2022 AWP Conference Schedule

The #AWP22 Conference & Bookfair in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. A version accessible to screen readers is also available.

Please note: The schedule you build on awpwriter.org will not transfer to the mobile app or the virtual conference platform as these systems are independent.

Scroll over participants’ names in blue to read their biographies.

 

Advanced Search
Clear
Wednesday, March 23, 2022

12:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Broad Street Atrium, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

W101.

Vaccination Verification Check-In

The first stop at #AWP22 is the vaccination verification check-in, located at the 155 N Broad Street entrance to the Pennsylvania Convention Center. All attendees must verify proof of valid COVID-19 vaccination through CrowdPass. Once you are verified, you will receive your #AWP22 lanyard, which will serve as indication your vaccination status has been verified. Proceed to the Registration area in Halls D&E on the 200 level to complete the registration process.

Add to schedule

Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

W103.

Conference Registration, Sponsored by Philadelphia Stories

Attendees who have registered in advance or who have yet to purchase a registration may secure their registration materials in AWP's registration area located in Exhibit Hall E, Pennsylvania Convention
Center, 200 Level. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a
valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

Add to schedule

Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

W104.

AWP Bookfair Setup, Sponsored by Butler University MFA in Creative Writing

The exhibit hall at the Pennsylvania Convention Center will be open for bookfair setup. For safety and security reasons, only those holding a Bookfair Setup Access (BSA) registration or those accompanied by an individual wearing a BSA registration will be permitted inside the bookfair during setup hours. Bookfair exhibitors are welcome to pick up their registration materials in AWP’s registration area in Exhibit Hall E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level.

Add to schedule

Near 126B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

W105.

Mamava Nursing Pod

A Mamava lactation suite is located outside of room 126B of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Add to schedule

3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Accessibility Desk, Registration Area, Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

W106.

Accessibility Tour

Join AWP conference staff for a tour of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. This tour will cover main event areas of the Pennsylvania Convention Center and will be an opportunity to ask questions about conference accessibility. This tour is great for someone who would like to get a sense for the distances between meeting rooms and to plan easiest routes. If you are unable to make it to this 3:00 p.m. tour, please email colleen@awpwriter.org to arrange for a different time.

Add to schedule

4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Salon E, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 5

W106B.

World of Wonders

(Aimee Nezhukumatathil, January Gill O'Neil)

World of Wonders, an up close-and-personal evening with Aimee Nezhukumatathil and special guest January Gill O'Neill, sponsored by Milkweed Editions. Reserve your ticket on the World of Wonders page of the AWP website. Suggested donation $25. https://www.awpwriter.org/awp_conference/gala

Add to schedule

5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

W107.

CLMP Membership Meeting

This event is for all independent literary magazine and small press publishers: seasoned professionals, those just starting out, and all in between. Learn what we're planning for the year, and share your thoughts on how we can best ensure that our community thrives. Even if you're not yet a member of CLMP but would like to find out more, please feel welcome to join us.

Add to schedule

6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Salon C, D, & E, Marriott Philadephia Downtown, Floor 5

W108.

AWP Small Press & Exhibitor Appreciation Reception

Join AWP in celebrating small presses and #AWP22 exhibitors. We will also be announcing and presenting the 2022 AWP Small Press Publisher Award and celebrating the amazing finalists: American Short Fiction, Ecotone, and Terrain.org.

Add to schedule
Thursday, March 24, 2022

7:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T101.

Sober AWP

Daily 12-step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

Add to schedule

8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Broad Street Atrium, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T102.

Vaccination Verification Check-In

The first stop at #AWP22 is the vaccination verification check-in, located at the 155 N Broad Street entrance to the Pennsylvania Convention Center. All attendees must verify proof of valid COVID-19 vaccination through CrowdPass. Once you are verified, you will receive your #AWP22 lanyard, which will serve as indication your vaccination status has been verified. Proceed to the Registration area in Halls D&E on the 200 level to complete the registration process.

Add to schedule

Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

T104.

Conference Registration, Sponsored by Philadelphia Stories

Attendees who have registered in advance or who have yet to purchase a registration may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

Add to schedule

Near Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

T104B.

Coat Check

Coat check is available outside of Halls D & E on the 200 level of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. It is $3.00 per item checked, or $5.00 for two items. ATMs can be found in the Broad Street Atrium on the 100 Level, by the Business Center on the 200 Level, and near the Concierge on 200 level.

Add to schedule

Near 126B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T105.

Mamava Nursing Pod

A Mamava lactation suite is located outside of room 126B of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Add to schedule

110A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T106.

Lactation Room

The Lactation Room is located in room 110A of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. To access the Lactation Room, please see the AWP Help Desk to obtain the key. For reasons of privacy and security, access to the lactation room is granted with permission from AWP only.

Add to schedule

113B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T107.

Dickinson Quiet Space

A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and
escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A
solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, /
Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul
admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity."—Emily Dickinson

Add to schedule

117, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T107B.

Dickinson Quiet Space 2

A second dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and
escape the literary commotion. “There is a solitude of space, / A
solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, /
Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul
admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity.” —Emily Dickinson

Add to schedule

110B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T108.

Nonfluorescent Quiet Space

A quiet space free of fluorescent lighting located in room 110B of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Add to schedule

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

T129.

Native & Indigenous Structure & Dramaturgy in Playwriting

( , , , )

This panel discussion will examine how Indigenous and Native dramatists use their unique storytelling structures to create work for the stage and illuminate their worlds. When non-Native theaters get to choose what plays speak for the Native experience, even when they're not coming from a Native perspective, how can this powerful community ensure they keep telling stories for the people they’re written for? And how can non-Native audiences engage when Native perspectives are rarely seen?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Rhiana Yazzie is a Navajo playwright and artistic director of New Native Theatre, a company devoted to producing new work by and for Native peoples. Rhiana's current projects include a book of short stories, a new children’s musical, and producing a short film.


Twitter Username: RHIANAYAZZIE

Website: www.rhianayazzie.com

Laura Annawyn Shamas was born in Oklahoma and is an enrolled member of the Chickasaw Nation. In 2021, she was a part of the Indigenous Writers Collaborative at Oregon Shakespeare Festival. In 2017, she won the Von Marie Atchley Award from Native Voices at the Autry for Seeds. laurashamas.com


Twitter Username: LauraShamas

Carolyn M. Dunn, PhD, is an Indigenous poet, playwright, editor, and publisher and the author/editor of seven books, including three books of poetry. Her first collection, Outfoxing Coyote, was recognized as Book of the Year by the Native Writers Circle of the Americas in 2002.


Twitter Username: DrDunn

DeLanna Studi is a Cherokee actor/playwright. She retraced her family’s footsteps along the Trail of Tears with her father and wrote her play And So We Walked. She is the chair of SAG-AFTRA’s National Native Americans Committee and the artistic director of native voices at the Autry.


Twitter Username: delanna_studi

Virtual

T130.

Noir as an Agent for Social Change: A Look at Transgressive Genre Fiction

(, , , , )

Should people dare to dream with the forces of the world allied against them? Though “noir” has morphed into a buzzword for any darkly themed thriller, its traditional elements are more specific: an outsider perspective, economic insecurity, systemic injustice, distrust of the status quo, existential despair. Five fiction writers and critics discuss the roots of noir and how writers today, both genre and literary, can build on and transform this tradition to explore similar themes today.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Art Taylor is the author most recently of The Boy Detective and The Summer of '74 and Other Tales of Suspense. His fiction has won the Edgar Award, four Agatha Awards, an Anthony Award, four Macavity Awards, and four Derringer Awards. He is an associate professor at George Mason University.


Twitter Username: ArtTaylorWriter

Website: www.arttaylorwriter.com

Richie Narvaez received the 2021 BRIO Award, a $5,000 grant for artistic excellence. His latest book is the anthology Noiryorican, which was nominated for an Anthony Award. He teaches crime fiction writing at the Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan.


Twitter Username: richie_narvaez

Website: www.richienarvaez.com

Steph Cha is the author of Follow Her Home, Beware Beware, and Dead Soon Enough. Her fourth novel, Your House Will Pay, will be out from Ecco in 2019. She’s the noir editor for the Los Angeles Review of Books and a regular contributor to the Los Angeles Times and USA Today


Twitter Username: stephycha

Elizabeth Hand is the author of sixteen multiple-award-winning novels and five collections of short fiction and essays. She is a longtime reviewer for numerous publications, including the Washington Post, LA Times, and Boston Review, and is on faculty at the Stonecoast MFA program.


Twitter Username: Liz_Hand

Jay A Gertzman is studying the contemporary version of the mid-twentieth century pulp crime "newsstand" paperback. In 2018, he published a study of the work of David Goodis, a leading twentieth-century pulp crime writer. It was a finalist for the 2019 Anthony Award for best critical or nonfiction work.


Twitter Username: Jay Gertzman

Website: https://www.facebook.com/Pulp-According-to-David-Goodis-745231742194171/

Virtual

T131.

The Poetics of Film: Five Poets on the Influence & Impact of Cinema

(, , , , )

Whether seen as adults or children, for pleasure or research, films can be as formative for a writer as any literary text. They can shape our aesthetics and our relationship with language and can provide a sense of lineage. They can awaken our civic consciousness and help us to see and be seen. In this panel, five poets will explore how the cinematic world has informed their poetic one and how films have inspired their craft, identity, and passion for the cross-pollination of artistic mediums.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Christopher Kondrich is the author of Valuing, a winner of the National Poetry Series and a finalist for the Believer Book Award, as well as Contrapuntal. Recent work appears in the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day, Bennington Review, Kenyon Review, Paris Review, and Poetry Northwest.


Twitter Username: ChrisKondrich

Chase Berggrun is a trans woman poet and the author of R E D). Her work has appeared in Poetry, APR, Jubilat, and elsewhere. She received her MFA from New York University.


Twitter Username: patriphobe

Jericho Brown celebrates his latest book, The Tradition, at this year's AWP. A Guggenheim fellow and the director of the creative writing program at Emory University, he also wrote Please and The New Testament. His poems have appeared in the New York Times, the New Yorker, and TIME magazine.


Twitter Username: jerichobrown

Website: jerichobrown.com

Sara Eliza Johnson is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in poetry, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, among other honors. Her first book, Bone Map, won the 2013 National Poetry Series. Her second book, Vapor, will be published in 2022.


Twitter Username: saraelizaj

Website: saraelizajohnson.com

Sally Wen Mao is the author of two poetry collections, Oculus and Mad Honey Symposium. She is the recipient of fellowships from the New York Public Library Cullman Center and the Jenny McKean Moore program at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: sallywenmao

Virtual

T132.

Celebrating the Chicago Quarterly Review's Anthology of Black American Literature

(, , , , )

Join the Chicago Quarterly Review for a celebration of its Anthology of Black American Literature, guest-edited by National Book Award winner and MacArthur Fellow Charles Johnson. This reading showcases the breadth of voices that have been brought together in this remarkable issue as well as the Chicago Quarterly Review's commitment to special editions, the fifth in its history. Interspersed with questions and commentary, five contributors of prose and poetry read from their included work.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Cyrus Cassells is the current poet laureate of Texas. His eighth book is The World That the Shooter Left Us (Four Way Books, February 2022). Among his several honors: a Guggenheim fellowship, a Lannan Literary Award, a Lambda Literary Award, two NEA grants, and an NAACP Image Award finalist nomination.

E. Ethelbert Miller is a writer and literary activist. He was inducted into the Washington, DC Hall of Fame in 2015. In 2016 he received the AWP George Garrett Award For Outstanding Community Service in Literature. When Your Wife Has Tommy John Surgery is his most recent book.


Twitter Username: ethelbertpoet

Website: www.eethelbertmiller.com

Mona Lisa Saloy, PhD, folklorist and professor of English at Dillard University, is author of Second Line Home: New Orleans Poems and Red Beans & Ricely Yours. Other work appears in The Southern Poetry Anthology, Louisiana Folklore Miscellany, Children’s Folklore Review, and Forward to Night Sessions.


Twitter Username: redbeansista

Website: www.monalisasaloy.com

Steven Barnes is the New York Times Bestselling author of over thirty novels of science fiction, suspense, and adventure. In addition he writes for television shows such as Outer Limits, Twilight Zone, and Andromeda

E. Hughes is a PhD student in the Program for Writers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She received her MFA and MA from the Litowitz Creative Writing Program at Northwestern University.


Twitter Username: e_hughes_poetry

Virtual

T132B.

Feral Turkeys & Dog Poop Bags: No Subject Is Too Strange for Creative Nonfiction

(, , , , )

Writing and publishing short creative nonfiction for magazines and newspapers trains us to be mindful of the small, strange events in our life and turn them into compelling stories. Feral turkeys uniting a neighborhood at dusk? Growing up in a museum with beer bottle walls? Hundreds of abandoned dog waste bags on hiking trails during the pandemic? We wrote about them all, and editors and readers were thrilled! We'll teach you to write and publish in a similar fashion.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Melissa Hart is contributing editor at the Writer Magazine and teaches for Southern New Hampshire University's MFA program. Her essays have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN, the Los Angeles Times, HuffPost, and the Advocate. She's the author of five books. www.melissahart.com


Twitter Username: WildMelissaHart

Website: www.melissahart.com

Tanya Ward Goodman is the author of the award-winning memoir, Leaving Tinkertown. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous publications including the Los Angeles Times, Coast Magazine, Luxe, Fourth River, and the Washington Post. She is working on a second memoir.


Twitter Username: campfiresally

Merrill Feitell's book, Here Beneath Low-Flying Planes, won the Iowa Short Fiction Award. Her text-image essays and creative nonfiction have appeared in McSweeney's Quarterly, Electric Literature, and LARB. With an MFA from Columbia University, she has taught writing at all levels and in many places.

Michael Copperman teaches writing to diverse students at the University of Oregon. His prose has appeared in the Oxford American, Guernica, Boston Review, Creative Nonfiction, Gulf Coast, and the Sun. His memoir, Teacher, was a finalist for the Oregon Book Awards in Creative Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: MikeCopperman

Jordan Rosenfeld is a writing coach, editor, and the author of six books on writing, most recently How to Write a Page-Turner and the bestselling Make a Scene. Her essays and articles have appeared in The Atlantic, The Rumpus, New York Magazine, Scientific American, and the Washington Post


Twitter Username: JordanRosenfeld

Virtual

T133.

Forgotten Fertile Ground: Contemporary Poetry & Community Colleges

(, , , )

For reasons economic and otherwise, there has been huge growth in the enrollment at community colleges. Many students never get the chance to take a class dedicated to poetry and instead only experience it through Basic Skills or Writing 101 classes. Four experienced community college faculty, poets themselves, will look at motivating ways of mining the poetic talent from community college students. We will discuss methods of eliciting remarkable writing from this often-forgotten segment.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

John Findura holds an MFA from The New School and an EdD from New Jersey City University. He is the author of the poetry collections Submerged (2017) and the forthcoming Useful Shrapnel (2022). John is the Writing Center supervisor at Bergen Community College in New Jersey.


Twitter Username: jfindura

Website: www.johnfindura.com

Brian Cordell holds an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts and is the author of the chapbook In Their Final Performance (2020). Brian is an associate professor at Bergen Community College where he teaches creative writing, composition, technical writing, and literature.


Twitter Username: becordellpoet

Mary Crosby is an assistant professor of English at Bergen Community College, where she teaches composition, creative writing, and literature. She is the editorial advisor of the student literary journal the Labyrinth and author of the poetry chapbooks Alluvium Stream and Cannon Mine.

Mike Matthews is author of two books, Water of Joy and Ashes, published by Finishing Line Press. Mike Matthews has been teaching English writing courses including creative writing for Central Texas College in Killeen, Texas. He is working on a third book.

Virtual

T134.

Staying in Key: Recognizing & Avoiding the False Notes of Anachronism

(, , , , )

Unless you’re writing in an intentionally anachronistic form, like steampunk, you probably know better than to allow your Victorian characters to refer to fax machines or the Beatles. But staying in key involves more than historical and technological accuracy—especially if you write cross-cultural fiction. This panel discusses the many hidden dimensions of anachronism and how to avoid their false notes.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Aimee Liu is the author of the novels Glorious Boy, Flash House, Cloud Mountain, and Face. Her nonfiction includes the memoirs Gaining and Solitaire. Her bestsellers have been published in more than a dozen countries. She teaches in Goddard College's MFA program in creative writing.


Twitter Username: aimee_liu

Website: https://aimeeliu.net/

Keenan Norris is a novelist, essayist, and short story writer. His latest novel is The Confession of Copeland Cane. His short work has appeared in numerous forums, including the Los Angeles Review of Books, Los Angeles Times, and Alta. He teaches at San Jose State University.

Jennifer Steil is a novelist, memoirist, and journalist. She is the author of Exile Music, which won the Grand Prize in the Eyelands 2020 Book Awards and is a finalist for the 2021 Lambda Literary Lesbian Fiction Award; the novel The Ambassador’s Wife; and the memoir The Woman Who Fell From the Sky.


Twitter Username: jfsteil7

Website: www.jennifersteil.net

Donna Hemans is the author of two novels: River Woman and Tea by the Sea. Her fiction and essays have appeared in Slice, Crab Orchard Review, Witness, Ploughshares, and Ms. Magazine, among others. She is the owner of DC Writers Room, a coworking studio for writers, and an editor at Pree.


Twitter Username: donna_hemans

Janet Benton's novel Lilli de Jong is the diary of an unwed Quaker in 1883 Philadelphia who fights to keep her baby despite fierce prejudice. She has taught writing at five universities and in private workshops for decades and has been an editor and mentor to hundreds of writers. janetbentonauthor.com


Twitter Username: janet_benton

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T112.

When Women Break Bad: Writing Unladylike Rage

(, , , , )

There is such a profound cultural discomfort around women's anger, especially women's rage, that when it is depicted, it is generally either sublimated or fetishized. Those who aren't are often coded as masculine, mentally ill, or victimized (or all three). While many male protagonists are more antihero than hero, "bad" women risk the deadly label of "unlikable." Five exceptional authors representing fiction, nonfiction, and poetry discuss the pitfalls and joys of being unladylike on the page.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Leigh Camacho Rourks is the author of the St. Lawrence Book Award winner, Moon Trees and Other Orphans. An assistant professor of English and humanities at Beacon College, she is also the recipient of the Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Award and the Robert Watson Literary Review Prize. 


Twitter Username: DrScaredWriter

Website: lcrourks.com

Rebecca Hazelwood is an essayist/memoirist who has been published widely in literary magazines. She currently teaches at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. She holds an MFA in creative writing and a PhD in English/creative writing. She is currently finishing a memoir.


Twitter Username: rlhazelwood

Sharon Harrigan is the author of the novel Half and the memoir Playing with Dynamite. She has published over fifty short pieces in the New York TimesVirginia Quarterly Review, Literary Hub, and elsewhere. She teaches creative writing at WriterHouse, a literary center in Charlottesville, Virginia.


Twitter Username: harrigan_sharon

Website: www.sharonharrigan.net

Nikki Dolson is the author of Love and Other Criminal Behavior and All Things Violent. Her short fiction has been published in TriQuarterly, Thuglit, Bartleby Snopes, Day One, and other journals. Her work has been selected for The Best American Mystery and Suspense 2021.


Twitter Username: NikkiDolson

Alison Pelegrin is the author of four poetry collections, most recently Our Lady of Bewilderment and Waterlines. She is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Louisiana Division of the Arts and is Writer in Residence at Southeastern Louisiana University.


Twitter Username: AlisonPelegrin

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T113.

Disrupting the Lexicon: Making Meaning with Polyglot Texts

(, , , , )

Poets and novelists who collectively speak ten languages will explore how words, phrases, and cadences in other languages—in or out of translation—help create meaning, context, atmosphere, and connection in English-language texts. Are there rules for writing with multiple languages? Who makes them? Whom do they serve? What are practical, artistic, and ethical considerations for writers incorporating other languages? How does language inform the way we navigate and write the world?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Amy Brill is the author of The Movement of Stars and a 2015 NYFA fiction fellow. Her stories and essays have appeared in One Story, the Common, and numerous anthologies. Her first translation, La Caimana (The Caiman) is out in 2022. Her new novel is set in a Yiddish-speaking community in 1930s Cuba.


Twitter Username: amy_brill

Website: http://www.amybrill.com

Nathalie Handal's recent books include Life in a Country Album, which “illuminates the luxuriance and longing of deracination—a contemporary Orpheus,” and The Republics, lauded as “one of the most inventive books by one of today’s most diverse writers." She is a professor at Columbia University.


Twitter Username: TheCityWriter

Website: www.nathaliehandal.com

Ru Freeman is an internationally recognized Sri Lankan and American poet, novelist, and critic. Her works include Sleeping Alone (2022) and On Sal Mal Lane (2013) and Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers on Palestine (2015). She directs the Artists Network at Narrative 4 and teaches worldwide.


Twitter Username: rufreeman

Website: www.rufreeman.com

Courtney Maum is the author of the novels Costalegre, Touch, I Am Having So Much Fun Here without You, and the forthcoming humor guide for writers Before and After the Book Deal: A Writer's Guide to Finishing, Publishing, Promoting and Surviving Your First Book. courtneymaum.com


Twitter Username: cmaum

Website: https://www.courtneymaum.com/

Rosa Alcalá is the author of three books of poetry, most recently MyOTHER TONGUE (Futurepoem, 2017). Recipient of an NEA Translation Fellowship, her translations are included in Cecilia Vicuña: New & Selected Poems (Kelsey Street, 2017), which she also edited. She teaches at the University of Texas at El Paso.


Twitter Username: myothertongue

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T114.

The Gift of Attention: The Writing Workshop Moving Forward

(, , , )

The workshop model has increasingly come under attack as a tool of power, privilege, racism, and colonialism. Is this pedagogy—the basis of creative-writing curricula for more than eighty years—on the verge of annihilation? This panel uses the idea of workshop apocalypse as both a lifting away of old ideas and anew beginning to look at which elements of the workshop should be salvaged from the wreckage—a subject explored in The Gift of Attention, forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press. 

Add to schedule

William Lychack is the author, most recently of the novel Cargill Falls. His work has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, the Pushcart Prize, and on public radio’s This American Life. He teaches at the University of Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: lychack

Miles Harvey is coauthor, with William Lychack, of The Gift of Attention, a user’s guide to the creative writing classroom, forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press. His previous books include The King of Confidence and The Island of Lost Maps. He teaches creative writing at DePaul.


Twitter Username: MilesHa91389803

Yona Harvey is the author of You Don’t Have to Go to Mars for Love, winner of the Believer Book Award, and Hemming the Water, winner of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. She teaches in the University of Pittsburgh writing program.


Twitter Username: yonaharvey

Website: www.yonaharvey.com

Amina Gautier is the author of three short story collections: At-Risk, Now We Will Be Happy, and The Loss of All Lost Things. For her body of work she has received the PEN/MALAMUD Award for Excellence in the Short Story.


Twitter Username: DrAminaGautier

Website: https://aminagautier.wordpress.com/

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T115.

