how nonfiction writers use speculation, then consider the repercussions, politics, and epistemology of mixing what is true with what is possible or even impossible.

Amy Benson is the author of Seven Years to Zero and The Sparkling-Eyed Boy, winner of the Bakeless Prize in Nonfiction by Bread Loaf Writers Conference. Recent prose has appeared in journals such as Agni, BOMB, Boston Review, and Gettysburg Review. She teaches at Rhodes College.

Susanne Paola Antonetta’s most recent book is Curious Atoms from Essay Press. Awards include a New York Times Notable Book, an American Book Award, a Library Journal Best Science book, a Pushcart Prize, and others. She coauthored nonfiction text Tell It Slant and she is editor of the Bellingham Review.

Kiese Laymon is a black southern writer, born and raised in Jackson. An associate professor English at Vassar College, he is the author of the novel, Long Division, and a collection of essays, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America.

Sabrina Orah Mark is the author of the prose poetry collections The Babies and Tsim Tsum. Her poems and stories have recently appeared or are forthcoming in American Short Fiction, B O D Y, The Believer, and in the anthology My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales.


Twitter Username: sabrinaorahmark

Website: http://liveplantscorsages.tumblr.com

Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and the author of two books, My Body Is a Book of Rules and Starvation Mode. She is an assistant professor at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: elissawashuta

Website: http://washuta.net

Florida Salon 6, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F145. A Tribute to Van Brock, Poet and Founder of Anhinga Press. (, , , , ) In this tribute, writers who knew Van Brock for many years will discuss his work, legacy and read some of his poems. Others from the audience may offer their remembrances too. Van K. Brock taught at Florida State University for 30 years. During that time, he nurtured three generations of writers, founded Anhinga Press, edited Sundog and International Quarterly, and started a still-active Tallahassee reading series. He also published six collections of poetry.

Rick Campbell's books of poetry are The History of Steel, Dixmont; The Traveler's Companion, and Setting the World In Order. His poems and essays have appeared in The Georgia Review and other journals. He directs the Florida Literary Arts Coalition, and teaches at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida.

Geoffrey Brock is a poet and a translator of Italian poetry and prose. He's the author of Voices Bright Flags and Weighing Light, the editor of The FSG Book of 20th-Century Italian Poetry, and the translator of works by Cesare Pavese, Umberto Eco, Italo Calvino, and others. He teaches at Arkansas.


Twitter Username: gbrock

Peter Meinke is poet laureate of Florida. He directed the Writing Workshop at Eckerd College for tewnty-seven years. He has published eight books in the Pitt Poetry Series, and six books with the University of Tampa Press. His most recent books are Lucky Bones, The Expert Witness, and To Start With, Feel Fortunate.

Silvia Curbelo's poetry books include Falling Landscape and The Secret History of Water. She received fellowships from the NEA, the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Cintas Foundation, and the Jessica Maxwell Poetry Prize from American Poetry Review.

Donna J. Long’s poems have appeared most recently in Clockhouse, The Southern Review, and Appalachian Heritage, as well as in the anthologies Unbridled; The Southern Poetry Anthology, Volume III; and The Poets’ Guide to the Birds. She is editor in chief of Kestrel: A Journal of Literature and Art.

Meeting Room 1, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F146. Beyond Skirts and Pants: Considering Gender in Children's Picture Books. (, , , , ) Gender-related messages are both overt and hidden in picture books, often the first—and thus, especially impactful—literature shared with youngsters. As writers, how might we discern and work against problematic messages? What gaps and challenges are especially salient as we head deeper into the 21st century? Five children's authors discuss what gender equality means in terms of authors, illustrators, child protagonists, featured parents, humor, gender markers, and the publishing industry.

Mary Quattlebaum is the author of twenty-five children's books, including picture books, novels, nonfiction, and poetry. She teaches in the MFA program in writing for children and young adults in the Vermont College of Fine Arts and frequently presents at schools.

J. Albert Mann is the author of five published middle grade and young adult novels. Her stories and poetry have appeared in Highlights for Children. She has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts in Writing for Children and Young Adults, where she also earned a Picture Book Intensive certificate.


Twitter Username: jenannmann

Cate Berry is an MFA candidate at Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her debut picture book is slated for publication. Ms. Berry's work combines humor and playfulness with subversive themes and situations. She is interested in challenging gender stereotypes within picture book animals and characters.


Twitter Username: cberrywriter

Leah Henderson is a writer, mentor, and avid traveler. When she is not scribbling down her characters’ adventures, she is off on her own, exploring spaces and places around the world. She is the author of the middle grade novel, One Shadow on the Wall and received her MFA from Spalding University.


Twitter Username: LeahsMark

Website: leahhendersonbooks.com

Jonah Heller is a graduate of the Writing for Children and Young Adults Program at Vermont College of Fine Arts. He works as an assistant editor for a children's trade book publisher.

Meeting Room 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F147. Narrative Medicine: The Write Prescription. (, , , , ) Narrative medicine brings storytelling and writing into the realm of physical and mental health. Writing allows doctors, patients, and families to move through their experience. Writers contribute to the field leading workshops and shaping stories. Narrative medicine is also a powerful tool for marginalized and vulnerable populations. Panelists offer insights from writing and teaching in the field, including discussion of therapeutic writing and writing for advocacy and literacy development.

Heather Bryant has published short fiction and nonfiction in The Massachusetts Review, The Southeast Review, CURA, and in anthologies. A winner of the Southeast Review Narrative Nonfiction Contest, she was Emerging Writer-in-Residence at Randolph College and teaches at Pace University.


Twitter Username: ProfHB1

Judith Hannan is an essayist and the author of The Write Prescription and Motherhood Exaggerated. She leads workshops for those affected by illness and for high-risk populations. She mentors cancer patients, and she is a recipient of a 2015 Humanism-in-Medicine award from the Arnold P. Gold Foundation.


Twitter Username: Judithhannan

Lisa Weinert is passionate about powerful voices and the potential of storytelling to heal and transform lives. She has worked with authors as a publicist, editor, and agent for fifteen years and is the creator of the debut annual Program in Narrative Medicine at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health.


Twitter Username: lisaweinert

Jessica Hall, LMSW, is the founder and Executive Director of Prison Writes. Jessica has over two decades experience working with marginalized and vulnerable populations and graduated with honors from the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College with a focus on community organizing.


Twitter Username: prisonwrites

Nellie Hermann, creative director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, is a graduate of Brown University and the MFA program at Columbia. She is author of two novels, The Cure for Grief and The Season of Migration, and a 2017–18 Cullman fellow at the New York Public Library.


Twitter Username: NellieGHermann

Website: www.nelliehermann.com

Meeting Room 9 & 10, Marriott Waterside, Third Floor

F148. Page Meets Stage. (, Aja-Monet Bacquie, , , ) In the 13 years since Page Meets Stage first paired a literary poet with a more performative spoken word poet and had them read back and forth, poem for poem, the line between page and stage has become wonderfully fluid. No one really claims that “page poets can’t read, and stage poets can’t write” anymore, but Taylor Mali has returned with four more poets to keep it that way. “Where the Pulitzer Prize meets the poetry slam.”

Taylor Mali is one of the most well-known poets to have emerged from the poetry slam movement and one of the original poets to appear on the HBO series Def Poetry Jam. A four-time National Poetry Slam champion, he is the founder of the Page Meets Stage reading series in New York City.


Twitter Username: TaylorMali

Website: www.taylormali.com

Ross Gay is the author of three books of poems: Against Which, Bringing the Shovel Down, and Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. A founding editor, with Karissa Chen and Patrick Rosal, of the online sports magazine Some Call It Ballin’, he is an editor with the chapbook presses Q Avenue and Ledge Mule Press and a founding board member of the Bloomington Community Orchard. He teaches in the creative writing program at Indiana University.

Mahogany L. Browne is a Cave Canem, Poets House, and Serenbe Focus alumna, playwright, poet, and orgranizer. Publisher of Penmanship Books, she earned her MFA in writing and activism from Pratt Institute and she serves as artistic director of Urban Word NYC.


Twitter Username: mobrowne

Website: www.mobrowne.com

Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz is an award-winning nonfiction writer and poet. Her second nonfiction book, Dr Mutter's Marvels, was a New York Times bestseller, and her seventh book of poetry, How to Love the Empty Air, was recently released.


Twitter Username: coaptowicz

Website: http://aptowicz.com/

Ballroom A, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F149. Strong Medicine: The Poetry of Addiction. (, , , , ) From Horace to Hass, poets have both lauded and vilified getting high. The “milk of paradise” can lead to masterworks, while addiction deserts ambition and destroys lives. In this panel, five award-winning poets, including two physician-poets, explore the swerve from inspiration to ruination from different perspectives and diverse writing styles. Themes of addiction in self, family, mentors, patients—e.g., post-9/11 veterans—as well as the seductive intimacy of shared intoxication, are featured.

Dawn McGuire is a neurologist and an award-winning poet. She has four published collections, including The Aphasia Cafe (winner of the Indie Book Award for poetry) and American Dream with Exit Wound. McGuire integrates her work with patients and neuroscience in many poems. Poetry makes her a better MD.

Keveh Akbar is founding editor of Divedapper. His poems apear in Poetry, APR, Ploughshares, Tin House, and elsewhere. The recipient of a Ruth Lilly & Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, Kaveh's first book, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, will be out with Alice James Books in 2017.


Twitter Username: kavehakbar

Website: kavehakbar.com

Lynn Emanuel is the author of five books of poetry, Hotel Fiesta, The Dig (National Poetry Series Award), Then, Suddenly- (Eric Matthieu King Award Academy of American Poets), Noose and Hook, and, in 2016, The Nerve of it: New and Selected Poems (Lenore Marshall Award, Academy of American Poets).

Owen Lewis is the winner of the 2016 International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry & Medicine and the 2016 Jean Pedrick Chapbook Award. Lewis is professor of psychiatry at Columbia University and author of four poetry collections: March in San Miguel, Sometimes Full of Daylight, Best Man, and the forthcoming Marriage Map.


Twitter Username: owenlewispoetry

Website: www.owenlewispoet.com

Nick Flynn has published nine books, including My Feelings, Some Ether, Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, The Captain Asks for a Show of Hands, The Reenactments, The Ticking is the Bomb, and Blind Huber. His work has been translated into fifteen languages.


Twitter Username: _nick_flynn_

Website: www.nickflynn.org

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floor

F150. Omnidawn Reading—Past Year's Authors. (, , , Joseph Rios) Authors will read from their new Fall 2017 & Spring 2018 Omnidawn books (authors of poetry & one author of fiction). This is an exciting opportunity to hear a brief, insight engaging glimpse of the newest writing by these terrific authors, and to ask them your questions, share your thoughts about their work. Readers are David Armstrong; Ewa Chrusciel; for Hillary Gravendyk, Sam Corfman will read; Richard Greenfield; Laura Neuman; Diana Khoi Nguyen; Joseph Rios; Claire Marie Stancek.

Ewa Chrusciel has three books in English: Of Annunciations, Contraband of Hoopoe, Strata, and three books in Polish: Furkot, Sopilki, and Tobolek.

David Armstrong is author of the story collections Going Anywhere and Reiterations. Winner of the Mississippi Review Prize and other awards, he was a PhD fellow in fiction at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and is now assistant professor of creative writing at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio.

Diana Khoi Nguyen is completing a PhD in creative writing at the University of Denver. A winner of the 92Y "Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Contest, her poems appear in Poetry, American Poetry Review, PEN America, and elsewhere. Her first book, Ghost Of, is forthcoming.

Virginia Barber Middleton Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floo

F151. Work Work Balance: When a Day Job Pays More Than the Bills. (Libby Burton, Chelsea Hodson, Rachel Heng) What if working a day job and writing didn't have to be a zero sum game? Hear from writers who have used their "day jobs" as inspiration, source material, and motivation to finish their books. We'll dig into how working and writing simultaneously doesn't always mean sacrificing one or the other, but rather, can create a balance leading to inspiration and success. What are the advantages of working and writing--and how do you find time for both? How can a day job both inspire and expose a writer to a world beyond what they've known?

Room 1, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F152. A Rose by Any Other Name Smells Just as Sweet: Creating and Reinventing Literary Magazines at Two-Year Colleges. (, , , , ) Want to start or reinvent a literary magazine at your two-year school? Advisers discuss and demonstrate strategies for naming and renaming the magazine, involving all of the stakeholders, garnering submissions, submission management, budget concerns, design, printer selection, online presence, and student practicums. Panelists also discuss the various views on the role of the adviser. While the panel focuses on two-year school programs, this event is also applicable to university publications.

Emily Andrews currently teaches composition, literature, and film at Volunteer State Community College in a suburb of Nashville, Tennessee. She is also a faculty advisor for the student literary arts magazine, Pioneer Pen.

Laura Jean Barrett McClister earned her MA in English from Austin Peay State University. She is a fiction writer and teaches at Volunteer State Community College in Gallatin, Tennessee. She serves as coadviser for her college's Sigma Kappa Delta chapter and for the literary arts magazine Pioneer Pen.

Jasmin Rae Ziegler received her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She is currently an English instructor and advisor to the Creative Writing Club at Anoka Ramsey Community College. She also serves as a Senior Editor of Poetry City, USA.

Kristofer Whited earned his MFA from California State University, Fresno in May 2011. He currently teaches composition, literature, creative writing and literary magazine at Community College of Aurora in Colorado, where he is also creative adviser for the student publishing club, Pulse'29.

Matthew Larrimore earned his MA in English (creative writing) at Northern Arizona University and completed his MFA in poetry at Old Dominion University. He has taught composition since fall of 2012, and he teaches Intro to Literature at ODU. He is the editor in chief of Four Ties Lit Review.

Room 3 & 4, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F153. Techno Black: Connecting the Mobile Reader to Globally Diverse Writers. (, , , , ) Even as publishers turn towards more culturally and geographically diverse Black writers, often at the expense of long-established and "matured" local markets, a burgeoning mobile black reader market is about to explode. If there is anything to be learned from the most recent twenty-year interest in the Black experience through books is that we can no longer place the telling of Black stories solely in the hands of traditional publishing.

Kadija Sesay is an award-winning literary activist, publisher of SABLE, editor of many anthologies. Her poetry collection Irki was shortlisted for the Glenna Luschei Prize for African Poetry. She received an Arts Council England R&D grant for her second book. She is a PhD student at Brighton University.


Twitter Username: sablelitmag

Website: www.sablelitmag.org/kadijasesay

Tim Fielder is an artist/instructor and Afrofuturist in comics and concept design for film and video games. His genre is the creation of speculative narratives as they apply to people of color. Tim's primary outlet is through his company Dieselfunk Studios with projects such as Matty's Rocket.


Twitter Username: Dieselfunkstu

Max Rodriguez is founder and publisher of QBR/The Black Book Review and founder of the Harlem Book Fair, televised nationally on C-Span's BookTV. He has served as moderator at American Booksellers Association events, BEA, American Publishers Association conferences, and New York Times author series.


Twitter Username: maxrodriguez

Website: qbrbookreviews.com

Suban Nur Cooley is a Somali storyteller, whose essay has been published Scarf magazine. She is on the editorial staff Michigan State University's nonfiction journal, Fourth Genre. Her research focuses on women in the Somali diaspora, identity formation, and their activism on digital platforms.


Twitter Username: subannurcooley

Ibrahim Ahmad is the editorial director at Akashic Books, where he has worked in various capacities since 2000. He teaches at the Wilkes MFA Low-Residency Creative Writing Program, leads frequent writing workshops, and is the cofounder of Brooklyn Wordsmiths, an editorial and consulting program.


Twitter Username: AkashicBooks

Room 5 & 6, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F154. On Speaking Terms: Forging Healthy Translation-Writer Communication and Boundaries. (, , , Evangelia Sakelliou) Translation has long been considered a diversifying and generous practice. As "the person in between," we often forge long-lasting, complicated, and wonderful relationships with our authors. There is a sense of accomplishment and challenge when we bring an author's words into the correct light. But about when we are faced with trials that accompany even the best working relationships? We will also discuss the intricacies of saying no, saying yes, and bettering communication with our authors.

Maria Nazos's poetry, translations, and lyrical essays are published in The New Yorker, TriQuarterly, The Tampa Review, The Mid-American Review, The North American Review, The Florida Review, The Southern Humanities Review, The Drunken Boat, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: MariaNazos

J. Kates is a poet, literary translator, and the codirector of Zephyr Press.

Aliki Barnstone is a poet, translator, critic, editor, and artist, whose most recent volumes are Winter, with Child, Bright Body, Dear God Dear, Dr. Heartbreak: New and Selected Poems, and a translation of Cavafy. Her awards include a Fulbright Fellowship in Greece and an Anderson Center residency.


Twitter Username: AlikiBee

Website: www.alikibarnstone.com

Room 7, 8, & 9, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F155. Apollinaire 100 Years On. (, , , , ) One hundred years ago, in the last year of his life, Guillaume Apollinaire wrote a poem celebrating the "long quarrel" between "order and adventure," a tension still animating our best poems. Panelists reconsider this modernist and his influence on our ongoing experiments. In a moment riddled with hate crimes, it is a tonic to encounter a poet who said, in a poem written just after his return from WWI, that all he wanted was to "explore kindness the enormous country where everything is silent...."

Catherine Barnett has received the James Laughlin Award, a Guggenheim, and a Whiting Writers Award. Her third book of poems will be published this year. Author of The Game of Boxes and Into Perfect Spheres Such Holes Are Pierced, she works as an independent editor and teaches in the writing program at NYU.

Roger Reeves was awarded a 2014–2015 Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, a 2013 National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and his poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Poetry, Ploughshares, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, and Tin House. His first book is King Me.

Ama Codjoe has been awarded support from Saltonstall Foundation, Cave Canem Foundation, and Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop. Her poems have appeared in Narrative, Four Way Review, Georgia Review, and elsewhere.

Julie Carr is the author of five books of poetry, most recently 100 Notes on Violence, Sarah—Of Fragments and Lines, RAG, and Think Tank. Prose books include Surface Tension: Ruptural Time and the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry and Objects from a Borrowed Confession.


Twitter Username: carrcarrjuli

Website: juliealicecarr.com

Ed Skoog is the author of three books of poems, Mister Skylight, Rough Day, and Run the Red Lights.


Twitter Username: jawfuls_of_marl

Website: http://skoog.land

Room 11, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F156. The World and the Story: How Plot Maps Fictional Realities. (, , , , ) In fiction, there’s an interdependent relationship between world-building (the map) and narrative construction (the route). This panel will examine how writers employ different types of stories—the romance, the mystery, the quest—in service to different visions of reality. Why does a realist like Chekhov so often use the romance? For what purposes does a fantasy writer use the quest? How can a writer of literary fiction employ the quest or the mystery to investigate character?

Leah Stewart is the author of six novels, including The Myth of You and Me, The New Neighbor, and the upcoming What You Don't Know About Charlie Outlaw. She is the director of the creative writing program at the University of Cincinnati.


Twitter Username: leahcstewart

Website: www.leahstewart.com

Brock Clarke's seventh book of fiction—the short story collection The Price of the Haircut—was published in March 2017. His award-winning short shorties and essays have appeared in dozens of magazines, newspapers, and anthologies. He teaches at Bowdoin College.

Jung Yun is the author of Shelter and an assistant professor of creative writing at the George Washington University. Her work has appeared in Tin House, the Massachusetts Review, the Atlantic, and the LA Review of Books.


Twitter Username: JungYun71

Brenda Peynado's work appears in the O. Henry Prize Stories 2015, Georgia Review, Kenyon Review Online, Threepenny Review, and others. She received an MFA at Florida State University and a Fulbright Grant to the Dominican Republic. She is an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: brendapeynado

Julialicia Case writes fiction and creative nonfiction. She has received a Fulbright Fellowship to Germany, a UNO Writing Award for Study Abroad, and a Tennessee Williams Scholarship to the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Currently, she is earning her PhD in fiction at the University of Cincinnati.

Room 12, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F157. A Reading from Flash Nonfiction Funny. (, , , , ) Flash Nonfiction Funny, edited by Tom Hazuka and Dinty W. Moore and published in 2018, provides a unique perspective on the flash genre: working within a 750-word limit, each of these nonfiction pieces is designed to make readers laugh. Satire, burlesque, farce, slapstick—all of it true, told in just 1–3 pages. The panelists will read their own stories from the book, as well as favorite pieces by other authors from the anthology.

Tom Hazuka has published the novels The Road to the Island, In the City of the Disappeared, and Last Chance for First, and edited the short story anthologies Flash Fiction; Flash Fiction Funny; Sudden Flash Youth; You Have Time for This; and A Celestial Omnibus. He teaches at Central Connecticut State University.

Wendy Brenner is the author of two books of fiction, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award and NEA Fellowship, and professor in the MFA program at University of North Carolina Wilmington. Recent work has appeared in The Best American Essays, Best American Magazine Writing, and other anthologies.

Michael Martone's newest books are Winesburg, Indiana and Memoranda. He teaches at the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa.


Twitter Username: 4foraQuarter

Sandra Gail Lambert's memoir, A Certain Loneliness, will be published by the University of Nebraska Press. Her short fiction and essays can be found in The Southern Review, New Letters, and Brevity. The River's Memory is her debut novel, and she is a coeditor of the anthology Older Queer Voices.


Twitter Username: sandralambert

Website: www.sandragaillambert.com

Suzanne Strempek Shea's dozen books include This Is Paradise, about a medical clinic in Malawi. She teaches at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program and is writer in residence/director of the creative writing program at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Massachusetts.


Twitter Username: sstrempekshea

Website: www.suzannestrempekshea.com

Room 13, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F158. From Pronouns to Pedagogy: Queering the Creative Writing Classroom. (, , , , ) Outside of the rare queer lit class, creative writing curricula remains overwhelmingly cis- and hetero-centered, and queer experience, marginalized or ignored. Addressing practical concerns, such as confronting insensitivity in the workshop and integrating diverse texts, alongside theoretical questions of queer literary aesthetic and semiotics, this multi-genre panel examines how we cultivate LGBTQ+, trans and genderqueer-inclusive creative writing classrooms––to the benefit of all our students.

Kathie Bergquist is the editor of Windy City Queer: LGBTQ Dispatches from the Third Coast, a 2008 Lambda fellow, and editor in chief of Ms. Fit magazine. Adjunct faculty in the Department of Creative Writing at Columbia College Chicago, she leads study abroad programs in Paris and Prague.