Poetry Makes Things Happen: Feminists Writing for Social Change

(, , , , )

In Louisville, KY, the city where Breonna Taylor was killed, the Kentucky Foundation for Women (KFW) resides and promotes the importance of social change through feminist expression. In 2020 alone, KFW granted $301,960 to KY artists. Panelists will share their funded projects that includes giving voice to BIPOC women, telling the stories of incarcerated women, and exploring what it means to be queer in Appalachia—and will show why more foundations like KFW are essential, especially now.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Sharon LaRue, executive director of the Kentucky Foundation for Women, is proud to lead an organization that honors the feminist perspective of collective strength and recognizes that art is a powerful catalyst for transformational change. She invites artists to claim their power to act!

Savannah Sipple is the author of WWJD & Other Poems. A professor, mentor, and editor, she is also the recipient of grants from The Barbara Deming Fund/Money for Women and the Kentucky Foundation for Women.


Twitter Username: savsip

Mariam I. Williams is a writer, dancer, and educator who received her first grant in 2008 from the Kentucky Foundation for Women. In 2019, she founded the Black Womanhood Re-Affirmation Project to reaffirm the resilience of Black women through literature, writing, and dance.


Twitter Username: missmariamw

DaMaris B. Hill, PhD, is a writer. Her books include Breath Better Spent: Living Black Girlhood, A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing, The Fluid Boundaries of Suffrage, Jim Crow: Staking Claims in the American Heartland, and \Vi-zə-bəl\ \Teks-chərs\.


Twitter Username: damarishill

Website: https://english.as.uky.edu/users/dbhi222

Kelly Moffett is an associate professor at Northern Kentucky University. She has three poetry collections, one chapbook, and another collection on its way. She is the recipient of five Kentucky Foundation for Women grants as well as a Fulbright Grant. www.kellymoffett.com

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T116.

Telling Tales (& Tankas) Out of School: University Presses Seeking Creative Work

(, , , , )

Most University Presses (UPs) can’t bestow six-figure advances, fly authors to events around the globe, or dedicate months to building media buzz, but because they aren’t profit-driven, UPs take risks and champion voices other houses may overlook. As a result, their creative titles regularly win awards, break conventions, and enrich the literary conversation. The directors and editors on this panel will discuss the many benefits of publishing with UPs as well as share manuscript wish lists.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Katie Cortese is the author of Girl Power and Other Short-Short Stories and Make Way for Her and Other Stories. Her work recently appeared in Indiana Review, Wigleaf, Animal, and elsewhere. She teaches at Texas Tech University, and she is the fiction editor for Iron Horse Literary Review.


Twitter Username: KatieCortese

Website: www.katiecortese.com

Lisa Bayer is director of the University of Georgia Press, where she launched the Crux creative nonfiction series and secured Roxane Gay as current judge of the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. Her publishing career spans thirty years and began with a paid internship.


Twitter Username: lisambayer

Courtney Ochsner is an associate acquisitions editor at the University of Nebraska Press, where she acquires trade creative works and oversees their series-based poetry program. She has worked in scholarly publishing since 2009.

Jim McCoy is the director of the University of Iowa Press. He has worked in the book world since 1992 for Waterstone's, the University of Chicago Press, and the University of Iowa Press. He received his BA in English from Indiana University.

Parneshia Jones is the author of Vessel: Poems, winner of the Midwest Book Award. She is recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award and the Aquarius Press Legacy Award. Jones serves as director at Northwestern University Press.


Twitter Username: parneshia

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T117.

AWP Program Directors’ Plenary Assembly

All AWP program directors should attend this meeting to represent their programs and to hear from AWP's board of directors and executive director about new and ongoing AWP initiatives that benefit their students, alumni, and faculty. The chair of the AWP Board and chair of the Professional Standards Committee will lead a review of the AWP Guidelines for Creative Writing Programs & Teachers of Creative Writing and ask for feedback about any needed revisions from program directors. It would be helpful for program directors to review this document before attending the meeting. Immediately after this plenary, directors attend breakouts to review and provide feedback for the ongoing revisions of AWP Hallmarks.

Add to schedule

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T118.

What It Means to Be Free

(, , , , )

In his 1983 “Letter to Prisoners,” James Baldwin writes: "What artists and prisoners have in common is that we both know what it means to be free." For the writer and activist concerned with social justice, the mass incarceration system in the US is the final frontier of arts programming and writing workshops. Writers and educators within the system will discuss trauma-informed pedagogical strategies, censorship, and structures you can implement for correctional engagement in your community.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Jen Fitzgerald is a poet, essayist, and photographer. She is the founder of Arthur Kill Books. Her first full-length collection, The Art of Work, was published by Noemi Press in 2016. Her work has appeared in such venues as PBS NewsHour, Tin House, Boston Review, and NER. JenFitzgerald.com


Twitter Username: bestfitzgerald

Website: www.jenfitzgerald.com

Gigi Blanchard is a writer and founder of The Kite, which facilitates storytelling workshops in detention centers for youth in adults across NYC. Her work draws on her own experience of coming of age in youth prisons, and she is currently seeking representation for her forthcoming memoir. gigiblanchard.com

Ravi Shankar, Pushcart-prize winning author of Correctional and professor at Tufts University, has written fifteen books. Chairman of Asia Pacific Writers & Translators and founder of Drunken Boat, he has won fellowships from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, and PEN. He has appeared on the BBC, PBS, and NPR and in the New York Times and the Paris Review.


Twitter Username: empurpler

Website: http://www.poetravishankar.com

Rosalyn Spencer, educator and advocate, holds a BA in English, MLS in public library studies, and MEd in educational leadership. She directs youth art programs and teaches English Language Arts in greater New Orleans. She is a grant writer, advocate, and supporter of the arts in education and equitable curriculum.

Jessica Hall, LMSW, is the founder and executive director of Prison Writes. Jessica has over two decades experience working with marginalized and vulnerable populations and graduated with honors from the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College with a focus on community organizing.


Twitter Username: prisonwrites

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T119.

Publishing Your First Story Collection

(, , , , )

Finding a publisher for a collection of short stories continues to be a daunting task. Five prize-winning authors lead a discussion detailing their journeys to publishing their first books. They will talk about how they landed their first publications, how they developed and shaped their short story collections, how they began to look for publishers, and other related topics such as submitting fiction to journals and national contests, querying agents, and overcoming rejection.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, a Russian Armenian, has published fifty stories and won the 2013 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction, the 2015 T. Williams scholarship from the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and the 2020 Raz/Shumaker Prairie Schooner Book Prize for her first collection, What Isn’t Remembered.


Twitter Username: kgnewberry

Matthew Lansburgh's collection of linked stories, Outside Is the Ocean, won the Iowa Short Fiction Award and was a finalist for the thirtieth Annual Lambda Literary Award and the 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction. He has received fellowships from Bread Loaf, Sewanee, Yaddo, and MacDowell.


Twitter Username: senorlansburgh

Website: www.matthewlansburgh.com

Caroline Kim is the author of a collection of short stories about the Korean diaspora, The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories, which won the 2020 Drue Heinz Prize in Literature and was longlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Short Story Collections and the Story Prize.


Twitter Username: carolinewriting

Rachel Swearingen's How to Walk on Water and Other Stories, winner of the 2018 New American Press Prize, was a New York Times "New & Noteworthy" selection and one of Electric Lit's favorite collections for 2020. Her stories have appeared in the Missouri Review, Kenyon Review, and Agni.


Twitter Username: rachelswearinge

Website: www.rachelswearinge.com

Jen Fawkes's debut book, Mannequin and Wife, was a 2020 Shirley Jackson Award Nominee, won two 2020 Foreword INDIES, and was named one of Largehearted Boy's Favorite Short Story Collections of 2020. Her second book, Tales the Devil Told Me, won the 2020 Press 53 Award for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: fawkesontherun

Website: jenfawkes.com

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T120.

Poetry & Place: Connecting Who We Are to Where We Are

(, , , , )

Poems of place not only describe and document locations: they reveal how we internalize place and how it impacts our lives. It can be said that where we are is who we are. Whether we are Indigenous, lifelong residents, recent transplants, or just passing through, places change us, and we in turn change them. US poets representing Alaska, Hawai‘i, the Mojave Desert, northern California, and the East Coast will read and discuss poems showing relationship to place, including cities and wilderness.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Lucille Lang Day is the award-winning author of eleven poetry collections, including Birds of San Pancho; two children’s books; and a memoir. A coeditor of two poetry anthologies, Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California and Red Indian Road West, she is the founder and publisher of Scarlet Tanager Books.


Twitter Username: LucilleLDay

Website: https://lucillelangday.com

Anne Coray’s novel Lost Mountain is a love story inspired by the Pebble Mine project. Author of three poetry collections, her work has appeared in North American Review, Kestrel, Poetry, and AQR. She has received fellowships from the Alaska State Council on the Arts and the Rasmuson Foundation.

Ruth Nolan, MFA, MA, is the author of Ruby Mountain (poems), editor of No Place for a Puritan: The Literature of CA's Deserts, and coeditor of Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of CA. She is professor of English, creative writing, and Native American literature at College of the Desert, Palm Desert, California.


Twitter Username: ruthnolan

Eric Paul Shaffer is author of seven poetry volumes, including Even Further West; A Million-Dollar Bill; Lāhaina Noon; and Portable Planet. He received Hawai‘i’s 2002 Elliot Cades Award for Literature and two Ka Palapala Po‘okela Book Awards. He is a professor at Honolulu Community College.

Ron Welburn (Accomac Cherokee) grew up in Philadelphia and is an emeritus English professor at University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he costarted the Native Studies program. His poems have appeared in over 125 literary outlets, and his seventh poetry book is Council Decisions: Selected Poems, Expanded Edition.

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T121.

American Regional Poets Laureate

(, , , , )

What does it involve to be a poet laureate of a state, city, or county? The five laureates on this panel, each of whom has received a laureate fellowship from the Academy of American Poets, come from diverse locations and backgrounds, just as the style of their poems is diverse. What do they hope to accomplish as their local poet laureate? What has it meant for them to be appointed poet laureate of their community, and what has it meant for their community?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Lloyd Schwartz is Frederick S. Troy Professor of English Emeritus at UMass Boston. He has five poetry books and has had poems chosen for a Pushcart Prize and The Best of the Best American Poetry. Guggenheim Fellow and Pulitzer Prize-winning critic, he has edited three books by and about Elizabeth Bishop.


Twitter Username: LloydSchwartz

Bobby LeFebre is an award-winning writer, performer, and cultural worker fusing a nontraditional, multihyphenated professional identity to imagine new realities, empower communities, advance arts and culture, and serve as an agent of provocation, transformation, equity and social change.


Twitter Username: bobbylefebre

Leslie Contreras Schwartz is a 2021 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow and the 2019–2021 Houston poet laureate. She teaches at Alma College's MFA low-residency program in creative writing. She is the author of four collections of poetry, including Black Dove / Paloma Negra.


Twitter Username: @lesliecontrerasschwartz

Brian Sonia-Wallace is the poet laureate of the City of West Hollywood and author of The Poetry of Strangers, which details his journey to write poems for 10,000 people across America on a typewriter as poet in residence at Amtrak, Mall of America, and Google.


Twitter Username: rentpoet

Georgina Marie is the Lake County poet laureate for 2020–2024, the first Mexican American and youngest to serve in this role for the county. She has received support from the Mendocino Coast Writers’ Conference, the Napa Valley Writers’ Conference, and the Academy of American Poets.


Twitter Username: higeorginamarie

Website: georginamariepoet.com

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T122.

Living & Writing the LGBTQIA Rural Life

(, , , , )

This panel discusses the complexities, challenges and opportunities queer writers can face when writing in and about rural communities. LGBTQIA presenters of various walks of life and career stages explore this question from perspectives that include multigenerational inhabitants of rural US communities and transnational experiences. We consider the possibilities for creating queer writing alliances across social differences, geographies, careers, and disciplines.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Catharine Wright teaches courses such as Writing Gender and Sexuality and Outlaw Women at Middlebury College. She has earned prizes for her fiction, nonfiction, and poetry in literary, queer, and feminist magazines. She just wrote a novel about a queer town clerk in a rural town.

François Clemmons, PhD, won a Grammy for a recording of Porgy and Bess, founded the Harlem Spiritual Ensemble, and was famously Officer Clemmons, the neighborhood policeman on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. His recently published memoir intimately details his life story as an artist with rural roots.

Estela González's narratives on race, class, gender, sexuality, and environmental justice appear in the Barcelona Review, Flash Frontier, Flyway, Label Me Latina, Solstice Literary Magazine, and several anthologies. Her novel Arribada was a finalist for the Feminist Press’s Louise Meriwether Award.


Twitter Username: 5estelagonzalez

Website: estelagonzalez.net

Alex Bacchus—hyperpolyglot, Fulbright alum, and multidisciplinary artist—is expected to graduate in 2022. Their artistry is inspired by holding queer, racialized identities; descending from free and forced migrations; and unpacking these profound meanings while living in North America.


Twitter Username: mxtheydiealex

Patricia Powell is the author of Me Dying TrialA Small Gathering of BonesThe Pagoda, and The Fullness of Everything. She is the recipient of a PEN award, a Lila Wallace Reader's Digest Writer's Award, and the Ferro-Grumley award for queer fiction. Powell teaches in the MFA program at Mills College.


Twitter Username: patriciapowell

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T123.

Writing Disaster: Imagine, Reveal, Reckon, Repair

(, , , )

What role can writers play in an era of compounding environmental disasters? Some writers use their craft to bear witness to an increasingly unlivable world; others go further, not only addressing the connections between hazard and harm, violence and vulnerability, but also taking action to repair and compelling others to do the same. These writers will discuss how our work makes possible (or fails to make possible) ways of reimagining how we can evolve in this moment of unprecedented urgency.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Emily Raboteau is the author of a novel, The Professor's Daughter, and a work of creative nonfiction, Searching for Zion: The Quest for Home in the African Diaspora, winner of an American Book Award. She is a professor in the MFA program at the City College of New York.


Twitter Username: emilyraboteau

Website: www.emilyraboteau.com

Kerri Arsenault is a book critic, teacher, book editor at Orion Magazine, contributing editor at Literary Hub, and author of Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains.


Twitter Username: kerriarsenault

Cinelle Barnes is the Philippine-born author of Monsoon Mansion and Malaya: Essays on Freedom and editor of A Measure of Belonging: Twenty-One Writers of Color on the New American South. She's received support from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, Capita, VONA, and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund, among others.

Lacy M. Johnson is a Houston-based professor, curator, activist, and is author of the essay collection The Reckonings, the widely acclaimed memoir The Other Side, and Trespasses: A Memoir. She teaches creative nonfiction at Rice University.


Twitter Username: lacymjohnson

Website: www.lacymjohnson.com

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T124.

Teaching Point of View: The Pedagogy of Perspective

(, , )

Writing students contend with reverberating questions about point of view, especially around issues of representation and narrative ownership. Why first person versus third person? Why does one work call for epic omniscience and another present tense? What happens when we give voice to those who are unlike us? This panel asks professors of creative writing how they approach the pedagogy of perspective. What practices best support our students’ critical thinking and imaginative abilities?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Sarah Braunstein is the author of The Sweet Relief of Missing Children. Her fiction and essays have appeared in the New Yorker, Playboy, Ploughshares, AGNI, Harvard Review, and the Sun. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Colby College in Maine.

Dolen Perkins-Valdez is the New York Times bestselling author of two novels: Wench and Balm. Her forthcoming novel Take My Hand will be published by Berkley/Penguin Random House. She is an associate professor in the MFA program at American University in Washington, DC.


Twitter Username: Dolen

Website: www.DolenPerkinsValdez.com

Mark Mayer is the author of Aerialists (Bloomsbury), shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. His stories have appeared in American Short Fiction, Kenyon Review, Guernica, and The Iowa Review. He is assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Memphis.

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T125.

2022 Debut Authors Discuss: How to Prepare for the Book Deal

(, , , , )

You've workshopped, revised, and even saved a "final draft" of your book-length work of fiction—so now what? Five debut authors discuss when and how to acquire a literary agent, considerations for going on submission to publishers, navigating auctions, international book sales, and shopping film rights, and what happens between the book deal and publication. Panelists from a diverse array of writing communities speak on their experiences to demystify the journey from writer to published author.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Jonathan Escoffery is the author of If I Survive You (FSG/ MCD 2022). He is the recipient of the Paris Review's Plimpton Prize, the ASME Award for Fiction, and a NEA fellowship. He is a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University and a doctoral fellow in USC's creative writing and literature program.


Twitter Username: J_Escoffery

Website: jonathanescoffery.com

Daphne Palasi Andreades is the author of the debut novel Brown Girls. She has received a 2021 O. Henry Prize, the Kenyon Review's 2019 Short Fiction Prize, and scholarships to Bread Loaf and Sewanee. She earned her MFA from Columbia University, where she was awarded the 2018 Henfield Prize.


Twitter Username: DaphnePalasiA

Website: https://daphnepalasiandreades.com/

Xochitl Gonzalez has an MFA from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop where she was an Iowa Arts Fellow and recipient of the Michener-Copernicus Prize in Fiction. She was the winner of the 2019 Disquiet Literary Prize. 


Twitter Username: xochitltheg

Website: xochitlgonzalez.com

Cleyvis Natera is the author of the forthcoming novel Neruda on the Park.


Twitter Username: cleyvisnatera

Jean Chen Ho is the author of Fiona and Jane. She is a doctoral candidate in literature and creative writing at the University of Southern California, where she is a Dornsife Fellow in fiction. Her writing appears in Georgia Review, GQ, Harper's Bazaar, Guernica, Apogee Journal, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jeanho

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T126.

This Is How We Do It: Periplus Collective Mentoring BIPOC Writers

(, , Kimberly Wong, , )

In an open chat, Periplus mentors Lan Samantha Chang and Adrienne Raphel and fellows Kimberly Wong and Dasia Moore will share their experiences about mentorship. Formed in 2020, the Periplus Collective of more than fifty writers is committed to mentoring fellows—promising BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of color) writers in the US who are at an early stage in their careers. Hear why Periplus was formed, what works or not, and how to make the most of mentorship as a fellow or a mentor!

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Bix Gabriel is a writer, teacher of creative writing, editor at the Offing magazine, 2021 Periplus Fellow, and occasional Tweeter. Her writing appears in the anthology A Map is Only One Story, Longleaf Review, Catapult, Guernica, and Electric Literature, among others.


Twitter Username: BixGabriel

Lan Samantha Chang is the author of The Family Chao, Inheritance, All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost, and Hunger: A Novella and Stories. The recipient of a 2021 Berlin Prize Fellowship, she is director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Adrienne Raphel is the author of Thinking Inside the Box and What Was It For. Her essays, poetry, and criticism appear widely. She holds a PhD from Harvard, an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and a BA from Princeton, where she currently teaches.


Twitter Username: AdrienneRaphel

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T127.

South Asian American Writers Charting New Narratives

(, , , , )

The event brings together five south Asian American writers writing in diverse registers. Kirtan Nautiyal and Chaya Murali use their background in the medical profession to explore issues of class, racism, and the human body. Anuradha Kumar reads from her latest collection described as "subtle, brief, quiet even." Torsa Ghosal reads from her experimental fiction. Moazzam Sheikh reads from his fiction known for mixing interiority with external events of life.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Moazzam Sheikh is the author of The Idol Lover and Other Stories and Cafe Le Whore and Other Stories. He guest-edited Chicago Quarterly Review's special South Asian American issue (2017), which received notable mention in Best American Essays. His fiction and reviews have been published widely.

Anuradha Kumar has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts and recently wrote A Sense of Time and Other Stories and The Hottest Summer in Years. She has written other novels for Hachette India, books for young readers, and she writes regularly for Scroll.in.


Twitter Username: anuradhakumar01

Torsa Ghosal is the author of an experimental novella, Open Couplets, and a book of literary criticism, Out of Mind. Her shorter writings have appeared in Necessary Fiction, Literary Hub, and Entropy. She is a professor of English at California State University and is at work on a second novel.


Twitter Username: TorsaG

Kirtan Nautiyal is a practicing hematologist/oncologist near Houston, Texas. His nonfiction has been published or is upcoming in Crazyhorse, Guernica, the Southern Review, Boulevard, Longreads, and McSweeney's Internet Tendency. He is currently a senior nonfiction reader for Ploughshares.


Twitter Username: kirtan_nautiyal

Chaya Nautiyal Murali is a pediatric geneticist and Pushcart Prize-nominated personal essayist. Her work, which centers on family, identity, and inheritance, has appeared in SFWP Quarterly, Barely South Review, Aster(ix), and elsewhere. 


Twitter Username: Chayasays

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T128.

The Vast Importance of Small Spaces in Nature

(, , , , )

How do creative nonfiction writers craft layered or intricate essays by focusing on small spaces, or what others might somehow overlook? A creek, a garden, a park, a tide pool, an ant hill, a sand dune, a river’s reach, a prairie dog burrow, an owl’s nest—our panel will discuss how we apply close observation and contemplation to reveal larger issues about the environment in our work. Protest or preservation can take root in the most commonly known or miniature and otherwise unseen places.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Allen Gee is the DL Jordan Endowed Professor of creative writing and editor of CSU Press at Columbus State University. He is author of My Chinese-America (essays), and At Little Monticello (a forthcoming biography of James Alan McPherson).


Twitter Username: allenrgee

Website: www.allengee.com

Susan Fox Rogers is the author of My Reach: A Hudson River Memoir and the editor of eleven anthologies including Antarctica: Life on the Ice, compiled via an NSF grant, and When Birds Are Near: Dispatches from Contemporary Writers. She has been writer in residence at Bard College since 2001.


Twitter Username: SusanFoxRogers1

Sean Hill, the author of two books of poems, Dangerous Goods and Blood Ties & Brown Liquor, directs the Minnesota Northwoods Writers Conference. His honors and awards include a fellowship from the NEA. His poems have appeared in journals and in anthologies including Black Nature and Villanelles.


Twitter Username: adamalzeal

Website: http://www.seanhillpoetry.com

Renata Golden has published numerous essays online and in print about the natural world. She is working on an essay collection about the Chiricahua Mountains where the borders of two states and two countries meet. She holds an MFA from the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: RenataMGolden

Website: renatagolden.com

CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems and coeditor of Native Voices. Cmarie is director of Elk River Writers Workshop and faculty in the graduate program in creative writing at Western Colorado University.

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

T109.

AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Butler University MFA in Creative Writing

With more than 600 literary exhibitors, the AWP Bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

Add to schedule

Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

T110.

Bookfair Concessions, Bar & Lounge

Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference program or mobile app for location details. Due to COVID-19 precautions, eating and drinking is limited to designated areas.

Add to schedule

126B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T111.

The Wick Poetry Center’s Traveling Stanzas Makerspace

The Wick Poetry Center’s Traveling Stanzas Makerspace offers conference attendees an opportunity to creatively engage with themes of health and healing, social and racial justice, nature and environment, and peace and conflict. This interactive exhibit invites participants to share their voice using a suite of digital expressive writing tools, such as Emerge (an erasure poetry app), Thread (community-generated poems), and the Listening Wall (thematically-driven touch-screen poetry displays). Visitors will be able to choose a theme, follow a prompt, then print and share their responses. More information can be found at http://travelingstanzas.com.

Add to schedule

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

T154.