Twitter Username: LaKathie

Website: www.msfitmag.com

Trace Peterson is a trans woman poet critic. Author of the poetry collection Since I Moved In, she is also editor/publisher of EOAGH and coeditor of the anthology Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, which was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in 2014.


Twitter Username: tracepeterson

Charles Rice-González is an assistant professor at Hostos Community College/CUNY. His novel, Chulito, received awards and recognitions from the ALA and the National Book Critics Circle. His MFA is from Goddard College; he cofounded BAAD! The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance; and he is a playwright.


Twitter Username: ricegonzalez

Website: www.charlesricegonzalez.com

C. Russell Price is an Appalachian, genderqueer, punk poet. Their chapbook Tonight, We Fuck The Trailer Park Out of Each Other explores class, race, sexuality, and gender in the South. They currently live and perform in Chicago, where they teach creative writing at Northwestern University.


Twitter Username: C_Russell_Price

Mecca Jamilah Sullivan is author of Blue Talk and Love (stories). She is assistant professor of women, gender, sexuality studies at UMass Amherst, and has published in Callaloo, American Fiction, Best New Writing, and others. She has won support from Bread Loaf, the Center for Fiction, Yaddo, and the NEA.


Twitter Username: mecca_jamilah

Website: www.meccajamilahsullivan.com

Room 14, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F159. A WITS Alumni Reading: The Unfiltered Imagination. (, , , , Niki Herd) For over 20 years, writers have taught creative writing in K–12 classrooms through the WITS Alliance, building on skills while in graduate school, freelance writing, or working on a novel or a collection of poetry. Four seasoned writers who started with WITS will read from their own work and discuss how teaching young children can serve as a reminder of how powerful the unfiltered imagination can be.

Jack McBride is associate director for Writers in the Schools in Houston. He designs creative writing school programs, collaborations with community organizations, and teaching opportunities for creative writers. Jack earned a masters of nonprofit administration from the University of Notre Dame.

Nicky Beer is the author of two books of poems, The Octopus Game and The Diminishing House, both winners of the Colorado Book Award for Poetry. Her awards include an NEA grant and a Ruth Lilly Fellowship. She is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver.

Karyna McGlynn is the author of I Have to Go Back to 1994 and Kill a Girl and Hothouse. She holds an MFA from the University of Michigan and a PhD from the University of Houston. She is currently a visiting assistant professor of creative writing and translation at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: karynamcglynn

Website: www.karynamcglynn.com

Ramon Isao is the recipient of the Tim McGinnis Award for Fiction, as well as fellowships from Artist Trust and Jack Straw Cultural Center. His writing appears in The Iowa Review, Ninth Letter, CityArts magazine, Hobart, and elsewhere. He teaches creative writing at Hugo House in Seattle.

Room 15, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F160. Oy Vey es Florida: Poetry on the Jewish American Experience. (, , , , ) From Borsht belt to sitcom humor, Jews have long traditions of making comedy from tragedy, including in the stand-up house of poetry. Jews compose over 50% of many Florida cities such as the oft' ridiculed "Boca," where portraits of Jewish shoppers overwhelm images of Jewish thinkers or writers. This panel brings poets of all ages, sexualities, and regions to kvetch and kvell through verse about the Jewish American experience. Secular or religious, righteous or salacious—all tucheses welcome

Robin Becker’s eight books of poems include The Black Bear Inside Me. Emerita Liberal Arts Research Professor of English at Penn State, Becker received fellowships from the Bunting Institute, the Mass Cultural Council, and the NEA. She edits poetry for The Women's Review of Books.

Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor is the author of a book of poetry, Imperfect Tense, and three books about arts-based education. She was awarded 2015–2018 NEA Big Read grants (Robinson Jeffers; Edgar Allan Poe and Yu Hua). She is professor of language and literacy education at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: cahnmann

Website: www.teachersactup.com

Alicia Ostriker's most recent collections of poetry are The Book of Life: Selected Jewish Poems 1979-2011, which won a Paterson Lifetime Achievement Award, The Old Woman, the Tulip and the Dog, and Waiting for the Light. She teaches in the low-res MFA program at Drew University.

Philip Terman is the author of five books of poetry, including Our Portion: New and Selected Poems. A selection of his poems has been translated into Arabic. He codirects the Chautauqua Writers' Festival and teaches at Clarion University, where he directs the visiting writers series.

Jacqueline Osherow is author of six books of poetry, most recently Whitethorn. Her seventh, White on White, is forthcoming. She has received the Witter Bynner Prize and grants from the NEA, Guggenheim, and Ingram Merrill Foundations. She directs Creative Writing at Utah.

Room 16, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F161. Graphic Women: The Evolution of Literary Comics. (, , , ) “The graphic novel is a man’s world, by and large,” wrote Charles McGrath in a New York Times Magazine cover story in 2004. He was right—in a way. Most successful graphic artists and writers were men, and the comics industry today remains exceedingly male-dominated. So what happens when women write and draw in a medium that has represented them so poorly? Four female artists and writers explore how the exclusionary landscape of American comics is changing.

Kristen Radtke is the author of the graphic memoir Imagine Wanting Only This. She is the managing editor of Sarabande Books and the film editor of TriQuarterly magazine. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, Oxford American, Guernica, and many other places.


Twitter Username: kristenradtke

Website: www.kristenradtke.com

Danica Novgorodoff is an artist, writer, and graphic novelist. Her graphic novels include The Undertaking of Lily Chen, Refresh Refresh, Slow Storm, and A Late Freeze.


Twitter Username: novgorodoff

Mira Jacob is the author of the novel, The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing, which was shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award, honored by the APALA, and named one of the best books of 2014 by Kirkus Reviews, The Boston Globe, Goodreads, Bustle, and The Millions.


Twitter Username: mirajacob

Website: mirajacob.com

Amy Kurzweil is the author of Flying Couch: A Graphic Memoir. Her cartoons appear in The New Yorker, and her comics and writing have been published by The Toast, The Awl, Hobart, Shenandoah, Blackbird, and elsewhere. She teaches writing and comics at Parsons and F.I.T. in Manhattan.


Twitter Username: amykurzweil

Room 17, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F162. Variedades: A Ballad Beyond the Border Wall. (, , , , ) Now in its 7th year, Variedades is an interdisciplinary per­for­mance se­ries that brings to­gether spoken word, music, theater, and comedy, loosely based on the Mexican vaudeville shows (“variedades”) of early 20th-century Los Angeles that my Mexican grand­parents per­formed in. Each show is fo­cused by a par­ti­cu­lar theme. For AWP in Tampa I am assembling a Southwest edition called Variedades: A Ballad Beyond the Border Wall, a polyvocal invocation to breach walls in art and life.

Rubén Martínez is an author, journalist, and performer. He books include Crossing Over and Desert America. He holds the Fletcher Jones Chair in Literature and Writing at Loyola Marymount University and is an artist in residence at Stanford University's Institute for Diversity in the Arts.


Twitter Username: ruben6211

Website: www.rubenmartinez.la

Dagoberto Gilb is a writer.


Twitter Username: DagobertoGilb

Cristina Rivera Garza is the award-winning author of novels, collections of short stories, and poetry books, and a distinguished professor of Hispanic studies and creative writing at the University of Houston. She has theorized the link between writing and community in our violent times.


Twitter Username: criveragarza

Website: cristinariveragarza.com

Raquel Gutiérrez is a poet, prose writer, and essayist. She publishes chapbooks with Econo Textual Objects. Her work explores tensions and creates intimate portraits of being a brown, queer child of immigrants. She holds a master's degree in performance studies from New York University.


Twitter Username: raquefella

Website: www.raquelgutierrez.net

Leticia Hernández-Linares is the author of Mucha Muchacha, Too Much Girl and editor of The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the United States. Widely published, her work appears in Pilgrimage and U.S Latino Literature Today. She is a member of CantoMundo Organizing Committee.


Twitter Username: joinleticia

Room 18 & 19, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F163. A Year of Intersectional Thinking: Identity in the Classroom. (, , , , ) In times of political unrest and 24-hour news cycles, what is our responsibility as educators of creative writing and composition to teach students not only to write, but to observe, interpret, and make meaning out of what they see? How do we teach increasingly diverse student populations to think intersectionally about identity? VIDA invites panelists to discuss tools and approaches to enable students to think, discuss, and write about both their own marginalization and privilege.

Hafizah Geter's poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The New Yorker, Tin House, Boston Review, Gulf Coast, and Narrative magazine, among others. She is on the board of VIDA and she is a poetry editor for Phantom Books. She is an editor at Amazon Publishing's Little A and Day One.


Twitter Username: RhetoricAndThis

Amy Lemmon is the author of the poetry collections Fine Motor and Saint Nobody, and coauthor, with Denise Duhamel, of ABBA: The Poems and Enjoy Hot or Iced: Poems in Conversation and a Conversation. She is professor of English at the Fashion Institute of Technology-SUNY in New York City.


Twitter Username: theSaintNobody

Website: http://amylemmon.com

Nicholas Boggs, clinical assistant professor of English at NYU, is coeditor of James Baldwin's "children's book for adults," Little Man, Little Man: A Story of Childhood, forthcoming from Duke University Press. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Millay Colony for the Arts.

Camille Rankine is the author of the poetry collection Incorrect Merciful Impulses, and the chapbook Slow Dance with Trip Wire, winner of the Poetry Society of America New York Chapbook Award. She serves on the executive committee for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: camillerankine

Website: http://www.camillerankine.com

Syreeta McFadden is one of the founding editors of the online literary magazine Union Station and a columnist for The Guardian US. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, NPR, BuzzFeed, Huffington Post, Feministing, The Brooklyn Rail, and Storyscape Journal.


Twitter Username: reetamac

Room 20 & 21, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F164. Slam, Veer, Hush, and Hook: On Ending Poems. (, , , ) Prompts, assignments, workshops, those snappy first lines—we’re awfully good at beginning poems. Ending a poem well is much harder. Our panel of esteemed poet-critics looks at varieties of closure and nonclosure in poems ranging across cultures, historical periods, and styles—and including their own work. What are the shopworn gestures, the easy or predicable endings, the clichés? How may we push harder toward the surprise and the rigorous originality of genuine poetry?

David Baker is a poet, critic, and editor whose recent books include Scavenger Loop (poems), Show Me Your Environment (essays), and Never-Ending Birds, winner of the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize. He is poetry editor of Kenyon Review and teaches at Denison University.

Linda Gregerson is the author of six books of poetry, most recently Prodigal, and two books of criticism. Among her honors are an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature and the Kingsley Tufts Award. She is a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Michigan.

Stanley Plumly is the author of twelve books of poems, including, most recently, Against Sunset. His latest nonfiction book is The Immortal Evening: A Legendary Dinner with Keats, Wordsworth, and Lamb. He teaches at the University of Maryland.

Ann Townsend is a poet and essayist, and the author of The Coronary Garden, Dime Store Erotics, and Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry (with David Baker). She directs the creative writing program at Denison University; in 2009, she cofounded VIDA: Women in Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: anntownsendpoet

Website: www.anntownsend.com

Room 22, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F165. Complex Narratives: A VIDA Voices and Views Disability Focus Interview . (, , , , ) The VIDA Count recently pointed to an underrepresentation of disability voices in literature. Seeking a better understanding of the causes, nature, and ramifications of exclusion, as well as possible solutions, this panel invites interviewees to share both their own creative works relating to disability and their personal and professional insights pertaining to ableism, promotion of disability literature, barriers to accessibility and publishing, and other issues facing disabled writers.

Melissa Studdard is the author of the poetry collection I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast, the middle-grade novel Six Weeks to Yehidah, and more. She is the executive producer and host of VIDA Voices & Views and a vice president for the Women's Caucus.


Twitter Username: MelissaStuddard

Website: www.melissastuddard.com

Danielle Pafunda is author of seven books including the forthcoming Beshrew That Heart That Makes My Heart To Groan, The Dead Girls Speak in Unison, Manhater, and Natural History Rape Museum.

Lydia X. Z. Brown is a queer east asian autistic activist, writer, and speaker whose work has focused on violence against multiply-marginalized disabled people, especially institutionalization, incarceration, and policing. They are editor of the first anthology by autistic people of color.


Twitter Username: autistichoya

L. Lamar Wilson is the author of Sacrilegion and coauthor of Prime: Poetry and Conversation. Wilson teaches creative writing and African American literature at the University of Alabama.

Lynne DeSilva-Johnson is a nonbinary interdisciplinary creator and performer. They are an assistant visiting professor at Pratt Institute, founder and managing editor of The Operating System, and libraries editor at Boog City. Lynne publishes and performs widely, amplifies often, and resists always.


Twitter Username: onlywhatican

Website: http://lynne-desilva-johnson.strikingly.com

Room 23, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F166. Still in the Trenches: Gender, Race, and Class in Creative Writing. (, , , , ) With the rise of creative writing spaces centering women/writers of color, are gender, race, and class finished conversations? This panel brings together diverse women writers to ask how these social forces continue to shape women's experiences of creative writing from learning in or teaching the workshop to publishing work to administering a program. Where are we today with regard to positions of power and our access to publication? The panelists will share visions and strategies for equity.

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs is the author of Paper Pavilion, winner of the White Pine Press Poetry Prize; Interrogation Room; and the chapbooks Necro Citizens and Notes from a Missing Person. An associate professor of English, she directs the Race and Ethnic Studies program at St. Olaf College.

Taiyon J. Coleman’s writing appears in Bum Rush the Page, Riding Shotgun, The Ringing Ear, Blues Vision, A Good Time for the Truth, How Dare We Write, and other publications. A McKnight Foundation Artist Fellow, she is assistant professor of English literature at St. Catherine University.

Lisa Lewis's books of poetry include The Unbeliever, Silent Treatment, Vivisect, Burned House with Swimming Pool, and The Body Double. She teaches in the creative writing program at Oklahoma State University and serves as poetry editor of the Cimarron Review.

Aimee Parkison is the author of Refrigerated Music for a Gleaming Woman, which won the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Parkison is the director of the creative writing program at Oklahoma State University and has published four books of fiction.


Twitter Username: AimeeParkison

Website: www.aimeeparkison.com

Sagirah Shahid is a radical, introverted, outgoing, Black Muslim poet from Minneapolis. She is the recipient of a Loft Literary Center Mentor Series Award in poetry and a winner of a Minnesota Center for Book Arts mentorship award. Her poems float around on the internet, print and on three giant lanterns.


Twitter Username: sagirahs

Room 24, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F167. What Writers Need to Know About What Editors Do. (, , , ) On the path to book publication, the editor is often seen as a mysterious and intimidating figure—the gatekeeper, the guru, or perhaps the pitiless slasher of prose. Such perceptions linger because the role of editor encompasses a wide range of tasks—not just shaping words on the page but serving as a book’s first and most critical advocate and publishing strategist. Five experienced panelists will share with writers in all genres what they need to know about what editors do.

Peter Ginna was most recently the founder and publisher of Bloomsbury Press; before that he held editorial positions at Oxford University Press, Crown Publishers, St. Martin’s Press, and Persea Books. He comments on books and publishing on the blog Doctor Syntax and on Twitter @DoctorSyntax.


Twitter Username: DoctorSyntax

Calvert Morgan is Executive Editor at Riverhead Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House, and board chair of the Center for Fiction. He has worked with authors including Jess Walter, Roxane Gay, Lidia Yuknavitch, Edward Carey, Rachel B. Glaser, Sarah Gerard, Kate Zambreno, and Blake Butler.


Twitter Username: calmorgan

Jeff Shotts is Executive Editor at Graywolf Press, where he acquires and edits poetry, creative nonfiction, literary criticism, and translation.


Twitter Username: JeffShotts1

Carol Saller is longtime editor of The Chicago Manual of Style’s online Q&A and was chief copy editor for the 16th edition of the Manual. She writes the Editor’s Corner feature for the CMOS Shop Talk blog and is the author of The Subversive Copy Editor as well as the young adult novel Eddie's War.

Room 25, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F168. Making Room for Essayistic Thinking During Fraught Times: The Personal and the Political. (, , , ) With the rise of “alternative facts” and an increasing disregard for both science and literature, thoughtful and nuanced essays are more important than ever. But longer, deeper work takes more time than a quick response piece. How can essayists make room for nuanced thinking, for thorough explorations of hard truths, for humor, for slowness, for contemplation? This panel of diverse essayists offers practical suggestions and discusses theoretical concerns. Come, think, and—hopefully—be eased.

Kristin Kovacic teaches in the Carlow University MFA program and at Winchester Thurston School in Pittsburgh. Her essays have received the Pushcart Prize and other awards. She is the editor of Birth: A Literary Companion and the poetry chapbook, House of Women.


Twitter Username: kmkpgh

Heather Kirn Lanier is the author of the nonfiction book, Teaching in the Terrordome, as well as two award-winning poetry chapbooks, The Story You Tell Yourself and Heart-Shaped Bed in Hiroshima. She teaches at Southern Vermont College.


Twitter Username: heatherklanier

Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. Her full-length collection Be with Me Always is forthcoming, and her lyric essay chapbook is Devotional. Other work appears in The New York Times, Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, and elsewhere. She is reviews editor at Tinderbox Poetry Journal.


Twitter Username: randonnoble

Website: www.randonbillingsnoble.com

Amy Monticello is the author of Close Quarters, a chapbook-length memoir, and the essay collection How to Euthanize a Horse. Her work has appeared in Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, The Iron Horse Literary Review, Salon, and elsewhere. She is an assistant professor at Suffolk University in Boston.


Twitter Username: AmyMonticello

Website: http://www.amymonticello.com/

12:00 pm to 1:15 pm

Grand Salon A, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F169. The Frontier as a Trope in Florida Writing Past and Present. (, , , ) The frontier as a literary trope is widely used by such Florida authors as Hurston, Rawlings, Hemingway, Joy Williams, and Peter Mattheissen. This panel will review the literary history of an early and persistent frontier in Florida which is often seen as ahistorical. It is useful for contemporary writers, both in Florida and elsewhere, to be aware of the possibilities of the expression of this trope as they experiment in their fiction writing.

Gregory Byrd is the author of a book of poetry, Salt and Iron, an essay on Florida poetry, "Aesthetics at the Southernmost Point: Towards a Definition of Florida Poetry," and he was a Fulbright Fellow to Albania in 2011. He teaches English and humanities at St. Petersburg College.


Twitter Username: drgregbyrd

Deborah Hall teaches at Valdosta State University and edited The Anatomy of Narrative, an anthology that analyzes craft. Her work has appeared in River Teeth, TLR, The Sun, Apalachee Review, and in Becoming: An Anthology of Women’s Stories and Stone, River, Sky: An Anthology of Georgia Poets.


Twitter Username: deborahhall07

Polly Buckingham is the author of The Expense of a View and A Year of Silence. She teaches creative writing at Eastern Washington University and she is founding editor of StringTown Press and associate editor of Willow Springs Books. Her work appears in The Gettysburg Review and Threepenny Review.

Michael Trammell edits the Apalachee Review. He teaches professional and business writing at Florida State University. Also, he has taught literature and fiction courses for FSU's OLLI program. He was a participating poet in The Florida Poets Project in 2012.

Grand Salon B, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F170. Authors Helping Authors: How Banding Together Can Help Boost Your Book's Visibility . (, , , , ) Book coverage in the media is shrinking, while more books are being published each year. Authors need to take the marketing of their work into their own hands. Many authors are finding creative ways to band together to promote each other’s work through group blogs, online reader/writer discussion groups, and genre-based websites. Join us for a panel discussion of the benefits (and challenges) of cultivating a community of authors, and how banding together can help you find a wider readership.

Louise Miller is a writer and pastry chef living in Boston, Massachusetts. She is the author of The City Baker's Guide to Country Living. Louise is an art school dropout, an amateur flower gardener, an old-time banjo player, an obsessive moviegoer, and a champion of old dogs.


Twitter Username: louisethebaker

Website: louisemillerauthor.com

Emily Ross is the author of the young adult novel, Half in Love with Death, which was named a finalist in the International Thriller Writers Organization’s 2016 Thriller Awards. She received a 2014 Massachusetts Cultural Council finalist award in fiction for Half in Love with Death.


Twitter Username: emilyross816

Website: http://www.emilyrosswrites.com/

Jennifer S. Brown is the author of Modern Girls. Her fiction and essays have been in Cognoscenti, Fiction Southeast, The Southeast Review, and Bellevue Literary Review, among other places. She has a BFA in film and television from NYU and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Washington.


Twitter Username: j_s_brown

Hank Phillippi Ryan is the on-air investigative reporter for Boston's WHDH-TV, winning thirty-four EMMYs for her journalism. The bestselling author of nine novels of suspense, she's won five Agathas and the Mary Higgins Clark award. She is 2013 president of national Sisters in Crime.


Twitter Username: HankPRyan

Ann Garvin, PhD, is the author of the USA Today–bestselling book I Like You Just Fine When You're Not Around, The Dog Year, and On Maggie's Watch. A professor at the University of Wisconsin Whitewater, she coruns The Fifth Semester and she is the founder and director of the Tall Poppy Writers.


Twitter Username: anngarvin_

Grand Salon C, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F171. Inanna Publications: 40th Anniversary Reading: Disrupting Realities in Feminist Fiction. (, , , , ) Inanna Publications is one of very few independent feminist presses remaining in Canada. Founded in 1978, we publish visionary books that reflect the depth, breadth, and diversity of women’s lives in Canada and around the world. Just as Inanna was established to disrupt the realities of women’s marginalized voices in writing and publishing, in celebration of Inanna’s 40th anniversary, four Inanna authors will read from and discuss disruptive realities in their recent works of feminist fiction.

Ami Sands Brodoff is the award-winning author of three novels and a volume of stories. Her latest novel, In Many Waters, centers on three orphans whose lives intersect on the island of Malta and grapples with our worldwide refugee crisis. Ami won The Canadian Jewish Book Award for Fiction.


Twitter Username: AmiSandsBrodoff

Jocelyn Cullity's fiction and creative nonfiction has been published in the United States, Canada, and India. Her first novel, Amah and the Silk-Winged Pigeons, was published in the fall of 2017. She is the director of the BFA in Creative Writing Program at Truman State University.


Twitter Username: JocelynCullity

Huey Helene Alcaro has worked on a farm, taught adults in inner city Newark, New Jersey, taught women’s studies, and served as director of the Women’s Center at Montclair State University. Her fiction has appeared in several North American journals. In the Land of Two-Legged Women is her debut novel.