What’s Form Got to Do with It: Finding Shape in Memoir Projects

(, , , )

How do you write the story of your life if words are not enough? Panelists interrogate traditional forms to explore how resisting, reimagining, and rebuilding memoir expectations allows writers to more accurately tell true stories. Panelists will discuss their diverse projects, including memoirs-in-essays, memoirs in stories and essays, memoirs incorporating research and theory, memoirs using image, and illustrated memoir, offering strategies for discovering the form for your memoir.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Sarah Fawn Montgomery is the author of Quite Mad: An American Pharma Memoir and three poetry chapbooks. She is an assistant professor at Bridgewater State University.


Twitter Username: SF_Montgomery

Tyrese Coleman is an essayist and fiction writer. She is the author of How to Sit, a 2019 PEN Open Book Award Finalist, and the forthcoming Spectacle.


Twitter Username: tylachelleco

Marcos Gonsalez is a queer Mexican Puerto Rican memoirist, essayist, and assistant professor. Gonsalez's debut blended memoir, Pedro's Theory, (2021) has been reviewed by the New York Times and Kirkus. Gonsalez's essays can be found at Lit Hub, New Inquiry, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: MarcosSGonsalez

Krys Malcolm Belc is a transmasculine essayist. He has published a chapbook of flash nonfiction, In Transit, and his essays have been featured in Granta, Brevity, the Rumpus, and elsewhere. His work has been supported by the Sustainable Arts Foundation.


Twitter Username: krysmalcolmbelc

Virtual

T155.

Story & Sound: The McSweeney's Audio Issue

(, , , )

Join us for a discussion about and live performance of McSweeney's Quarterly's first ever audio issue—a riotous exploration of audiovisual storytelling, coproduced with Radiotopia from PRX. We'll talk about the the way sound and text can come together to create an immersive experience of story and experience live excerpts of a handful of pieces in the issue.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Andrew Leland's book about blindness is forthcoming from Penguin Press. He hosted and produced the Organist for KCRW and has been an editor at the Believer since 2003. His writing has been featured in the New York Times Magazine, 99% Invisible, McSweeney’s, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: quailty

Rion Amilcar Scott is the author of story collections The World Doesn't Require You and Insurrections, which won the 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. He earned an MFA from George Mason University and teaches English at the University of Maryland.


Twitter Username: reeamilcarscott

Andy Slater is a media artist, researcher, and disability advocate living in Berwyn, Illinois. His heroes are Jim Rockford, Pauline Oliveros, and Darryl McDaniels. 

Shayla Lawz is a writer and interdisciplinary artist from Jersey City, New Jersey. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Jack Jones Literary Arts, and CAAPP. Her debut collection speculation, n. was chosen by Ilya Kaminsky for the 2020 Autumn House Poetry Prize. She teaches at Pratt Institute.


Twitter Username: shaylalawz

Virtual

T157.

Mi Casa Es Su Casa: A Bilingual Event for Latinx Writers

(, , , Daniel Reschinga)

Uprooted writers discuss themes of home, displacement, and rerooting in aid of diverse literature. These authors had one more barrier: their work had to be translated or reconceived to reflect their uprootedness for this book, giving us a view we seldom see: the path of the writer before he becomes acculturated. What happens to the work of those "just-arriveds"? Is it lost? How can we prevent it if so? (This event will be held mostly in Spanish.)

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Anjanette Delgado is a novelist and journalist who writes about identity, displacement, and heartbreak, often through immigrant characters from Caribbean countries. Author of The Heartbreak Pill and The Clairvoyant of Calle Ocho, she holds an MFA in CRW from FIU.


Twitter Username: anjanettedelgad

Hernán Vera Álvarez, sometimes known as “Vera,” is the author of La librería del mal salvaje, winner of a Florida Book Award; Grand Nocturno; La vida enferma; and Los románticos eléctricos. He is editor of the anthologies Viaje One WayMiami (Un)plugged; Don´t cry for me, América; and Escritorxs Salvajes.


Twitter Username: HVeraAlvarez

Caridad Moro-Gronlier is the author of Tortillera. She is a contributing editor of Grabbed: Writers Respond to Sexual Assault and associate editor for SWWIM Every Day. A career educator, she is an English professor in Miami, Florida.


Twitter Username: CaridadMoro1

Virtual

T158.

New Poetry from Graywolf Press

(, , , , )

Five extraordinary poets will present and read from their new collections published by Graywolf Press, one of the leading independent publishers in the country. In singular, profound voices, these poets reckon with the gravity of what it is to witness and live through the vital struggles and issues of our time—colonialism, domestic violence, police murders, racism, sexuality, existential grief, mortality—and, with care, disrupt the borders between our interior and political realities.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Tracy K. Smith is a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, memoirist, translator, and librettist who served as poet laureate of the United States from 2017–19. She is a professor of English and African and African American Studies at Harvard University.

Vijay Seshadri is the author of five collections of poems: Wild Kingdom, The Long Meadow, The Disappearances, 3 Sections, and That Was Now, This Is Then. His work has been recognized with a number of honors, including the Pulitzer Prize.

Jim Moore's book of poetry, Prognosis, was published by Graywolf in November, 2021. He is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in poetry and has been writing poems for more than fifty years. 

Donika Kelly is the author of the full-length collections The Renunciations and Bestiary. She is an assistant professor at the University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: officialdonika

Virtual

T159.

Asian Diasporic Poets Writing into Mythology

(, , , , )

Each of the poets on this panel uses mythology as a centering device in their own writing. Each poet will begin by reading one or two poems. We will then explore questions such as: What is the mythic? What is the value of writing through and alongside mythology for Asian diasporic poets? How can poetic myth and mythmaking serve as productive scaffolding and sites of new narrative possibilities? How does myth allow poets to access intergenerational, cultural, and communal discourses?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Jasmine An is the author of two chapbooks of poetry: Naming the No-Name Woman and Monkey Was Here. She has been awarded residencies at Hedgebrook and Willapa Bay AiR. Poetry editor for Agape Editions, she is pursuing a PhD in women’s studies and English at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: JasmineAn

Maria Isabelle Carlos is a writer from Missouri. A graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill and the MFA program at Vanderbilt University, she is the assistant nonfiction editor of Zone 3 Press and the editor of Inch, a quarterly series of microchapbooks from Bull City Press. Read more at www.mariaisabellecarlos.com


Twitter Username: mariacarlospoet

Website: www.mariaisabellecarlos.com

Lo Kwa Mei-en is the author of Yearling and The Bees Make Money in the Lion. She works in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Twitter Username: loekwa

Website: www.lokwameien.com

Nandini Dhar is a bilingual poet who writes in English and her native language, Bangla. She is the author of three books, one in English, and two in Bangla—Historians of Redundant Moments), Jitakshara), and Ma-Rupak Khelchhi Na.

Carlina Duan is the author of Alien Miss and I Wore My Blackest Hair. She received her MFA in poetry from Vanderbilt University and she is currently a PhD student in the Joint Program in English and Education at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: ccduan

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T135.

AWP Program Directors' of Traditional MFA in Creative Writing Programs

If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member of a traditional creative writing program, you should attend this session that will review ongoing revisions and garner feedback on "AWP Hallmarks of a Successful MFA Program in Creative Writing." It would be helpful for directors to review their hallmarks before attending this breakout.

Add to schedule

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T136.

AWP Program Directors' of Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Programs

If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member low-residency creative writing program, you should attend this session that will review ongoing revisions and garner feedback on "AWP Hallmarks of an Effective Low-Residency MFA Program in Creative Writing." It would be helpful for directors to review their hallmarks before attending this breakout.

Add to schedule

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T137.

Socializing the Nature Poem: The Nonhuman World & Identity

(, , , , )

As Audre Lorde said, “Our visions are essential to create that which has never been, and we must each learn to use all of who we are to achieve those visions.” The “nature poem” was never just about nature. When we look at anything, we put ourselves into that gaze. Five poets of diverse backgrounds share poems that engage with the more-than-human world in ways that are accurate, ethical, nuanced, and surprising, connecting gender, race, geography, sexuality, and culture.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Derek Sheffield's collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. He is the poetry editor of Terrain.org and a coeditor of Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy and Cascadia: A Field Guide through Art, Ecology, and Poetry.


Twitter Username: terrainorg

Website: www.dereksheffield.com

Chaun Ballard’s chapbook, Flight, was the winner of the 2018 Sunken Garden Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Narrative Magazine, Rattle, the New York Times, Terrain.org, Tupelo Quarterly, and other literary magazines.

Michael Wasson, author of Swallowed Light, is a 2019 Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellow and a 2018 NACF National Artist Fellow in Literature. He is nimíipuu from the Nez Perce Reservation in Idaho.

Elizabeth (Betsy) Aoki is a videogame producer and National Poetry Series finalist. Her awards include: Artist Trust, City of Seattle, Hedgebrook, Clarion West Writers Workshop (speculative fiction). Her first book of poems about technology, Breakpoint, is forthcoming in 2022.


Twitter Username: baoki

Brian Teare is the author of six critically acclaimed books of poetry, most recently The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven and Doomstead Days. An associate professor at the University of Virginia, he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T138.

AWP Program Directors of BFA Programs or BA Majors in Creative Writing

If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member BFA program or BA major writing program, you should attend this session that will review ongoing revisions and garner feedback on "AWP Hallmarks of an Effective BFA Program or BA Major in Creative Writing." It would be helpful for directors to review their hallmarks before attending this breakout.

Add to schedule

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T139.

Contemporary Writing at an Art School: A Reading by Alumni & Faculty from UArts

(, , , , )

How does an arts-centric education affect a student’s development as a writer? How does teaching at an art school influence a writer’s approach to craft? This reading features work by alumni and faculty from the University of the Arts, a uniquely arts-based university in Center City Philadelphia and home to the region's only Creative Writing BFA.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Elise Juska is an associate professor of creative writing at UArts, where she received the 2014 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. She is the author of five novels and numerous short stories, which have appeared in Ploughshares, the Gettysburg Review, the Missouri Review, and elsewhere.

Rahul Mehta is the author of a novel, No Other World; a short story collection, Quarantine, which won a Lambda Literary Award and the Asian American Literary Award for Fiction; and a forthcoming collection of poetry and essays. They teach at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

Steven Kleinman is the author of Life Cycle of a Bear, winner of the 2019 Philip Levine Poetry Prize. He is the interim director of the creative writing program at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and a contributing editor and podcast cohost at the American Poetry Review.


Twitter Username: stevendkleinman

Glorious Piner is a poet from Philadelphia studying poetry at the University of Maryland. Her work can be found in journals such as the American Poetry Review and the Florida Review. She cohosts a forthcoming podcast on the study and practice of literature called "The Speakeasy."


Twitter Username: gloriouspiner

MeeRee Orlandini is a poet and fiction writer based in Philadelphia. She received her BFA in creative writing from the University of the Arts, where she coordinates the Pre-College Creative Writing Summer Institute. By day, she is an assistant first grade teacher at Germantown Friends School.

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T140.

AWP Program Directors of Minors in the Undergraduate Study of Creative Writing

If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member minor in the undergraduate study of creative writing, you should attend this session that will review ongoing revisions and garner feedback on "AWP Hallmarks of an Effective Minor in the Undergraduate Study of Creative Writing." It would be helpful for directors to review their hallmarks before attending this breakout.

Add to schedule

118A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T142.

The Narrative 4 Story Exchange: Building Empathy & Bridging Divides

(, , , )

How can we move from discord to understanding and positive action? What practices can we use to scaffold students towards high-level thinking and SEL skills? Listening and retelling someone else's story can be a powerful first step.The Narrative 4 (N4) Story Exchange is an authentic process designed to bridge difference. Through the lens of an N4 artist, educator, and student, this panel will explore practical applications of the Story Exchange in classrooms and communities.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Felice Belle is a lecturer at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, New York, and director of communications for the global nonprofit Narrative 4. As a poet and playwright, she has performed at the Apollo Theater, Joe’s Pub, and TEDWomen. Her poetry collection, Viscera, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: analogurl

Lee Keylock is N4's director of global programs and training and leads the professional development strategy and implementation for N4 educators globally. Lee immigrated to the US from Britain and taught English in Newtown High School, Connecticut. He also taught creative writing at Southern Connecticut State University


Twitter Username: leeroykeylock

Alondra Marmolejos became involved with Narrative 4 in 2013 while she was a junior at Newtown High School in Newtown, Connecticut. Within the last seven-plus years she transformed from a student ambassador to a facilitator, master practitioner, intern, and now N4’s programs assistant.

Rob Spillman is an editor at Pioneer Works. He cofounded and edited Tin House from 1999-2019. He is the recipient of the PEN/Nora Magid Award for Editing; the VIDO Award, presented by VIDA: Women in Literary Arts; and the CLMP Energizer Award for Acts of Outstanding Literary Citizenship.


Twitter Username: robspillman

Website: http://www.robspillman.com/

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T143.

Five Writers Walk into a Bar: Humor in a Flash

(, , , , )

The flash format can do almost anything, but must so much of it be serious? In fact, writing in a small space is perfect for absurd setups, shifts in perspective, comic riffs, and other tricks of the humor trade. Proposition, extension, and payoff are not just for jokes. This panel includes a diverse array of editors, teachers, and writers and emphasizes techniques for both fiction and creative nonfiction flash.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

David Galef has published novels, short stories, poetry, children’s books, criticism, and translation. His latest book is Brevity: A Flash Fiction Handbook. He is a professor of English and the creative writing program director at Montclair State University, as well as the editor at Vestal Review.


Twitter Username: dgalef

Website: http://davidgalef.com/

Rone Shavers is author of the experimental Afrofuturist novel Silverfish, recently shortlisted for a CLMP Firecracker Award. His writing has appeared in Big OtherBlack Warrior Review, and Bomb. He is also a fiction editor at Obsidian: Literature and Arts in the African Diaspora.


Twitter Username: roneshavers

Website: www.roneshavers.com

Francine Witte is the author of ten books of flash fiction and poetry. Her stories appear in Smokelong Quarterly, Wigleaf, Best Small Fictions, Best Microfiction, W.W. Norton New Micro, and Flash Fiction Funny. She is flash fiction editor for Flash Boulevard and SoFloPoJo.


Twitter Username: francinewitte

Alle C. Hall's flash fiction was a finalist for the 2021 Lascaux Prize. Other work is in: Litro, Tupelo Quarterly, Creative Nonfiction, the Evergreen Review, and elsewhere. She was a former associate editor at Vestal Review. Her first novel publishes in 2023. She favors a "sense" of humor.


Twitter Username: @allechall1

Beth Ann Fennelly, a 2020 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow, was poet laureate of Mississippi from 2016 to 2021. Her collection of flash CNF, Heating & Cooling: 52 Micro-Memoirs, was a Goodreaders Favorite and an Atlanta Journal-Constitution Best Book. http://www.bethannfennelly.com

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T144.

Myth & Monsters in Memoir: Using Folklore to Structure Personal Writing

(, , , )

Folklore, fairy tales, and myths persist because they tell us stories about ourselves—where we come from, what we should value, what we should fear. These stories exist to establish the boundaries of what we see as possible, desirable, and laudable. As writers, we can also make use of folklore to define our own stories—whether we embrace the cultural narrative or reject it. The authors on this panel will discuss how to harness mythological figures and tropes to give shape to personal writing.

Add to schedule

Jess Zimmerman is an editor at Quirk Books and the author of Women and Other Monsters.


Twitter Username: j_zimms

Carmen Maria Machado is the author of National Book Award finalist story collection Her Body and Other Parties and the memoir In the Dream House. She is a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, and her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, Granta, Tin House, Conjunctions, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: carmenmmachado

Website: http://carmenmariamachado.com/

Sofia Samatar is the author of four books, most recently Monster Portraits, a collaboration with her brother, the artist Del Samatar. Her work has received several honors, including the World Fantasy Award. Her memoir The White Mosque is forthcoming.

Jami Nakamura Lin is the author of The Night Parade, a speculative memoir illustrated by her sister Cori. She is a 2016 NEA US–Japan Creative Artists Fellow and a former Catapult columnist. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Electric Lit, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jaminlin

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T145.

Artist & Scholar: What to Expect & How to Thrive in a Creative Writing PhD

(, , , )

PhD programs require artists to deftly navigate academia in ways that are distinct from MFA programs. Panelists will share what aspects of the PhD experience can aid the creative process and prepare candidates for post-PhD careers. Topics include how to utilize critical research—such as course work and comprehensive exams—to build a creative bank, how to establish a committee, and how to fashion an inspiring writing community while fulfilling the challenging requirements of a PhD program.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Tatiana Duvanova is a writer born and raised in Russia. She holds an MFA degree in creative writing from the University of New Mexico and she is currently working toward her PhD in English/creative writing at the University of Rhode Island, where she also teaches creative writing and literature courses.

Afua Ansong is scholar and artist currently pursuing a PhD in English literature at the University of Rhode Island. Her work interrogates representations of Black female subjectivities in African Diaspora literature. She is currently working on a collection of poems about the material culture.

A.H. Jerriod Avant is from Longtown, Mississippi. The recipient of scholarships from Vermont Studio Center and Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, Jerriod has received two Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and he is currently a PhD English student at the University of Rhode Island.


Twitter Username: AHJerriodAvant

Sue Y. Kim is currently a creative writing PhD candidate at the University of Rhode Island. She hails from Seoul, Korea, and her writing and research interests include the transnational novel and narrative spatio-temporality.


Twitter Username: sueyon_kim

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T146.

AWP Program Directors of Creative Writing at Two-Year Colleges

If you are a program director or codirector of an AWP member creative writing program at a two-year college, you should attend this session that will review ongoing revisions and garner feedback on "AWP Hallmarks of an Effective Program in Creative Writing at a Two-Year College." It would be helpful for directors to review their hallmarks before attending this breakout.

Add to schedule

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T147.

Reckoning with Anti-Asian Violence: Reshaping Our Narratives & Communities

(, , , )

In light of this year’s cultural reckoning with anti-Asian hate, how do we acknowledge both recent violence and longstanding history? How do we move forward in our writing practices and communities? This panel will focus on how we address racism, violence, and stereotypes through poetry and poetics—including lyric essay, ars poetica, and received forms—as a way to examine our indoctrination into racism, unlearn and heal from harmful ideologies, and reteach ourselves and our audiences.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Su Cho (PhD/MFA/BA) is the author of The Symmetry of Fish, which won the National Poetry Series, and is a visiting assistant professor at Franklin & Marshall College. She currently serves as consulting editor for Poetry Magazine after serving as guest editor.


Twitter Username: su__cho

Lisa Low's poems appear or are forthcoming in Colorado Review, Copper Nickel, Ecotone, the Iowa Review, Poetry Northwest, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of the 2020 Gulf Coast Nonfiction Prize, an assistant editor at the Cincinnati Review, and a PhD student at the University of Cincinnati.

Danni Quintos is the author of Two Brown Dots, winner of the twentieth A. Poulin Jr. Prize, and Python, an ekphrastic chapbook. She is a Kentuckian, a mom, an educator, and an Affrilachian Poet. She received her BA from the Evergreen State College and her MFA in poetry from Indiana University.


Twitter Username: dleighquint

Anni Liu is the author of the Lexi Rudnitsky Prize-winning poetry collection The Eye Trees. She edits at Graywolf Press, translates the contemporary Chinese poet Du Ya, and is working on a hybrid memoir about unbearable intimacies. You can find her online at anniliuwrites.wordpress.org.


Twitter Username: IamAnniLiu

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T148.

Honoring American Poet Ruth Stone in a New Film about Her Life & Poetry

(, , , , )

In this presentation, several poets who are interviewed in the new film “Ruth Stone’s Vast Library of the Female Mind” talk about why they wanted to participate in the filming and how Ruth Stone influenced them, their lives, and their work. Though Ruth Stone won awards and accolades, many people in the literary world still don’t know her name. The goal of the film and the event is to reveal Stone's poetry and life to a wider audience, as well as to pay tribute to this wholly original poet.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Maria Mazziotti Gillan is winner of the 2014 George Garrett Award from AWP, the 2011 Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award from Poets & Writers, and the 2008 American Book Award for her book. She is professor emerita of English and creative writing at Binghamton University—SUNY. www.mariagillan.com


Twitter Username: mariagillan

Website: www.mariagillan.com

Bianca Stone is a poet and visual artist. Her books include The Mobius Strip Club of Grief and What is Otherwise Infinite. She lives in Vermont where she is creative director at the Ruth Stone House.


Twitter Username: biancastone

Website: poetrycomics.org

Jan Freeman is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Blue Structure, and coeditor of Sisters: An Anthology. She was the longtime director of Paris Press. She teaches at the MASS MoCA Writing Through Art Poetry Retreats and provides editorial services to poets and writers.


Twitter Username: janfreeman27

Toi Derricotte's recent book is 'I', New and Selected Poems. Her honors include the 2012 Paterson Poetry Prize for Sustained Literary Achievement and the 2012 PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry. Her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review and the Paris Review. She cofounded Cave Canem in 1996.

Chard deNiord is the author of six books of poetry, most recently In My Unknowing and Interstate. He is also the author of a book interviews with nine eminent American poets titled I Would Lie To You If I Could. He served as poet laureate of Vermont from 2016 to 2019.


Twitter Username: charddeniord

Website: wwwcharddeniord.com

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T149.

Writing Young Protagonists: YA or A & Who Decides?

(, , , , )

Why do we write young protagonists? Are coming-of-age stories YA? What happens when our young protagonist is defined as YA contrary to our intentions? What craft choices do we make when we intend to write YA? Panelists discuss when writer intentions and reader perceptions coincide and when they diverge with respect to writing young protagonists. They share the changes they did or didn’t make in the writing, revising, and marketing of their work to satisfy their own intentions and perceptions.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Donna Miscolta is the author of three books of fiction. Living Color: Angie Rubio Stories (2020) is her latest. Her work reflects her Filipino and Mexican heritage. Recent essays appear in Poetry Northwest and The Museum of Americana. She recently retired as a project manager in local government.


Twitter Username: donnamiscolta

Website: donnamiscolta.com

Leslie Pietrzyk is the author of Admit This to No One, Silver Girl, and This Angel on My Chest, a collection of short stories that won the Drue Heinz Literature Prize. She teaches fiction at the Converse College low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: lesliepwriter

Website: www.workinprogressinprogress.com

Jessica Barksdale’s second poetry collection, Grim Honey, and her fifteenth novel, The Play’s the Thing, were both published in 2021. She teaches novel writing for UCLA EX and in the MFA program at SNHU.


Twitter Username: jessicainclan

Website: https://www.jessicbarksdaleinclan.com

Lan Samantha Chang is the author of The Family Chao, Inheritance, All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost, and Hunger: A Novella and Stories. The recipient of a 2021 Berlin Prize Fellowship, she is director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Amanda Floresca is a graduate student at the University of South Carolina earning a master’s in library and information science. She has a BA in English with a concentration in creative writing and an MFA from Converse College. Her current project is a YA #OwnVoices novel.


Twitter Username: AJFloresca

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T150.

The Neanderthal & the Fax Machine: Teaching the Surreal & Absurd

(, , , Ephraim Sommers, Kimberly Southwick-Thompson)

The time of literary-realism’s dominance in the workshop is mostly passed. The number of students submitting works that break the rules of both writing convention as well as physics grows every day and with it, so does the desire among students to be taught the fundamentals and craft concerns of genres like absurdism. Our panelists will discuss the challenges and opportunities of introducing this sort of work in the classroom as well as address issues surrounding these ideas in workshop.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Saul Lemerond is an assistant professor of English at Hanover College. He received his PhD in English with an emphasis in creative writing–fiction. He is dyslexic. His book, Digital Voices: Podcasting in the Creative Writing Classroom, has been contracted by Bloomsbury Academic.