Twitter Username: HueyAlcaro

carole giangrande is a former broadcast journalist and the award-winning author of nine books—three novels, three novellas, a short story collection, and two nonfiction works. Her most recent novel is All That Is solid Melts into Air.


Twitter Username: CaroleGian

Grand Salon D, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F172. Lies, Damned Lies, and Stall Tactics: How “Truth” Reveals Character Via Dialogue. (, , , ) Everyone loves brilliant dialogue, snappy patter that amuses, informs, and entertains the reader while revealing character at the same time. It’s common to hear writers described as having “an ear for dialogue,” but great dialogue is more than just sounds and speech patterns. Language reveals multiple aspects of the character’s place in society—status, values, norms, education, and gender. Four middle-grade and YA novelists dissect the sociolinguist underpinnings of character interaction.

Kekla Magoon is the author of eight novels, including The Rock and the River, How it Went Down, and X. She is a CSK Honor winner, NAACP Image Award winner, and National Book Award finalist. She teaches at Vermont College of Fine Arts and she is on the Writers Council for the National Writing Project.


Twitter Username: keklamagoon

Website: www.keklamagoon.com

William Alexander writes science fiction and fantasy for young audiences. His novels include Goblin Secrets (a National Book Award winner) and Ambassador (an International Latino Book Award finalist). He teaches at the Vermont College of Fine Arts Program in Writing for Children and Young Adults.


Twitter Username: williealex

Cynthia Leitich Smith is a New York Times bestselling, award-winning children's YA author. She was a Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers Writer of the Year. She's a Muscogee Indian Nation citizen, a Vermont College of Fine Arts faculty member, and on the advisory board of We Need Diverse Books.


Twitter Username: CynLeitichSmith

David Macinnis Gill is a faculty member at VCFA and UNC Wilmington, specializing in young adult literature. He is a past president of ALAN, the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of NCTE. He has published four YA novels with HarperCollins. His latest is, Uncanny.


Twitter Username: thunderchikin

Florida Salon 1, 2, & 3, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F173. Workshops that Work, Workshops that Matter. (, , , Michael Copperman) The workshop is the foundation of creative writing classes, but has it evolved to meet literary culture's diverse current needs? What conventions need rethinking? How do we talk about craft and not ignore its cultural implications? What practices might provide an encouraging and inclusive atmosphere for underrepresented students and limit reproductions of power? Four writers of color who teach share strategies to innovate and invigorate the workshop in ways that benefit all participants.

Joy Castro is the author of the literary thrillers Hell or High Water and Nearer Home, the memoirs The Truth Book and Island of Bones, and the short fiction collection How Winter Began. Editor of the collection Family Trouble, she teaches at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.


Twitter Username: _JoyCastro

Website: www.joycastro.com

Bich Minh Nguyen (who goes by Beth) is the author of the memoir Stealing Buddha’s Dinner, which received the PEN/Jerard Award, the novel Short Girls, which received an American Book Award, and the novel Pioneer Girl. She directs the MFA in Writing Program at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: bichminhnguyen

Website: www.bichminhnguyen.com

Matthew Salesses's books include The Hundred-Year Flood; I'm Not Saying, I'm Just Saying; The Murder of the Doppelgänger; and Own Story: Essays. He has written for The New York Times, NPR, Salon, VICE, and others. He is an assistant professor of English at Coe College.


Twitter Username: salesses

Website: http://matthewsalesses.com

Florida Salon 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F174. Writing Race, Writing Madness: Writing Trans, Writing Genderfuck. (, , , , ) This panel focuses on truth-telling, specifically writing about trans and/or genderqueer, lives in relation to race and mental illness. We will share readings that evoke questions about naming the varied realities of our lived experiences in a transphobic heteronormative racist ableist world that denies our realities and glorifies white able-bodied androgyny and thinness. Each author will address different challenges around writing memories of trauma.

Ari Burford teaches creative writing and queer studies in the women's and gender studies program at Northern Arizona University. Their PhD is in literature, and they are finishing a memoir entitled Tell me a Secret: Incest, White Supremacy, Genderfucking Crazy, and other Taboo Subjects.

Mel McCuin received her MFA in creative writing from Northern Arizona University in 2014. She works as a program coordinator for the LGBTQ and Intercultural Resource Center at Rutgers University-Newark. She is currently working on a book of poetry.

Wryly T. McCutchen is a queer poet and memoirist. They're a writing consultant and hold an MFA in both nonfiction and poetry from Antioch University. The poems in Wryly's first collection, My Ugly and Other Love Snarls, meditate on and often confront issues of gender, identity, and embodiment.


Twitter Username: Wryly_T

Timothy Corvidae is a Narrative facilitator who works with nonprofit and grassroots organizations to explore how issues of justice, identity, and the stories we tell ourselves and each other affect our work, relationships, and well-being. He's a lecturer in social work at Northern Arizona University

Grace Shuyi Liew is the author of the chapbook Prop and Book of Interludes. Her poetry collection is forthcoming from Noemi Press in 2018. She is a contributing editor for Waxwing.


Twitter Username: g_liew

Website: www.graceungrateful.com

Florida Salon 5, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F175. Against Forgetting Against Forgetting: 25 Years Later. (, , , , ) Twenty-five years ago, Carolyn Forche’s groundbreaking anthology, Against Forgetting: Twentieth Century Poetry of Witness, was published. This gathering of poems helped to galvanize an entire generation of poets who came to believe that poems could do more than articulate a poet’s confessional hankerings and could bear witness to history itself. The poets on this panel will read a few of their favorite poems from the anthology and discuss what this book meant and means to their own work and the world.

John Poch is professor of English in the creative writing program at Texas Tech University. His most recent collection, Fix Quiet, won the New Criterion Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in Paris Review, Poetry, Yale Review, The Nation, The New Republic, Image, Agni, and other journals.


Twitter Username: jpoch

Website: https://vimeo.com/114291370

Jill Bialosky’s four poetry collections include the recent The Players. She’s authored three novels, recently The Prize, and two memoirs, New York Times bestseller History of a Suicide and Poetry Will Save Your Life. Her writing appears in The New Yorker, Paris Review, and more. She is an editor at W.W. Norton.

Peter Balakian is the author of seven books of poems, most recently Ozone Journal, winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Other collections include ZigguratJune-tree: New and Selected Poems 1974–2000, and Dyer’s Thistle. His memoir Black Dog of Fate is the winner of the PEN/Albrand Prize for memoir and a New York Times notable book.

Jacob Shores-Arguello is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship to Ukraine, the Dzanc Books ILP International Literature Award, and the Fine Arts Work Center Fellowship in Provincetown. His manuscript, In The Absence of Clocks, was awarded the 2011 Crab Orchard Series Open Competition.

Rebecca Gayle Howell is the author of American Purgatory and Render / An Apocalypse. Howell is the poetry editor at the Oxford American and the James Still Writer in Residence at the Hindman Settlement School in Knott County, Kentucky.


Twitter Username: howtopreserve

Website: www.rebeccagaylehowell.com

Florida Salon 6, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F176. Blacklandia: Claiming Our Stories and Spaces. (, , , , ) What does it mean to be a Black poet residing in a region characterized as having a homogeneous non-Black population? In 1991, Frank X Walker coined the term Affrilachia to highlight the multicultural spectrum of the Appalachian region and challenge its constructed identity. This reading seeks to honor this legacy by extending it to its natural progression, as Black Poets present work that explores the relationship between poet and categorized non-Black spaces.

Frank X Walker is a cofounder of the Affrilachian Poets, a Cave Canem fellow, and Editor of PLUCK!. The author of nine collections of poetry and a recipient of a Lannan Foundation Poetry Fellowship, he is professor of English and African American and Africana studies at the University of Kentucky.

Christopher Rose is a Cave Canem fellow and he serves as department chair for the English department at the Cascade campus of Portland Community College.

Jonterri Gadson is the author of Blues Triumphant. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Bread Loaf, University of Dayton, and University of Virginia. She was selected for the 2016 NBC Late Night Writers Workshop. She is the assistant professor of creative writing at Bloomfield College.


Twitter Username: jaytothetee

Catherine Ntube is a poet and educator currently pursuing an MFA at the University of South Carolina. She is a Cave Canem and Watering Hole fellow.

Meeting Room 1, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F177. “Nothing Can Happen Nowhere”: The Craft of Setting in LGBTQ-Themed Fiction . (, , , , ) “Nothing can happen nowhere,” Elizabeth Bowen famously wrote about the importance of setting in fiction. But in LGBTQ-themed fiction, “place” is complicated: While many physical settings support queer characters, others feel unwelcoming or dangerous, including familiar ones like home. This panel explores how fiction writers negotiate place for their LGBTQ characters. Is the city a natural refuge? Are rural spaces always inhospitable? Does “home” necessarily render LGBTQ characters strangers?

Paula Martinac is the author of four novels, including The Ada Decades, a novel in stories; and the Lambda Literary Award–winning Out of Time. She teaches creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and is a fiction writing coach at the Charlotte Center for the Literary Arts.


Twitter Username: PaulaMartinac

Website: http://www.paulamartinac.com

Amy Hoffman is the author of the novel The Off Season and the memoirs Lies About My Family; An Army of Ex-Lovers: My Life at the Gay Community News; and Hospital Time. Editor of Women's Review of Books, she teaches in the Solstice low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: womensreview

Website: www.amyhoffman.net

Cheryl A. Head is the author of Long Way Home: A World War II Novel, a 2015 Next Generation Indie Book finalist for historical fiction and African American literature. Her novel, Bury Me When I’m Dead, the first book in the Charlie Mack Motown Mysteries, was a 2017 Lambda Literary Awards finalist.


Twitter Username: cheaddc

Serkan Gorkemli is the author of Grassroots Literacies: Lesbian and Gay Activism and the Internet in Turkey, winner of the 2015 CCCC Lavender Rhetorics Book Award. An associate professor of English at UConn Stamford, he is working on a collection of queer short stories set in Turkey.


Twitter Username: sgeenyc

Carter Sickels is the author of the novel The Evening Hour, and the editor of Untangling the Knot: Queer Voices on Marriage, Relationships & Identity. He is assistant professor of creating writing at Eastern Kentucky University.


Twitter Username: cartersickels

Website: www.cartersickels.com

Meeting Room 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F178. Beyond 140 Characters and the Canon: The Growth of Undergraduate Creative Writing. (, , , , ) As undergraduate creative writing programs become increasingly popular, many teachers of writing must learn and explore strategies specific to undergraduate instruction that may differ vastly from their graduate school experience. Five professors working exclusively with undergraduates will address conducting workshops, challenges specific to their students and, in turn, their teachers, as well as how to build, maintain, and identify the hallmarks of a dynamic undergraduate program.

Laura van den Berg is the author of two short story collections, more recently The Isle of Youth, which received the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters and the Bard Fiction Prize, and the novel Find Me. She is a Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Fiction at Harvard University.


Twitter Username: lvandenberg

Website: http://www.lauravandenberg.com/

Anne Valente is the author of the novel, Our Hearts Will Burn Us Down, and the short story collection, By Light We Knew Our Names. Her fiction appears in One Story, The Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, and The Chicago Tribune. She teaches creative writing and literature at Hamilton College.


Twitter Username: aevalente

Website: www.annevalente.com

Sequoia Nagamatsu is the author of the story collection, Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone. His stories have appeared in Conjunctions, ZYZZYVA, Black Warrior Review, and The Fairy Tale Review, among others. He is an editor of Psychopomp magazine and an assistant professor at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: sequoian

Website: http://sequoianagamatsu.net

Shane McCrae is the author of five full-length collections of poems—most recently, The Animal Too Big to Kill and In the Language of My Captor—as well as three chapbooks, and has received a Whiting Writer’s Award and an NEA fellowship. He teaches at Oberlin College and Spalding University.


Twitter Username: akasomeguy

Kirstin Valdez Quade is the author of Night at the Fiestas, which received a “5 Under 35” award from the National Book Foundation, the John Leonard Prize from the National Book Critics Circle, and the Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She teaches at Princeton.

Meeting Room 9 & 10, Marriott Waterside, Third Floor

F179. Free Speech on Campus. (, , ) How can college campuses fulfill their multiple missions as champions of intellectual and academic freedom, open environments for discourse and disagreement, and advancing inclusion and equality within their campus communities? Following their 2016 report, "And Campus For All, on Diversity, Inclusion, and Freedom of Speech on Campus," PEN America will host a panel of student leaders, academics, and literary professionals to reflect upon the vital questions raised by this debate.

Inam Sakinah is a senior presidential scholar and founding chair of the Student Diversity and Inclusion Council at Florida State University. She launched and currently curates a nationally recognized, university-wide campaign called #PowerofWE, championing engagement across differences and divides.

Adeline Lee is the program coordinator of PEN America's Campus Free Speech Initiative. She graduated in 2016 from Wellesley College, serving as student body president her senior year, and was one of twelve nationally selected participants in 2017 for the Coro New York Fellows Program in Public Affairs.


Twitter Username: adelineslee

Katy Glenn Bass is the director of PEN America’s Free Expression Policy and Research. She focuses on free expression in the US, China, and PEN’s other core focus countries, and supervises the production of PEN’s reports analyzing issues that affect free expression around the world.

Ballroom A, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F180. Reimagining Our Family Tree: New Poetry of Inheritance and Survival. (, , , , ) Five authors of hot-off-the-press poetry collections from Copper Canyon Press trace and reinvent family ties. Through readings and conversation, we’ll share vital stories including a multi-generational migration from El Salvador to the United States; an immersive journey with the ghosts of Brazilian ancestors; identity in adventures in high-stakes suburbia; and notions of inherited madness, marked names, and queer chosen family—this is poetry that claims a lineage of survival.

Traci Brimhall is the author of three collections of poetry: Saudade, Our Lady of the Ruins, and Rookery. A recipient of an NEA Fellowship, she is an assistant professor at Kansas State University.

Victoria Chang's fourth book of poems, Barbie Chang, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2017. Her most recent book, The Boss, won the PEN Center Literary Award and a California Book Award. Recipient of a 2017 Guggenheim Fellowship, she teaches at Chapman University.


Twitter Username: VChangPoet

Website: www.victoriachangpoet.com

Brenda Shaughnessy is the author of four poetry collections, most recently So Much Synth. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry, The Nation, The New Yorker, Poetry, and elsewhere. She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2013, and she is associate professor at Rutgers University-Newark.

Javier Zamora is a 2016–2018 Wallace Stegner Fellow, and he holds fellowships from CantoMundo, Colgate University, the NEA, and the Poetry Foundation. His poems appear in Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, and the New York Times. He is the author of Unaccompanied.


Twitter Username: jzsalvipoet

Rachel McKibbens is the author of three full-length books of poetry, blud, Into the Dark & Emptying Field, and Pink Elephant, as well as the chapbook Mammoth. She is a two-time New York Foundation for the Arts poetry fellow and founder of the Pink Door Women's Writing Retreat.


Twitter Username: RachelMcKibbens

Ballroom D, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F181. What Agents Want, Sponsored by The Authors Guild. (, , , ) The author-agent relationship is one of the most important in a writer’s professional life. But how does it come about, and what are the keys to making it work? A panel of seasoned literary agents will discuss how an author should go about finding and choosing an agent, the fundamentals of the author-agent relationship, how to pitch a project to publishers, dissolving the author-agent relationship, what agents are really looking for in authors, and more.

Paul W. Morris is Vice President of Programs & Outreach at The Authors Guild. The former Director of Literary Programs and Outreach at PEN America, Morris was also an associate editor at Viking Penguin, and from 2004 to 2011 he was General Manager of Digital Media and Marketing at BOMB magazine.


Twitter Username: pwmorris

Website: www.facebook.com/pwmorris

Jeff Kleinman is a founding partner of Folio Literary Management. He serves on the boards for Writer House and the Southern NH University MFA program. Clients include bestselling authors Garth Stein, Elizabeth Letts, Charles Shields and Mollie Katzen, and Pulitzer Prize finalist Eowyn Ivey.

Anjali Singh is a literary agent at Ayesha Pande Literary. She was previously an editor at Vintage Books, HMH, Simon & Schuster, and Other Press. She represents adult and YA literary fiction, narrative nonfiction, memoir, and graphic novels for all ages.


Twitter Username: anjalibsingh

Sarah Bowlin joined Aevitas Creative Management as an agent in early 2017, after a decade as an editor of bold new voices in literary fiction and nonfiction at Riverhead Books and Henry Holt & Co.


Twitter Username: svbowlin

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floor

F182A. Flesh and Blood: Women Writing Our Bodies. (, , , , ) Throughout history, women have been discouraged and even forbidden from articulating the realities of living in a female body. Join the International Women’s Writing Guild in a discussion of the issues women face when exploring their bodies as subject material including overcoming personal shame, fear of exposure, limited publishing options, and bullying in in the cyber-universe. We’ll discuss how giving voice to our body is both a political act and a way of taking back ownership of ourselves.

Janice Gary is the author of Short Leash: A Memoir of Dog Walking and Deliverance, winner of two Nautilus Silver Awards and a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Award. A faculty member at ASU's Master of Liberal Arts Program, she teaches memoir workshops at writing centers and conferences.

Dixie L. King, PhD, is the Executive Director of the International Women's Writing Guild and a recent graduate of the Antioch University Los Angeles MFA program. A cultural anthropologist, she uses the writing of creative nonfiction as a tool for working with youth in high risk environments.


Twitter Username: dixielking

Lisa Freedman’s work has appeared in these anthologies: Satya ~ The Long View; Resist Much, Obey Little; Grabbing the Apple; and the 20th Anniversary of Art & Understanding. She’s working on a memoir, Death and Happiness, about being diabetic and HIV-positive and cultivating fearlessness.


Twitter Username: LBFreedman

Arielle Silver teaches in the MFA, BA, and community writing programs at Antioch University Los Angeles, where her scholarship on stepmothers, feminist pedagogy, and lyric essay won the Library Research Award in 2016 and 2017. She serves on the International Women’s Writing Guild advisory board.


Twitter Username: relsilver

Tabitha Blankenbiller is an essayist with work that has appeared in Electric Lit, The Rumpus, Brevity, Hobart, Catapult, among other venues. Her debut collection is Eats of Eden.


Twitter Username: tabithablanken

Website: www.tabithablankenbiller.com

Virginia Barber Middleton Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, T

F182B. FSG Originals and the Writer/Editor Relationship. (Emily Bell, Amelia Gray, Jac Jemc, Shelly Oria, Catherine Lacey) Since 2011, FSG Originals has maintained a mission to publish "voices that insist on being heard, stories that demand to be told, writers who are compelled to show us something new. They defy categorization and expectation. They are, in a word, original." It's a mission exemplified in the relationship that editor Emily Bell, Director of FSG Originals, has built and sustained with a number of authors, such as Amelia Gray, Lindsay Hunter, Catherine Lacey, and Laura van den Berg, among others. Bell introduced these writers' work to mainstream publishing, and insisted on developing their second—and sometimes third—books, in the face of consolidating and shifting market expectations. On this panel, Emily Bell will join a handful of the authors published at FSG Originals to discuss the writer/editor relationship, the virtues of experimenting with established systems, and standing up for weird books.

Room 1, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F183. It's the Season of the Hmong Writers. (, ) 2018 is the year of the Hmong writers. Join three as they read from their recently published books. From memoir to poetry, participants will enjoy the varied songs of Hmong writers.

Mai Neng Moua founded Paj Ntaub Voice, the Hmong literary arts journal, and edited Bamboo Among the Oaks. Her awards include the Bush Artist Fellowship. The Bride Price: A Hmong Wedding Story was published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press in March 2017.

Khaty Xiong is the author of Poor Anima, which is the first full-length collection of poetry published by a Hmong American woman in the United States. Xiong’s work was recently featured in The Academy of American Poets' "Writing from the Absence," a project highlighting Hmong American voices.


Twitter Username: khatyxiong

Room 3 & 4, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F184. Decolonizing the Archive: Examining the Liminal Space Between Experience and Reality. (, , , , ) Writers of diverse ideologies, regions, and cultural inheritances discuss how their poetics try to rectify an injury between language and history. In examining their methodologies, they seek answers to the following questions: What can be recovered from the residue of rhetoric and language that imposes its own historical record? How can poetry use imagery to describe a real environment that has collapsed under the idea of that environment? How can a poet give form to what has already been lost?

Mark Haunschild teaches writing at Arizona State University, where he serves as the faculty advisor of poetry for Superstition Review. He has been a member of the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley since 2011.


Twitter Username: bottlegardener

Lauren Espinoza earned her MFA at Arizona State University where she currently teaches. She is the Workshop Coordinator for CantoMundo. Her poetry has appeared in New Border Voices: An Anthology, Pilgrimage, and Sinister Wisdom. Her manuscript was a finalist for the 2016 Andres Montoya Poetry Prize.

David Antonio Moody is a writing instructor at Arizona State University and audio editor for The Cortland Review. His poetry appears in Carolina Quarterly, Watershed Review, and Columbia Review. He completed his doctorate at Florida State University where he performed in the Flying High Circus.


Twitter Username: davidmoodydoes

Sara Sams is a poet and translator who teaches at Arizona State University’s College of Integrative Sciences and Arts. She is a graduate of Davidson College (BA) and ASU (MFA). She is a former translations editor for Hayden's Ferry Review and editorial assistant at Parnassus: Poetry in Review.


Twitter Username: sasamsz

Bojan Louis is the author of the nonfiction chapbook Troubleshooting Silence in Arizona. His first collection of poetry is Currents. Louis teaches rhetoric and composition at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: BojanLouis

Website: bojanlouis.com

Room 5 & 6, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F185. Everywhere, A Poem: Poetry as Public Art. (, , , ) Drawing on inspiring examples from three cities—Buffalo, Miami, and Philadelphia—panelists explore a broad spectrum of public art projects designed to democratize access to poetry by bridging communities and reaching underserved audiences. Projects include: the Outbound Poetry Festival, a collaboration with Amtrak’s 30th Street Station; poems printed on rooftops and beaches; readings in a ninety-year-old abandoned grain elevator; and literary art sculptures in community gardens and public parks.

Barbara Cole is the artistic director of Just Buffalo Literary Center and a 2011 fellow in poetry from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). Cole received her MA in creative writing from Temple University and her PhD in English, specializing in poetics, from the University at Buffalo.


Twitter Username: bacole14222

P. Scott Cunningham is the author of Ya Te Veo and serves as the director of O, Miami, a festival that aims for every single person in Miami to encounter a poem during the month of April, and the executive editor of Jai-Alai Books.