Twitter Username: SaulLemerond

Dustin Hyman, PhD, teaches English at Trinidad State College in Colorado. His first novel, Island Folks, was published by Black Rose Writing. Dustin won the Chicago Tribune’s 2018 Nelson Algren Literary Award. He is dyslexic and proud of it.


Twitter Username: hyman_dustin

Benjamin T. Lambright is a formerly homeless, nonbinary author writing and teaching in San Francisco. He runs a literacy-focused nonprofit called We Read Together. His novel Retrofit & Original Copy is forthcoming from TouchPoint Press. He is also the lead editor for purplewallstories.com.


Twitter Username: Ragnaroknroller

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T151.

Flash (Nonfiction) to the Future: A Speculative Brevity Reading

(, , , , )

Brevity has been a celebrated home to flash nonfiction, publishing thousands of essays, craft pieces, and blog responses over its two decades and counting. In an increasingly online era with the popularity of flash rocketing forward, it is a good time to explore what’s next for this incredibly rich, groundbreaking genre. Join our diverse panel of Brevity contributors for a reading and discussion exploring future possibilities for the flash nonfiction form and genre hybrids just now emerging.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Dinty W. Moore is author of Crafting the Personal Essay: A Guide for Writing and Publishing Creative Nonfiction, the memoir Between Panic & Desire, and numerous other books of nonfiction. 


Twitter Username: brevitymag

Website: www.dintywmoore.com

Ira Sukrungruang is the author of the nonfiction books This Jade WorldBuddha’s Dog & other MeditationsSouthside Buddhist, and Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy. The Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College, he is the editor of Sweet: A Literary Confection.


Twitter Username: sukrungruang

Website: www,sukrungruang.com

Natalie Lima is a Cuban Puerto Rican writer and an MFA candidate in creative nonfiction at the University of Arizona. Her essays and fiction have been published or are forthcoming in Longreads, Guernica, Brevity, the Offing, Catapult, and elsewhere. Find her on Twitter at @natalielime09.


Twitter Username: natalielima09

Deesha Philyaw is the author of The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, winner of the the 2021 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the 2020/2021 Story Prize, and the 2020 Los Angeles Times Book Prize: The Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and a finalist for the 2020 National Book Award for Fiction.


Twitter Username: deeshaphilyaw

Ander Monson is the author of nine books, including the forthcoming Predator: a Memoir. He teaches at the University of Arizona and edits the magazine DIAGRAM, the website Essay Daily, March Xness, and New Michigan Press.


Twitter Username: angermonsoon

Website: http://otherelectricities.com

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T152.

Translingual Poetics, Transgression & Resistance

(, , , )

Poets and translators discuss how translingualism, defined by Dowling as “a set of strategies by which writers engage with diverse linguistic codes in ways that are context-dependent,” can constitute transgressive acts of resistance, in contexts where political, patriarchal, and settler colonial powers have encoded hierarchical values to languages, bodies, and cultures. They consider interlingual dynamics and tensions between translatability and untranslatability at play in translingual poetics.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Clara Burghelea is a Romanian-born poet, editor, and translator. Winner of the Robert Muroff Prize in Poetry, she received her MFA in poetry from Adelphi University in 2018. Her collection The Flavor of the Other was published in 2020 with Dos Madres Press.


Twitter Username: ioanaclara

Brenda Cárdenas, former Milwaukee poet laureate, has authored Boomerang: Poems and From the Tongues of Brick and Stone, coauthored two chapbooks, and coedited Resist Much/Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance and Between the Heart and the Land: Latina Poets in the Midwest.


Twitter Username: CardenasBrendaE

Joan Naviyuk Kane is the author of eight collections of poetry and prose. Her honors include a Whiting Writer’s Award, the Donald Hall Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She teaches at Harvard and Tufts, and she was founding faculty in the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts.


Twitter Username: naviyuk

Website: thejoankane.com

Beatrice Szymkowiak is a French American writer and the author of Red Zone. Her work has appeared in many poetry magazines. She obtained a MFA in creative writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts, and she is now a PhD candidate and research fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.


Twitter Username: OhOldOcean

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

T153.

Lily Poetry Review Books Reading

(Christine Jones, Josette Akresh-Gonzales, Jennifer Jean)

Stage reading by poets Mary Lou Buschi, Jennifer Jean, Renuka Raghavan, Josette Akresh-Gonzales, Eric Hyett, Frances Donovan, Robin Reagler, Judson K. Evans, Susan Berger Jones, and Gale Bachelder.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Virtual

T160.

AWP Award Series Reading

(, , , )

A reading featuring the 2020 AWP Award Series winners.

Add to schedule

Tracy Fuad's debut collection of poetry, about:blank, was selected by Claudia Rankine as the winner of the AWP Donald Hall Prize (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021). She is a graduate of the MFA program at Rutgers-Newark and a Poetry Fellow at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center.


Twitter Username: tracyfuad

Christie Hodgen is the author of three books of fiction: Elegies for the Brokenhearted, Hello, I Must Be Going, and A Jeweler's Eye for Flaw. Her awards include the AWP Award in Short Fiction, two Pushcart Prizes, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

John Weir is the author of two novels, The Irreversible Decline of Eddie Socket, which won the 1989 Lambda Literary Award for Best Gay Debut, and What I Did Wrong. He is Associate Professor of English at Queens College CUNY, and a member of the English Department's MFA Program in Creative Writing and Literary Translation.

Caroline Crew is the author of Pink Museum, as well as several chapbooks. She serves as Poetry Editor for New South, and Editorial Assistant for Five Points.  Currently, she is pursuing a PhD at Georgia State University, after earning an MA at the University of Oxford and an MFA at UMass-Amherst.


Twitter Username: carolinecrew

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

T182.

Building the South Asian Avant-Garde

(Nur Ibrahim, , , )

This panel explores the process of building a digital anthology of South Asian creative work from beginning to release, centered around the avant-garde. We address concept development, fundraising, community building, and outreach, particularly through a progressive lens. We discuss the creation process during a pandemic, navigating time zones, illnesses, and challenges in South Asia. We discuss how BIPOC creatives draw from their radical traditions to build new creative forms and futures.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Kamil Ahsan is currently a doctoral student in History at Yale University with a prior doctorate in Biology from the University of Chicago. Originally from Lahore, Pakistan, he is also a freelance journalist, critic, and the editor of South Asian Avant-Garde (SAAG). 


Twitter Username: kamuleosaurus

Abeer Y. Hoque is a Nigerian-born Bangladeshi American writer and photographer. Her books include a monograph of travel photographs and poems (The Long Way Home, 2013), a book of linked stories, poems, and photographs (The Lovers and the Leavers, 2015), and a memoir (Olive Witch, 2017).


Twitter Username: olivewitch

Aditya Desai's stories, essays, and poems have appeared in B O D Y, the Rumpus, the Millions, the Margins, District Lit, the Kartika Review, the Aerogram, and others. He received his MFA in fiction from the University of Maryland, College Park. He currently teaches writing in Baltimore.


Twitter Username: atwittya

Virtual

T183.

Writing for All: Building Inclusive Writing Spaces from the Start, Sponsored by WITS Alliance

(, Shawntai Brown, )

What does inclusivity in the classroom (WITS/writer residency) program look like? From hiring to practice in the classroom, this discussion will explore the landscape of inclusivity work in literary arts education. Teaching artists will discuss what WITS programs can do to expand the notion of inclusivity with an intersectional disability justice lens.

Add to schedule

MATTMATT is a poet from Bedford Heights, Ohio. They earned their MFA in creative writing at The New School. MATTMATT has edited over ten anthologies of student-centered writing and has taught with Teachers & Writers Collaborative, National Book Foundation, Parsons, and Sarah Lawrence University.


Twitter Username: mattraybeam

Michele Kotler is the founding director of the Community Word Project, an arts-in-education organization based in New York City. She received her BA from Sarah Lawrence College and her MFA in creative writing, poetry, from the University of Michigan.

Virtual

T184.

L’Chaim! Celebrating Jewish Poetry in the Third Millennium

(, , , , )

What is a "Jewish poem"? Come find out as we read from 101 Jewish Poems for the Third Millennium, a new anthology, featuring voices that range from emerging to established, both Jewish and non-Jewish, as well as several translations. The themes range from observing Jewish traditions to more modern ones, such as same-sex marriage and nonfaith. With the rise in anti-Semitism and other hate crimes in this country, it is more important now than ever before to celebrate diversity.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

M.E. Silverman founded Blue Lyra Review. His books include The Floating Door andThe Breath before Birds Fly. He edited three anthologies including Bloomsbury’s Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry, The Plume Anthology of Longish Poems, and one on the Holocaust.


Twitter Username: bluelyrareview

Website: http://mesilverman.com

Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored twelve titles, including eight translations. A BTBA and CLMP finalist, she is a recipient of two grants from the NEA and one from the Maryland Arts Council and was decorated with the French Academic Palms. An Infusion of Violets was named "new & noteworthy" by the New York Times.

Ilya Kaminsky was born in Odessa, Ukraine, and currently lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

Joy Ladin is the author of nine books of poetry, including newly reissued The Book of Anna, Lambda Literary Award finalists Transmigration and Impersonation, a memoir, National Jewish Book Award finalist Through the Door of Life, and Triangle Award finalist The Soul of the Stranger.


Twitter Username: joyladin

Website: joyladin.com

Zilka Joseph is the author of five books. She has been nominated for Pushcart and PEN awards and was a finalist for the Foreword Indies Book Award. In Our Beautiful Bones is her newest book. Her work is influenced by Indian/Eastern and Western cultures and her Bene Israel roots. www.zilkajoseph.com

Virtual

T185.

The Business & Pleasures of Editing the Literary Anthology

(, , , , )

Five editors of published or forthcoming poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction anthologies offer advice concerning how to propose an anthology for independent and mainstream presses, and how to query and collaborate with contributors and acquisitions editors, which might include making calls for submissions, setting and meeting deadlines, publicizing a new anthology, and handling contributor remuneration. They will also discuss any pitfalls they've encountered during the editorial process.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Christine Sneed is the faculty director of Northwestern University's graduate writing program; she also teaches for Regis University's low-residency MFA program and was an AWP W2W mentor. She has published four books; her first, Portraits of a Few of the People I've Made Cry, won the Grace Paley Prize for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: ChristineSneed

Website: http://www.christinesneed.com

Phong Nguyen is the author of Bronze Drum, Roundabout, The Adventures of Joe Harper, Pages from the Textbook of Alternate History, and Memory Sickness. He edited two books: one on author Nancy Hale and the Best Peace Fiction anthology. He teaches creative writing at the University of Missouri.


Twitter Username: AlternaHistory

Website: http://www.phongvnguyen.com

Kevin Prufer is the author most recently of How He Loved Them, Churches, In a Beautiful Country, and National Anthem. He is codirector of the Unsung Masters Series and a professor at the University of Houston's creative writing program and the Lesley University low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: Prufer_Kevin

Website: www.kevinprufer.com

Jennifer Baker is a publishing professional, creator of the Minorities in Publishing podcast, faculty member of BayPath University's Creative Nonfiction MFA program, a former contributing editor to Electric Literature, & editor of Everyday People: The Color of Life—A Short Story Anthology (2018).


Twitter Username: jbakernyc

Website: www.jennifernbaker.com

Jason Lee Brown is the author of three books and former editor in chief of River Styx literary magazine, director of the River Styx Reading Series, and series editor of New Stories from the Midwest. He also coedited the poetry anthology The Book of Donuts.

Virtual

T186.

Writing Home: Using Family & Regional History to (Re)Connect with Our Roots

(, , , , )

As recent events have demonstrated, Asian Americans are seen as perpetual foreigners in the US. Yet, owing to complicated reasons around migration, many of us also feel like foreigners in our countries of origin. We are five Asian American writers who have all sought to (re)connect with our cultural roots through writing about family and/or regional histories. In this panel, we read from our works and discuss how we use history to inform our fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Rita Chang-Eppig received her MFA from NYU. Her stories have appeared/are forthcoming in McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, Conjunctions, Virginia Quarterly Review, Best American Short Stories, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from the Vermont Studio Center and the Steinbeck Center at SJSU.


Twitter Username: rche_types

Susan Ito coedited the anthology A Ghost At Heart's Edge: Stories and Poems of Adoption. She is author of the memoir The Mouse Room. She is a member of the San Francisco Writers' Grotto and on faculty at Mills College and BayPath University's MFA programs.


Twitter Username: thesusanito

Website: http://www.susanito.com

Jerome Blanco received his MFA from New York University, and his writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Literary Hub, Southern Humanities Review, Emrys Journal, the Margins, and elsewhere. 


Twitter Username: JeromeSBlanco

Preeti Vangani is the author of Mother Tongue Apologize, winner of the RL India Poetry Prize. Her work has been published in Threepenny Review, Gulf Coast, and Cortland Review. A graduate of University of South Florida's MFA program, she has received fellowships from PEN America, UCross, and Center for Cultural Innovation.


Twitter Username: Pscripturient

Zora Mai Quỳnh is a Vietnamese American writer who has been published in Ploughshares, Kweli, and Strange Horizons. They are the winner of the 2021 SF Foundation Nomadic Press Literary Award. Zora is a contributing writer with diaCRITICS. Visit Zora: zmquynh.com and @zmquynh.


Twitter Username: zmquynh

Website: zmquynh.com

Virtual

T187.

Writing Is For Everyone!: Ways to Make the Writing Classroom More Accessible

(, , , )

Shifting to Zoom-based writing education during COVID had the side effect of improving accessibility for many disabled people and raising awareness of disability inclusion. How can we maintain that momentum as we gather again in person? This panel of authors and educators, some who have learning or other disabilities themselves, will discuss strategies writing teachers and workshop leaders can use to help make writing instruction accessible to those of all abilities and the neurodiverse.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Colin Mustful is the founder and editor of History Through Fiction. He is the author of four historical novels about the settlement and Native history of the Upper Midwest. His books combine elements of fiction and nonfiction to tell compelling and educational stories.


Twitter Username: colinmustful

Leticia Escalera is the author of memoir A Journey to Begin in Life about life with learning disabilities. She's a former independent living skills coach and advocate with the Center for Independent Living (Berkeley, CA) and has worked with the Spanish Speaking Citizens Foundation in Oakland, CA.

Kathleen Marcath has a BA degree in deaf community studies. Years of experience as a Special Education Sign Language (ASL) Supporter have kindled her passion for helping children reach their educational potential. Kathleen is delighted to help fill the need for picture books illustrated in ASL.


Twitter Username: ASL Picture Books

Website: https://www.aslpicturebooks.com/

Kris Francoeur, writer and educator, lives in Vermont and is a full-time writer and educational consultant. Kris loves to help young writers blossom and find their voices.


Twitter Username: KFAnnaBelleRose

Website: www.authorkfrancoeur.com

Virtual

T187B.

The Hybrid Poem & Its Myriad Possibilities

(, , , , )

Juxtaposing modes of expression, the hybrid poem allows for discursive, expansive thought. For these poets, “hybrid” can refer to hybridity of genre, form, literary influences, and the use of “unpoetic” materials, like scientific writing or computer programming. Hybrid poems explode the syntactic, intellectual, and formal directions contained in every poem and make them visible to the reader. This panel will highlight the ways the hybrid poem can stretch the boundaries of contemporary poetry.

Add to schedule

Kimiko Hahn finds material from disparate sources: identity, current events/history, nature, science, the Japanese zuihitsu. In her tenth book, she explores iterations of foreign bodies. Awards include a Guggenheim. She teaches in the MFA program in creative writing and translation at Queens College, CUNY.

Jill Bialosky’s five poetry collections include the recent Asylum. She’s authored three novels, recently The Prize, and two memoirs, New York Times Best Seller History of a Suicide and Poetry Will Save Your Life. Her writing appears in the New Yorker, Paris Review, and more. She is an editor at W.W. Norton.


Twitter Username: jrbialosky

Brenda Hillman is the author of ten collections of poetry, most recently Extra Hidden Life, among the Days. She is a chancellor at the Academy of American Poets, teaches at St. Mary’s College of California, and is the poetry director at Community of Writers.


Twitter Username: brendalhillman

Website: brendahillman.net

Lillian-Yvonne Bertram is the author of Travesty Generator, a book of computational poetry longlisted for the 2020 National Book Award in Poetry. The author of several works, they currently direct the MFA program at UMASS Boston and edit for Black Ocean Books and Persea Press.

Paisley Rekdal is the author, most recently, of Appropriate: A Provocation and Nightingale. A Guggenheim fellow and Utah's poet laureate, she teaches at the University of Utah, where she edits the web archive project Mapping Literary Utah.


Twitter Username: paisleyrekdal

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

Terrace Ballroom I & II, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 400 Level

T161.

The Center for Fiction Presents Melissa Febos and Brandon Taylor on Narrative Craft

()

Critically acclaimed authors Melissa Febos (Body Work, Abandon Me, and Whip Smart) and Brandon Taylor (Filthy Animals, Real Life) dig into the radical power of personal narrative, with special attention to the rigor of craft. A story must not only be well told, it must be well constructed. But what does that mean for your work? This is less of a how-to and more a call to courage: for great writing has the potential to be revolutionary. This event will be livestreamed. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

Add to schedule
Melissa Febos is the author of Whip Smart, Abandon Me, and Girlhood—a national bestseller. The inaugural winner of the Jeanne Córdova Nonfiction Award from LAMBDA Literary, she is associate professor at the University of Iowa, where she teaches in the nonfiction writing program.
Twitter Username: melissafebos

Website: melissafebos.com

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T162.

Jumping the Moat: Academic & Community-Based Collaborations

(, , , , Philip Memmer)

What are the challenges and pleasures of building coalitions between community-based writing centers and academic writing programs that share a geography? Join admins from Austin Bat Cave, Chippewa Valley Writers Guild, Literary Cleveland, Lit Youngstown, and The Porch as they explore partnerships, internships, mentorships, and other big and small “ships” with moat-crossing abilities between the proverbial “town” and “gown.”

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Cassandra Lawton is an outreach coordinator for Lit Youngstown and a student in the Northeast Ohio Master of Fine Arts program. She received her master of social work from Michigan State University. Cassandra has been published in Entropy and Bridge Literary Journal.

Katie McDougall is the cofounder, codirector, and a regular instructor for The Porch, a Nashville literary arts nonprofit. As codirector, she helps oversee strategic partnerships and spearheads community outreach opportunities.

B.J. Hollars is an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, the director of the Chippewa Valley Writers Guild, and the author of several works, most recently Go West Young Man: A Father and Son Rediscover America on the Oregon Trail.


Twitter Username: bjhollars

Website: www.bjhollars.com

Matt Weinkam’s work has appeared in TINGE Magazine, Monkeybicycle, and The Rumpus, and he is an editor for Threadcount, an online journal of hybrid prose. He is currently in the MFA program at Northern Michigan University in Marquette.


Twitter Username: MattWeinkam

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T163.

Being Black & Muslim in Literature

(, , , , )

At a time when the many facets of Blackness are gaining recognition, the stories and language of Black American Muslims are also coming to the fore. This multigenre reading by Black Muslim authors showcases a variety of such perspectives. Listen to stories about love, family, magic, mystery, faith, and community as readers share fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Nearly sixty years after The Autobiography of Malcolm X, hear what it means to be a black American Muslim author now.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Sufiya Abdur-Rahman is author of the memoir Heir to the Crescent Moon, winner of the Iowa Prize for Literary Nonfiction. She is creative nonfiction editor for Cherry Tree, a literary journal at Washington College, where she teaches creative writing and journalism. 


Twitter Username: MrsAbolitionist

Kaaronica Evans-Ware is the author of the novel Fire & Clay: Book One. She lives in Santa Barbara, where she is a doctoral student in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Kaaronica is also the director of Zawiyah Foundation California.

Aaliyah Bilal is a fiction/nonfiction writer focusing on the Afro-Chinese and the Black American Muslim experience. A graduate of the University of London (SOAS), she was a recipient of the Shansi Memorial Fellowship at Yunnan University, where she conducted research among HuiZu Muslims.

Yasin Abdul-Muqit received a master of fine arts degree in creative writing from the University of Michigan in 2017.

Aisha Sharif is the author of To Keep from Undressing, a collection of poems addressing her life as an African American Muslim woman. Aisha's poetry has been nominated for Pushcart Prizes and published in Crab Orchard Review and Rattle. She holds an MFA in poetry and is a Cave Canem fellow.


Twitter Username: sharifpoet

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T164.

Thirty Years of ASF: Challenging Boundaries of Short Fiction

(, , , Lydia Conklin)

For thirty years, American Short Fiction has been publishing award-winning fiction by authors who push the boundaries of the traditional short story and help us reimagine the landscape of contemporary fiction. Come celebrate our anniversary with some of our favorite contributors, who will discuss how they interrogate the limits of the short story by breaking form, building worlds, harnessing distinctive voices, and playing by their own rules, pulling the peculiarity of existence into full focus.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Adeena Reitberger is the editor and codirector of American Short Fiction. Her stories and essays have been published in Fence, Black Warrior Review, Mississippi Review, Cimarron Review, Nimrod International, and Sierra Nevada Review.


Twitter Username: AdeenaR

Don Lee is the author of the novels Lonesome Lies Before Us, The Collective, Wrack and Ruin, and Country of Origin, and the story collection Yellow. His new collection, The Partition, will be released in 2022. He teaches in the MFA program in creative writing at Temple University.

Dantiel W. Moniz is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and the Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction. Her debut collection, Milk Blood Heat, is an Indie Next Pick, and her work has appeared in magazines such as the Paris Review. She is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Twitter Username: dantielwmoniz

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T165.

Flash Fiction: Forward to the Future!

(, , , , )

Not even twenty years ago, flash fiction—also known as snap fiction, sudden fiction, short shorts, etc.—was considered a new and experimental form. With flash fiction journals, workshops, anthologies, and courses abounding, flash has taken its place among better-known genres and forms. Does this mean flash has lost its edge? What does the future hold for the form? Five flash writers will discuss flash's past and its status in today's literary landscape and share their thoughts on where the genre is headed.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

MIchael Czyzniejewski is the author of three collections of stories: I Will Love You for the Rest of My Life: Breakup Stories, Chicago Stories, and Elephants in Our Bedroom. He teaches at Missouri State University, where he edits for Moon City Press and Moon City Review.


Twitter Username: MCzyzniejewski

Elizabeth Crowder is acquisitions editor for X-R-A-Y Literary Magazine and associate editor for Uncharted Magazine. Her writing appears in SmokeLong Quarterly, Pithead Chapel, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: lzcrowder

Tommy Dean has written two flash fiction chapbooks, Special like the People on TV  and Covenants . His flash story collection, Hollows, is debuting in February 2022. He is the editor at Fractured Lit and Uncharted Magazine.


Twitter Username: tommydeanwriter

Kim Magowan lives in San Francisco and teaches at the Department of Literatures and Languages at Mills College. She is the author of two story collections, How Far I've Come (2022) and Undoing (2018), and the novel The Light Source (2019). She is the editor in chief and fiction editor of Pithead Chapel.


Twitter Username: kimmagowan

Hananah Zaheer is the author of Lovebirds. She serves as fiction editor for Los Angeles Review, a senior editor for South Asian Avant Garde: a dissident literary anthology, and she is the founder of Dubai Literary Salon.


Twitter Username: hananahzaheer

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T166.

Call Your Agent: Finding Representation For Your Writing

(, , , )

Finding an agent is a key step in getting published by a major publisher. But what are agents looking for, and what should authors know before trying to find one? This panel will feature five actively acquiring agents and anextended Q&A session so attendees can get the specific information that they need, as well as cover the process of querying, signing, and working with an agent.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Michelle Brower is an agent with Aevitas Creative Management, where she specializes in literary fiction, book club fiction, and narrative nonfiction. Her authors include Clare Beams, Sarah Domet, Jason Mott, Tara Conklin, Viet Dinh, and many others.


Twitter Username: michellebrower

Annie Hwang is a literary agent at Ayesha Pande Literary, where she represents literary fiction with teeth and mission-driven nonfiction. A former journalist, Annie is constantly on the hunt for underrepresented voices and gifted storytelling that stretches its genre to new heights.


Twitter Username: AnnieAHwang

Duvall Osteen is a literary agent at Aragi Inc., where she represents literary fiction, humor, and narrative nonfiction writers. She holds an MA in Southern cultural studies from the University of Mississippi.

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T167.

Not Another Male Orgasm: Using the Shapes of Meander, Spiral, Explode in CNF

(Randon Billings Noble, , , )

Jane Alison’s craft book Meander, Spiral, Explode discusses narrative shapes beyond the traditional climactic arc—but her examples are drawn from fiction. In this session, each panelist will show, through both example and speculation, how Alison’s shapes (waves, cells, spirals, explosions) can function in creative nonfiction. The session will include a series of generative writing prompts, and end with a discussion of the ways that shape, pattern, and design can provoke and enrich CNF content.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Ellie Bozmarova is a Bulgarian American writer. Her nonfiction won the 2021 Nomadic Press and 2020 Women’s National Book Association-SF awards. She was a 2020 US Fulbright Grant semi-finalist in creative writing. Ellie's essays have appeared in Business Insider, the Common, phoebe, and more.


Twitter Username: bozmarova

Kristina R. Gaddy is the author of Flowers in the Gutter: The True Story of the Edelweiss Pirates, Teenagers Who Resisted the Nazis and Well of Souls: Music, Dance, Spirituality, and the Early Banjo.

Laura Laing is a queer journalist, essayist, and author. A graduate of Goucher's MFA in creative nonfiction, she is the vice president of ASJA. Her essays have appeared in a number of literary journals, and she is working on a memoir, weaving narrative with explorations of abstract mathematics.


Twitter Username: llaingwriter

118A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T169.

Translation: The Alternative MFA, Sponsored by ALTA

(, )

Many translators now begin their careers in MFA programs, while those writing original texts in English are increasingly finding their way into translation workshops. Even as translators learn their craft by writing creatively, many writers learn come into their voice via translation and an engagement with international literature. What can translation programs offer writers, and what can writing programs offer translators?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Becka Mara McKay is a poet and translator. She directs the creative writing MFA at Florida Atlantic University, where she serves as faculty advisor to Swamp Ape Review. Her newest book of poems is The Little Book of No Consolation.

Derick Mattern has an MFA in poetry from University of Wisconsin-Madison and another in literary translation from the Iowa Translation Workshop. His work has received support from the BCLT, the NEA, and Banff. He is currently on the International Writers Track at Washington University in St. Louis.


Twitter Username: derickmattern

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T170.

Beyond the Statement: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Literary Organizations

(, , , , )

Literary organizations must reflect the growing call for diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in their workshops, events, readings, and outreach. Adopting a statement is the first step, but how do we create socially relevant and diverse programming while ensuring equity and inclusive access to all? Join the leaders of several literary organizations to discuss creating their own statements and how through increasing and supporting DEI, the reach of the literary arts exponentially expands.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Michael Khandelwal writes and publishes fiction and poetry and teaches workshops for the Muse Writers Center in Norfolk, Virginia, for which he is the executive director (and cofounder). He is a columnist for Coastal Virginia Magazine and a former webmaster for the American Council on Education.

Rob Arnold (he/him) is a Chamoru poet, editor, and interim executive director of Hugo House, Seattle's independent writing center. His poems have appeared in Ploughshares, Hyphen, Gettysburg Review, Poetry Northwest, Red Ink, Yes, Poetry, the Ocean State Review, and the Volta, among others.


Twitter Username: _robarnold

Jerod Santek is the artistic director at Write On, Door County, a nonprofit writing center and writers' residency program he helped found in 2013. From 1994 to 2013, he served as the program director at the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis.

Peter E. Murphy is the founder of Murphy Writing of Stockton University, which has been sponsoring The Winter Poetry & Prose Getaway and other conferences, workshops, and courses in the United States and Europe since 1994. www.murphywriting.com


Twitter Username: murphywriting

Carla Du Pree's fiction appears in several literary journals. She is executive director of CityLit Project and recipient of fellowships from Hedgebrook, VCCA, Rhode Island Writers Colony for Writers of Color, and Poetry Foundation, as well as a Rubys Grant and MSAC Individual Artist award for her work-in-progress.


Twitter Username: darkndifferent

Website: citylitproject.org

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T171.

Twenty Years of One Story: How We Did It, Sponsored by CLMP

(, )

Cofounders of the award-winning literary nonprofit, One Story, share the highs, lows, and bumps in the road on their twenty-year journey. Most literary magazines open and fold in three years, but in 2002, Maribeth Batcha and Hannah Tinti launched a tiny zine celebrating the short story and eventually grew their organization into a literary nonprofit that is still going strong. If you’re thinking of launching a lit mag or facing challenges as a small press or literary nonprofit, this is the panel for you!

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Maribeth Batcha is the publisher and cofounder of One Story. She has a BA from New York University and an MFA in creative writing from Columbia University.

Hannah Tinti is the author of Animal Crackers,The Good Thief, and The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley. She is also cofounder and executive editor of One Story magazine. She teaches at New York University's MFA program.


Twitter Username: hannahtinti

Website: www.hannahtinti.com

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T172.

The Power of Podcasting: Finding Creative Autonomy in the Audio Form

(, , , , Annmarie Kelly-Harbaugh)

Authors are turning to podcasting to find new audiences and expand their platform—but podcasting isn't just about promotion. A National Book Award finalist, a feature film novelist, an International Women's Podcast Awards winner, and two NYT bestselling authors talk about what podcasting gave them that publishing couldn’t: quick, consistent deadlines; tools to develop their craft; an antidote to perfectionism; and a space to connect, critique the industry, and collaborate with fellow creators.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Laura Joyce Davis is the host and producer of Shelter in Place, a podcast about coming together in a world that pulls us apart. She is a Fulbright scholar, a WNYC podcast accelerator finalist, a Pushcart Prize nominee, and the winner of the Poets & Writers Exchange Award for fiction.


Twitter Username: laurajoycedavis

Website: http://www.laurajoycedavis.com/

Sarah Enni is the author of Tell Me Everything and the creator and host of the First Draft with Sarah Enni podcast, which features weekly conversations with storytellers about how their art affects their life.


Twitter Username: sarahenni

Claribel A. Ortega is a former reporter who writes middle grade and young adult fantasy inspired by her Dominican heritage. Her debut middle grade novel Ghost Squad is out now and is being made into a feature film. Her forthcoming books include Witchlings and the graphic novel Frizzy.


Twitter Username: claribel_ortega

Dhonielle J. Clayton is the cofounder of CAKE Literary, a boutique book development company with a decidedly diverse bent. She is the coauthor of Tiny Pretty Things and Shiny Broken Pieces with Sona Charaipotra and the author of The Belles. She is COO of We Need Diverse Books.


Twitter Username: brownbookworm

Website: www.CAKELiterary.com

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T173.

Twenty-Five Years of Poetry Daily!

(, , , , )

In 1997, when most readers accessed the Internet through dial-up—if at all—Don Selby and Diane Boller launched an elegant, user-friendly website to help people discover poets and poetry they like—and to help publishers spread news of their books, magazines, and journals to more readers. Join Poetry Daily readers and members of its new staff and prominent editorial board as they read outstanding poems, share Poetry Daily stories and visions, and celebrate the retirement of Don and Diane.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Amaud Jamaul Johnson is the author of three poetry collections, Imperial Liquor, National Book Critics Circle Award finalist; Darktown Follies, winner of the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; and Red Summer, winner of the Dorset Prize.

Jennifer Chang is the author of The History of Anonymity and Some Say the Lark, which won the 2018 William Carlos Williams Award. She is poetry editor of the New England Review and teaches at the University of Texas at Austin.

Danielle Williams is a Black and Chamorro poet, essayist, and spoken word artist. A 2021 MFA graduate of George Mason University, she holds nominations for the Pushcart Prize and Best New Poets, with fellowships from Palm Beach Poetry Festival, The Watering Hole, and the Open Mouth Poetry Retreat.


Twitter Username: dpwpoetry

Website: http://daniellepwilliams.com/

Lisa Russ Spaar is the author/editor of twelve books. Her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Rona Jaffe Award. She is the director of creative writing at the University of Virginia, and her essays have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and the New York Times.

Martin Mitchell is the managing editor of Poetry Daily and the events and content manager at The Cheuse Center. His writing has appeared in the Threepenny Review, the Raintown Review, and Time Out New York..


Twitter Username: marty_benz

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T174.

Screenwriting 101 for the Novelist

(, )

Many novelists want to transform their book into a marketable screenplay. This panel focuses on the beginning concepts they will need to get started: genre considerations, loglines, beat sheets, treatments, format, writing for a visual medium, the hero's journey, and more.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Andrea Baltazar is an assistant professor of communication at Weber State University where she teaches audio production, editing, and documentary filmmaking. She’s also a writer/director of a short film entitled “Urban Uber.” She graduated from Pepperdine University with an MFA in screenwriting.

Tom Provost wrote Under Suspicion starring Oscar winners Morgan Freeman and Gene Hackman. It was nominated for an Edgar Award. He wrote and directed The Presence starring Oscar winner Mira Sorvino. The film won numerous Best Picture and Best Director awards. He is an honors graduate from University of Texas at Austin.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T175.

A Form for What Haunts You: Using Fixed Forms to Write About Trauma

(, , , , )

Many poets feel compelled to write about painful experiences, but we may approach such material with a mixture of urgency and hesitancy. Finding the right language to convey trauma can be liberatory, but the process is often painful. A fixed form—whether that be a villanelle, a golden shovel, or a grocery list—can provide a strong container for writing about trauma and, more generally, memories that haunt. This panel features five poets discussing their usage of fixed forms to approach trauma.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Melissa Crowe is the author of the poetry collection Dear Terror, Dear Splendor. She is the coordinator of the MFA program at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where she teaches poetry and publishing.


Twitter Username: melissamcrowe

Stevie Edwards holds an MFA from Cornell University and a PhD from University of North Texas. She is a lecturer at Clemson University and a senior editor at YesYes Books. She is the author of Sadness Workshop, Humanly, and Good Grief. Her poems appear in American Poetry Review, Missouri Review, and Crazyhorse.


Twitter Username: DrStevie_Poetry

Rachel McKibbens is the author of three full-length books of poetry, blud, Into the Dark & Emptying Field, and Pink Elephant, as well as the chapbook Mammoth. She is a two-time New York Foundation for the Arts poetry fellow and founder of the Pink Door Writing Retreat.


Twitter Username: RachelMcKibbens

Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon is the author of Open Interval, a finalist for the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and Black Swan, winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. She has been awarded fellowships from Cave Canem, the Lannan Foundation, and Civitella Ranieri.

Meg Day is the 2015–2016 recipient of the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship, a 2013 recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Poetry, and the author of Last Psalm at Sea Level. Day is assistant professor of English and creative writing at Franklin & Marshall College.


Twitter Username: themegdaystory

Website: www.megday.com

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T176.

Who Gets to Tell Our Stories: Analyzing Power & Ethics of Storytelling

(Marcos Damián León, , , , )

Responding to the controversy over American Dirt, author Jeanine Cummins claimed she wanted "to humanize 'the faceless brown mass' of Mexican migrants coming to the US." Literary critics defended her despite community outcry that it wasn’t her story to tell. This panel asks: Who gets to tell whose stories? The goal of the conversation is to develop an onsite ethics of authorship that considers the agency of racialized and gendered subjects within the field of storytelling.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez got her masters of divinity from Vanderbilt University. The bulk of her work is around making the theories and heavy material that is oftentimes only taught in racist/classist institutions accessible through storytelling.


Twitter Username: priscadorcas


Twitter Username: MigrantScribble

Website: www.alanpelaez.com

Ashia Ajani is a Black queer environmental storyteller and educator hailing from Denver, Colorado (unceded territory of the Cheyenne, Ute, Arapahoe, and Comanche peoples). They have been published in Frontier Poetry, World Literature Today, Them.us, and Sierra magazine, among others.


Twitter Username: ashiainbloom

Raquel Reichard is an Orlando-based award-winning storyteller with an editorial objective to engage, educate, and empower. As a journalist, she centers her reporting on body politics and Latinx culture. She has a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Central Florida and a master's degree in Latinx media studies from New York University.


Twitter Username: raquelreichard

Website: www.raquelreichard.com

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T177.

Re-Presenting the Past: Poets Writing the Holocaust Toward a Humane Future

(, , , , )

What can writing poetry about the intergenerational trauma of the Holocaust do to address white supremacy? How can Jewish poets—specifically mothers—rewrite a narrative of exceptionalism for future generations while staying true to the particularities of Holocaust trauma? This panel takes up these questions through the voices of five poets, all mothers, whose writing explores intersections of Jewish trauma, inheritance, motherhood, and poetry’s capacities for antiracist work.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Maya Pindyck is the author of the poetry collections Emoticoncert and Friend Among Stones. A 2019 NEA Fellow in creative writing, she teaches and directs the writing program at Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia.

Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach is a poet and author of The Many Names for Mother (Wick Poetry Prize, KSU Press, 2019), Don't Touch the Bones, and 40 Weeks. She is the Murphy Visiting Fellow in Poetry at Hendrix College in Arkansas.


Twitter Username: jkdpoetry

Elana Bell is the author of Mother Country, poems about motherhood, fertility, and mental illness. Her first collection of poetry, Eyes, Stones, was selected as the winner of the 2011 Walt Whitman Award. She teaches poetry to actors at the Juilliard School. www.elanabell.com.


Twitter Username: elanabellpoet

Website: www.elanabell.com

Luisa Muradyan is the author of American Radiance. She earned her PhD in literature and creative writing from the University of Houston, where she was the editor of Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts. She was also the recipient of the Prairie Schooner Book Prize.

Alicia Ostriker 's most recent collections of poetry are Waiting for the Light, which won a National Jewish Book Award, and The Volcano and After: Selected and New Poems. She is an Academy of American Poets Chancellor Emerita, and New York state poet.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T178.

Urgent Wonder: The Practice & Paradox of Teaching Environmental Writing

(, , , , )

Teaching environmental writing is critical, rewarding, and often overwhelming. How can we urge students to express deep-felt awe for the natural world and address urgent ecological crises? How can we nurture creativity, offer solace, and spur action? How can we decolonize nature writing tropes? As writers, how do we strike the balance of wonder and terror ourselves? In this panel, we grapple with these questions and share practical approaches for the classroom and beyond.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Ana Maria Spagna is the author of several books of creative nonfiction including Uplake and Reclaimers and the poetry chapbook, Mile Marker Six. A four-time finalist for the Washington State Book Award, she is currently Viebranz Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at St. Lawrence University.


Twitter Username: amspagna

Website: www.anamariaspagna.com

Laura Pritchett is an author and a conservationist. She is the author of The Blue Hour; Red Lightning; Stars Go Blue; Sky Bridge; Hell's Bottom, Colorado; and several books of nonfiction. More at www.laurapritchett.com


Twitter Username: authorlaura

Nicole Walker is the author of Processed Meats: Essays on Food, Flesh, and Navigating Disaster; Sustainability: A Love Story; Egg; Microcosm; Quench Your Thirst with Salt; and This Noisy Egg. She edited, with Margot Singer, Bending Genre: Essays on Creative Nonfiction. She teaches at Northern Arizona University.


Twitter Username: nikwalkottter

Website: http://nikwalk.com

Derek Sheffield's collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. He is the poetry editor of Terrain.org and a coeditor of Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy and Cascadia: A Field Guide through Art, Ecology, and Poetry.


Twitter Username: terrainorg

Website: www.dereksheffield.com

CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems and coeditor of Native Voices. Cmarie is director of Elk River Writers Workshop and faculty in the graduate program in creative writing at Western Colorado University.

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T179.

Doing the Work: Publishing with University Presses

(, , , )

While it is heartening to see publishers commit to publishing more work by writers from historically marginalized groups, how do writers navigate the world of trade, indie, and university presses to find a partner who will honor their voice, experience, and vision? Writers from different backgrounds who have published with Mad Creek Books will read a section of their nonfiction work and discuss how a university press can be a supportive partner, reflecting on the entire publishing process.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Kristen Elias Rowley is editor in chief at Mad Creek Books/Ohio State University Press. Books she's edited include a 2020 National Book Award finalist, International Latino Book Award winners, Lambda Literary award winners, and a Grub Street Prize winner, among others.


Twitter Username: KEliasRowley

Harrison Candelaria Fletcher is the author of Descanso for My Father, Presentimiento: A Life in Dreams, and the forthcoming Finding Querencia: Essays from In Between. He teaches nonfiction in the MFA programs at Colorado State University and Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Negesti Kaudo is an essayist based in the Midwest. She is the youngest recipient of the Ohioana Library Association's Walter Rumsey Marvin Grant. Her work has been published in Best American Experimental Writing, Seneca Review, Fourth Genre, Storm Cellar, Cosmonauts Avenue, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: kaudonegesti

Hasanthika Sirisena's essays and stories have appeared in Electric Literature, Michigan Quarterly Review, Epoch, and Narrative. She is a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writers' Award and the 2015 Juniper Prize for Fiction. Her essay collection Dark Tourist will be released December 2021.


Twitter Username: thinkhasie

Website: http://hasanthikasirisena.com/

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T180.

The Edited Voice: The Challenge of Maintaining a Writer's Distinct Voice

(, , , , )

Panelists who work as both editors and writers will consider the balance between voice and conventions from both sides of the process. How do editors encourage the unique voices of writers when they may not comply with standard diction or syntax or may be experimental or stylistically different from a publication's norm? How can writers best work with editors to strengthen their writing while maintaining their distinct voices?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Nancy Lord is the author of environmentally related books including the nonfiction Early Warming and Beluga Days and, most recently, pH: A Novel. She edited the anthology Made of Salmon. She teaches nature and science writing for Johns Hopkins University and is a former Alaska Writer Laureate.

Holly J. Hughes is editor of Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose about Alzheimer's Disease, coauthor of The Pen and the Bell: Mindful Writing in a Busy World, and author of Sailing by Ravens and Passings, which received an American Book Award. Hold Fast was released from Empty Bowl Press in 2020.

Elizabeth Dodd teaches creative writing and environmental literature, as well as interdisciplinary science and humanities courses at Kansas State University. She’s authored six books, most recently Horizon’s Lens. She is nonfiction editor of Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments.

Juan J. Morales is the author of three poetry collections including The Handyman's Guide to End Times. He is a CantoMundo Fellow, the editor of Pilgrimage Magazine, an associate dean in the College of Humanities Arts & Social Sciences, and a Professor of English at Colorado State University Pueblo.


Twitter Username: moralesjuanj

Jill McCabe Johnson's poetry collections include Revolutions We'd Hoped We'd Outgrown, Pendulum, and Diary of the One Swelling Sea, winner of a Nautilus Award. She teaches creative writing at Skagit Valley College and is editor in chief for Wandering Aengus Press and its imprint, Trail to Table.


Twitter Username: JMcJohnson

Website: jillmccabejohnson.com

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level.

T181.

Lily Poetry Review Books Celebrates Literary Citizenship

(Eileen Cleary, Steven Riel, Cynthia Bargar)

Stage reading by Steven Riel, Chloe Yelena Miller, Cynthia Bargar, Jeff Oaks, Jennifer Badot, Mark Jednaszewski, Christine Jones, Eileen Cleary, and Eric Roy.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Virtual

T210.

Surviving Patriarchy: Colonialism & Its Impact on Muslim Women's Literature

(, , )

Historically, Muslim women made significant literary contributions. However, many of these contributions have been muted, dismissed, or deliberately misused due to patriarchal constructs that suppressed vibrant minority voices. Subduing women's literature manifested due to colonialism and patriarchal constructs around the world, and it is prevalent up to recent day. Together, we will journey into the lives of female Muslim literary legends, and unearth staggering accounts of rising women's voices.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Tayyaba Syed is a multiple award-winning author, who has written over twenty children's books. As a journalist, her byline has been in numerous publications like NPR. She conducts literary and faith-based presentations as a teacher and storyteller.


Twitter Username: TayyabaWrites

Carla Taylor writes book reviews for Daybreak Press and has a particular interest in reading and reviewing nonfiction books addressing sociological themes, religion, and history. She homeschools her three children and is very passionate about early childhood literacy.

Afshan Malik is a Chicago native turned southern belle who authored the 2019 YA novel Pieces by Daybreak Press. She holds an MA in the nonprofit field and brings her interests together at Rabata, an organization promoting positive cultural change through education, spirituality, and community care.


Twitter Username: afshan1009

Virtual

T211.

W.W. Norton Poets: A New Generation

(, , , , )

W.W. Norton’s historic list of poets includes Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, A R. Ammons, Ai, Stanley Kunitz, and Joy Harjo—poets who published books that reflect their social moment and resonate beyond, yet not at the expense of craft and meaningful individualism. In this panel, midcareer and younger poets to Norton will read their work and discuss what it means to be part of a socially conscious tradition of poetry that adheres to democratic ideals of diversity and aesthetic innovation.

Add to schedule

Jill Bialosky’s five poetry collections include the recent Asylum. She’s authored three novels, recently The Prize, and two memoirs, New York Times Best Seller History of a Suicide and Poetry Will Save Your Life. Her writing appears in the New Yorker, Paris Review, and more. She is an editor at W.W. Norton.


Twitter Username: jrbialosky

Major Jackson is the author of five volumes of poetry, most recently The Absurd Man. A recipient of Guggenheim Fellowship, Jackson is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in the Humanities at Vanderbilt University. He serves as poetry editor of the Harvard Review.


Twitter Username: Poet_Major

Website: majorjackson.com

Roger Reeves’s first book of poems is King Me from Copper Canyon Press. He has been awarded a 2015 Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, and a 2013 NEA Fellowship. His next book of poems, Best Barbarian, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton.

Meghan O’Rourke is the editor of the Yale Review and the author of The Night Side: Reimagining Chronic Illness and The Long Goodbye, as well as the poetry collections Sun In Days, Once, and Halflife. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, among other prizes.


Twitter Username: meghanor

Website: http://www.meghanorourke.net

Sandra Lim is the author of three books of poetry, The Curious Thing, The Wilderness, and Loveliest Grotesque. She has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Levis Reading Prize, and a Literature Award form the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She teaches at University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Virtual

T213.