Twitter Username: omiamifestival

Noah Falck is the author of Snowmen Losing Weight and several chapbooks including Celebrity Dream Poems. He is the education director at Just Buffalo Literary Center and curates the Silo City Reading Series, a multimedia poetry series in a 130-foot abandoned grain elevator.


Twitter Username: nofalck

Yolanda Wisher is the author of Monk Eats an Afro and the coeditor of Peace is a Haiku Song. A Cave Canem Fellow (1999–2001), Pew Fellow, and Hedgebrook Writer in Residence, Wisher founded and directed the Germantown Poetry Festival (2006–10). She is currently the third poet laureate of Philadelphia.


Twitter Username: yolandawisher

Room 7, 8, & 9, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F186. Get Lit: Transform Your Writing by Fusing Classic Poetry with Your Own Spoken Word!. (, , , , Hieu Minh Nguyen) Get Lit presents an award-winning pedagogy guaranteed to ignite classrooms and spark the poet inside each student. The Get Lit curriculum fuses classic poetry (from Rumi to Tupac) with original spoken word response writing, to embolden and inspire social consciousness in diverse youth (13–24). This multigenerational panel filled with award-winning poetic luminaries will showcase the power of Get Lit to transform your self-expression. “Claim your poem. Claim your life!”

Kelly Grace Thomas is the manager of education for Get Lit-Words Ignite. She is also the winner of the 2017 Neil Postman Award, a Pushcart Prize nominee, and a Fellow for the Kenyon Review Young Writers Workshop. Kelly’s poems have appeared in Nashville Review, Sixth Finch, Muzzle, PANK, and more.


Twitter Username: kellygracethoma

Patricia Smith's books are Incendiary Art, Gotta Go, Gotta Flow, Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah (2013 Lenore Marshall), and Blood Dazzler (2008 National Book Award finalist). A 2014 Guggenheim fellow and two-time Pushcart winner, she is a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada's MFA program.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

Mila Cuda is the current Youth Poet Laureate of Los Angeles. Her work has been featured by Button Poetry, Huffington Post, Buzzfeed, and PBS. She is a two-time Classic Slam champion, captain of the LA Brave New Voices team, and lead editor of the weekly online political poetry series Get Lit Now.


Twitter Username: milacuda

Raul Herrera has written and performed for the United Nations, the White House, and more. A former Get Lit Player, his work is featured in Get Lit Rising, and he is currently writing DANTE, Get Lit’s hip-hop adaptation of Dante’s Inferno, under the tutelage of Tim Robbins.

Room 11, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F187. Carrying Continents in Our Eyes: A Reading of Arab and Arab American Poetries . (, , , , ) In “Carrying Continents in Our Eyes,” Philip Metres notes that Arab American literature showcases a “remarkably robust multiplicity of styles and themes.” This reading features poets who resist dehumanization and victim objectification, highlight transnational belongings and displacements, and depict landscapes of intimacy and estrangement. Arab and Arab American poets summon their multiple, polylingual, and intercultural visions and voices against this juncture of normalized demonization.

Peter Twal's poetry has appeared in Best New Poets, Kenyon Review Online, and West Branch Wired. He earned his MFA from the University of Notre Dame, and he is a recipient of the Samuel and Mary Anne Hazo Poetry Award.


Twitter Username: PoeticEngineer

Philip Metres is the author of a number of books and chapbooks, including Sand Opera, Pictures at an Exhibition, A Concordance of Leaves, and To See the Earth. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry, has garnered a Lannan Fellowship, two NEAs, the Hunt Prize, and the Cleveland Arts Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

Mohja Kahf’s books of poetry are Hagar Poems and E-mails from Scheherazad. She is the author of a novel, The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf. Kahf, who teaches at the University of Arkansas, has a manuscript of essays on Syria and two poetry manuscripts ready for publication.

Zeina Hashem Beck's second collection, Louder than Hearts, won the May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize. Her chapbooks are 3arabi Song, winner of the Rattle Chapbook Prize, and There Was and How Much There Was, selected by Carol Ann Duffy as a Laureate's Choice. Her first book is To Live in Autumn.


Twitter Username: zeinabeck

Farid Matuk is the author of This Isa A Nice Neighborhood and the chapbook My Daughter La Chola. He serves on the poetry editorial team for Fence and is an assistant professor of English at the University of Arizona. The Real Horse, his second full-length collection, is forthcoming.

Room 12, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F188. Translating from the Peripheries, Sponsored by ALTA. (, , , Rachael Small) Translating from the peripheries of a dominant language, e.g. from Taiwan/Hong Kong for Chinese, from Austria/Switzerland for German, or from Venezuela/Chile for Spanish, underscores questions about what readers and publishers expect in translated literature. Panelists discuss the challenges and rewards of translating authors on the margins of their own language, such as an Austrian writer whose books were initially mis-received by German reviewers for being written in "Austrian.”

Chenxin Jiang translates from the Italian, German, and Chinese. She is senior editor (Chinese) at Asymptote Journal. Recent translations include Volatile Texts by Zsuzsanna Gahse and The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution by Ji Xianlin, awarded a 2011 PEN Translation Grant.

Annie Janusch is the translator of four novels by Wolf Haas, the Heinrich von Kleist novella The Duel, as well as works by Jürgen Goldstein, Anja Kampmann, Walter Kappacher, and Uwe Tellkamp. She is fiction editor of the Chicago Review and a fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Kelsi Vanada is a poet and translator in Iowa. She holds an MFA in poetry from the Iowa Writers' Workshop and an MFA in literary translation from the University of Iowa. Her translation of Spanish poet Berta García Faet's La edad de merecer came out last year. She was a 2016 ALTA Travel Fellow.

Room 13, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F189. A Haunting Gaze: Writing About and Toward Others. (, , , ) Creating characters outside one’s direct experience, beyond one’s cultural, gender, or regionally constructed identities, presents a vital moral and aesthetic conundrum fraught with the perils of misrepresentation and the question of exclusive rights to subject matter. Four writers who have published fiction and poetry that engages the challenge discuss its demands and imaginative possibilities.

Lisa Birnbaum is the author of the novel Worthy, from Dzanc Books. She teaches writing at the University of Tampa, where for many years she served as fiction editor of Tampa Review and at the University of Tampa Press.

Pede Hollist is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, and associate professor of English, specializing in African literature, at The University of Tampa.

Mildred K. Barya teaches creative writing and literature at UNC-Asheville and is a board member of African Writers Trust (AWT). She has published three books of poetry and short stories. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Denver and blogs on literary matters.


Twitter Username: midibarya twitter

Donald Morrill’s debut novel Beaut won the Lee Smith Fiction Prize and is forthcoming in 2018. The author of three volumes of poetry, including Awaiting Your Impossibilities (2015 Florida Book Award), and four books of nonfiction, he teaches in the low-residency MFA at the University of Tampa.

Room 14, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F190. New England Review 40th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) New England Review celebrates forty consecutive years of publishing new voices in poetry, fiction, and essays. Featuring writers who appeared in NER as early as 1978 and as recently as last year, this event offers a range of voices and genres, styles and viewpoints. Come hear some of the authors who have distinguished and sustained NER through the past four decades, making it one of the nation’s most reliably inventive cross-genre literary journals.

C. Dale Young is author of The Affliction, a novel-in-stories, and four collections of poetry,  most recently The Halo. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation, he practices medicine full-time.

Cate Marvin is a visiting professor at Colby College. Her most recent book of poems is Oracle.


Twitter Username: catemarvin

Website: www.catemarvin.com

Kathryn Davis is the author of eight novels. She has been the recipient of the Kafka Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Lannan Award for Fiction, the Katherine Anne Porter Prize from the American Acedemy of Arts & Letters. She is Hurst Sr. Writer-in-Residence at Washington University in St. Louis.

Kate Lebo's essay "The Loudproof Room," originally published in New England Review, was anthologized in Best American Essays 2015. She is the author of a cookbook, Pie School, and currently at work on her first collection of essays, The Book of Difficult Fruit.


Twitter Username: mizkatelebo

Website: www.katelebo.com

Hai-Dang Phan is a 2017 NEA Fellow in Literature and the author of the chapbook Small Wars. His work has been published in The New Yorker, Poetry, Best American Poetry, and New England Review. He currently teaches at Grinnell College in Iowa.


Twitter Username: haidang_phan

Room 15, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F191. (Re)Writing the Right Words: Revision Pedagogy. (, , , , ) This panel explores techniques to help instructors teach college students to revise. Based on field-tested experiences, let's analyze and discuss what works in the classroom. We'll focus on genre-specific strategies for the short story, novel, creative nonfiction, poetry, and scripts, as well as core principles of revision. From refining the portfolio method to designing exercises and optimizing workshop dynamics, our diverse multi-genre panel offers a range of tools for writing instructors.

Gabriel Scala is the author of two chapbooks: Leaping from the Bottom Step and Twenty Questions for Robbie Dunkle. She is an assistant professor of English at Delta State University and has taught creative writing in both traditional and online, full-semester and abbreviated-course formats.

Jason Marc Harris teaches creative writing, folklore, and literature at Texas A&M. Stories in journals such as Arroyo Literary Review, Midwestern Gothic, and Psychopomp magazine. He was fiction editor of Mid-American Review and is creative editor of Cosmogamy: Science Fiction and Fantasy Creations.

John Dufresne is the author of two story collections, six novels, and three books on craft, including Flash! A Guide to Writing Very Short Fiction. He teaches creative writing at Florida International University, and is at work on a novel and an illustrated guide to writing fiction.

John Lavelle is the author of the novel Oreads. He managed the Creative Writing Institute writing conference. He is a graduate associate professor at Florida Institute of Technology where he teaches beginning and advanced creative writing. His short stories have appeared in various journals.

Susan M. Stabile has published creative nonfiction in such journals as The Southwest Review, Biography, and The Iowa Review (selected as a “Notable Essay of 2014” in Best American Essays). She is an associate professor at Texas A&M University, teaching courses in creative nonfiction essay and memoir.

Room 16, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F192. The Ecstasy and the Laundry: Gender, Families, and the Writing Life. (, , , , ) What happens when writers commit to sharing the challenges of their careers and the work of raising a family? In a world that privileges male genius and fetishizes female domesticity, how do we work toward relationships and family structures that do neither? On this panel, four distinguished writers reflect on their imaginative lives, their families, who buys the groceries, who does carpool, and who cleans the lint out of the dryer.

Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine and the story collections The Train to Lo Wu and Nobody Ever Gets Lost. He has received Guggenheim and NEA fellowships; his work has appeared in The New Yorker, Granta, and the Best American Short Stories. He teaches at the College of New Jersey.


Twitter Username: rowjess

Website: www.jessrow.com

Elizabeth Kadetsky's books include two works of fiction (a story collection and novella) and a memoir. She has been honored with a Fulbright fellowship, a Pushcart Prize, two Best American Short Stories notable citations, and publication in Best New American Voices. She is on faculty at Penn State.


Twitter Username: ekadetsky

Website: ElizabethKadetsky.com

Imad Rahman is the author of I Dream Of Microwaves. His short fiction has appeared in One Story, The Fairy Tale Review, Gulf Coast, and the anthology xo Orpheus: Fifty New Myths, among other venues. He teaches fiction writing at Cleveland State University and in the NEOMFA program.

Kate Tuttle, President of the National Book Critics Circle, writes about books for The Boston Globe. Her reviews have also appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Salon, The Washington Post, and Newsday. Her essays on childhood, race, and politics have appeared in Dame, The Rumpus, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: katekilla

Emily Raboteau is the author of a novel, The Professor's Daughter, and a work of creative nonfiction, Searching for Zion: The Quest for Home in the African Diaspora, winner of the 2014 American Book Award. She is a professor in the MFA program at the City College of New York in Harlem.


Twitter Username: emilyraboteau

Website: www.emilyraboteau.com

Room 17, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F193. Crazy, Sexy Miami: Reporters Tell All. (, , , ) In South Florida in the '80s, today’s hot topics were already in full evidence: racial tension, terrorism, free speech, LGBTQ rights, immigration, culture clashes, epidemics (then, incurable AIDS). To explore these complicated topics Miami Herald reporters became experts in long-form, immersion, and voice-driven journalism. Prizewinning (seven Pulitzers) former staffers will explain how and why they wrote what they wrote, and connect that writing to current creative nonfiction.

S.L. (Sandi) Wisenberg is the author of a chronicle, The Adventures of Cancer Bitch; an essay collection, Holocaust Girls: History, Memory & Other Obsessions; and a short story collection, The Sweetheart Is In. She teaches at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago Graham School.


Twitter Username: SLwisenberg

Website: http://SLwisenberg.blogspot.com

Liz Balmaseda, food and dining editor of The Palm Beach Post, has worked as a foreign correspondent, TV producer, and columnist. It was as a Miami Herald columnist that she won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary and later shared a second Pulitzer for breaking news in 2001. She has authored several books.


Twitter Username: LizBalmaseda

Madeleine Helena Blais is a professor of journalism at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a mentor in the Goucher College low-residency MFA in nonfiction program as well as a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. Her most recent book is a memoir, To the New Owners.

Sydney Freedberg has worked on newspaper investigations that have been honored with four Pulitzer Prizes. Her work contributed to the conviction of a politically influential sect leader, the courts-martial of Navy personnel charged with abuse, and the overturning of a fraudulent election in Miami.


Twitter Username: spfreedberg

Room 18 & 19, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F194. Political Pivoting: Literary Publishing at the Pace of Politics, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , , ) Politics pivots from one issue/story to the next very quickly. How can small publishers keep up with the pace while remaining both relevant and true to their literary values? A panel of writers, activists, and independent literary publishers tackling current events discuss challenges and opportunities.

Johnny Temple is the publisher of Akashic Books and one of the main organizers of the Brooklyn Book Festival. He also plays bass guitar in the band Girls Against Boys who have toured extensively across the globe. His writing has appeared in The Nation and Publishers Weekly, among other publications.

Paul Reyes is the editor of Virginia Quarterly Review and author of Exiles in Eden: Life Among the Ruins of Florida’s Great Recession. His essays and reporting have appeared in VQR, Harper's, The Oxford American, The New York Times, Mother Jones, and Slate.


Twitter Username: reyes_edits

Amanda Johnston is the author of Another Way to Say Enter. She is an Affrilachian poet and a Cave Canem graduate fellow. She is a cofounder of Black Poets Speak Out, founder of Torch Literary Arts, and faculty with the Stonecoast MFA program.


Twitter Username: amejohnston

Website: www.amandajohnston.com

Meara Sharma is a writer, radio producer, and senior nonfiction editor for Guernica magazine. She has reported from India, Liberia, and Rwanda and has contributed to The New York Times, NPR, Matador, WNYC's On the Media, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: mearasharma

Room 20 & 21, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F195. More Than Just a Magazine: Literary Community Building in the Digital Age. (, , , , ) In recent years, online “magazines” have become much more than just literary repositories, thanks to subscriber engagement at multiple levels and the flexibility and immediacy of social media. Editors from The Rumpus, Lit Hub, Guernica, Catapult, and Brevity will discuss how blogs, book clubs, live events, anthologies, classes, Facebook events, member-only content, and other creative innovations increase readership and expand literary community.

Dinty W. Moore is author of The Story Cure: A Book Doctor's Pain-Free Guide to Finishing Your Novel or Memoir, the memoir Between Panic & Desire, and numerous other books of nonfiction. He lives in Athens, Ohio, gardens avidly, and is deathly afraid of polar bears.


Twitter Username: brevitymag

Website: www.dintywmoore.com

Marisa Siegel lives, writes, and edits near New York City. She is editor in chief and owner of TheRumpus.net.


Twitter Username: marisasaystweet

Mensah Demary is the associate web editor for Catapult, and the editor of Specter magazine. His fiction and nonfiction has appeared in PANK, Electric Literature, Salon, and elsewhere. He also cohosts LIT: A Music and Reading Series.


Twitter Username: mensah4000

Website: http://www.zerocopula.com

Hillary Brenhouse is coeditor in chief of Guernica magazine and a writer whose work (on women's issues, religion, culture) has appeared in Time, The New York Times, and the Oxford American, among others.


Twitter Username: hbrenhouse

Jonny Diamond is the founding editor of Brooklyn magazine, and is the editor in chief of Literary Hub.


Twitter Username: jonnydiamond

Room 22, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F196. AWP Town Hall on Accessibility. Join AWP conference staff and accessibility consultant Cindy Kauffman for a Q&A and discussion about accessibility at the annual Conference & Bookfair.

Room 23, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F197. How We Do in Tampa: A University of Tampa Low-Residency MFA Faculty Reading. (, , , , ) This event highlights four faculty members from UT's Low-Residency MFA Program. Fiction writer Jessica Anthony is the author of The Convalescent and Chopsticks. John Capouya, a journalist turned professor, is the author of the forthcoming Florida Soul. Alan Michael Parker is the author of 17 books, including a new novel, Christmas in July. Jeff Parker, the program's founding director, is the author of three books, including a memoir, Where Bears Roam the Streets: A Russian Journal.

Erica Dawson is the author of two books of poetry: Big-Eyed Afraid and The Small Blades Hurt. With a PhD from University of Cincinnati, she is an associate professor of English and writing at University of Tampa, and she serves as the Director of UT's low-residency MFA.

Jessica Anthony is the author of the novels The Convalescent and Chopsticks. She has recently received fellowships from the Creative Capital Foundation and the Maine Arts Commission to complete Enter the Aardvark, a collection of novellas. She teaches in the University of Tampa's low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: jessica_anthony

John Capouya teaches nonfiction narrative in University of Tampa's low-residency creative writing MFA program, and he is the author of three nonfiction books. His latest, Florida Soul, is a history of soul music in this state. His previous book, Gorgeous George, is being adapted into a feature film.

Alan Michael Parker is the author of four novels, including Christmas in July, eight books of poetry, and editor of five other works. Douglas C. Houchens Professor of English at Davidson College, he teaches as well in the University of Tampa low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: AMPoProse

Website: www.alanmichaelparker.com

Jeff Parker’s most recent book is Where Bears Roam the Streets: A Russia Journal. He is coeditor of A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors and coauthor of Erratic Fire, Erratic Passion: The Poetry of Sportstalk. He teaches fiction in the MFA program at UMass Amherst.


Twitter Username: oparkero

Website: www.thebackoftheline.net

Room 24, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F198. Preserving the Memory: Strategies for Keeping the Work of Deceased Poets Alive. (, , , , ) A staggering number of poets have left us over the past decade, poets whose presence in our ongoing conversations about poetics and culture remains important. Creative actions by family members, editors, publishers, academics, and readers can help to make sure these writers retain a seat at the table. This panel will speak to specific cases, what has been done, and what we hope to do in the future to preserve their memory.

John Hoppenthaler's books of poetry are Domestic Garden, Anticipate the Coming Reservoir, and Lives of Water. He has also coedited Jean Valentine: This-World Company. Editor of "A Poetry Congeries," he is a professor of creative writing and literature at East Carolina University.


Twitter Username: jhoppenthaler

Brian Turner (author of My Life as a Foreign Country; Here, Bullet; and Phantom Noise) received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a USA Fellowship, an NEA grant, the Amy Lowell, the Poets' Prize, and a fellowship from the Lannan Foundation. He directs the MFA in creative writing at Sierra Nevada College.


Twitter Username: TurnerBriturn3

Sidney L. Clifton is an Emmy-nominated producer with a nearly twenty-year career in animated and live action television series and longform content. In her current role as a creative recruiter for Riot Games, she juggles recruiting duties along with her independent content development and production.


Twitter Username: sidneyc323

Laure-Anne Bosselaar is the author of The Hour Between Dog & Wolf, Small Gods of Grief (Isabella Gardner Prize), and A New Hunger (ALA Notable Book). She taught at Sarah Lawrence College, and teaches at the Solstice Low-Residency MFA at Pine Manor College. Four Way Books will publish her next book.

Gregory Donovan is author of the poetry collections Torn from the Sun as well as Calling His Children Home, winner of the Devins Award. A faculty member of the VCU MFA writing program, he's an editor of the online journal Blackbird and a producer of the Levis documentary film A Late Style of Fire.

Room 25, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F199. AWP Award Series Reading. (, , , ) A reading featuring the 2016 AWP Award Series winners Lauren Clark, James Janko, Mary Kuryla, and Paisley Rekdal.

Lauren Clark's first collection of poems, Music for a Wedding, was selected by Vijay Seshadri for the 2016 AWP Donald Hall Prize in Poetry. It was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press in 2017. They work in New York City and collaborate with Etc. Gallery in Chicago.


Twitter Username: laurclar

James Janko's novel, Buffalo Boy And Geronimo (Curbstone Press), received wide critical acclaim and two awards: The Association of Asian American Studies 2006 Prose Award and the 2007 Northern California Book Award for Fiction. His short stories have appeared in the Massachusetts Review, the Sun, and numerous other magazines. Janko won the 2002 Illinois Arts Council Award for Fiction.

Mary Kuryla's stories have received the Pushcart Prize and have appeared in several literary journals. With a winning story in the July 2015 Glimmer Train Very Short Fiction Prize, she also has a story forthcoming in The Normal School. Her award-winning shorts and feature films have premiered at Sundance and Toronto. She has written screen adaptations for United Artists and MGM, and she has been a scholar at the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and the New York Summer Writers Institute.

Paisley Rekdal is the author, most recently, of The Broken Country and Imaginary Vessels. A Guggenheim fellow and the current Utah Poet Laureate, she teaches at the University of Utah, where she edits the web archive project Mapping Salt Lake City.


Twitter Username: paisleyrekdal

12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Room 10, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F200. Yoga for Writers. (Melissa Carroll) Join a certified yoga instructor for a gentle, one-hour yoga and meditation practice, appropriate for practitioners of all levels and abilities, focusing on stretching and mindfulness for writers. Please come in comfortable street clothes; mats and yoga apparel are not necessary. Chairs will be provided and advance sign-up is required. Sign up will be available beginning on Monday, 11/13/17, 12 noon EST.

1:30 pm to 2:45 pm

Grand Salon A, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F201. Writing/Righting Cuba/n from Afar. (, , , ) This panel explores ways in which Cuban American and Cuban-born writers, at various biographical, geographical, and temporal distances from the island, claim rights to cultural and national identity through their fiction. Together, these writers and their works contribute to a larger discussion about not only the various relationships and complex connections that mark narratives about Cuba (written both from the island, as well as from afar), but also about what constitutes Cuban literature.

Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés is the author of two short story collections—Oye What I’m Gonna Tell You and Marielitos, Balseros and Other Exiles, as well as Everyday Chica, the 2010 Longleaf Press Poetry Prize. She teaches literature and fiction in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: CeciliaMilanes

Website: www.oyechica.net

Ivonne Lamazares is the author of a novel, The Sugar Island, translated to seven languages. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The Southern Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Latina Magazine, and several anthologies. She is the recipient of an NEA and teaches writing at Miami Dade College.

Susannah Rodriguez Drissi is lecturer and research fellow in comparative literature, at UCLA. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in national and international journals. Recently, she finished her first novel Until We're Fish. Currently, she writes a YA #ownvoices novel titled Letters from Camus.


Twitter Username: rsdrissi

Rebecca Marie Fortes is the recipient of a Helen Zell Fellowship from the Helen Zell Writers' Program at the University of Michigan, where she earned her MFA in fiction. She is currently at work on a novel that takes place across Miami and Havana.

Grand Salon B, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F202. Writing a New Identity: Caribbean Women Writers from Beach & Carnival Culture to Political & Survival Text. (, , , , ) Caribbean women writers like Audre Lorde, Jamaica Kincaid, and June Jordan have pioneered a tradition of writing that is authentically Caribbean, while introducing styles that distinguish them from their predecessors. How do today's Caribbean women writers continue boldly tackling issues like sexual identity and social justice, birth new worlds while honoring the legacy of our ancestors? We are Caribbean women writers honoring our carnival culture while reclaiming lost spirituality, dialect, and dignity.

Keisha-Gaye Anderson is a Jamaican-born poet and creative writer. She is the author of the poetry collection Gathering the Waters. Her writing has been published in a number of national literary journals. Keisha holds an MFA from The City College, CUNY.


Twitter Username: KeishaGaye1

Cheryl Boyce-Taylor is the recipient of the 2015 Barnes and Noble Writer for Writers Award. Arrival, her fourth collection of poetry, will be published by Northwestern University Press in June 2017. Cheryl holds an MFA in poetry from Stonecoast, and is the founder of Calypso Muse and The Glitter Pomegranate Reading Series.

Mercy Tullis-Bukhari is an essayist, fiction writer, and poet. She is Afro-Latina American, Bronx-bred, Garifuna, of Honduran Jamaican descent. Mercy is currently receiving her MFA in creative writing from The College of New Rochelle, and is writing her first novel.


Twitter Username: MercyMTB

Website: mercytullisbukhari.com

Donna Aza Weir-Soley, PhD, associate professor of English at Florida International University is the author of First Rain and The Woman Who Knew, coeditor (with Opal Palmer Adisa) of anthology, Caribbean Erotic. aka Donna Aza; Aza Weir-Soley

R. Erica Doyle was born to Trinidadian immigrant parents who were spirit-seeing agnostics. Her first book, proxy, was a Lambda Literary Awards Finalist and winner of the Norma Farber Award from the Poetry Society of America. She is a fellow of Cave Canem.


Twitter Username: r_erica_doyle

Website: rericadoyle.com

Grand Salon C, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F203. Challenges and Triumphs: Underrepresented Voices in Publishing . (, , , , ) In this panel, we’ll hear from a diverse mix of agents, editors, and authors at different stages in their careers. The panelists will talk about the challenges they face as part of communities underrepresented within the publishing industry, their approaches to overcoming these obstacles, and what we can do to foster diversity and inclusivity among both readers and publishing professionals.

Ayesha Pande is a literary agent who has worked in the publishing industry for over twenty years. Before launching her agency, Ayesha was a senior editor at Farrar Straus & Giroux. She has also held editorial positions at HarperCollins and Crown Publishers.

Sonali Chanchani is an assistant and rising literary agent at Folio Literary Management, where she specializes in upmarket fiction and narrative nonfiction.

Emi Ikkanda is a senior editor at Spiegel and Grau. Her authors include Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award Finalist Carla Power and bestselling authors Richard Reeves, Julia Angwin, and Michael David Lukas. She pursues journalism, memoir, history, pop culture, science, and multicultural fiction.


Twitter Username: emi_ikkanda

SJ Sindu is the author of the novel Marriage of a Thousand Lies and the chapbook I Once Met You But You Were Dead. Her short work has appeared in various journals. She holds a PhD in creative writing from Florida State University, and teaches creative writing at Ringling College of Art & Design.


Twitter Username: sjsindu

Website: http://sjsindu.com

Rakesh Satyal is a senior editor at Atria Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, where he focuses primarily on narrative nonfiction. He is also the author of the Lambda Award-winning novel Blue Boy. His second novel is No One Can Pronounce My Name.


Twitter Username: rakeshsatyal

Grand Salon D, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F204. A Tribute to the Poets Claire Kageyama-Ramakrishnan and Derick Burleson, Two University of Houston Graduates. (, , , , ) In 2016, the writing world lost Claire Kageyma-Ramakrishnan and Derick Burleson. They had each earned their doctorates at the University of Houston, and they were each poets and professors in the prime of their careers, Claire only 47, Derick just 53. Their absence is not easy to bear; our diverse panel will pay tribute to them for their friendship, their teaching, and their writing, and we hope everyone who knew them will gather with us to contribute as many remembrances as time allows.

Allen Gee is professor of English at Georgia College, where he directs the creative writing program and edits fiction for Arts & Letters. He is also the editor for 2040 Books, a diverse press, and is the author of My Chinese-America. His essays and stories have appeared in numerous journals.


Twitter Username: allenrgee

Adrienne Su is the author of four books of poems, most recently Living Quarters. A 2007 NEA fellow, she is poet in residence at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania.


Twitter Username: adriennesu

Website: http://blogs.dickinson.edu/adriennesu/

Laurie Clements Lambeth is the author of Veil and Burn, a National Poetry Series selection. Her poems have most recently appeared in Poetry magazine, Bellevue Literary Review, Nimrod, and TQR. Her recent creative nonfiction has been published by The New York Times, Ecotone, and Crab Orchard Review.

Sean Hill, the author of two books of poems, Dangerous Goods and Blood Ties & Brown Liquor, is an assistant professor at UA-Fairbanks. His honors and awards include a fellowship from the NEA. His poems have appeared in journals and in anthologies including Black Nature and Villanelles.


Twitter Username: adamalzeal

Website: http://www.seanhillpoetry.com

Ed Skoog is the author of three books of poems, Mister Skylight, Rough Day, and Run the Red Lights.


Twitter Username: jawfuls_of_marl

Website: http://skoog.land

Florida Salon 1, 2, & 3, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F205. Vassar Miller Poetry Prize 25th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) The Vassar Miller Poetry Prize, founded at the University of North Texas in 1993, honors Texas poet, writer, and disability rights advocate Vassar Miller (1924–1998). To commemorate the prize's 25th anniversary, writers of winning manuscripts will read from their collections, showcasing the formal and geographic variety of poetry published in the series. The reading will be followed by a Q&A.

Alison Stine is the author of three poetry books: Wait, winner of the Brittingham Prize; Ohio Violence, winner of the Vassar Miller; and Lot of My Sister, along with a novel Supervision and a novella The Protectors. She has received an NEA Fellowship, a Wallace Stegner, and a Ruth Lilly Fellowship.


Twitter Username: alisonstine

Website: http://www.alisonstine.com

James Najarian grew up on a goat farm in central Pennsylvania. He has published a book on Keats and the Victorians, articles on 19th- and 20th-century poetry, and poems in literary journals. He won the 2017 Vassar Miller Prize, and his book of verse is forthcoming.

Anna Lena Phillips Bell is the author of Ornament, winner of the 2016 Vassar Miller Prize, and the artist's book A Pocket Book of Forms. The recipient of a 2016 North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship in literature, she is editor of Ecotone and Lookout Books, and teaches at UNC Wilmington.


Twitter Username: thenewnewyear

Website: http://todointhenewyear.net

Jordan Windholz is currently a visiting assistant professor at Shippensburg University. She is the author of Other Psalms and a scholar of English Renaissance literature.


Twitter Username: jwindholz

Florida Salon 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F206. Failure: The Taboo Element of Craft. (, , , , ) If you think of failure as a necessary part of the creative process, you begin to see it as an essential element of craft, the gateway to writing the thing that does work. Eventually, the connection between writing that succeeds and writing that fails illuminates itself, and you use this to your advantage. The five writers on this panel will address the various ways that they view failure as an inevitable and therefore important part of the process, and how they've accommodated for it.

John McNally is author of The Promise of Failure: A Writer's Perspective on Not Succeeding; After the Workshop: A Novel; The Book of Ralph: A Novel; Ghosts of Chicago: Stories; Troublemakers: Stories; among others. He is writer in residence at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Hannah Tinti is the author of Animal Crackers,The Good Thief, and The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley. She is also cofounder and executive editor of One Story magazine. She teaches at New York University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: hannahtinti

Website: www.hannahtinti.com

Valerie Laken is the author of the story collection, Separate Kingdoms, and the novel, Dream House. Her work has received a Pushcart Prize and has been longlisted for the Story Prize, the Frank O’Connor Award, and Best American Short Stories. She teaches at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.


Twitter Username: valerielaken

Website: www.valerielaken.com

Eric G Wilson is author of Against Happiness and Everyone Loves a Good Train Wreck. His work has appeared in the Virginia Quarterly Review, the Georgia Review, The Collagist, the Portland Review, and Hotel Amerika. His novel Polaris Ghost is forthcoming. He teaches at Wake Forest University.


Twitter Username: ericgwilson

Sheree L. Greer founded Kitchen Table Literary Arts to showcase and support the work of women writers of color. The author of two novels, Let the Lover Be and A Return to Arms, she is a VONA/VOICES alum and currently teaches writing at St. Petersburg College.


Twitter Username: shereelgreer

Florida Salon 5, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F207. Poems and Poets from Between the Coasts. (, , , ) Living and working away from the East and West coasts, regional voices can complicate conversations about art, politics, current events, race, and class in illuminating and unexpected ways. What does verse coming out of the Midwest and South sound like today? What does a life in poetry look like there? Three poets—with roots in states including Michigan, Ohio, and Alabama—read and discuss place, inspiration, and finding community and opportunities.

Jenny Xu is the poetry editor at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Keith Leonard is the author of the poetry collection, Ramshackle Ode. His poems have recently appeared in the Academy of America Poets Poem-A-Day Program, Horsethief, and Copper Nickel. Keith teaches at The Wellington School, an independent school in Columbus, Ohio.


Twitter Username: KeithLeonard_

Marcus Wicker is the author of Silencer and Maybe the Saddest Thing. He is the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, a Pushcart Prize, the Missouri Review’s Miller Audio Prize, as well as fellowships from Cave Canem, and the Fine Arts Work Center.


Twitter Username: a2poet

Website: marcuswicker.com

Rodney Jones is the author of eleven books of poems. His many honors include the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Harper Lee Award, and the Kingsley Tufts Award, and he has been a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the Griffin International Poetry Prize, and the Pulitzer Prize.

Florida Salon 6, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F208. Opening the Door: Articulation Agreements as a Tool for Creating Diversity and Access. (, , , , ) Articulation agreements between BA/BFA and AFA creative writing programs can bring new, diverse students to four year programs while building a bridge to success for community college students. Articulation agreements between MFAs and BA/BFAs can provide similar mutual advantages. This panel will examine how to negotiate such compacts and then use them in conjunction with other outreach techniques to expand and diversify our literary communities.

Glen Retief's The Jack Bank: A Memoir of a South African Childhood won a Lambda Literary Award. He teaches creative nonfiction at Susquehanna University, where he also directs the undergraduate creative writing major.

Kathryn Kysar is the author of two books of poetry, Dark Lake and Pretend the World, and she edited Riding Shotgun: Women Write About Their Mothers. A previous AWP board member, Kysar chairs the creative writing program at Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Minneapolis.


Twitter Username: darklake

Website: www.kathrynkysar.com

Mary F. Rockcastle is the author of the novels In Caddis Wood and Rainy Lake. She is director of the creative writing programs at Hamline University and Executive Editor of Water~Stone Review. Her awards include a Loft-McKnight Award of Distinction in Prose and a Bush Fellowship.

Lisa Tucker, associate professor of English at Raritan Valley Community College in North Branch, New Jersey, earned a master’s degree in education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her interests are war trauma and minority student retention. Lisa initiated a war journaling club.


Twitter Username: LisaTucker

Alysia Sawchyn is an MFA candidate at the University of South Florida where she teaches a variety of writing courses. She attended community college before receiving a BA in writing and an MA in rhetoric and composition. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Fourth Genre, Assay, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: happiestwerther

Meeting Room 1, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F209. If You Haven't Lived It, Can You Write It? . (, , , , ) As fiction writers, we are used to creating worlds and characters, if not from scratch, then from some merging of memory and imagination. But what happens when our story ideas veer toward experiences and worlds beyond our own? When can research fill in for lived experience? And what is our responsibility to “get it right?” What are some things we can do if we get it wrong? When is the story not ours to tell?

Patricia Smith is the author of the novel The Year of Needy Girls. Her nonfiction has appeared in Salon, Broad Street, Prime Number, and various anthologies including Older Queer Voices. She teaches writing and American Literature at the Appomattox Regional Governor's School in Petersburg, Virginia.


Twitter Username: pattysmith711

Website: patricia_smith.com

Virginia Pye is author of two critically acclaimed novels, Dreams of the Red Phoenix and RIver of Dust, an Indie Next Pick and Finalist for Virginia Literary Award. Her award winning short stories and essays are in New York Times, Literary Hub, The Rumpus, Huffington Post, and numerous literary journals.


Twitter Username: VirginiaPye

Website: http://www.virginiapye.com

Dolen Perkins-Valdez is the author of The New York Times bestselling novel Wench. Her second novel Balm was published May 2015. Her stories have appeared in The Kenyon Review and elsewhere. She teaches in the American University MFA program.


Twitter Username: Dolen

Website: www.DolenPerkinsValdez.com

Lamar Giles writes novels and short stories for teens and adults. He is the author of the 2015 Edgar Award Nominee Fake ID, the 2016 Edgar Award Nominee Endangered, and Overturned from Scholastic Press. He is a founding member of We Need Diverse Books.


Twitter Username: LRGiles

Julie Wu's debut novel, The Third Son, was listed as one of ten riveting reads by O, The Oprah Magazine. Her honors include a Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellowship, honorable mention in the Lorain Hemingway Short Story Contest, and a short-listing in the Faulkner-Wisdom Creative Writing Competition.


Twitter Username: Juliewuauthor

Website: www.juliewuauthor.com

Meeting Room 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F210. The Enhanced Memoir: When It Happened to Me Isn't Enough. (, , , ) This panel will look at the rise of the enhanced or hybrid memoir, the writer who merges a personal narrative with social commentary, cultural criticism, or reportage. As more writers arrive at the the memoir after working in other forms, the genre has become less defined by traditional narrative, and more marked by the writer’s willingness to borrow from the novelist’s, essayist’s, or journalist’s toolbox. The panel will focus on the form's rewards, challenges, and shifting boundaries.

Kim Brooks is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and a recipient of a Michener-Copernicus fellowship and a Posen Foundation fellowship. She is the author of The Houseguest, and her memoir, Small Animals: A Memoir of Parenthood and Fear, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: KA_Brooks

Website: www.kabrooks.com

Lucas Mann is the author of Lord Fear: A Memoir and Class A: Baseball in the Middle of Everywhere. His essays have appeared in Guernica, TriQuarterly, Slate, BuzzFeed, and The Kenyon Review. He earned his MFA from the University of Iowa and teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.


Twitter Username: lucaswmann

Website: lucasmann.com

Deanna Fei is the author of the award-winning books Girl in Glass, a memoir, and A Thread of Sky, a novel. Her essays have appeared in The New York Times, Time, and Slate. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Fei has received a Fulbright Grant and a New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship.


Twitter Username: deannafei

Website: http://www.deannafei.com

Kiki Petrosino is an associate professor of English at the University of Louisville, where she directs the creative writing program. She has authored three books of poetry: Witch Wife, Fort Red Border, and Hymn for the Black Terrific. She is coeditor of Transom, an online poetry journal.


Twitter Username: kikipetrosino

Website: http://www.transomjournal.com

Meeting Room 9 & 10, Marriott Waterside, Third Floor

F211. Crowdfunding for Publishing Projects, Sponsored by CLMP. (, , , ) Lit mag and small press publishers have been successfully raising funds for projects using crowdsourcing tools such as Indiegogo and Kickstarter. Learn what makes a successful crowdfunded project, from what kinds of project work best to the best kinds of perks to attract backers.

Carey Salerno is the Executive Editor of Alice James Books. She is the editor, along with Anne Marie Macari, of the anthology Lit from Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James Books. Her first book is Shelter. You may find her poems in print and online.

Elaina Ellis is the author of Write About An Empty Birdcage, a poetry collection. She works as an editor at Copper Canyon Press.

D.M. Hedlund published her first novel at eighteen, using the experience to found Tethered by Letters (TBL), the international literary nonprofit in 2007. Currently, she is the CEO of TBL and the editor in chief of the literary and art collection, F(r)iction Series.


Twitter Username: DMHedlund

Website: tetheredbyletters.com

Margot Atwell works with publishers and authors at Kickstarter as the director of publishing. She is also the publisher of Gutpunch Press. She is the author of Derby Life: A Crash Course in the Incredible Sport of Roller Derby and coauthor of The Insider’s Guide to Book Publishing Success.


Twitter Username: MargotAtwell

Website: www.margotatwell.com

Ballroom A, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F212. Dazzling Jimi: A Tribute to Patricia Smith. (, , , , ) Patricia Smith, Guggenheim Fellow and winner of the Lenore Marshall Prize, has made American poetry swagger with righteous funk for over three decades. Her poems close imagined gaps between “page” and “stage,” making her the great Black formalist of our time. In this tribute to her teaching and literary citizenship, emerging poets of color taught by Smith will read work inspired by and from her catalogue. We offer testimonies on her good name and conclude with a brief reading by Smith herself.

Danez Smith is the author of Don't Call Us Dead and [insert] boy, winner of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and the Lamda Literary Award. They are a Ruth Lilly/Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellow. a two-time World Poetry Slam finalist, a member of the Dark Noise Collective, and a 2017 NEA poetry fellow.


Twitter Username: danez_smif

Fatimah Asghar is a nationally touring poet, photographer, and performer. She has received fellowships and residencies from Fulbright, Millay, the University of Michigan, and Kundiman. Her work has appeared in many journals. Her chapbook After is a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book Award.


Twitter Username: asgharthegrouch

Website: www.fatimahasghar.com

Paul Tran is a Pushcart Prize-nominated poet and historian. They received fellowships from Kundiman, VONA, Poets House, Lambda Literary, Napa Valley, Home School Miami, and the Vermont Studio Center. In 2015, they placed Top 10 at both the National Poetry Slam and Individual World Poetry Slam.


Twitter Username: speakdeadly

Patricia Smith's books are Incendiary Art, Gotta Go, Gotta Flow, Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah (2013 Lenore Marshall), and Blood Dazzler (2008 National Book Award finalist). A 2014 Guggenheim fellow and two-time Pushcart winner, she is a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada's MFA program.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

Angel Nafis is the author of BlackGirl Mansion. With poet Morgan Parker, she is The Other Black Girl Collective, an internationally touring Black Feminist poetry duo. Nafis was a recipient of the 2016 Ruth Lilly & Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation and a 2017 NEA.


Twitter Username: angelnafis

Website: http://angelnafis.tumblr.com/

Ballroom B, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F213. Hell's Bells: A Talk on Tone by Mary Ruefle, Sponsored by The Poetry Foundation. () Mary Ruefle is the author of numerous volumes from Wave Books, including My Private Property (2016), Trances of the Blast (2013), Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures (2012), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism, and Selected Poems (2010), which was the winner of the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. Ruefle is the recipient of many honors, including the Robert Creeley Award, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and a Whiting Award. She lives in Bennington, Vermont.

Mary Ruefle is the author of eleven books of poetry, including Trances of the Blast and Indeed I Was Pleased with the World. Her book Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award and her Selected Poems won the 2011 William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. She is also an erasure artist, whose treatments of 19th-century texts have been exhibited in museums and galleries and published in her book A Little White Shadow. She teaches in the MFA program at Vermont College.

Ballroom C, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F214. Writing Place, People, and Culture: Nonfiction at its Finest, Sponsored by Grove Atlantic Press and Rain Taxi Review of Books. (, , , ) Join award-winning and critically-acclaimed writers Bob Shacochis (Kingdoms In The Air) Kao Kalia Yang (The Song Poet), and Molly Brodak (Bandit: A Daughter's Memior) as they discuss crafting nonfiction narratives across myriad forms. From journalism to memoir to travel writing, all three authors explore the challenges of mining one’s past and present, and the joys and difficulties of bringing place, culture, and people to vibrant life on the page. Moderated by Eric Lorberer, editor of Rain Taxi Review of Books.

Eric Lorberer, editor of Rain Taxi Review of Books, has published poems, essays, and criticism in numerous magazines and has been awarded a SASE/Jerome Fellowship for his writing. He directs the Rain Taxi Reading Series and Twin Cities Book Festival.

Molly Brodak is the author of Bandit: A Daughter's Memoir, and the poetry collection A Little Middle of the Night, along with three chapbooks of poetry.


Twitter Username: mollybrodak

Bob Shacochis’s first collection of stories, Easy in the Islands, won the National Book Award for First Fiction, and his second collection, The Next New World, was awarded the Prix de Rome from the Academy of Arts and Letters. His novel, Swimming in the Volcano, was a finalist for the National Book Award, and The Woman Who Lost Her Soul was a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. He is a contributing editor for Outside, and his op-eds on the US military, Haiti, and Florida politics have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal.

Kao Kalia Yang is the author of award-winning books, The Latehomecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir and The Song Poet: A Memoir of My Father. Yang is a graduate of Carleton College and Columbia University's MFA Program in creative nonfiction writing.


Twitter Username: kaokaliayang

Website: www.kaokaliayang.com

Ballroom D, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F215. Open Pedagogies: Teaching Poetry Through Art Inside and Outside of the Workshop. (, , , , ) Poets often find themselves bringing poetry to students in a variety of settings. Nevertheless, poetry workshops are often taught the same way in all of these spaces—through the singular lens of poetry itself. While this approach can be productive in some classrooms, it has limitations. In this panel, we will provide practical suggestions for integrating art and poetry and will explore the immense creative output that happens when we open our teaching towards the influence of other art forms.