The Hidden Toil of Editing a Literary Journal & How It Impacts Inclusivity

(, , , , Catherine Esposito Prescott)

Being at the helm of a literary journal comes with plenty of rewards—and an equal amount of stress. Costs range from financial to emotional to vocational. These literary journal editors discuss the hidden obligations and labor of literary editing, including facing cancel culture, declining colleagues, encountering poor behavior from submitters, and receiving retribution rejections from editors. In light of these, they advise on best practices for ensuring inclusivity, diversity, and fairness.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

W. Todd Kaneko is the author of the poetry books The Dead Wrestler Elegies and This is How the Bone Sings and coauthor of Poetry: A Writer's Guide and Anthology. He is a Kundiman fellow, former coeditor of Waxwing magazine, and an associate professor at Grand Valley State University.


Twitter Username: toddkaneko

Website: http://www.toddkaneko.com

Ashley M. Jones is the author of Magic City Gospel. She teaches at the Alabama School of Fine Arts.


Twitter Username: ashberry813

Website: ashleymichellejones.wordpress.com

Lesley Wheeler’s books include the essay collection Poetry's Possible Worlds; The State She's In, her fifth poetry collection; and Unbecoming, a novel. She is poetry editor of Shenandoah. Her work appears in American Poetry Review, Ecotone, Poetry, and Massachusetts Review.


Twitter Username: LesleyMWheeler

Website: http://lesleywheeler.org/

Celia Lisset Alvarez (she/her) has been the sole editor of Prospectus: A Literary Offering for over a year. She has three collections of poetry: Shapeshifting, The Stones, and Multiverses, a speculative memoir in verse about the death of her son.


Twitter Username: CeliaLisset

Website: celialissetalvarez.com

Virtual

T214.

The Poetry of Capital: A Reading from a New, Multigenre Anthology

(, , , , )

This reading will feature contributors to The Poetry of Capital, a diverse new anthology in which forty-four poets explore the contemporary American relationship to money, tackling subjects from global economic crises to local tag sales, from the subversive effects of dark money on politics to the freedom granted by summer jobs. Alongside the poems, the volume includes original essays about how capital shapes us and our American experience. Poets will share selections from both their poems and essays.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Clare Rossini has published three collections of poetry, the most recent of which is Lingo. Her poems and essays have been published and anthologized widely, including twice in Best American Poetry, and have been featured on NPR and the BBC. She is Artist in Residence at Trinity College in Hartford.

Mark Doty's nine books of poems—most recently, Deep Lane—have received the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the T.S. Eliot Prize. A new prose study of Walt Whitman is forthcoming. He is a Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University.

Afaa M. Weaver is a poet, playwright, editor, and translator. Spirit Boxing is his fifteenth poetry collection. His awards include four Pushcarts, an NEA, a Fulbright, the Kingsley Tufts Award, the Phillis Wheatley Award, a Guggenheim, and the Botolph Club Foundation Distinguished Artist Award.


Twitter Username: Afaa_Weaver

Website: afaaweaver.net

Benjamin S. Grossberg’s books include My Husband Would, Space Traveler, and Sweet Core Orchard, winner of the 2008 Tampa Review Prize and a Lambda Literary Award. He directs the creative writing program at the University of Hartford.

Sheyl Luna's Magnificent Errors received the Ernest Sandeen Prize and will be published in February 2022. Pity the Drowned Horses received the Andres Montoya Prize. Seven was a finalist for the Colorado Book Award.

Virtual

T215.

Who Are Adoptees & Who Has the Right to Write about Them?

(, , , )

Books featuring adoption have garnered attention in recent years, and yet many portrayals of adoptees in literature continue to be one-dimensional. This panel takes a critical look at adoptee representations in several examples of contemporary literature in order to interrogate the ways in which adoptee narratives reflect broader understandings of adoptee identity. Panelists also examine the consequences that such problematic depictions can have on US international relations and policy-making.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello is the author of Hour of the Ox, winner of the Donald Hall Poetry Prize and a Florida Book Award Bronze Medal. She has received fellowships from Kundiman and the American Literary Translators Association and serves as a program coordinator for Miami Book Fair.


Twitter Username: marcicalabretta

Website: www.marcicalabretta.com

Tiana Nobile is the author of Cleave. She is a Korean American adoptee, Kundiman fellow, recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and a finalist of the National Poetry Series and Kundiman Poetry Prize. 


Twitter Username: tiananob

Website: tiananobile.com

Leah Silvieus is a Kundiman fellow and books editor at Hyphen. She is also the author of three poetry collections: Anemochory, Season of Dares, and Arabilis. She is also the coeditor, with Lee Herrick, of the anthology The World I Leave You: Asian American Poets on Faith and Spirit.


Twitter Username: l_silvieus

Ansley Moon is the author of the poetry collection How to Bury the Dead. She has received awards and fellowships from Kundiman and the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund and was a finalist for the Jake Adam York Poetry Prize and the Emerging Poets Prize from the Great Indian Poetry Collective.


Twitter Username: ansleymoon

Virtual

T216.

Teaching toward Justice: Student Voice & Power in Creative Writing

(, , , , )

For too long, creative writing courses have held themselves outside politics and current events, invoking ideals of the “timeless” and “universal.” But antiracist creative writing classrooms can be sites of transformational action and resistance, led by students. Our cross-genre teaching methods include an antiracist writing workshop, student-led projects, community-based fieldwork, student publishing on digital platforms, collaborative storytelling, and intentional community building.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Catina Bacote is a 2021–2022 Jerome Hill Artist and American Association of University Women Fellow. Her essays have appeared in This Is the Place: Women Writing About Home, Ploughshares, Tin House, Gettysburg Review, Gulf Coast, and others. She teaches at St. John’s University in New York City.

Helen Betya Rubinstein has taught at CUNY schools, University of Iowa, Yale, and The New School, where her current courses follow an inquiry-to-action model. Her essays have appeared in Literary Hub, Jewish Currents, Gulf Coast, and elsewhere, and she works one-on-one with other writers as a coach.


Twitter Username: helenbetya

Leora Fridman is author of My Fault, among other works of prose, poetry, and translation. She holds degrees with honors from Brown University and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has taught online and in person for universities, homes, and community groups since 2004.


Twitter Username: ummleora

Website: leorafridman.com

Felicia Rose Chavez is an award-winning educator with an MFA from the University of Iowa. She is author of The Anti-Racist Writing Workshop: How to Decolonize the Creative Classroom and coeditor of The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 4: LatiNEXT. Find her at www.antiracistworkshop.com.


Twitter Username: writeantiracist

Steven Alvarez specializes in literacy studies and bilingual education with a focus on Mexican immigrant communities. He teaches courses at St. John’s University ranging from ethnographic methods, visual rhetoric, and “taco literacy.” He is the author of two books and three volumes of poetry.

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Michael A. Nutter Theater, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T188.

Since My Body: Discovery & Embodiment of Disabled Voices, Sponsored by Zoeglossia

(, , , , )

Five pioneers of disability poetry in a reading and moderated Q&A that expresses different strains of disability poetics. From the anticolonial to the queer celebratory, disabled voices are charting a poetics of liberation that illuminates the intersectionality of body and identity and the forms of social control and oppression that seek to correct or silence disabled bodies. Together, these four poets will explore, to quote Kay Ulanday Barrett, “the potentiality in being multiple embodiments."



This event will be prerecorded and available on the virtual conference platform, in addition to being screened onsite. ASL interpretation and captioning will be provided.

Add to schedule

Ellen McGrath Smith, who has taught with Zoeglossia, works at the University of Pittsburgh. Her poetry has appeared in the Georgia Review, the New York Times, the American Poetry Review, Los Angeles Review, and other journals and anthologies. Books include Scatter, Feed (Seven Kitchens, 2014) and Nobody's Jackknife (West End Press, 2015).


Twitter Username: breezely1462

Leroy F. Moore Jr. is the founder of Krip-Hop Nation. A founding member of National Black Disability, he is an activist around police brutality against people with disabilities. His cultural work includes poetry books, the film Where Is Hope: Police Brutality against People with Disabilities, and a children’s book, Black Disabled Art History 101 (Xochitl Justice Press).

Allison Adelle Hedge Coke (2021 George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature winner)'s books include Look at This BlueBurnStreamingBlood Run, and Effigies III. Distinguished professor at UC Riverside, she teaches in creative writing and the School of Medicine, directs UCR Writers Week, Lit Sandhill CraneFest, and Along the Chaparral.


Twitter Username: AAHedgeCoke

Website: www.allisonhedgecoke.com

Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet and writer. K. has featured in New York Times, PBS News Hour, the Rumpus, VIDA Review, and Race Forward. They are a MacDowell and Lambda Literary Fellow. Their book, More Than Organs, received a 2021 Stonewall Honor Award and is a 2021 Lambda Literary Award Finalist.


Twitter Username: brownroundboi
Saleem Hue Penny is a Black “rural hip-hop blues'' poet, arts educator, and mutual aid advocate with Lowcountry roots, single-sided deafness, and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome. The 2021 Poetry Coalition Fellow at Zoeglossia, an assistant poetry editor at Bellevue Literary Review, and a proud Cave Canem Fellow, Saleem’s writing explores how young people of color traverse wild spaces and define freedom on their own terms. He often punctuates his poetry with drum loops, gouache, and birch bark.
Twitter Username: huedotart

Website: http://hueart.org

Terrace Ballroom I & II, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 400 Level

T189.

PEN Presents: Ayad Akhtar and Alexandra Schwartz

Drawing from their writing careers, which together span genres from playwriting, screenwriting, journalism, criticism, and fiction, the two will explore a wide range of questions focused on storytelling and the process of literary creation, as well as life in the theater seen from both the playwright and critic's perspective. They will also discuss the role of the writer in the face of recent challenges to the freedom to read in the United States, and the mounting threats to democracy and global free expression today. Akhtar is a playwright, novelist, and screenwriter, whose most recent novel Homeland Elegies was a Finalist for the 2021 Andrew Carnegie Medal. Schwartz was the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle’s Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing for 2014.



This event will be livestreamed. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

Add to schedule

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T190.

Of Triggers & Things: Workshopping the Difficult Text

(, , , )

In an online class with international participants, one panelist was taken aback by a submission of creative nonfiction that entered de Sadean realms of sexual exploration. Despite the writing's brilliance and the scene's necessity, the panelist felt that a warning, at least, was necessary for those with less tolerance for extreme behaviors and graphic description. This panel will discuss strategies for confronting that moment in workshop.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Tim Tomlinson is cofounder of New York Writers Workshop and coauthor of its popular text, The Portable MFA in Creative Writing. He's lived in China, the Philippines, Thailand, Italy, the United Kingdom, the Bahamas, Miami, New Orleans, Boston, and New York, all of which figure in his poetry and fiction.


Twitter Username: nyww

Jee Leong Koh is the author of five books of poems, a volume of essays, a hybrid work of fiction, and a collection of zuihitsu. He heads the New York City-based literary nonprofit Singapore Unbound and its publishing arm Gaudy Boy.


Twitter Username: Jee_Leong_Koh

Website: https://singaporeunbound.org/

Jacqueline Bishop has twice been awarded Fulbright Fellowships, including a year-long grant to Morocco; her work exhibits widely in North America, Europe and North Africa. The Gift of Music and Song: Interviews with Jamaican Women Writers is Jacqueline Bishop's latest publication.


Twitter Username: bishopjacqueline

Website: http://www.jacqueline-bishop.com

Sally Breen, PhD, is the author of The Casuals, winner of the Varuna Harper Collins Manuscript Prize (2011), and Atomic City (2013). She is senior lecturer in creative writing at Griffith University Australia and executive director of APWT Asia Pacific Writers and Translators.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T191.

So You Can Write. But Can You Write a Book Review?

(, , , , )

To review a book connects readers with an unfamiliar text. And it’s an artistic project of its own. Yet it also embarks on a critical engagement with the work. How can all of these things be simultaneously true? Five writers and editors—a scholar of Black intellectual practice, a prizewinning poetry critic, a PEN award-winner, an expert in horror and a former books editor of the L.A. Times—discuss the art, craft and practice of book reviewing, exploring points of intersection and difference.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Adriana E. Ramírez is a Mexican Colombian writer, essayist, critic and poet based in Pittsburgh. She won the inaugural PEN/Fusion Emerging Writers Prize (2015) for her novella-length work of nonfiction, Dead Boys. Her full-length work of nonfiction, The Violence, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: zadri

Website: www.aeramirez.com

Carolyn Kellogg is a writer and critic. For three years she served as books editor at the Los Angeles Times, and she was a judge of the National Book Award in nonfiction in 2019.


Twitter Username: paperhaus

Vidyan Ravinthiran teaches at Harvard. The author of two books of poetry and an award-winning study of Elizabeth Bishop, he helps organize Ledbury Critics, a scheme for increasing racial diversity in book reviewing.

Walton Muyumba’s essays have appeared in Oxford American and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He is the author of The Shadow and the Act: Black Intellectual Practice, Jazz Improvisation, and Philosophical Pragmatism. He teaches literature at Indiana University.


Twitter Username: wmuyumba

Website: waltonmuyumba.com

Gabino Iglesias is a writer, journalist, professor, and book reviewer. He’s the author of Coyote Songs and Zero Saints. His work has been translated into three languages, optioned for film, and nominated to the Wonderland Book Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the Locus Award.


Twitter Username: Gabino_Iglesias

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T192.

Her/Story: Appropriately Hers in Literature Featuring Young Characters

(, , , , Ellen Hagan)

This panel—comprised of diverse female writers and academics—explores the narratives and counternarratives intrinsic to the self: LGBTQIA+, the Latinx and Caribbean American voice, Black, Caucasian, and biracial. We depart from the idea that it is imperative for authors to employ their culture and gender of origin. Sometimes characters from different backgrounds inhabit our work. This raises questions: Are we entitled to do this? Is a sensitivity reader sufficient? Is this acceptable—or not?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Pamela L. Laskin teaches graduate children's writing and directs the Poetry Outreach Center at the City College. She is the 2019 winner of the Leapfrog International Fiction contest for Why No Bhine. Atmosphere Press will soon be publishing The Lost Language of Crazy, a book about mental illness.


Twitter Username: RonitandJamil

Suzanne Weyn is best known for her award-winning Bar Code Tattoo trilogy and her eco thriller, Empty. She teaches writing and children's literature at the City University of New York. Her comedic middle grade novel, Snapstreak, came out in 2018. Find her at suzanneweynbooks.com.


Twitter Username: SuzanneWeyn

Website: suzanneweynbooks.com

DuEwa Frazier is a Brooklyn-born poet, educator, author, and speaker. She received the 2021 Voices of Color Writing Fellowship from MVICW. Her stories for young readers include Alice's Musical Debut, Quincy Rules, and Deanne in the Middle. She earned an MFA in creative writing at The New School.


Twitter Username: DuEwaFrazier1

Website: www.duewaworld.com

JP Howard's debut collection Say/Mirror was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. JP’s poetry is widely anthologized. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Lambda Literary, and VONA/Voices. JP curates Women Writers in Bloom Poetry Salon.


Twitter Username: JPHoward_poet

Website: http://www.jp-howard.com

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T193.

Shaping a Poetry Manuscript That Has a Chance in Today's Literary Landscape

(, , , )

Even experienced writers struggle with putting together a manuscript that will be true to their project and appeal to publishers they are interested in working with. The panel, consisting of award-winning editors and writers, will cover a range of topics, from basics like font size and line spacing to more subtle aspects such as poem ordering and how to manage the readers' experience as they move through your book. All in order to give your collection the best chance of catching an editor's eye.

Add to schedule

KMA Sullivan is the author of two poetry collections: Inclined to Riot and Necessary Fire, winner of the St. Lawrence First Book Award. She is founder and publisher at YesYes Books.


Twitter Username: kmasullivan

Website: kmasullivan.com

Erika Stevens is the editorial director at Coffee House Press, where she acquires poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. She was previously in acquisitions at the University of Georgia Press and University Press of Florida. She freelances as Quick Bread Editorial and has taught publishing/editing at Portland State University and Sierra Nevada.

Suzi F. Garcia is the author of the chapbook A Home Grown Fairytale. She is the executive editor at Noemi Press, online editor at Michigan Quarterly Review, znd forthcoming guest editor at Poetry Magazine. Her work is published or forthcoming from the Georgia Review, Ninth Letter, and more.


Twitter Username: SuziG

Website: http://suzifgarcia.com

Kayleb Rae Candrilli is the recipient of a Whiting Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts. They are the author of Water I Won’t Touch, All the Gay Saints, and What Runs Over.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T194.

Indigenous Ecopoetry: Environmental Perspectives from Those Who Came First

(, , , , )

Indigenous peoples are those who have had the longest relationship with any given place. They have the deepest knowledge of the plants and animals, and they are the longest-serving stewards of the land, often for 10,000 years or more. Respect for the land is an integral part of Indigenous cultures. The panelists will discuss what Indigenous writers bring to the broader conversation of poetry concerning environmental preservation, ecosystem damage, and climate change and read representative poems.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Lucille Lang Day is the award-winning author of eleven poetry collections, including Birds of San Pancho; two children’s books; and a memoir. A coeditor of two poetry anthologies, Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California and Red Indian Road West, she is the founder and publisher of Scarlet Tanager Books.


Twitter Username: LucilleLDay

Website: https://lucillelangday.com

Kimberly Blaeser, past Wisconsin poet laureate, is the author of five poetry collections, most recently Copper Yearning. A professor at UW—Milwaukee and MFA faculty member for Institute of American Indian Arts, Blaeser is Anishinaabe and founding director of Indigenous Nation Poets.


Twitter Username: kmblaeser

Denise Low, Kansas poet laureate 2007–2009, is author of The Turtle’s Beating Heart: One Family’s Story of Lenape Survival and Jackalope, among thirty books. She copublishes Mammoth, a literary press. At Haskell Indian Nations University, Low founded the creative writing program. She is a former AWP board president.


Twitter Username: deniselow9

Website: www.deniselow.net

Craig Santos Perez, PhD, is a native Chamoru from the Pacific Island of Guam. He is the author of five poetry books and the coeditor of five anthologies. He is a professor and former director of the creative writing program in the English department at the University of Hawai’i, Mānoa.


Twitter Username: craigsperez

Website: www.craigsantosperez.wordpress.com

Kimberly Gail Wieser, PhD, author of Texas . . . to get Horses, is associate chair and associate professor of English at the University of Oklahoma and affiliated Native Studies faculty; director of Native Writers Circle of the Americas; and writes poems, screenplays, stories, plays, and articles.


Twitter Username: meonahanehe

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T195.

AAWW at AWP: Stories in Solidarity for Asian Artists

(, , , )

Piyali Bhattacharya, Mira Jacob, Nayomi Munaweera, and Jafreen Uddin ask each other: why is it often difficult to build writing coalitions of color? What does it mean to build artistic community among Asian women, and why are these spaces so often riddled with drama? Is the root of the problem internalized racial oppression? That white supremacy tells us "there can only be one?" If so, what can we do in our writing communities to address this elephant in the room when or even before it comes up?

Add to schedule

Jafreen Uddin is the executive director of the Asian American Writers' Workshop. She is the first woman to lead the organization since its founding in 1991. With over a decade of experience working in the public sector, she specializes in communications, education, and fundraising.


Twitter Username: jafreenmu

Piyali Bhattacharya is editor of the collection Good Girls Marry Doctors. Her short stories and essays have appeared in Ploughshares and the New York Times. Her novel-in-progress has been supported by Hedgebrook and VCCA. She is artist-in-residence at UPenn, where she teaches fiction and nonfiction.


Twitter Username: sari_torial_ink

Website: www.piyalibhattacharya.com

Mira Jacob is the author and illustrator of Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations. Her critically acclaimed novel The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing was a Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers pick and was shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award.


Twitter Username: mirajacob

Website: mirajacob.com

Nayomi Munaweera's debut novel, Island of a Thousand Mirrors, won the 2013 Commonwealth Prize for Asia. The New York Times called it "incandescent." Her second novel, What Lies Between Us, drew comparisons to the voices of Michael Ondatjee and Jumpha Lahiri.

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T196.

The Long Haul: Keep Your Fire, Baby!

(, , , )

Over many years, a poet’s relationship to language, to self, and to society goes through many changes, some deliberate, some unconscious. This is especially true for writers from marginalized communities who often face biases that further complicate their lives—on and off the page. Using their own recently published new and selected collections, the panelists—four poets, two women, two men—will read original work and discuss the things that can sustain or confound a life in writing.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Tim Seibles has published several collections of poetry, including Buffalo Head SolosFast Animal—a finalist for the National Book Award in 2012—and, most recently, One Turn Around The Sun. His new and selected collection, Voodoo Libretto, will be released in January 2022. 


Twitter Username: Timseibles77@gmail.com

Laurie Ann Guerrero is the author of A Tongue in the Mouth of the Dying, A Crown for Gumecindo, and I Have Eaten the Rattlesnake. San Antonio poet laureate (2014) and Texas poet laureate (2016), she is an assistant professor of poetry and gender studies at Texas A&M University-San Antonio.


Twitter Username: LaurAnnGuerrero

Website: www.LaurieAnnGuerrero.com

Patrick Rosal is author of The Last Thing: New and Selected Poems. He is a professor of English and campus codirector of the Institute for the Study of Global Racial Justice at Rutgers-Camden. He has been awarded the Lenore Marshall Prize, as well as fellowships from the NEA, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and the Fulbright Program.


Twitter Username: patrickrosal

Website: www.patrickrosal.com

Lisa Russ Spaar is the author/editor of twelve books. Her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Rona Jaffe Award. She is the director of creative writing at the University of Virginia, and her essays have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and the New York Times.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T198.

Change of Plans: The Pleasure & Pain of Walking Away from Academia

(, , , , )

Did you think you’d finish graduate school and then score a great gig at an institution of higher learning? But now you're tired of the hustle? For many of us, the dream is over as jobs in humanities departments dwindle. So what are the options? Join this diverse panel of professionals who have let go of academic aspirations—some happily, some not so much —and who have found new ways to work while still maintaining their identities as writers.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Sonia Greenfield is the author of four books of poetry: Letdown, selected for the Marie Alexander Series in 2020; American Parable; Circus Gravitas; and Boy with a Halo at the Farmer's Market, winner of the 2014 Codhill Poetry Prize. She teaches writing at Normandale College in Minneapolis.


Twitter Username: SoniaGreenfield

Website: soniagreenfield.com

Andres Rojas holds an MFA and a JD from the University of Florida. He is the author of a full-length poetry book and two chapbooks and has many journal publications, including translations. As a poetry editor at various literary journals, he has sought to foster the work of new and emerging writers.


Twitter Username: OkAporia

Chloe Martinez is the author of two collections, Ten Thousand Selves and Corner Shrine, winner of the Backbone Press Chapbook Prize. She works at Claremont McKenna College, where she is staff at the Center for Writing & Public Discourse and lecturer in religious studies.


Twitter Username: chloepoet

Sarah Kersey is a poet and x-ray technologist from New Jersey. She is an associate editor of South Florida Poetry Journal and is an assistant features editor for the Rumpus. Kersey attended the 2021 Tin House Summer Workshop. She tweets @sk__poet.