Dorothea Lasky is the author of five books of poetry, including the forthcoming Milk and most recently Rome. She is an assistant professor of poetry and codirector of Columbia Artist/Teachers at Columbia University's School of the Arts.


Twitter Username: dorothealasky

Timothy Donnelly’s most recent book is The Cloud Corporation, winner of the 2012 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. A Guggenheim Fellow, he is a poetry editor for Boston Review and chair of Columbia University's writing program.

Emily Skillings is the author of two chapbooks, Backchannel and Linnaeus: The 26 Sexual Practices of Plants. Her first full-length collection of poetry, Fort Not, will be published in 2017. She is an MFA candidate at Columbia University and a member of the Belladonna* Collaborative.


Twitter Username: emily_skillings

Myung Mi Kim is the author of numerous books of poems, including Penury, Commons, Dura, and Under Flag. Kim is James H. McNulty Chair of English and Director of the Poetics Program at The University at Buffalo, State University of New York.

Wendy Xu is the author of Phrasis, You Are Not Dead, and the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation. Her work has appeared widely in journals such as Poetry, Boston Review, Best American Poetry, and elsewhere. She is poetry editor for Hyperallergic.


Twitter Username: wendyx

Website: http://extrahumanarchitecture.tumblr.com

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floor

F216. Butler University MFA’s 10th Anniversary Reading. (Kaveh Akbar, Doug Manuel, Andrea Boucher) It’s the 10th Anniversary of that scrappy, don’t-count-us-out Butler University MFA program, and we are proud to celebrate our survival—and flourishing—with a reading that features three of our most successful alumni: Kaveh Akbar (Calling A Wolf a Wolf, Alice James Books 2017), Doug Manuel (Testify, Red Hen Press 2017), and Andrea Boucher (Redivider Beacon Street Prize in Nonfiction 2017).

Virginia Barber Middleton Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floo

F217. Collaborative Play: Prose Poetry as Creative Research. (, , , , ) This panel will reflect on an international project in which writers based in the UK, Australia, and Singapore wrote and shared prose poems in the spirit of experimental play. An email exchange, initiated by three poets, eventually involved twenty-four poets from nine universities, generating over 2,500 poems in two years. The discoveries, in terms of personal and collaborative practice, the value of creative play, and the capabilities of the form itself, have been significant, with a wide range of outputs.

Paul Munden is postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Canberra, and program manager for the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI). He is director of the UK's National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE). His recent collections include The Bulmer Murder and Fugue.


Twitter Username: Paul_Munden

Jen Webb is director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research at the University of Canberra, Australia. A poet and cultural theorist, Jen publishes widely on creative writing, creative research, and the relationship between art and society; and both publishes and exhibits her poetry.


Twitter Username: JenWebb19

Paul Hetherington is professor of writing at the University of Canberra, head of the International Poetry Studies Institute (IPSI) there and a founding editor of the international journal Axon: Creative Explorations. An award-winning poet, his eleventh poetry collection is Gallery of Antique Art.

Cassandra Atherton is a writer, academician, and critic. A Harvard Visiting Scholar in English, she is the recipient of several grants and has judged major poetry awards. She is the poetry editor of Westerly magazine and her most recent books of prose poetry are Trace and Exhumed.

Andrew Melrose is professor of children’s writing at the University of Winchester, UK. He has over 150 film, fiction, nonfiction, research, songs, poems, and other writing credits, including thirty-three scholarly or creative books. He is currently working on The Boat http://theimmigration-boat-story.com

Room 1, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F218. Be Brave: Writing YA Literature in an Angry World. (, , ) Young Adult audiences recognize they live in a world of obstacles created by angry and polarized groups within communities and schools and exacerbated by political and cultural strife. Many stories seek to help readers reflect upon differences and to resolve disputes or to seek positive change. Panelists will review a variety of novels and nonfiction they've written and taught and to explore discussion methods that overcome polarity and anger and that encourage understanding across divisions.

Sarah Aronson is the founder and organizer of the Writing Novels for Young People retreat at VCFA. She holds an MFA from VCFA and leads workshops for writers.com and The Highlights Foundation. Her newest book for young readers is The Wish List 1, The Worst Fairy Godmother Ever!


Twitter Username: sarah_aronson

Website: www.saraharonson.com

Heather Lee Schroeder is a poet, fiction writer, essayist, and English Department faculty member at Pelllissippi State Community College. Her writing focuses on environmental concerns, motherhood, and the effects of violence on the human psyche. Her work has appeared in numerous journals.


Twitter Username: hl_schroeder

Room 3 & 4, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F219. Advice to Nonprofit Organizations Seeking Funding from the NEA. (, , , ) Staff members from the Literature Division of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) will address your questions and provide a status update on a range of topics, including grant opportunities, eligibility, the review process, tips for an effective proposal, and the field of literature. Both publishers and presenters are welcome.

Jessica Flynn is a literature specialist at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Amy Stolls is the Director of Literature at the National Endowment for the Arts.


Twitter Username: amystolls

Katy Day is the assistant grants management specialist in literature at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Mohamed Sheriff is a literature specialist at the National Endowment for the Arts.

Room 5 & 6, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F220. The (Art) World Is Everywhere Whispering Essays. (, , , , ) Alexander Smith once wrote, “The world is everywhere whispering essays,” and that got us thinking—what does that mean in the art world? What, for instance, might sculpture teach us about shaping an essay? How might theater help us write more convincing nonfiction scenes? What can essayists learn from stand-up comedy or hip hop? What about radio production or rock 'n' roll? Join us as we explore what a close study of other art forms can teach us about crafting the personal essay.

Joey Franklin is the author of My Wife Wants You to Know I'm Happily Married, and his essays have recently appeared in Fourth Genre, Ninth Letter, and The Norton Reader: An Anthology of Nonfiction. He is an assistant professor of creative writing at Brigham Young University.


Twitter Username: joey_franklin

Website: http://joeyfranklin.com

Elena Passarello is the author of the essay collections Animals Strike Curious Poses and Let Me Clear My Throat. A recipient of a 2015 Whiting Award, she coedits the In Place book series for West Virginia University Press and teaches in the MFA program at Oregon State University.


Twitter Username: elenavox

Website: www.elenapassarello.com

Shawn Wen is a writer, radio producer, and multimedia artist. Her book, A Twenty Minute Silence Followed by Applause, came out with Sarabande in 2017. Her writing has also appeared in n+1, Iowa Review, White Review, and The Lifted Brow. She is currently a producer at Youth Radio.


Twitter Username: shawn_wen

Jericho Parms is the author of Lost Wax. Her essays have appeared in Fourth Genre, The Normal School, Hotel Amerika, Brevity, and elsewhere. She is the associate director of the MFA in writing program at Vermont College of Fine Arts and teaches at Champlain College. www.jerichoparms.com

Joe Bonomo’s books include Field Recordings from the Inside, Conversations with Greil Marcus, and Jerry Lee Lewis: Lost and Found. A five-time "Notable Essays" selection at Best American Essays, he teaches at Northern Illinois University and appears online at No Such Thing As Was.


Twitter Username: BonomoJoe

Website: http://www.nosuchthingaswas.com

Room 7, 8, & 9, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F221. The Art of Politics, The Politics of Art: Writers, Gun Violence, and the Literature of Social Engagement. (, , , , ) Contributors and respondents for Bullets Into Bells: Poets and Citizens Respond to Gun Violence in the U.S. will not only discuss how and why they wrote their poems and responses for the anthology but will also talk about their fiction, nonfiction, screenplays, and poetry confronting this issue. Increasingly, writers are making the causes and consequences of gun violence central to their work. This panel will explore the complicated marriage of politics and craft, medium and message.

LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) writes novels, plays, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Her memoir, Choctalking on Other Realities won the inaugural 2014 MLA Prize for Studies in Native American Literature. Other awards include the 2012 United States Artist Ford Fellowship, and an American Book Award for Shell Shaker.


Twitter Username: LeAnneHowe

Website: http://mikokings.wordpress.com/

Sharbari Ahmed is the author of The Ocean of Mrs Nagai: Stories. Her fiction has appeared in The Gettysburg Review, Caravan, The Asian Pacific American Journal, and Wasafiri, among others. She wrote for the ABC show Quantico, season one. She teaches in the MFA program at Manhattanville College.


Twitter Username: sharbarizohra

Richard Blanco is the youngest, first Latino, and first openly gay person to serve as the Presidential Inaugural Poet. Author of two memoirs and three poetry books, his honors include awards from the University of Pittsburgh, PEN, the Paterson Prize, Lambda Literary, and Education Ambassador for the Academy of American Poets.

Dean Rader's recent books include Self-Portrait as Wikipedia Entry; Suture (sonnets written with Simone Muench); and Bullets Into Bells: Poets and Citizens Respond to Gun Violence in the U.S. (with Brian Clements and Alexandra Teague). He is a professor at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: deanrader

Website: http://deanrader.com

Brenda Hillman is the author of ten collections of poetry, including Practical Water, Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire, and Extra Hidden Life, Among the Days, and has cotranslated At Your Feet by Ana Cristina Cesar. Hillman is the Filippi Professor of Poetry at St. Mary’s College of California.


Twitter Username: brendalhillman

Website: brendahillman.net

Room 11, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F222. Go Home! Asian American Writers Imagine Home Beyond a Place. (, , , , ) For many immigrant writers, home is more and less than a place. Home might be found in a language that one is losing one’s grasp of. Home might have been lost in the aftermath of war. Home might be an impossibility. The writers on this panel, all contributors to the new anthology Go Home!, discuss how they navigate ideas of home in their writing. How can fiction, nonfiction, and poetry approach home? What does it mean to write for people with different ideas of home?

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan is the editor of the Go Home! anthology. She is the author of the novel Harmless Like You, which was a New York Times Editors' Choice.


Twitter Username: rowanhlb

Gina Apostol's last novel, Gun Dealers' Daughter, won the 2013 PEN/Open Book Award. Her first two novels, Bibliolepsy and The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata, both won the Juan Laya Prize (Philippine National Book Award). Her next novel, The Unintended, is forthcoming from Soho Press in 2018.


Twitter Username: GinaApostol

Website: ginaapostol.com

Karissa Chen has published fiction and essays in numerous publications including Gulf Coast, PEN America, and Guernica. She was awarded a Fulbright research grant to Taiwan, and she is a Kundiman and VONA/Voices Fellow. She is currently the editor in chief at Hyphen magazine.


Twitter Username: karissachen

Rajiv Mohabir, Winner of the 2015 Kundiman Prize at Tupelo Press (The Cowherd's Son), the Four Way Books Intro Prize 2014 (The Taxidermist's Cut), and the AWP Intro Journal Award 2015 is an assistant professor of poetry at Auburn University's creative writing program.


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Esmé Weijun Wang is the author of the novel The Border of Paradise, and was chosen by Granta as a Best of Young American Novelists in 2017. She received the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize in 2016, and has written essays for publications including The Believer, The New Inquiry, and Salon.


Twitter Username: esmewang

Website: http://www.esmewang.com/

Room 12, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F223. Taking up the Quill: Queer Representation Through Writing, Awards, and Publication. (, , , , David Brendan Hopes) Though labels of identity can be alienating, they can also be empowering and community building. We discover identities within ourselves through the recognition of communities in visual and print media. This was the inspiration to launch Quill, a new queer imprint of Red Hen Press, which publishes queer literary prose through award submissions. Hear Quill’s editor, judges, and award winners read their powerful works and discuss the need for representation through publication.

Tobi Harper is the founder and editor of the queer publishing series, Quill, and serves as director of operations at Red Hen Press. Tobi has completed a BA in English with a minor in LGBTQ studies at UC Santa Barbara, and a MA in English literature at San Francisco State University.


Twitter Username: theharper

Celeste Gainey is the author of the poetry collection, The GAFFER, and the chapbook, In the Land of Speculation & Seismography. The first woman admitted to the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees as a gaffer, she has spent many years working with light in film and architecture.


Twitter Username: thegaffer2015

Website: www.celestegainey.com

Ryka Aoki is the author of the performance, prose, and poetry collection, Seasonal Velocities, a Lambda Literary Award Finalist; the novel, He Mele a Hilo: A Hilo Song; and the poetry book, Why Dust Shall Never Settle Upon This Soul. She is a professor at Santa Monica College and Antioch University.


Twitter Username: ryka_aoki

Website: www.rykaryka.com

Martha K. Davis is the 2016 winner of the Quill Queer Prose Award for her novel, Scissors, Paper, Stone. The recipient of an MFA from Columbia University, she has published short fiction and essays in River Styx, StoryQuarterly, The Gay & Lesbian Review, CALYX, and elsewhere.

Room 13, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F224. "The Dividing Line": Blending Research In Personal Narratives. (, , , Allison Coffelt) This panel will gather together creative nonfiction writers who mix various types of research into their personal narratives. Inherent in their creative process is a burgeoning integration of both the shared and the personal. The panel’s discussion will focus on the way each writer approaches this “dividing line,” the space between the material that comes forward through extensive research and the material pulled from the writer’s unaided memory.

Jon Pineda is the author of the forthcoming novel Let's No One Get Hurt. His recent poetry collection Little Anodynes received the 2016 Library of Virginia Literary Award, and his memoir Sleep in Me was a 2010 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection.


Twitter Username: scrimshawcinema

Website: http://www.jonpineda.com

Joni Tevis is the author of two books of essays, most recently The World Is on Fire. Her essays have appeared in Orion, Oxford American, Poets & Writers, the Pushcart Prize anthology, and elsewhere. She teaches at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina.


Twitter Username: JoniTevis

Website: www.jonitevis.com

Colin Rafferty is the author of Hallow This Ground, a collection of essays on memorials, published by Break Away Books/Indiana University Press. He teaches nonfiction writing at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia.


Twitter Username: colintrafferty

Room 14, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F225. Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! The Unconventional Writing Career, Sponsored by WITS. (, , , , ) While the tenure-track teaching job is often the dream of creative writers, the academic market has become increasingly competitive, calling for much more than an MFA or a PhD. Here are exciting careers you can build outside of the ivory tower, where your mastery of language and critical thinking skills can make a real difference in communities. From the creative to the nonprofit sectors, listen in as our panelists share how you can craft a meaningful living.

Michele Kotler is the founding director of the Community Word Project, an arts in education organization based in New York City. She received her BA from Sarah Lawrence College and her MFA in creative writing, poetry from the University of Michigan.

Martin Rock is associate director of communications at the Exploratorium and the author of Residuum (2015 CSU First Book Prize). With Kevin Prufer and Martha Collins he coedited the Unsung Masters volume Catherine Breese Davis: On the Life and Work of an American Master. martinrockpoetry.com.


Twitter Username: martinerikrock

Website: martinrockpoetry.com

Abby Travis is an editor at Milkweed Editions and she was editorial assistant at Ploughshares. She has held positions across the literary arts, social sector, and higher education. She received an MFA from Emerson College, and her writing has been recognized as notable by Best American Essays.


Twitter Username: abbyltrav

Thomas Calder earned his MFA in creative writing from the University of Houston. He writes for a weekly publication, Mountain Xpress. He also leads weekend tours through the Old Kentucky Home, the former boardinghouse and childhood home of writer, Thomas Wolfe.

Giuseppe Taurino is the associate director of the creative Writing program at the University of Houston, and a contributing editor at American Short Fiction. His stories have appeared in B O D Y, Bridge Eight, Epoch, Green Mountains Review, New South, The Potomac Review, Word Riot and elsewhere.

Room 15, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F226. Stitching Quilts: The Carolina African American Writers' Collective as the American Story. (, , , ) African American quilting is as old as the history of the nation, yet, like African American people, it is often brushed aside. The quilt serves as vibrant revealer of stories in textile and thread and serves as a metaphor for the work of African American writers, stitching image and time. Our work is essential to the American story, in its thread, color, and fabric. In this session, writers defy the erasure of blackness and black excellence, through sharing poems, essays, and quilt images.

Lauri Ramey is founding director of the Center for Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, professor of English and creative writing, and faculty adviser of Statement: A Journal of Literature and Art at California State University, Los Angeles.

Dr. Lila Teresa Church has been a member of the Carolina African American Writers' Collective since 1995. She serves as archivist and membership chairperson for the organization.

DéLana R.A. Dameron is the author of Weary Kingdom and How God Ends Us. She is an arts and culture administrator in New York City.


Twitter Username: delana_writes

Lenard D. Moore is associate professor of English at the University of Mount Olive. His literary works have appeared in more than 400 publications, including Callaloo, North American Review, and Prairie Schooner. He is author of A Temple Looming, among other books. He is founder of Carolina African American Writers' Collective.

Room 16, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F227. Four Way Books 25th Anniversary Reading. (, , , , ) Celebrating our 25th anniversary in 2018, Four Way Books presents five writers from around the country reading from recent work. Since its founding, Four Way Books has been revered for its commitment to showcasing a wide range of poetry and short fiction by debut and established writers. From the elegant lyric to the disruptive narrative, in gritty portrayals of the interior to near-apocalyptic visions, this celebratory reading offers new writing across genres and aesthetic divides.

Kevin McIlvoy teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Warren Wilson College. He is a retired Regents Professor of the Department of English, New Mexico State University. He has served on the Board of Directors of AWP and CLMP.

Aaron Coleman is the author of Threat Come Close and St. Trigger, a chapbook that won the 2015 Button Poetry Prize. A Fulbright Scholar, Cave Canem fellow, and ALTA's 2017 Jansen Memorial Fellow, Aaron is currently a PhD student in comparative literature at Washington University in St. Louis.

Kamilah Aisha Moon is the author of She Has a Name and Starshine & Clay. A Pushcart Prize winner, Moon was also selected as a PSA New American Poet. Widely published in journals and anthologies, Moon holds an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and teaches at Agnes Scott College.


Twitter Username: kamoonshine

Website: http://www.kamilahaishamoon.org

Kevin Prufer is the author most recently of How He Loved Them, Churches, In a Beautiful Country, and National Anthem. He is codirector of the Unsung Masters Series, and professor at the University of Houston's creative writing program and the Lesley University low-residency MFA program.

Valerie Wallace is the author of House of McQueen, chosen by Vievee Frances for the Four Way Books Intro Prize, and the chapbook The Dictators' Guide to Good Housekeeping. She has received an Illinois Arts Council Literary Award and her work was selected by Margaret Atwood for the Atty Award.


Twitter Username: valeriemartt

Website: http://valeriewallace.net

Room 17, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F228. Above, Beyond, and After Duty: Teaching Creative Writing to Veterans. (, , , , ) Working artists across multiple genres discuss the challenges and rewards of teaching writing to veterans and active duty service members. In our panel discussion, we will cover institutional and individual approaches to pedagogy, why this work is worth doing, and how to do this emotionally exhausting and occasionally triggering work sustainably in university and community settings. Panelists will also discuss how their own writing has been influenced by working with this unique population.

Steve Kistulentz is the author of Panorama, a novel and two books of poems, Little Black Daydream and The Luckless Age. He is the founding director of the graduate program in creative writing at Saint Leo University.


Twitter Username: kistulentz

Website: www.kistulentz.com

Jesse Goolsby is the author of the novel I'd Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them. A recipient of the Florida Book Award and the Richard Bausch Fiction Prize, his recent work appears in Epoch, The Literary Review, Pleiades, and Blackbird. He is the acquisitions editor at War, Literature & the Arts.


Twitter Username: jessegoolsby

Website: www.jessegoolsby.com

Seema Reza is the author of When the World Breaks Open, a memoir in essays and poetry and coordinates and facilitates a unique multi-hospital military arts program in Washington, DC. She is a VONA alumnus and serves as a council member-at-large for the Transformative Language Arts Network.


Twitter Username: seemareza

Lovella Calica is a writer and photographer. She is the founding director of Warrior Writers, a creative community for veterans articulating their experiences, and has worked with veterans for ten years. An editor of four anthologies of veterans’ writing, she has self-published two chapbooks of poetry.

Matt Young is the author of Eat the Apple, a multi-genre flash memoir about his enlistment in the Marine Corps. His recent work can be found in Consequence, Split Lip, Word Riot, and others. He is an instructor at Centralia College in Washington and an editorial assistant for Under the Gum Tree.


Twitter Username: young_em_see

Room 18 & 19, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F229. Unacknowledged Legislators: Poetry in the Age of Alternative Facts. (, , , ) What counts as political poetry? Which characteristics constitute a successful political poem? Can invocations of myth, landscape descriptions, and dramatic personae affect social, cultural, and political change? Join us for a lively consideration of these and other topics including literary representations of otherness, the political implications of prosodic techniques, and writing beyond the limitations of satire, polemics, and prophecy.

Brian Brodeur is author of the poetry books Natural Causes and Other Latitudes, and the chapbooks Local Fauna and So the Night Cannot Go on Without Us. New work appears in American Poetry Review, Pleiades, and The Writer's Chronicle. He is assistant professor of English at Indiana University East.

Dorianne Laux’s fifth collection, The Book of Men won The Paterson Prize. Her fourth book, Facts about the Moon, won The Oregon Book Award. She teaches for the Program in Creative Writing at North Carolina State University and is founding faculty of Pacific University's Low-Residency MFA Program.


Twitter Username: doriannelaux

Website: http://doriannelaux.net

David Mason’s poetry books include The Buried Houses, The Country I Remember, Arrivals, Sea Salt, and the verse novel, Ludlow, which was featured on the PBS News Hour. He has written three collections of essays, a memoir, a children's book, and several opera libretti. He is former Colorado laureate.

Nicole Terez Dutton teaches creative writing at a Emerson College and in the Solstice MFA program. She is a senior editor at Transition magazine and the poetry editor at The Baffler.


Twitter Username: afrogalactica

Room 20 & 21, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F230. Persea Books: Poetry of Protest. (, , , , ) The American cultural landscape has shifted radically in the wake of the 2016 presidential campaign, with the rights and dignity of so many groups of people under attack. In such times, poetry is more important than ever in its capacity to both resist and connect memorably, potently, and portably. Join Persea poets as they discuss crafting political poems and read from their newest work.

Randall Mann is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Proprietary. He lives in San Francisco.


Twitter Username: randallmannpoet

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart and Apocalyptic Swing. Her third book of poems is Rocket Fantastic. She is an editor at large at Los Angeles Review of Books and a cocurator at Voluble. She is a queer lesbian living in North Carolina.