Twitter Username: sk__poet

Pamela Hart is author of Mothers Over Nangarhar, published in 2019. She is writer in residence at the Katonah Museum of Art. She received a poetry fellowship from the NEA. She is a poetry editor for the Afghan Women's Writing Project and As You Were: The Military Review.


Twitter Username: PamelaHart5

Website: https://www.pamelahartpoet.com

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T199.

For the Ancestors: Literary Conduit of the Divine

(, , , , )

This panel reading explores writers Jayne Cortez, Tyehimba Jess, Wole Soyinka, Monica Hand, Sonia Sanchez, and Julia de Burgos, whose works engage African cosmology, culture, history, and spirits of the divine. Panelists discuss African Diasporic identities and representative voices who resist colonial and oppressive silence(s) to foster healing and explore local and global BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) who use the word/craft as conduits of transformative justice.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Virginia Vasquez is a writer, multidisciplinary artist, educator, and collaborator. She taught creative writing at the City College of New York, where she received her MFA in creative writing. She is currently working on a collection of hybrid poetry, titled "El Llanto: A Puerto Rican Lament."

Natasha Herring is a VONA recipient and genrebending writer. Recent publications include PressPlayFastForward, Oye Drum, i found god in myself/i loved her, and Operating System. Her works in progress include a novel, memoir, and poetry collection. She has taught at CCNY, Laguardia.

Robert Anthony Gibbons, a native Floridian, came to New York City in 2007 in search of his muse Langston Hughes and found a vibrant contemporary poetry community. His poetry explores spirituality, ancestor worship, and community. He uses the poetic form of chant and folklore in his poems.


Twitter Username: Anthonyrobertgibbons

Starr Davis is a poet and essayist whose work has been featured in literary venues such as the Kenyon Review, the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day, and the Rumpus. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the City College of New York. She is the creative nonfiction editor for TriQuarterly.


Twitter Username: _starrdavis

Mwalim (MJ Peters) is a multi-award-winning storyteller/spoken word artist, playwright, singer, songwriter, music producer, and filmmaker. He is a tenured associate professor of English and Black studies at UMass Dartmouth. Land of the Black Squirrels is his first novel.


Twitter Username: mwalim

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T200.

Dear You, Love Me: Queer(ing) as/and Epistolary Form

(, , )

What about the letter appeals to queer writers across multiple genres? How, when, and why do queer writers turn to/make use of epistolary form? Working with and within the form of the letter, this diverse panel of three transgenerational queer-identified writers reveals epistolarity as an aperture for vulnerability, renewed intimacy with the body, and access for/to past and future selves. In writing to an imagined audience of everyone, how might we use the letter to express desires yet to come?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Ames Hawkins is a trans writer and author of the award-winning book These Are Love(d) Letters. A professor of English and creative writing at Columbia College Chicago, Ames has been a Lambda Fellow and in residence at Bread Loaf, Banff Centre, and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.


Twitter Username: amesthehawk

Website: ameshawkins.com

CM Burroughs is associate professor of poetry at Columbia College Chicago. Her books are The Vital System and Master Suffering. She has been awarded fellowships from organizations including Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, and Cave Canem Foundation.

Samuel Ace is the author most recently of Our Weather Our Sea (Black Radish), and Meet Me There (Belladonna* Germinal Texts). A recipient of an Astraea Writer's Award, he is a multitime finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and the National Poetry Series. He teaches at Mount Holyoke College.


Twitter Username: samuel_ace

Website: https://www.samuelace.com

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T201.

Family Heritage, Violent History: World War I's Lost Transversality in War Poetry Today

(, , , , )

World War I’s centennial offered chances for today’s war writers to reflect upon literary debts owed to 1914–1918 poets in blogs, articles, and new work. This panel fuses history, literary analysis, and creative writing to explore this phenomenon. Members include veteran poets addressing issues of religion, family, sexuality, gender, and PTSD through WWI's lens. WWI poetry and contemporary war literature experts propose insight into the intersections of personal experience, history, and literary craft.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Jennifer Orth-Veillon, PhD, is a writer and translator based in Lyon, France. Published in the New York Times, The War Horse, Lunch Ticket, Consequence, and The Wrath-Bearing Tree, her anthology on WWI and today's veterans is forthcoming in 2022. Her first novel, Mice in the Shadows, is based on WWII.


Twitter Username: orthveillon

Peter Molin, the keeper of the blog Time Now: The Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan in Art, Film, and Literature, has written and presented often on war-writing and literature and has led and participated in numerous veterans-writing workshops. An Afghanistan vet, he teaches at Rutgers University, New Jersey.


Twitter Username: TimeNowBlog

Drew Pham is a queer, transgender writer and educator of Vietnamese heritage. A child of war refugees, her work centers on legacies of violence. She has published in McSweeny's, Slice Magazine, the Daily Beast, and Columbia Journal.


Twitter Username: drewspeak

Connie Ruzich is the editor of International Poetry of the First World War: An Anthology of Lost Voices, a project that developed while she was a 2014–15 UK Fulbright Scholar. She curates the popular blog Behind Their Lines and has published numerous essays on FWW poetry.


Twitter Username: wherrypilgrim

Seth Brady Tucker is a writer, poet, and veteran originally from Wyoming. Seth is the author of the books, Mormon Boy and We Deserve the Gods We Ask For. He writes and teaches at the Lighthouse in Denver and executive directs the Longleaf Writers Conference in Seaside, Florida.


Twitter Username: AirbornePoet

Website: https://www.sethbradytucker.ink

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T202.

Beyond the Immigrant Narrative: The Poetics, Politics & Craft at the Margins

(, , , , )

The immigrant narrative has long posed questions about borders, traditions, assimilation, and multiple identities. Writers and artists have worked across genres and media to create these experiential portraits. In this conversation, we'll explore the effects, consequences, and stories that emerge when writers and artists invoke characters from second- and third-generation immigrant heritages that journey through intersectional communities while creating one for themselves.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Juan Carlos Reyes has published the novella A Summer's Lynching and the fiction chapbook Elements of a Bystander. His fiction and essays have appeared in Waccamaw Journal, Florida Review, and Moss. He teaches creative writing at Seattle University and serves as executive editor at BigFiction.


Twitter Username: JCReyesian

Shin Yu Pai is the author of many books including Virga, ENSO, and AUX ARCS. She has taught at Vermont College of Fine Arts, University of Texas at Dallas, Southern Methodist University, and was a Peter Taylor Fellow at Kenyon College.


Twitter Username: shinyupai

Website: www.shinyupai.com

Kristen Millares Young is a prize-winning journalist, essayist and author of the novel Subduction. Named a Paris Review staff pick, Subduction won Nautilus and IPPY awards. The editor of Seismic, a Washington State Book Award finalist, Kristen reviews books for the Washington Post.


Twitter Username: kristenmillares

Website: www.kristenmyoung.com

Jason Magabo Perez is the author of This is for the mostless. Currently, Perez is an assistant professor of ethnic studies at California State University San Marcos.


Twitter Username: jsnmgbprz

Website: linktr.ee/jasonmagaboperez

David Heska Wanbli Weiden is the author of the novel, Winter Counts, nominated for the 2021 Edgar Award and named a New York Times Editors' Choice, Indie Next Pick, Amazon Best Book, and Book of the Month Club main selection. He was a 2018 MacDowell and PEN America Fellow. davidweiden.com


Twitter Username: WanbliWeiden

Website: www.DavidWeiden.com

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T202B.

Building a Bridge: The Linked Story Collection & the Novel

(, , , Sidik Fofana, Jonathan Escoffery)

The linked short story collection is capacious. By considering a range of formal possibilities—from collections loosely linked by voice or theme to more traditionally linked collections united by place or character to novels that make use of the form of the collection through, for example, the use of an episodic structure—we will investigate ways to conceive of and begin (or finish!) book projects along this spectrum, guided by a sense of what the writer wants to collect.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Cara Blue Adams is the author of You Never Get It Back, winner of the John Simmons Short Fiction Award, judged by Brandon Taylor. Her award-winning fiction appears in Granta, the Kenyon Review, American Short Fiction, and elsewhere. She is an associate professor at Seton Hall University.


Twitter Username: carablueadams

Website: www.carablue.com

Asako Serizawa is the author of Inheritors, which won the 2021 PEN/Open Book Award and the Story Prize Spotlight Award. She is a recipient of two O. Henry Prizes, a Pushcart Prize, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, and a fiction fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.


Twitter Username: a_serizawa

Website: www.asakoserizawa.com

Kirstin Valdez Quade's story collection, Night at the Fiestas won the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard award, the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction, a 5 Under 35”award from the National Book Foundation, and was a finalist for the New York Public Library Young Lions Award. She is an assistant professor at Princeton.

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T204.

Writing to Center & Empower Children Outside the Mainstream

(, , , , )

Childrens’ authors have the privilege and responsibility to tell stories that matter. These panelists write stories that share the lived experiences of children and teens outside the mainstream, narratives that transcend marginalizations—not by erasing them, but by embracing them. In centering outsiders, these authors honor the craft of story and the art of humanity. This panel highlights the motivations, challenges, craft, and artistry that contribute to the creation and success of their books.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Alison Green Myers is a writer, poet, and teacher. She is the program director for the Highlights Foundation. She is a National Writing Fellow and author of stories for children. Her debut middle-grade book, A Bird Will Soar, was recently released.


Twitter Username: alisongmyers

Katey Howes is the author of Rissy No Kissies, "an artistic gem for consent discussions, sensory-processing contexts, and anyone who champions children’s agency and bodily autonomy" (Kirkus). Katey's previous books received ILA's Social Justice Literacy Award and an Anna Dewdney Read Together Honor.


Twitter Username: kateywrites

Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow is a Philadelphia-based educator and award-winning children’s book author. Her picture books and middle-grade fiction center young Black Muslim protagonists and have been recognized as the best in children’s literature by Time Magazine, Read Across America, and NPR.


Twitter Username: jtbigelow

Website: https://jamilahthewriter.com

Alexandra Villasante's debut, The Grief Keeper, was an Indie Next, Indies Introduce, Junior Library Guild Selection, and winner of the 2020 Lambda Literary Award for LGBTQ YA Fiction. Her short stories will appear in the upcoming YA anthologies Our Shadows Have Claws and All Signs Point to Yes.


Twitter Username: magpiewrites

Meera Trehan’s novel, The View from the Very Best House in Town, releases in February 2022. Her work has been published in magazines, and she is actively involved with the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators and the Writer’s Center. Before turning to creative writing, she practiced public interest law, focusing on civil rights.


Twitter Username: writemeera

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T205.

More Interesting than Monsters: Resisting the Urge to Villainize in Memoir

(, , , , Michelle Filgate)

Vivian Gornick instructs memoirists to capture complexity in the people they write about, even those who cause great conflict or pain. “For the drama to deepen,” she asserts, “we must see the loneliness of the monster and the cunning of the innocent.” Memoirists on this panel share their experience portraying difficult people on the page and offer techniques for writing about them in rich and multidimensional ways, resisting the urge to villainize while also not pulling any punches.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Ronit Plank is the author of the memoir When She Comes Back and the short story collection Home Is A Made-Up Place. She is a creative nonfiction editor at the Citron Review and has work in The Atlantic, The Rumpus, The Washington Post, The Iowa Review, The Seattle Times, and Litro. www.ronitplank.com


Twitter Username: ronitplank

Lilly Dancyger is the author of Negative Space, a reported and illustrated memoir selected by Carmen Maria Machado as a winner of the 2019 SFWP Literary Awards, and editor of Burn It Down, a critically acclaimed anthology of essays on women's anger. She is an assistant editor at Barrelhouse Books.


Twitter Username: lillydancyger

Allison Hong Merrill is a Taiwanese immigrant who writes in both Chinese and English. She is the creative nonfiction editor at Dialogue Journal and the author of Ninety-Nine Fire Hoops: A Memoir. Her work has won both national and international awards. Visit her at https://www.allisonhongmerrill.com


Twitter Username: xieshou

Website: allisonhongmerrill.com

Michelle Yang is an advocate who speaks and writes about the intersection of Asian American identity, feminism, and mental health. Born ethnic Chinese in South Korea, Michelle grew up as an immigrant takeout kid. Her memoir, Phoenix Girl: How a Fat Asian with Bipolar Found Love, is in progress.


Twitter Username: michellehyang

Website: michelleyangwriter.com

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T206.

Fatherhood & Grief: Writers Reflect on the Most Difficult Story

(, , , Catherine Ricketts)

Three poets and one novelist reflect on the traumas of child loss, reproductive loss, and geographical/genocidal loss through the lens of fatherhood. These writers will explore what it means to name the unsayable nature of grief in their writing as both a craft and personal issue. Deconstructing societal taboos around emotion and masculinity, these writers will explore the particular nature of fatherly grief, what it means to “lose all father now” as the poet Ben Jonson wrote centuries ago.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Aaron Brown is the author of Acacia Road, winner of the 2016 Gerald Cable Book Award. He has published work in Image, World Literature Today, Tupelo Quarterly, Waxwing, and Transition, among others. Brown grew up in Chad and is an English professor at LeTourneau University.

Shann Ray is the author of American Masculine: Stories; the nonfiction book, Forgiveness and Power in the Age of Atrocity; Balefire: Poems; and the novel, American Copper. His work has been honored with an American Book Award and an NEA Literature Fellowship. He teaches leadership and forgiveness studies at Gonzaga University.

Saddiq Dzukogi’s poetry collection Your Crib, My Qibla was named one of twenty-nine best poetry collections by Oprah Daily. He is the recipient of fellowships and grants from Nebraska Arts Council, Pen America, Obsidian Foundation, and University of Nebraska–Lincoln.


Twitter Username: SaddiqDzukogi

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T207.

(In)Forming Varieties: Poets on Unique Uses of Form in Composition & Performance

(, , , )

How do varieties of form inform poets’ performances? What are the sonic connections between visual poems and villanelles? How can collage collect a community's attention? Join us for an innovative reading exploring idiosyncratic approaches to form and its relationship to both composition and performance. We'll engage the drafting process as well as final drafts. And, as each poet is also an accomplished teacher, we'll discuss how diverse formal innovations enliven the community of the classroom.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

David Welch received his MFA from the University of Alabama and teaches at DePaul University, where he is assistant director of the DePaul Publishing Institute. He's the author of the collection Everyone Who Is Dead, and his poems appear in journals including AGNI, Boston Review, and Colorado Review.

Jaswinder Bolina is author of the poetry collections The 44th of July, Phantom Camera, Carrier Wave, and the digital chapbook The Tallest Building in America. He teaches on the faculty of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Miami.

Avni Vyas, along with Anne Barngrover, is the author of the chapbook, Candy In Our Brains. Her poetry appears in Juked, Meridian, Grist, and Crab Orchard Review. She teaches at New College of Florida in Sarasota.


Twitter Username: AvniDangerfield

Keith S. Wilson is an Affrilachian poet, Cave Canem fellow, graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and recipient of three Bread Loaf scholarships. He holds an MFA in poetry from Chicago State University. Keith works as a writer and game designer in Chicago.


Twitter Username: robottomulatto

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level.

T208.

Southern New Hampshire University Online MFA Faculty Reading

(Jessica Barksdale, Kelly Ann Jacobson, Tiffany Trent, Paul Witcover)

Short fiction readings from faculty members of the Southern New Hampshire University Online MFA program.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Virtual

T209.

Writers Are Laborers, Too: Building a Road to Relief, Recovery, & Representation

(, , , David Kipen)

In the wake of COVID, arts communities, including literary communities and artists, have been devastated. As we emerge, arts activists are looking beyond relief to new modes for supporting artists and the arts. Can there be a new new deal for artists? What might it include? Four thinkers explore how the arts build equity and discuss art as labor, art as a component of repair and reparation, and current initiatives designed to create a richer, more abundant future for working artists.


This virtual discussion room will take place live and will not be recorded for on-demand viewing.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Cathy Linh Che is the author of the poetry collection Split, winner of the Kundiman Poetry Prize, the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the Best Poetry Book Award from the Association of Asian American Studies.

Matthew-Lee Erlbach is a writer, organizer, lobbyist, and cofounder of Arts Workers United/Be An Arts Hero. He has written for Netflix, Showtime, and Nickelodeon; as a playwright, Off-Bway and Steppenwolf. His work has received support from the NEA, Puffin Foundation, and Humanitas, among others.


Twitter Username: thismatthewlee

David Haynes is a twenty-five-year member of faculty at the MFA program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. He has written seven novels; Martha’s Daughter: A Novella and Stories will be published soon. He is the board chair for Kimbilio, an organization serving writers of the African diaspora.


Twitter Username: kimbiliofiction

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

T238.

Happy Neuroqueering: A Reading by Neuroqueer Poets

(, , , )

Neuroqueer poets write poems amazingly expressive of their divergent selves and shaped by the practice of neuroqueering. Think of e.e. cummings, who was dyslexic, jumbling words and scattering letters across a page. Neuroqueer poets are expanding the boundaries of poetic communication and intention in ways that are disruptive, vital, and celebratory. This panel brings together three autistic poets (Jai Hamid Bashir, Hilary Brown, and Nathan Spoon) and an OCD poet (K. Iver).

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Jai Hamid Bashir has been published by the American Poetry Review, Black Warrior Review, the Adroit Journal, Wildness, Cortland Review, Guernica magazine, Academy of American Poets, and others. https://www.jaihamidbashir.com/


Twitter Username: JaiofEARTH

Hilary Brown is the Pushcart-nominated author of When She Woke She Was an Open Field. Their work has appeared in the Labletter, apt, and the Ocotillo Review among others. They're a queer disability activist living in Oakland, California.


Twitter Username: Hil_c_brown

Nathan Spoon is an autistic poet with learning disabilities whose poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Columbia Journal, Gulf Coast, Poetry, Poetry Daily, and the anthology How to Love the World. He is the author of a debut collection, Doomsday Bunker, and editor of Queerly.


Twitter Username: npspoon

K. Iver is a nonbinary poet from Mississippi. They received a PhD in poetry at Florida State University. Their work has appeared in Boston Review, BOAAT, Gulf Coast, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere. They are the 2021–2022 Ronald Wallace Poetry Fellow for the University of Wisconsin–Madison.


Twitter Username: k_ivertown

Virtual

T239.

United We Stand: How Diverse Collections Create Space

(, , , , )

Literature provides some solace, even after a global pandemic, widespread racial unrest, and the Capitol attack. And while America’s still healing, the diverse anthology/edited collection is one substantive and impactful way to unite voices. Now more than ever, more women, POC, and queer writers are leading and creating our own spaces for diverse narratives. The editors in this panel discuss projects they directed alongside the challenges and triumphs they faced organizing and pitching them.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Niki Herd is coeditor of Laura Hershey: On the Life & Work of an American Master. She has work forthcoming from Oxford University Press and Copper Nickel. She earned her PhD from the University of Houston and is currently a visting writer in residence at Washington University in St. Louis.

Jake Young is the author of the poetry collections American Oak, What They Will Say, All I Wanted, and the essay collection True Terroir. He received his PhD from the University of Missouri, and he serves as the poetry editor for the Chicago Quarterly Review. jake-young.com

Susan Muaddi Darraj won the American Book Award for A Curious Land: Stories from Home, winner of the 2014 AWP Grace Paley Prize for Short Fiction. A USA Ford Fellow, Susan teaches in Johns Hopkins' MA in writing program. Her children's book series Farah Rocks was published in 2020.


Twitter Username: SusanDarraj

Website: www.SusanMuaddiDarraj.com

dave ring is a queer writer of speculative fiction living in Washington, DC. He is also the publisher and managing editor of Neon Hemlock Press and the coeditor of Baffling Magazine. Find him online at www.dave-ring.com or @slickhop on Twitter.


Twitter Username: slickhop

celeste doaks is a poet and journalist who has published widely in the US and the UK. She's the author of Cornrows and Cornfields and the award-winning chapbook American Herstory. She is also the editor of the poetry anthology Not Without Our Laughter. You can find her at www.doaksgirl.com.


Twitter Username: thedoaksgirl

Website: www.thedoaksgirl.com

Virtual

T240.

Beyond Representation: Intersections of Poetry & Mental Illness

(, , , , )

The intersection of poetry and mental illness has a problematic history in the cultural imagination, from Blake’s mythologized “madness” to Plath’s romanticized suicide. In recent years this connection has been demystified, illuminating that the lived reality of writing with these disabilities is complex—as is the relationship between one’s conditions and their art. How do mental illnesses consciously and subconsciously impact poetics? This panel convenes five poets to discuss their experiences.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Sara Eliza Johnson is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in poetry, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, among other honors. Her first book, Bone Map, won the 2013 National Poetry Series. Her second book, Vapor, will be published in 2022.


Twitter Username: saraelizaj

Website: saraelizajohnson.com

Rachel Mennies is the author of The Naomi Letters and The Glad Hand of God Points Backwards, winner of the Walt McDonald First-Book Prize in Poetry and finalist for a National Jewish Book Award. She works as an adjunct professor and freelance writer and serves as a member of AGNI's editorial staff.


Twitter Username: rmennies

Website: http://www.rachelmennies.com

Marcelo Hernandez Castillo is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the author of Cenzontle, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Prize, Dulce, and Children of the Land. A Canto Mundo Fellow, he cofounded the Undocupoets campaign.


Twitter Username: marcelo_H_

Aricka Foreman is an American poet and interdisciplinary writer from Detroit, Michigan. Her debut poetry collection, Salt Body Shimmer, earned her the 2021 Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Poetry. She has earned fellowships from Cave Canem, Callaloo, and the Millay Colony for the Arts.


Twitter Username: arickamarie

Website: www.arickaforeman.com

Daniella Toosie-Watson has received fellowships and awards from the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop and the University of Michigan Hopwood Program. Winner of the 92Y 2020 Discovery prize, she received her MFA from the University of Michigan. Daniella is a program coordinator for Lambda Literary.


Twitter Username: ToosieWatson

Virtual

T241.

Brutal or Traumatic Scenes in Creative Nonfiction: Is There a Veil?

(, , , , )

Most of the time, creative nonfiction books deal with something traumatic or brutal. As writers, how mindful are we in recreating these scenes on the page? When we engage with topics like physical, mental, or sexual abuse, rape, self-harm, debilitating illness, and deaths of our loved ones, how intentional are we when narrating readers through these moments? Do we create a veil to protect our readers or draw the readers right in as though they’re experiencing these things themselves? 

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Lara Lillibridge (she/zher) is the author of Mama, Mama, Only Mama and Girlish: Growing Up in a Lesbian Home and coeditor of the anthology Feminine Rising. The interviews editor for Hippocampus Magazine, she holds an MFA from West Virginia Wesleyan College, and she is a mentor for Writer to Writer.


Twitter Username: only_mama

Krystal Sital is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Secrets We Kept. A PEN Award finalist, her essays have been anthologized in A Map Is Only One Story and Fury: Women’s Lived Experiences of the Trump Era. Her work can also be found in Elle, the New York Times, and Catapult.


Twitter Username: krystalAsital

Athena Dixon, a native of northeast Ohio, is the author of The Incredible Shrinking Woman  and No God in This Room. Her work also appears in The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic (Haymarket Books). Learn more at www.athenadixon.com.