Twitter Username: rocketfantastic

Molly McCully Brown is the author of The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded, which won the 2016 Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize. She is the 2017–2018 Jeff Baskin Writers fellow at the Oxford American magazine.


Twitter Username: mmccullybrown

Website: http://mollymccullybrown.com

Mitchell L. H. Douglas is the author of \blak\ \al-fe bet\, winner of the Lexi Rudnitsky/Editor's Choice Award, and Cooling Board: A Long-Playing Poem, an NAACP Image Award nominee. An Affrilachian Poets founder and Cave Canem graduate, he is an Associate Professor of English at IUPUI.


Twitter Username: MLHDouglas

Website: mitchelldouglaspoetry.com

Heather Derr-Smith is the author of four books of poetry, Each End of the World, The Bride Minaret, Tongue Screw, and Thrust.


Twitter Username: Hderrsmith

Website: http://heatherderrsmith.com/

Room 22, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F231. How Short Story Collections Are Born: Demystifying the Process of Publishing Your Debut Collection. (, , , , ) From big houses to small presses, from contests to agented submissions, short story writers have several options for publishing first collections. The implications of these choices, however, are seldom clear until the process is complete. This panel will discuss the different paths by which four authors published debut collections, as well as the lessons they learned about editing, publishing, and promoting their books along the way.

Marian Crotty is the author of the story collection, What Counts as Love, winner of the John Simmons Award. She is an assistant professor at Loyola University Maryland and an assistant editor at The Common.


Twitter Username: mgcrotty

David James Poissant is the author of The Heaven of Animals, winner of the GLCA New Writers Award, and a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize and the PEN/Bingham Prize. His work has appeared in The Atlantic and The New York Times. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida.


Twitter Username: djpoissant

Website: www.davidjamespoissant.com

Manuel Gonzales is the author of the collection, The Miniature Wife and Other Stories, and the forthcoming novel, The Regional Office is Under Attack!. He teaches creative writing at the University of Kentucky in Lexington and at the low-residency MFA program at IAIA.


Twitter Username: hrniles

Rion Amilcar Scott's story collection, Insurrections, won the 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. He earned an MFA from George Mason University, and he teaches English at Bowie State University.


Twitter Username: reeamilcarscott

Amina Gautier is the author of three short-story collections: The Loss of All Lost Things, which won the Elixir Press Award; Now We Will Be Happy, which won the Prairie Schooner Book Prize; and At-Risk, which won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: DrAminaGautier

Website: https://aminagautier.wordpress.com/

Room 23, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F232. More and Different: Literary Nonfiction and the University Press. (, , , ) Series editors from four new book series from university presses will explore the expanding publishing world of literary nonfiction. All launched within the previous three years, their series—Crux, In Place, Machete, and 21st Century Essays—signal a growing audience for and interest in the genre. Panelists will discuss why they started their series, what role they see the series—and university presses—serving in the wider publishing industry, and what they’re looking for in new manuscripts.

Jeremy B. Jones is the author of the memoir Bearwallow. His essays appear in Oxford American, The Iowa Review, Brevity, and elsewhere. He is an associate professor of English at Western Carolina University, and is the series coeditor of In Place, a book series from WVU Press.


Twitter Username: thejeremybjones

Website: thejeremybjones.com

David Lazar's books include I'll Be Your Mirror: Essays and Aphorisms, Occasional Desire: Essays, Who's Afraid of Helen of Troy, and After Montaigne. Seven "Notable Essays of the Year" have been listed in Best American Essays. He is the founding editor of Hotel Amerika, a professor at Columbia College Chicago, and a Guggenheim fellow.


Twitter Username: DavidEssays

Website: lazar.org

Kristen Elias Rowley is editor in chief at The Ohio State University Press where she acquires literary trade, American Studies, and critical race and ethnic studies. She has worked as an editor since 2006, acquiring memoir, nonfiction, fiction, translations, American Studies, and cultural criticism.


Twitter Username: KEliasRowley

Room 24, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F233. Mindfulness in the Writing Workshop. (, , , ) Mindfulness is a term derived from Buddhist teaching that means being aware of and nonjudgmental about what you’re experiencing at any moment. Cultivated by meditation, it is an ethical practice: taking responsibility for your mind’s activity for the benefit of others and yourself. It's also a potential antidote to how weird workshops can be. Via discussion and a brief meditation, panelists and audience will explore how mindfulness may foster community and artistic expression in a workshop.

Matthew Sharpe is the author of the novels You Were Wrong, Jamestown, The Sleeping Father, and Nothing Is Terrible. He has had fellowships from the NEA and NYFA, and has taught graduate and undergrad writing at Columbia, Wesleyan, and Bard. He has been meditating for six years, not continuously.

Marie Myung-Ok Lee is the author of the novel Somebody's Daughter and one forthcoming. Fiction has appeared the Kenyon Review, FiveChapters, TriQuarterly, Witness, Joyland, and Guernica. Nonfiction has appeared in The Atlantic, The Paris Review, and The New York Times. She teaches creative writing at Columbia.


Twitter Username: MarieMyungOkLee

Website: https://www.facebook.com/MarieLeeWriter

Robin Coste Lewis is the author of Voyage of the Sable Venus. She is writer in residence at the University of Southern California and the poet laureate of the City of Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: thesablevenus

Marie Mutsuki Mockett's memoir, Where the Dead Pause and the Japanese Say Goodbye, examines grief against the backdrop of the 2011 Great East Earthquake in Japan. It was a finalist for the 2016 PEN Open Book Award, 2016 Indies Choice Best Book of Nonfiction, and 2016 Northern California Book Award.


Twitter Username: mariemockett

Website: www.mariemockett.com

Room 25, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F234. 2017/2018 Writers’ Conferences & Centers (WC&C) Meeting. An opportunity for members of Writers’ Conferences & Centers to meet one another, and the staff of AWP to discuss issues pertinent to building a strong community of WC&C programs

3:00 pm to 4:15 pm

Grand Salon A, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F235. Stealing from STEM: Applying Pedagogies from Other Disciplines in the Creative Writing Classroom. (, , , ) Sometimes, we imagine the creative writing classroom as its own special world, with its own organizing methodologies that isolate it from other fields. However, teaching practices borrowed and adapted from STEM fields can reinvigorate creative writing courses, providing new insights for students and instructors alike. From the application of technology and the scientific method to crafting formal poster presentations, this panel will detail ways to use STEM-based strategies in the classroom.

Callista Buchen is an assistant professor at Franklin College. She is the author of The Bloody Planet and Double-Mouthed, and the winner of DIAGRAM's essay prize.


Twitter Username: CallistaBuchen

Website: callistabuchen.com

DaMaris B. Hill serves as an assistant professor of creative writing and African American studies at the University of Kentucky. She teaches creative writing in digital spaces.


Twitter Username: damarishill

Website: https://english.as.uky.edu/users/dbhi222

Jeremy Schraffenberger is editor of North American Review and an associate professor at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author of Saint Joe's Passion and The Waxen Poor. His other work has appeared in Best Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, Prairie Schooner, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jdschraff

Website: jdschraffenberger.wordpress.com

Trent Hergenrader is an assistant professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. His short stories have appeared in Fantasy & Science Fiction, Realms of Fantasy, Best Horror of the Year, and elsewhere. His academic work focuses on digital pedagogy, creative writing pedagogy, and game studies.


Twitter Username: thergenrade

Website: http://www.trenthergenrader.com

Grand Salon B, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F236. Write What You Want to Know: Fiction Writers on Research. (, , , Walter B. Thompson, Lillian Li) Whether your project is inspired by the real world or an imagined one, research can play an essential role in writing fiction. How do we use facts without allowing them to derail our narratives? How do we take advantage of resources outside of our comfort zones? From conducting academic research to personal interviews, mining family histories to the depths of the Internet, five writers discuss tactics for exploring the interplay between research and imagination.

Lucy Tan is the author of the novel What We Were Promised. She is a Kundiman fellow, a UW-Madison MFA graduate, and winner of the 2015 Ploughshares Emerging Writer's Contest.

Joseph Cassara is the author of the novel The House of Impossible Beauties. He holds degrees from Columbia University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop. He was a 2016–2017 writing fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.

Judith Claire Mitchel is the author of the novels The Last Day of the War and A Reunion of Ghosts. She is the Dorothy Draheim Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where she directs the creative writing program and teaches undergraduate and graduate fiction workshops.

Grand Salon C, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F237. Writing Dementia: How We Give Voice to Fragmentation and Decline. (, , , , ) Dementia is, among many things, the fragmentation of a life. How does a writer give voice to that fragmentation and to its impact on family members and their stories? What is the challenge of putting into words the disintegration of personality, relationship, and lives? Two poets, an essayist, and a graphic memoirist wrangle with these questions and examine the ways parental dementia has shaped their recent work.

Erin Coughlin Hollowell's latest book, Every Atom, chronicles her mother's dementia. Her first book of poetry is Pause, Traveler. Her poetry has appears in literary magazines. She teaches in the UAA MFA Program and is the Executive Director of Storyknife Writers Retreat.


Twitter Username: beingpoetry

Website: http://www.erincoughlinhollowell.com

Brendan Constantine is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Dementia, My Darling. He currently teaches poetry in Los Angeles, and regularly offers classes to hospitals, foster homes, veterans, and centers for the elderly.


Twitter Username: poetbrendan

Website: brendanconstantine.com

Kate Carroll de Gutes's book, Objects In Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear, won the 2016 Oregon Book Award for creative nonfiction and a 2016 Lambda Literary Award in memoir. Her new book, The Authenticity Experiment: Lessons From the Best & Worst Year of My Life was released in September 2017.


Twitter Username: kcdegutes

Website: www.katecarrolldegutes.com

Sarah Leavitt is the author of Tangles: A Story About Alzheimer's, My Mother and Me. Tangles, one of the first book-length comics about dementia, has received international critical acclaim. Sarah teaches comics classes in the creative writing program at the University of British Columbia.


Twitter Username: sarahbleavitt

Tina Schumann is author of three poetry collections. Her chapbook Requiem. A Patrimony of Fugues won the 2016 Diode Editions Chapbook Competition. She is editor of the anthology Two-Countries: U.S. Daughters & Sons of Immigrant Parents. Her work has appeared widely since 1999.

Grand Salon D, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F238. Sustainable: On Writing Long and Linked Poems. (, , , , ) In an age of digestible snippets, we grow hungry for occasions to practice the fine art of paying attention. An art form rooted in mindfulness, the long poem is one way of practicing deliberate attention. Drawing on their own experiences writing and publishing long poems, linked poems, project books, and novels-in-verse, this panel will discuss both the rich literary tradition of long and linked poems, as well as provide insights into the process and craft of creating your own sustained lyrics.

Kathryn Nuernberger is the author of two poetry collections, The End of Pink and, and Rag & Bone. Her collection of lyric essays is Brief Intrerviews with the Romantic Past. An associate professor of creative writing at University of Central Missouri, she also serves as director of Pleiades Press.

Jenny Molberg is the author of the poetry collection Marvels of the Invisible, recipient of the Berkshire Prize. She is assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Central Missouri, where she coedits Pleiades.


Twitter Username: jennymolberg

Cortney Lamar Charleston is the author of Telepathologies. He has received fellowships from Cave Canem, The Conversation Literary Festival, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.


Twitter Username: bardsbesidebars

Jacques J. Rancourt is the author of Novena, winner of the Lena-Miles Wever Todd prize, and Covenant. He has held poetry fellowships from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris, and Stanford University, where he was a Wallace Stegner Fellow.


Twitter Username: jj_rancourt

Traci Brimhall is the author of three collections of poetry: Saudade, Our Lady of the Ruins, and Rookery. A recipient of an NEA Fellowship, she is an assistant professor at Kansas State University.

Florida Salon 1, 2, & 3, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F239. Instructor, Agent, Editor: Mentors in Service of the Emerging Writer. (, , , , ) This panel brings together the three most important types of mentors in the emerging writer's career: the instructor, the agent, and the editor. Panelists from these three fields will discuss how they see their distinct roles and how they see opportunities for collaboration to serve emerging writers. They will also discuss how their roles complement and sometimes contradict each other, and what they see are the best approaches and strategies for the emerging writer to get the most out of them.

Fred Leebron has graduate degrees from Johns Hopkins and Iowa. He has published essays, stories, and novels, coedited anthologies, and cowritten a textbook. He directs low-residency MFA and summer programs, and is an English professor at Gettysburg College.

Jeff Kleinman is a founding partner of Folio Literary Management. He serves on the boards for Writer House and the Southern NH University MFA program. Clients include bestselling authors Garth Stein, Elizabeth Letts, Charles Shields, and Mollie Katzen, and Pulitzer Prize–finalist Eowyn Ivey.

Barbara Jones is an executive editor at Henry Holt & Company, where she acquires and edits fiction, memoir, and narrative nonfiction. She was previously the editorial director at Hyperion Books, and previous to that, a longtime magazine editor at Harper’s, Vogue, Real Simple, and elsewhere.

Rob Spillman is editor and cofounder of Tin House. He is the 2015 recipient of the PEN/Nora Magid Award for Editing and is currently a lecturer at Columbia University. His memoir, All Tomorrow’s Parties, is out from Grove Press.


Twitter Username: robspillman

Website: http://www.robspillman.com/

Anna deVries is an Executive Editor at Picador. She acquires and edits literary fiction and nonfiction. She has worked with authors including Jeff Chang, Meghan Daum, Keith Donohue, Scaachi Koul, Harriet Lane, Amy Grace Loyd, Chris McCormick, Katha Pollitt, Rakesh Satyal, and Damon Tweedy.


Twitter Username: adevries18

Florida Salon 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F240. If Only I’d Known: Advice for Navigating the Publishing World. (, , , , Courtney Maum) From getting an agent to working with an editor to doing publicity, the life of a writer is filled with potential pitfalls. What are things you should do before you ever sign with an agent? What are definite no-nos while trying to get an agent? How many of your editor’s changes do you accept? What are tips for a great reading? How can you do publicity best? These seasoned writers talk about their own experiences with different agencies and publishing houses and share their hard-earned advice.

Jean Kwok is The New York Times and international bestselling author of the award-winning novels Girl in Translation and Mambo in Chinatown. Her work has been published in eighteen countries and is taught in schools across the world. She has spoken at Harvard, Columbia, and many other schools and venues.


Twitter Username: jeankwok

Website: www.jeankwok.com

Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel The Residue Years won a Whiting Award and the Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, The Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel prize, and the Hurston Wright Legacy award.


Twitter Username: mitchsjackson

Website: www.mitchellsjackson.com

Rebecca Makkai is the author of the story collection Music for Wartime and two novels, The Hundred-Year House and The Borrower. Her work was chosen for The Best American Short Stories in 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011, and won a 2016 Pushcart Prize. She is artistic director of StoryStudio Chicago.


Twitter Username: rebeccamakkai

Website: www.rebeccamakkai.com

Julia Fierro is the author of the novels The Gypsy Moth Summer and Cutting Teeth and founder of Sackett Street Writers' Workshop, home to over 3,000 writers in NYC and online, named "New York City's Best Writing Class" (TimeOut NY) and "Top Alternative to MFA" by Poets & Writers.


Twitter Username: juliafierro

Website: http://www.juliafierro.com/

Florida Salon 5, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F241. Barbara Deming Fund: Celebrating 42 Year of Supporting Feminist Writers. (, , , , ) For 42 years, the Barbara Deming/Money for Women Fund has supported feminist women writers at all stages in their careers. By consistently encouraging women writers, the Fund has profoundly impacted American letters. In this session, past grantees will carry forth Deming’s vision and legacy and, through reading their work, illuminate the importance of socially engaged feminist writing by women, which may be more relevant now than at any time in recent history.

Maureen Brady is the author of three novels, including Folly and Ginger’s Fire, and a collection of short stories. She teaches at NYU and NewYorkWritersWorkshop at the JCC of Manhattan, and with the Peripatetic Writing Workshop. She has served on the Money for Women Fund Board for twenty years.


Twitter Username: meb4444

Crystal Williams, a poet and essayist, is the author of four poetry collections, most recently, Detroit as Barn. She has received numerous fellowships, awards, and honors. crystalannwilliams.com.


Twitter Username: crystallises

Website: www.crystalannwilliams.com

Nicole Dennis-Benn is the author of Here Comes The Sun, an NPR and New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Dennis-Benn is a Lambda Literary Award winner, and named a finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Award, and NYPL Young Lions Award.


Twitter Username: ndennis_benn

Website: www.nicoledennisbenn.com

Joy Katz’s latest poetry collection is All You Do Is Perceive. Her work in progress, White: An Abstract, attempts to document American whiteness. A former NEA fellow, Katz collaborates in the activist art collective Ifyoureallyloveme. She teaches at Carlow University.


Twitter Username: Joy_Katz

Tsering Lama writes fiction, poetry, and plays. She has won grants and residencies from The Canada Council for the Arts, Barbara Deming Memorial Fund, The Lillian E. Smith Center, Writers Omi, Catwalk Institute, WildAcres, and Playa Summer Lake. She holds an MFA in fiction from Columbia University.


Twitter Username: lippointer

Florida Salon 6, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F242. The Fragmented Truth Is Nothing but the Truth: Women Writing Trauma. (, , , ) Abuse. Neglect. Sexual assault. Addiction. Death. Bearing witness to or experiencing trauma leaves women writers vulnerable in a misogynistic and culturally violent society. Consequently, the psychological stress of traumatic events creates an often-fractured memory, a perceived roadblock for creative nonfiction writers who are committed to truth. This panel will focus on both writing about and through trauma in a way that is healing rather than triggering, even in the face of backlash.

Melissa Grunow is the author of Realizing River City, which won Second Place-Nonfiction in the 2016 Independent Author Network Book of the Year Awards. Her work has appeared in Creative Nonfiction, River Teeth, The Nervous Breakdown, New Plains Review, and Blue Lyra Review, among many others.


Twitter Username: melgrunow

Website: http://www.melissagrunow.com

Chelsey Clammer is the author of BodyHome and Circadian, (winner of the 2015 Red Hen Press Nonfiction Manuscript Award). Her work as appeared in The Rumpus, Hobart, The Normal School, and many others. She's the essays editor for The Nervous Breakdown and an instructor with Women on Writing.


Twitter Username: ChelseyClammer

Website: www.chelseyclammer.com

Emily Eveland a.k.a. Leif E. Greenz, is an MFA candidate at Antioch University Los Angeles. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in xoJane, Narratively, City Pages, The Minnesota Daily, and Entropy. She writes extensively about complex trauma and addiction on her personal blog, Big Mouth.

Ming Lauren Holden is the author of Refuge, which was chosen by Lidia Yuknavitch as the winner of Kore Press's inaugural Memoir Award (forthcoming), and the nonfiction novella The Survival Girls, which documents her time founding an arts group for Congolese refugee women in Kenya.


Twitter Username: minglishmuffin

Meeting Room 1, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F243. Writing the Mind: Mental Health in YA Novels. (, , , Ann Jacobus) Mental health is becoming an increasingly predominant and urgent topic in our current day and age—however, the topic continues to carry stigma, as well as misconceptions, in many circles. These panelists will discuss their own experiences and approaches with writing about mental health, as well as why they find the young adult novel medium to be such a powerful tool for discussing this vital topic.

Natalka Burian received an MA from Columbia University where she studied Eastern European literature. She is the co-owner of two bars in Brooklyn, Elsa and Ramona, and the cofounder of the Freya Project, a feminist fundraising reading series. Welcome to the Slipstream is her first novel.


Twitter Username: natalkaburian

Sonia Belasco has spent much of her professional life working with teenagers as a mentor, tutor, and therapist, and she is often inspired by their passion, creativity, and strength. She received her MFA from California College of the Arts, and her debut novel is entitled Speak of Me As I Am.


Twitter Username: SoniaBelasco

S.F. Henson was born and raised in the deep south with a passion for sweet tea and writing about dark, nefarious subjects. Her debut novel is Devils Within. www.sfhenson.com and Twitter @sfhwrites.


Twitter Username: sfhwrites

Website: http://www.sfhenson.com/

Meeting Room 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor

F244. The Art of Unlearning in the Creative Writing Workshop. (, , , , ) Teachers of creative writing discuss impeding tendencies students often transfer into the workshop from their courses in literature and composition (as well as their own commonly held misperceptions). The panel will explore ways of facilitating a modern workshop classroom by helping students unlearn certain presuppositions about the processes of reading, writing, and evaluating in a workshop setting while also building the skill set important for writers operating in this unique environment.

Emilia Phillips is the author of Signaletics, Groundspeed, and Empty Clip. Her poetry appears in Agni, Boston Review, The Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, and elsewhere. She's an assistant professor of poetry in the MFA Writing Program at UNC–Greensboro.


Twitter Username: gracefulemilia

Website: http://emiliaphillips.com

Patrick Bizzaro is the author of eleven books and chapbooks of poetry and editor of two books on the poetry and fiction of Fred Chappell. He has also written extensively on creative writing pedagogy in journal articles and books. He is Professor of English Emeritus at East Carolina University.

Hadara Bar-Nadav is the author of several poetry collections, most recently The New Nudity, Lullaby (with Exit Sign), The Frame Called Ruin, and Fountain and Furnace, and co-author of Writing Poems, 8th ed. She is a professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.


Twitter Username: Hadarabar

Website: www.HadaraBarNadav.com

Christopher Salerno is an associate professor of English at William Paterson University and editor of Saturnalia Books. He is the author of four full-length poetry collections, including Sun & Urn, Minimum Heroic, Whirligig, and ATM. He is a New Jersey Council for the Arts Fellow.

Megan Kaminski is the author of two books of poetry, Deep City and Desiring Map, and ten chapbooks. She is an assistant professor in the University of Kansas' graduate creative writing program and an Integrated Arts Research Initiative Faculty Fellow at the Spencer Museum of Art.


Twitter Username: megan_kaminski

Website: http://www.megankaminski.com/

Meeting Room 9 & 10, Marriott Waterside, Third Floor

F245. What We Really Tell When We Tell of Home: The Resonant Poetics of Narrative. (, , , , ) Writers of color discuss the contemporary mandate for re-imagining the relevance, scope, and use of narrative in their work. Set against the context of traditions that seemingly view the use of auto/biographical and narrative types of writing in poems with suspicion because of their association with the merely confessional, this panel seeks to argue for the potency and continued relevance of narrative in poems, in the formal and poetic sense, and beyond their subjective or cathartic value.

Nishat Ahmed is a Bengali American poet working towards an MFA at Old Dominion University. His works revolve around blending spoken word elements with musical punk confessionalism. His poems thematically tie in mental illness, language, immigration, racism, and place.


Twitter Username: thenishfish

Tim Seibles has published several collections of poetry, including Buffalo Head Solos, Fast Animal—a finalist for the National Book Award in 2012—and, most recently, One Turn Around The Sun. He is a professor of English at Old Dominion University and the current poet laureate of Virginia.


Twitter Username: Timseibles77@gmail.com

Cornelius Eady is the author of eight poetry collections including Victims of the Latest Dance Craze, winner of the 1985 Lamont Prize, and Brutal Imagination. He holds the Miller Chair at the University of Missouri and is cofounder of Cave Canem.


Twitter Username: roughband

Website: http://blueflowerarts.com/artist/cornelius-eady/

Luisa A. Igloria’s books include Ode to the Heart Smaller than a Pencil Eraser (2014 May Swenson Prize), The Saints of Streets, and Juan Luna's Revolver (2009 Ernest Sandeen Prize). She teaches at Old Dominion University, where from 2009–15 she directed the MFA creative writing program.


Twitter Username: thepoetslizard

Website: www.luisaigloria.com

Amanda Galvan Huynh has been a recipient of a 2016 AWP Intro Journal Project Award and a 2017 Sewanee Conference Tennessee Williams Scholarship. Her work was a finalist for the 2015 Gloria Anzaldua Poetry Prize, and she has received a scholarship from the Sundress Academy for the Arts.


Twitter Username: amghuynh

Ballroom A, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F246. Poets Teaching Poets: Literary Mentorship and the Creative Life. (, , , , ) Our greatest teachers are those who attend, with exquisite care, to our deepest creative impulses. They show us a path into our writing with an understanding that shapes us profoundly, as writers and as teachers. In this panel, we will reflect on our own mentors, including Stephen Dunn, Lorna Goodison, Galway Kinnell, Dorianne Laux, Philip Levine, and Jean Valentine, while considering what constitutes meaningful literary mentorship in the academy and in our broader writing communities.

Melissa Hammerle directs the Low-Residency MFA in Writing Program at Vermont College of Fine Arts. Formerly she was director of the creative writing program at NYU and codirector of the Poetry Center at the 92nd Street Y. She has served on the AWP Board and has taught at UVM and Middlebury College.


Twitter Username: MAHammerle

Kathleen Graber is the author of two collections of poetry, The Eternal City and Correspondence. She is the recipient of fellowships from the NEA, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She teaches at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Malena Morling is the author of two books of poems, Ocean Avenue and Astoria. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, and a Dianna L. Bennet Fellowship from The Black Mountain Institute. She teaches at The University of North Carolina, Wilmington.

Danielle Legros Georges is a poet, essayist, and professor at Lesley University. She is the author of two book of poems, The Dear Remote Nearness of You and Maroon.

Matthew Dickman is the author of All-American Poem, 50 American Plays, Mayakovsky's Revolver, Wish You Were Here, 24 Hours, and Wonderland. Matthew Dickman works as a freelance copywriter. He teaches at the low-residency program at VCFA.

Ballroom B, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F247. A Reading and Conversation with Tyehimba Jess, Shara McCallum, and Morgan Parker. Sponsored by Cave Canem. (, , , , ) Three award-winning poets give brief readings of their original work, followed by a moderated conversation on a range of topics from race and poetic forms to the poet's evolving role and responsibility in and to a literary landscape at once predominantly white and rapidly diversifying.

Tyehimba Jess's last book, Olio, won the Pulitzer Prize and Anisfield-Wolf. His first book, Leadbelly, won the National Poetry Series. A NEA, Whiting, and Lannan Foundation Award winner, he teaches at College of Staten Island and is poetry/fiction editor for African American Review.


Twitter Username: TyehimbaJess

Morgan Parker is the author of There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé and Other People’s Comfort Keeps Me Up At Night. She is the recipient of a 2017 National Endowment of the Arts Literature Fellowship, winner of a 2016 Pushcart Prize, and a Cave Canem graduate fellow.


Twitter Username: morganapple

Website: www.morgan-parker.com

Nicole Sealey is the author of The Animal After Whom Other Animals Are Named, winner of the 2015 Drinking Gourd Chapbook Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and elsewhere. She is the Executive Director at Cave Canem Foundation.


Twitter Username: Nic_Sealey

Clint Smith is a PhD candidate at Harvard University and the author of Counting Descent, 2017 BCALA Literary award winner and NAACP Image award finalist. He is a 2014 National Poetry Slam champion and his writing has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: ClintSmithIII
Shara McCallum is a Jamaican American poet and the author of five books of poetry, including The Water Between Us, which was awarded the 1999 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize, and Madwoman, her most recently published volume. Her work has been widely published in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Europe, and has been translated into several languages. McCallum has been the recipient of several honors and awards, including a Witter Bynner Fellowship from the Library of Congress and a 2011 NEA poetry fellowship. She lives in Pennsylvania and teaches creative writing and literature at Penn State University

Ballroom C, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F248. Nathan Englander and Lauren Groff: A Reading and Conversation, Sponsored by Penguin Random House Speakers Bureau. (, , Colette Bancroft) Masters of contemporary fiction Nathan Englander and Lauren Groff will read and discuss their craft. Pulitzer Prize–finalist and Pen/Faulkner Award–winner Nathan Englander is the author of Dinner at the Center of the Earth, What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, and For the Relief of Unbearable Urges. National Book Award–finalist Lauren Groff is the author of Fates and Furies, Arcadia, and Delicate Edible Birds. Her forthcoming book, Florida, is named after her adopted home state.

Ballroom D, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F249. The Politics of Craft. (, , , , ) Often, we make content carry the weight of politics in a classroom. But if the personal is always political partially because we are in bodies, then the body of a text—its craft—is always political, too. Panelists in multiple genres will share craft lessons that foreground the politics involved in making, reading, and teaching creative work. By embedding issues of power, erasure, point of view, voice, consumption, empathy, and community into craft, this panel widens a workshop’s aperture.

Sasha West’s first book, Failure and I Bury the Body, won the National Poetry Series and a Texas Institute of Letters award. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.

James Allen Hall is the author of I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, a book of lyric essays, as well as a book of poems, Now You're the Enemy, which won awards from Lambda Literary, the Texas Institute of Letters, and the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He teaches at Washington College.


Twitter Username: jamesallenhall

Website: notbeauty.blogspot.com

Lisa Olstein is the author of four poetry collections, most recently, Late Empire. She is a member of the poetry faculty for the New Writers Project and the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas at Austin.

Hasanthika Sirisena's stories have appeared in Glimmer Train, Epoch, StoryQuarterly, Narrative, and other magazines. She is a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writer's Award and the 2015 Juniper Prize for Fiction. Her short story collection The Other One was released in March 2016.


Twitter Username: thinkhasie

Website: http://hasanthikasirisena.com/

Tiphanie Yanique is the author the novel, Land of Love and Drowning, winner of the First Novel Award from the Center for Fiction and the Rosenthal Family Award of the American Academy of Arts & Letters. Her collection of poems, Wife, won the 2016 Forward Felix Dennis Prize for Best First Collection. 


Twitter Username: tiphanieyanique

Website: www.tiphanieyanique.com

Cody D. Todd Memorial Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floor

F250. Five Oaks Press Reading. (, , , , ) Poets and fiction writers published by Five Oaks Press will read from their recent works.

Lynn Marie Houston’s poetry has appeared in over thirty-five literary journals and in four book-length collections: The Clever Dream of Man, Chatterbox, Unguarded, and The Mauled Keeper. She holds a PhD from Arizona State, an MFA from Southern CT State, and she is the founding editor of Five Oaks Press.

Rob Davidson is the author of three short fiction collections: Spectators: Flash Fictions; The Farther Shore: Stories; and Field Observations: Stories. He teaches at California State University-Chico and at the Fairbanks Summer Arts Festival.


Twitter Username: robdavidson_9

Website: http://www.robdavidsonauthor.net/

Sara Moore Wagner is a pushcart-nominated poet and author of the chapbook Hooked Through. Her work has appeared in many journals and anthologies including Stirring, Gigantic Sequins, and Reservoir. She lives and teaches in Cincinnati. SaraMooreWagner.com.


Twitter Username: Saramoorewagne1

Rae Hoffman Jager received a BA in writing from Warren Wilson College and an MFA from Wichita State University. Her chapbook has been described as rambunctious, urgent, funny, and elegiac. You can see her publications, contests, and read some of her work at www.raehoffmanjager.com.


Twitter Username: raehoffmanjager

John Davis Jr. is the author of four poetry collections. His poems have been published in dozens of literary journals, with significant appearances in The American Journal of Poetry, The Common online, and Nashville Review. He holds an MFA from University of Tampa and teaches at Keiser University.


Twitter Username: poetjohndavisjr

Virginia Barber Middleton Stage, Sponsored by USC, Exhibit Hall, Tampa Convention Center, Third Floo

F251. Four Way Books Stage Reading, Part 1. (, , , , ) Come join us for a Four Way Books reading, featuring distinguished authors from our Fall 2017/Spring 2018 seasons!

Panio Gianopoulos is the author of the story collection, How to Get Into Our House and Where We Keep the Money, and the novella, A Familiar Beast. His writing has appeared widely, and he is the recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship for nonfiction literature.


Twitter Username: panio

Website: www.paniogianopoulos.com

Daniel Tobin is the author of eight books of poems, most recently From Nothing and The Stone in the Air. On Serious Earth is his latest book of essays. His awards include the Massachusetts Book Award in Poetry, and fellowships from the NEA and Guggenheim Foundation.

Maggie Anderson is the author of five books of poems including Dear All, Windfall: New and Selected Poems, and A Space Filled with Moving. She has received fellowships from the NEA and from state arts councils in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia.

Joan Houlihan is the author of five books of poems, most recently Shadow-feast. She is founding director of the Colrain Poetry Manuscript Conference and professor of practice at Clark University. She serves as poetry faculty in the Lesley University low-res MFA program.

Margaree Little’s first book, Rest, is forthcoming. Her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, New England Review, The Missouri Review, and The Southern Review; her criticism appears in American Poetry Review and Kenyon Review Online. She is a 2016–2018 Kenyon Review Fellow in Poetry.

Room 1, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F252. Undocupoets Speak. (, , , ) In 2015, Undocupoets published an open petition asking for ten highly visible and renowned first book poetry contests to reconsider and remove the language stating US citizenship as a requirement for submission/publication. In fall 2016, they established the Undocupoets Fellowship. Janine Joseph joined them in order to begin this fellowship to help undocumented writers pay book contest fees. Here they will discuss their goals moving forward and the marginalization of undocumented writers.

Suzi F. Garcia has an MFA in poetry with minors in gender studies and screen cultures. She is a poetry editor at Noemi Press, a CantoMundo Fellow, Macondonista, and her work is published or forthcoming from the University of Arizona Poetry Blog, Vinyl, Fence, The Offing, Drunken Boat, and more.


Twitter Username: SuziG

Website: http://suzifgarcia.tumblr.com/

Marcelo Hernandez Castillo is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the author of Cenzontle, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Prize from BOA Editions (2018) and Dulce. A Canto Mundo Fellow, he cofounded the Undocupoets campaign.


Twitter Username: marcelo_H_

Janine Joseph is a poet, librettist, and educator. She is the author of Driving Without a License, winner of the Kundiman Poetry Prize and finalist for the 2017 Oklahoma Book Award. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Oklahoma State University.


Twitter Username: ninejoseph

Website: http://www.janinejoseph.com/

Christopher Soto is the author of Sad Girl Poems and the editor of Nepantla: A Journal Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color. In 2017, he was awarded “The Freedom Plow Award for Poetry & Activism” by Split This Rock. He cofounded the Undocupoets.


Twitter Username: loma-poetry

Room 3 & 4, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F253. Writing the Frail Essay. (, , , , ) We are interested in essays that are wayward, unbalanced, embarrassing, strangely researched, disabled, and/or feminine. The frail essay, we argue, opens up a space of intimacy between writer and reader, one overlooked by conversations about “craft” and “mastery.” In this panel, we will read from our work and collaborate on key principles of frail essay writing. Then, along with the audience, we will apply these principles to a well-known masterful essay; we will together frail the strong.

Caren Beilin is the author of a forthcoming work of nonfiction, SPAIN, a novel, The University of Pennsylvania, and a collection of short fiction, Americans, Guests, or Us. She is a reviews editor for Full Stop magazine and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

Amina Cain is the author most recently of the short story collection Creature, and she is currently at work on a novel and a book of essays on fiction.

Shamala Gallagher is a poet and essayist whose work appears in Poetry, Black Warrior Review, The Offing, West Branch, and The Rumpus. She is a Kundiman fellow, a graduate of the Michener Center for Writers, and a PhD student and instructor at the University of Georgia.


Twitter Username: shamala_jane

April Freely's essays and poetry have appeared in Forklift, OH, Gulf Coast, New Madrid, and elsewhere. A recipient of an Ohio Arts Council grant, she has also been awarded fellowships from Vermont Studio Center, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the George Kaiser Family Foundation.

Vi Khi Nao is the author of a novel, Fish in Exile, and, The Old Philosopher, a poetry collection. She was the winner of 2014 Nightboat Poetry Prize and the 2016 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Contest for A Brief Alphabet of Torture, a collection of short stories.


Twitter Username: vikhinao

Room 5 & 6, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F254. From Words to Images: Making Comics (for Writers). (, , , ) So you’re a writer and you want to make comics? Then you’ve come to right place! Through this interactive panel, attendees will participate in hands-on comics activities, and learn practical techniques and approaches for moving from language to image, from writing to drawing, from literature to comics. The panelists will show comics that represent many levels of artistic skill and share tips for writers interested in learning to make comics.

Jarod Roselló is a Cuban American cartoonist, writer, and teacher. He is the writer/artist of The Well-Dressed Bear Will (Never) Be Found, the serialized comic, Those Bears, and the forthcoming illustrated novel, How We Endure. He teaches comics and fiction at University of South Florida.


Twitter Username: jarodrosello

Website: www.jarodrosello.com

John Dermot Woods is the author of the illustrated novel The Baltimore Atrocities and the comics collection Activities. He is a professor of English at Nassau Community College and is currently the Viebranz Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at Saint Lawrence University.


Twitter Username: johndermotwoods

Website: www.johndermotwoods.com

Lydia Conklin has received two Pushcart Prizes, work-study scholarships from Bread Loaf, and fellowships from Emory, MacDowell, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, and Djerassi. Her fiction has appeared in Tin House, The Southern Review, Narrative magazine, New Letters, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: Lydiaconklin

Colleen Kolba is a digital teaching fellow at the University of South Florida, where she teaches creative writing, literature, and professional writing.

Room 7, 8, & 9, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F255. The Civics of Literature. (, , , ) Join the leaders of GrubStreet, The Loft, Lighthouse Writers Workshop, and Hugo House to discuss the role narrative can play in addressing the deep cultural divisions we face today and in helping to reimagine the common good. They will share programs they've launched which address the refugee crisis, extreme poverty, homelessness, and juvenile detention, discuss the relevance of narrative to building a healthier culture, and lead a discussion with attendees to generate new ideas.

Eve Bridburg is the founder and Executive Director of Grub Street, one of the country’s leading writing centers. She is also a former literary agent with ZSH Literary Agency, where she's edited and sold bestselling and award-winning nonfiction and fiction.


Twitter Username: eve_grubstreet

Tree Swenson is executive director of Hugo House in Seattle. She was previously Executive Director of the Academy of American Poets. A former AWP board president, her work in the literary arts began with cofounding Copper Canyon Press, where she was publisher and Executive Director for twenty years.

Michael Henry is cofounder and Executive Director of Lighthouse Writers Workshop, an independent creative writing center located in downtown Denver. His poetry and nonfiction have appeared in places such as The Writer, 5280 magazine, Georgetown Review, Threepenny Review, and Copper Nickel.


Twitter Username: mjhenry66

Website: http://mjhenry.wordpress.com/

Britt Udesen joined the Loft in 2015 as its Executive and Artistic Director. Before that, she served as the Executive Director of the Cabin in Boise, Idaho and has held leadership positions at Storyfort Literary Festival, The Sun Valley Center for the Arts, and the Textile Center of Minnesota.


Twitter Username: brittaudesen

Room 11, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F256. Writing as Migration. (, , , , ) Meaning thrives within the liminal linguistic space between words. For translators, this space is uniquely fraught. How do translators carry the scars of history, intersecting cultures and languages under their skin? What forms of resistance subsist and thrive within the art of translation? How do translators translate the untranslatable? What are the different ways and reasons translators might resist translation?

Nancy Au’s stories appear in FRiGG, Tahoma Literary Review, Lunch Ticket, The Pinch, Beloit Fiction, Smokelong Quarterly, Journal of Compressed Creative Arts, and Forge Literary Magazine, among others. She has an MFA from San Francisco State University. She teaches creative writing at CSU Stanislaus.

May-lee Chai is the author of nine books of fiction and nonfiction, including the translation from Chinese to English of the 1934 Autobiography of Ba Jin and the memoir Hapa Girl, a Kiriyama Prize Notable Book. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at San Francisco State University.


Twitter Username: mayleechai

Ploi Pirapokin's work is featured in Tor.com, Apogee Journal, The Bellingham Review, and more. She has received grants and fellowships from the San Francisco Arts Commission, Radgale, the Anderson Center, Kundiman and others. She holds an MFA in fiction from San Francisco State University.


Twitter Username: ppirapokin

Nayomi Munaweera's debut novel, Island of a Thousand Mirrors, won the 2013 Commonwealth Prize for Asia. The New York Times called it "incandescent." Her second novel, What Lies Between Us, drew comparisons to the voices of Michael Ondatjee and Jumpha Lahiri.

Achy Obejas is the author of the recent The Tower of the Antilles, as well as the critically acclaimed Ruins, Days of Awe, and Memory Mambo. She has translated Junot Díaz, Wendy Guerra, Rita Indiana, and others. She is the director of the MFA in translation program at Mills College. www.achyobejas.com


Twitter Username: achylandia

Website: achyobejas.com

Room 12, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F257. A Different Drummer: Thoreau’s Legacy on the Bicentenary. (, , , , ) In the bicentennial year of Henry David Thoreau’s birth, and amid the current assault on the natural world, this panel will consider Thoreau’s modern relevance––in print and in person. What does the sage artist-activist’s life and work reveal about the evolving tension between the personal and the political for nature writers in the 21st century? From “Civil Disobedience” and “A Plea for Captain John Brown,” to Walden and “Walking,” few writers have had a more enduring impact.

Tom Montgomery Fate is the author of five books of nonfiction, including Beyond the White Noise, Steady and Trembling, and Cabin Fever. His essays have appeared in The Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, Orion, Iowa Review, and others. He teaches creative writing at College of DuPage in Chicago.

John T. Price is the award-winning author of three memoirs, including Daddy Long Legs: The Natural Education of a Father and Man Killed by Pheasant and Other Kinships, and editor of The Tallgrass Prairie Reader. He is director of the nonfiction writing program at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Michael Branch is professor of literature and environment at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is the author or editor of eight books and more than 200 essays and reviews. His most recent books are Raising Wild and Rants from the Hill.

Diane P. Freedman, professor of English at UNH, is the author of Midlife with Thoreau: Poems, Essays, Journals and An Alchemy of Genres; editor of Millay at 100; and coeditor of The Teacher's Body: Embodiment; Autobiographical Writing Across the Disciplines; and The Intimate Critique.


Twitter Username: dianepfreedman1

Elizabeth Dodd teaches creative writing and environmental literature at Kansas State University, where she is an affiliated researcher with the Konza Prairie Ecological Research Station. She has authored six books, most recently Horizon’s Lens.

Room 13, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F258. Cross-Border Memoir in the Age of Isolationism. (, , , , ) Authors of cross-border memoirs read from award-winning works that examine US-Mexico, US-Iran, and US-Colombia relations. They discuss what it has meant to tell binational truths amid a global wave of isolationism, specifically under the Trump administration in the US. The panelists will explore what it takes to create a singular literary world from plural nations.

Jean Guerrero is an author and journalist, whose first book, CRUX: A Cross-Border Memoir, will be published in July 2018, and which won the PEN/FUSION Emerging Writers Prize in 2016. Guerrero received an MFA in creative nonfiction from Goucher College. She reports on immigration for KPBS, PBS, and NPR in San Diego, has published articles in The Economist, The Seattle Times, among others, and also served as a foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal in Mexico City.


Twitter Username: jeanguerre

Neda Semnani is a journalist and writer whose work has appeared in various online and print publications, including The Washington Post, New York magazine, The Baffler, The Week, and Roll Call among others. She is currently at work on her memoir, They Said They Wanted Revolution.


Twitter Username: neda_semnani

Alfredo Corchado is Border, Mexico correspondent bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News and author of Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter’s Journey Through a Country’s Descent Into Darkness. His second book, Shadows at Dawn: Four Friends, Three Decades, One Journey, is due out 2018.


Twitter Username: ajcorchado

Adriana E. Ramírez is a writer, critic, and performance poet. She won the inaugural 2015 PEN/Fusion Emerging Writers Prize for Dead Boys. She is critic at large for the LA Times Book Section. Her debut full-length work of nonfiction, The Violence, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: zadri

Website: www.aeramirez.com

Lizz Huerta is a poet, fiction writer, and essayist from the Borderlands of Southern California. Her work is informed/shaped/ by the borders of land, spirituality, ancestry, and labor. She is outside of academia, working as a painting contractor, collecting stories and voices from construction sites.


Twitter Username: lizzhuerta

Room 14, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor

F259. Poetry Mixtape. (, , , , Jenny George) Four dynamic poets and one publicist collectively DJ this event that is one part reading, one part listening session, by sharing the soundtracks to their poetry—whether those songs directly inspire or appear in the poems, were listened to during composition or editing, or simply make for a perfect sonic pairing. Featured songs will span decades and genres and are sure to make your conference blues disappear.

Emily Grise is the digital content manager for Copper Canyon Press and poetry editor for WomenArts Quarterly.

Natalie Shapero is the professor of the practice of poetry at Tufts University, an editor at large of the Kenyon Review, and the author of the books Hard Child and No Object. Her awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Ruth Lilly Fellowship, and a Kenyon Review Fellowship.


Twitter Username: natalieshapero

John Freeman is author of