Twitter Username: AthenaDDixon

Website: http://www.athenadixon.com

Carol Smith is an award-winning journalist and editor for NPR affiliate KUOW Public Radio in Seattle. Her essays and other writings have appeared in more than a dozen literary journals. Her memoir, Crossing the River: Seven Stories that Saved My Life, A Memoir, came out in May 2021.


Twitter Username: clsmith321

Christine Hyung-Oak Lee is the author of the memoir Tell Me Everything You Don't Remember. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, ZYZZYVA, Guernica, the Rumpus, Hyphen Magazine, and BuzzFeed.


Twitter Username: xtinehlee

Website: http://www.christinehlee.com/

Virtual

T242.

All About Publicity: Publicists & Small Presses

(, , , , )

Publishing with a small press with a limited promotion budget can leave an author feeling adrift and alone when it comes to advertising and promoting their books. Some (who have the resources to do so) hire outside publicists. This panel seeks to answer some hard questions about how to find the right publicist to promote your work and how to gauge your success. What should a publicist cost? How many books will the author have to sell to cover that cost? Is it worthwhile in the long run?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Kimberly Davis is the director at Madville Publishing, a nonprofit independent press based in Denton, Texas. Kim writes mostly fiction and has an MFA from SHSU. She spent five years at Texas Review Press.


Twitter Username: kim4true

Website: https://kpdavis.com

Caitlin Hamilton Summie is the former marketing director of MacMurray & Beck and of BlueHen Books/Penguin Putnam. At each firm, she also managed imprint profile and directed all publicity, hardcover and paperback. In 2003, she founded Caitlin Hamilton Marketing & Publicity.


Twitter Username: csummie

Website: www.caitlinhamiltonmarketing.com

Gigi Marino is a senior publicist with Otter PR in Orlando, Fla. She has more than twenty-five years of experience working in higher education as a writing lecturer, magazine editor, photography director, and director of communications, She also is a poet and essayist.


Twitter Username: durgagi

Lee Zacharias is the author of a collection of short stories, a collection of essays, and four novels. Her work has received IPPY silver medals for fiction and nonfiction, two Sir Walter Raleigh Awards, the Phillip H. McMath Book Award, and fellowships from the NEA and the North Carolina Arts Council.


Twitter Username: LeeZacharias

Michael Simms founded Autumn House Press in 1998 and served as editor in chief until 2015 when he started Vox Populi, a public sphere for politics and poetry. His poetry collections include American Ash and Nightjar, and he's been the lead editor of over 100 published books.


Twitter Username: simmsahp

Website: www.voxpopulisphere.com

Virtual

T243.

How to Start a Poetry Festival & Why

(, , )

Why did Dodge Poetry, Mass Poetry, and Split This Rock call themselves festivals? Do they share some fundamental goals for the kinds of events and experiences they want to create, voices they choose to present, or the audiences they hope to reach? What distinguishes them from academic or professional conferences? Past and present directors of some of our most vibrant poetry festivals discuss the hows and whys of starting, sustaining, and keeping them alive and well.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Martin Jude Farawell directs the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival, where he has filled a variety of roles since 1998. Author of the poetry collection Odd Boy from Sibling Rivalry Press, he was a visiting poet and writing, literature, and poetry instructor for a decade before arriving at Dodge.

Sarah Browning is cofounder and for ten years was executive director of Split This Rock. Author of Killing Summer and Whiskey in the Garden of Eden, she received an MFA in poetry and creative nonfiction from Rutgers Camden in 2021 and is a recipient of the Lillian E. Smith Writer-in-Service Award.

M.P. Carver is a poet and visual artist from Salem, Massachusetts. She teaches digital and creative writing at Salem State University and directed the 2021 Massachusetts Poetry Festival. She is microfounder of Molecule: A Tiny Lit Mag and former poetry editor of Soundings East. See more at mpcarver.com.

Virtual

T244.

The Blended Memoir: When Memoir Isn't Just Memoir

(, , , )

Blended memoirs—or books or collections that incorporate other genres and forms into the personal narrative—are increasingly common in today's literary market. But how to strike the right balance between the personal and the critical, the reported, the illustrated, the researched? How to sell it? Our panel will explore the creative process and blunt publishing reality of this emergent form.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Melissa Febos is the author of Whip Smart, Abandon Me, and Girlhood—a national bestseller. The inaugural winner of the Jeanne Córdova Nonfiction Award from LAMBDA Literary, she is associate professor at the University of Iowa, where she teaches in the nonfiction writing program.


Twitter Username: melissafebos

Website: melissafebos.com

Marcos Gonsalez is a queer Mexican Puerto Rican memoirist, essayist, and assistant professor. Gonsalez's debut blended memoir, Pedro's Theory, (2021) has been reviewed by the New York Times and Kirkus. Gonsalez's essays can be found at Lit Hub, New Inquiry, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: MarcosSGonsalez

Jeanna Kadlec is the author of the forthcoming memoir-in-essays This I Know: A Memoir of Heresy (Mariner Books, 2022). She is a former culture columnist at Longreads, and her work has appeared in ELLE, Glamour, Allure, NYLON, Lit Hub, Catapult, Electric Literature, Autostraddle, and more.


Twitter Username: jeannakadlec

Angela Chen is the author of Ace: What Asexuality Reveals about Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex, which was named one of the Best Books of 2020 by NPR, Electric Literature, and Them. Her reporting and essays have also appeared in the New York Times, the Atlantic, Paris Review, and more.


Twitter Username: chengela

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

Terrace Ballroom I & II, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 400 Level

T218.

Door in the Mountain: A Tribute to Jean Valentine, Sponsored by Alice James Books

(Anne Marie Macari, Joan Larkin, Mark Doty, Brenda Hillman, Mihaela Moscaluic)

AJB presents a tribute, celebrating Jean Valentine, author of thirteen books of poetry and recipient of numerous awards and fellowships in recognition of her exceptional accomplishments in literature, including the Bollingen Prize for Poetry in 2017. Moderated by Anne Marie Macari, the tribute gathers a distinguished panel as they celebrate Jean Valentine's extraordinary life and contributions to literature.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T219.

Racially-Conscious Literary Criticism

(, , )

Just as astute fiction writers build their racial awareness to portray racial realities outside their own, discerning literary critics can develop such awareness to review books with unfamiliar racial experience. How can critics deepen understanding of an author’s racially informed artistic tradition? Should critics seek editorial guidance to identify potential racial blind spots? This diverse panel brings together critics and creative writers to explore these and other questions.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Erik Gleibermann is a San Francisco social justice journalist, memoirist, and poet. He has written for the Atlantic, New York Times, Washington Post, Guardian, Black Scholar, and World Literature Today, where he is contributing editor. He recently completed Jewfro American: An Interracial Memoir.


Twitter Username: erikgleibermann

Emily Bernard is the author of Black Is the Body, winner of the Christopher Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose. She is a 2020 Andrew Carnegie Fellow and the Julian Lindsay Green and Gold Professor of English at the University of Vermont.


Twitter Username: emilyebernard

David Mura is the author of the memoirs Turning Japanese and Where the Body Meets Memory; the novel Famous Suicides of the Japanese Empire; and four poetry books, including The Last Incantations. His latest book is A Stranger's Journey: Race, Identity & Narrative Craft in Writing. He teaches at the Loft and VONA Writers’ Conference.


Twitter Username: MuraDavid

Website: davidmura.com

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T220.

Multitudes: Writing Intersecting Identities in Short Fiction

(, , , , Nova Ren Suma)

Short form fiction has an important part to play in children’s literature—particularly when it can highlight the intersecting identities that make up the reality of our world. A diverse panel of authors writing for children across age groups will discuss the impact that short fiction can have on readers and how learning how to write short fiction can deepen and improve craft.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Eric Smith is a literary agent and young adult author living in Philadelphia. An agent with P.S. Literary, he's worked on award-winning and New York Times bestselling books. As an author, his latest novels include Don't Read the Comments and You Can Go Your Own Way.


Twitter Username: ericsmithrocks

Website: http://www.ericsmithrocks.com

Alexandra Villasante's debut, The Grief Keeper, was an Indie Next, Indies Introduce, Junior Library Guild Selection, and winner of the 2020 Lambda Literary Award for LGBTQ YA Fiction. Her short stories will appear in the upcoming YA anthologies Our Shadows Have Claws and All Signs Point to Yes.


Twitter Username: magpiewrites

Mia García studied creative writing at The New School, worked in publishing, and lived under a pile of to-be-read books. She is the author of Even If the Sky Falls and The Resolutions.


Twitter Username: mgarciawrites

Katherine Locke is the award-winning author of The Girl with the Red Balloon, The Spy with the Red Balloon, and other titles, including editing and contributing to It's a Whole Spiel: Love, Latkes, and Other Jewish Stories and This Is Our Rainbow: Sixteen Stories of He, Her, Them, and Us.


Twitter Username: bibliogato

Website: KatherineLockeBooks.com

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T221.

A Misfit of Ghosts: How Haunted Memoir Rethinks the Real

(, , , , )

Haunted memoir unsettles traditional notions of memoir and nonfiction as it engages with ghosts, both metaphoric and actual, to examine what haunts us collectively and individually. In this session, panelists will discuss the various forms hauntings have taken in their work, how haunted memoir pushes against the constraints of normative nonfiction, as well as discuss how they create their ghosts on the page.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Bruce Owens Grimm is a queer ghost nerd based in Chicago. He is a coeditor of Fat & Queer: An Anthology of Queer & Trans Bodies & Lives. He attended the 2021 Tin House Winter Workshop and taught his "Haunted Memoir" workshop at Story Studio Chicago and the Desert Nights, Rising Stars Conference.


Twitter Username: bruceowensgrimm

Elissa Washuta (Cowlitz Indian Tribe) is the author of White MagicMy Body Is a Book of Rules, and Starvation Mode, and coeditor of the anthology Shapes of Native Nonfiction: Collected Essays by Contemporary Writers. She is an assistant professor at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: elissawashuta

Website: http://washuta.net

Steffan Triplett is a Black, queer writer from Missouri. He received his MFA in nonfiction from the University of Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: steffantriplett

Jami Nakamura Lin is the author of The Night Parade, a speculative memoir illustrated by her sister Cori. She is a 2016 NEA U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Fellow and a former Catapult columnist. Her work has appeared in the New York Times and Electric Lit.


Twitter Username: jaminlin

J. Nicole Jones received an MFA in creative nonfiction from Columbia University and has held editorial positions at VICE and VanityFair.com. Her essays and writing have appeared in the LA Review of Books and VanityFair.com, among others. Her memoir Low Country was published in 2021 by Catapult.


Twitter Username: jnicolejones

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T222.

Extending the Frame: Toward a New Ekphrasis

(, , , , )

Traditional notions of ekphrasis often give poet and poem passive roles like observing or reflecting. These poets expand the aesthetics of ekphrasis into active modes of research and documentary, creating works that are not so much products but processes of exploration and interrogation. Fusing the verbal and the visual into a single lens, they go beyond the museum and gallery to elucidate not only other art forms but also the social, political, economic, and linguistic forces shaping all.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Dean Rader has written, edited, or coedited eleven books, including Self-Portrait as Wikipedia Entry, a finalist for the Oklahoma Book Prize and the Northern California Book Award. He is a professor at the University of San Francisco and a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow in Poetry.


Twitter Username: deanrader

Website: http://deanrader.com

Heid E. Erdrich is a poet, writer, editor, and winner of a National Poetry Series Award for Little Big Bully. She teaches in the low-residency MFA program of Augsburg University. Heid is Ojibwe, enrolled at Turtle Mountain.


Twitter Username: HeidErdrich

Website: heiderdrich.com

Tess Taylor is the author of five collections of poetry, including The Misremembered World, The Forage House, and Work & Days. In spring 2020 she published two books of poems: Last West, part of Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures at the Museum of Modern Art, and Rift Zone, from Red Hen Press.


Twitter Username: tessathon

Website: www.tess-taylor.com

Cole Swensen is the author of nineteen books of poetry, most recently Art in Time. A 2006 Guggenheim Fellow, she has won the Iowa Poetry Prize, the SF State Poetry Center Book Award, and the 2004 PEN/USA Award in Translation. She teaches in literary arts at Brown University.

Biswamit Dwibedy is a poet, novelist, and nonfiction writer with six books published in India and the United States. He has an MFA from Bard College, New York, and he now teaches at the American University of Paris. His memoir, Hundred Greatest Love Songs, is forthcoming.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T223.

In This Together: Teacher-Poets Building Community Within & Beyond the Classroom

(, , , , )

Community is integral to a poet’s work, development, and identity. Poets who are K–12 teachers often struggle to access the larger literary community and must find new ways of building support networks and seeking creative opportunities, often doing so through their teaching practice. Five poets discuss how to cultivate strong connections to the larger poetry world while using poetry to foster more caring communities for their students, many of whom carry literary aspirations of their own.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Donna Vorreyer is the author of To Everything There Is and two other poetry collections from Sundress Publications, as well as eight chapbooks. She is an associate editor at Rhino Poetry and has recently retired from thirty-six years in public K-8 education.


Twitter Username: djvorreyer

Leah Umansky is the author of four books of poetry: The Barbarous Century, Don Dreams and I Dream, Straight Away the Emptied World, and Domestic Uncertainties. She earned her MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and is the host and curator of the COUPLET Reading Series in New York City.


Twitter Username: lady_bronte

Website: http:/leahumansky.com

Ashley M. Jones is the author of Magic City Gospel. She teaches at the Alabama School of Fine Arts.


Twitter Username: ashberry813

Website: ashleymichellejones.wordpress.com

Matthew E. Henry (MEH) is a high school English teacher and author of the chapbooks Teaching While Black and Dust and Ashes and the forthcoming full-length collection The Colored Page. He is also editor in chief of the Weight Journal, an international publication of high school creative writing.


Twitter Username: MEHPoeting

Website: www.MEHPoeting.com

Joan Kwon Glass is the author of Night Swim, winner of the 2021 Diode Editions Book Contest. She has chapbooks forthcoming with Small Harbor Publishing and Milk & Cake Press (spring 2022). She has been a social studies educator in the Connecticut public schools for the past twenty years.


Twitter Username: joanpglass

Website: www.joankwonglass.com

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T224.

A Tribute to Monica A. Hand: Poet, Playwright, Translator, Mentor, Activist

(, , , , )

Monica A. Hand (1953–2016) was a brilliant poet, playwright, book artist, translator, Cave Canem Fellow, mentor, and activist. Her poetry books, me and Nina (2012), winner of the 2010 Kinereth Gensler Award, and The DiVida Poems (A2018), reveal a profound, major voice for the experiences of African Americans, women, and artists and for peace and social justice. Panelists will talk about her, read her poems, and show images of one of our most beloved poets whose loss is felt all over the world.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Aliki Barnstone is a poet, translator, critic, editor, and artist. Some of her recent books of poems are Dwelling, Bright Body, Dear God, Dear Dr. Heartbreak, and a translation of Cavafy. Among her awards are a Fulbright Fellowship in Greece and residencies at VCCA. She is poet laureate of Missouri.


Twitter Username: AlikiBee

Website: www.alikibarnstone.com

Cornelius Eady is the author of eight poetry collections, including Victims of the Latest Dance Craze, winner of the 1985 Lamont Prize, and Brutal Imagination. Cofounder of Cave Canem, he holds the Miller Chair at the University of Missouri.


Twitter Username: roughband

Website: http://blueflowerarts.com/artist/cornelius-eady/

Rebecca Pelky is an assistant professor of film studies at Clarkson University. She has two collections of poetry, Horizon of the Dog Woman and Through A Red Place. She is a member of the Brothertown Indian Nation of Wisconsin and writes in Mohegan and English.


Twitter Username: RebeccaPelky

Liana Sakelliou is a poet, translator, critic, editor, and professor at the University of Athens, Greece and a member of the Hellenic Authors' Society. She is the author of eighteen books and wrote monographs on Emerson, Dickinson, H.D., Levertov, Snyder. Her poems have been widely anthologized and translated into several languages.

Lauren K. Alleyne is author of Difficult Fruit (2014) and Honeyfish (2019) and coeditor of Furious Flower: Seeding the Future of African American Poetry (2020). Assistant director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center, she is professor of English at James Madison University.


Twitter Username: poetlka

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T226.

Ten Years After Occupy: Writing, Capital, & Power

(, , , , )

In the decade since Occupy Wall Street, American writers have focused on questions of money and power to a degree not seen at least since the 1930s. On this panel, five novelists will discuss how recent critiques of capitalism have shaped their writing, their teaching, and their approach to the literary community.

Add to schedule

Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine, the story collections The Train to Lo Wu and Nobody Ever Gets Lost, and a book of essays, White Flights: Race, Fiction, and the American Imagination.


Twitter Username: rowjess

Website: www.jessrow.com

Rion Amilcar Scott is the author of the story collections The World Doesn't Require You and Insurrections, which won the 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. He earned an MFA from George Mason University and teaches English at the University of Maryland.


Twitter Username: reeamilcarscott

Alexandra Kleeman is the author of You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine, Intimations, and the novel Something New Under the Sun and an assistant professor at the New School. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, the Paris Review, n+1, Harper's, the New York Times Magazine, and Conjunctions.


Twitter Username: alexkleeman

Website: http://www.alexandrakleeman.com

Tracy O'Neill is the author of the novels The Hopeful and Quotients. A National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree and a 2012 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellows, her work has appeared in Granta, VQR, the Atlantic, the New Yorker, Rolling Stone, the Guardian, and the New York Times.


Twitter Username: tracysoneill

Matt Bell is the author of the novels Appleseed, Scrapper, and In the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the Woods, the story collection A Tree or a Person or a Wall, and two works of nonfiction, Refuse to Be Done and Baldur's Gate II. He is an associate professor at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: mdbell79

Website: http://www.mdbell.com

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T227.

To Lie or Not to Lie? How Writers Choose Between Fiction & Nonfiction

(, , , , )

How do writers decide between fiction and memoir? How does the process of writing shift when shifting genres? In this panel, writers who have written and published in both genres will discuss the craft choices, ethical questions, research inquiries, and publishing concerns that lie behind each. Rather than approaching the topic as fiction vs. nonfiction, we will offer examples of how to navigate both and encourage people to consider the possibilities that emerge from multigenre writing.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Adrienne Brodeur is the author of the bestselling memoir Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover and Me, which was named a Best Book of the Year by Amazon, Audible, Buzzfeed, LJ, NPR, People, Real Simple, Slate, and Washington Post. She is the executive director of Aspen Words, a literary nonprofit.


Twitter Username: adriennebrodeur

Website: www.adriennebrodeur.com

Beth (Bich Minh) Nguyen is the author of the memoir Stealing Buddha’s Dinner, the novels Short Girls and Pioneer Girl, and the forthcoming memoir Owner of a Lonely Heart. She is a professor in the creative writing program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.


Twitter Username: bichminhnguyen

Website: www.bichminhnguyen.com

Mira Jacob is the author and illustrator of Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations. Her critically acclaimed novel The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing was a Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers pick and was shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award.


Twitter Username: mirajacob

Website: mirajacob.com

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh is the author of two story collections, American Estrangement and Brief Encounters With the Enemy, and a memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free. His writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Paris Review, and Best American Short Stories. He teaches at NYU and Hunter College.


Twitter Username: sayrafiezadeh

Joanna Rakoff is the author of the bestsellers My Salinger Year—recently adapted into a feature film starring Sigourney Weaver—and A Fortunate Age, winner of the Goldberg Prize for Fiction. Her family memoir, The Fifth Passenger, will be out in 2022. She writes for the New York Times and Vogue.


Twitter Username: joannarakoff

Website: http://joannarakoff.com

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T228.

The Sentence as Itself: Vivifying Grammar in Writing Classrooms

(, , , , )

Say the word "grammar," and most students flee, but attention to the mechanics of the sentence as a dynamic form can illuminate new possibilities for writers in any genre. Four writer-teachers with experience from grade school to grad school will speak about the generative potential that conversations about grammar and syntax have in their classrooms and their own work. Challenging ideas of “correctness,” they engage students in understanding how grammar underpins voice, vernacular, and expression.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

B.K. Fischer is the author of five books of poetry—Mutiny Gallery, St. Rage's Vault, Radioapocrypha, My Lover's Discourse, and Ceive—and a critical study of ekphrasis, Museum Mediations. She teaches the Comma Sutra, a crossgenre seminar on grammar and syntax for MFA writers, at Columbia University.


Twitter Username: BK_Fischer

Website: www.bkfischer.com

Camille Guthrie is the director of undergraduate writing initiatives at Bennington College. She teaches essay writing, critical theory, ekphrasis, poetry, gender studies, grammar, and first-year writing. She is the author of four books of poetry, including Diamonds (2021).


Twitter Username: GuthrieCamille

Emily Suazo is an educator, writer, and translator based in New York City. She is currently an instructor in the university writing program for the core at Columbia University.


Twitter Username: emilymiquela

Bronwen Tate is an assistant professor of teaching in the School of Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. She is the author of The Silk the Moths Ignore, and her poems and essays appear in Contemporary Literature and The Rumpus.


Twitter Username: bronwentate

Jared Jackson holds an MFA from Columbia University. He has been awarded fellowships from the Center for Fiction, MacDowell, and Baldwin for the Arts. His work appears in the New York Times Book Review, the Yale Review, Guernica, and more. He is the literary programs manager at PEN America.


Twitter Username: jjackso92

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T229.

Broadsided Press: Celebrating Fifteen Years of Poetic & Artistic Collaboration

(, , , , )

Broadsided Press has been publishing collaborations between writers and visual artists as monthly broadsides since 2005; this year, Provincetown Arts Press is publishing an anthology of this groundbreaking work. Join founder Elizabeth Bradfield and poets from the anthology Jennifer Perrine, Luiza Flynn-Goodlet, Margaret Noodin, and John Nieves in a celebration of poems, art, and the synergy between. Images of the art will be projected as the poets read work from the anthology.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Elizabeth Bradfield’s most recent book is Toward Antarctica. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, Poetry, and her honors include the Audre Lorde Prize and a Stegner fellowship. Founder of Broadsided Press, she works as a naturalist/guide and teaches creative writing at Brandeis University.


Twitter Username: e.bradfield

Website: www.ebradfield.com

Jennifer Perrine is the author of four books of poetry: Again; No Confession, No Mass; In the Human Zoo; and The Body Is No Machine. She is a recipient of the Publishing Triangle Audre Lorde Award and fellowships from Literary Arts and the Vermont Studio Center.

Luiza Flynn-Goodlett, editor in chief of Foglifter, is the author of Look Alive—winner of the 2019 Cowles Poetry Book Prize from SEMO Press—along with seven chapbooks, most recently The Undead (Sixth Finch Books' 2020 Chapbook Contest) and Shadow Box (2019 Madhouse Press Editor's Prize).


Twitter Username: luizagurley

Website: luizaflynngoodlett.com

Margaret Noodin is a poet and associate professor at the University of Wisconsin‹Milwaukee. She is the author of Bawaajimo, a book on native literature and Weweni, a collection of bilingual poems in Ojibwe and English. Her poems and essays have been anthologized in numerous journals and collections.


Twitter Username: OjibweNet

Website: www.ojibwe.net

John A Nieves is an associate professor of English and director of graduate studies at Salisbury University in Maryland. He holds an MA from South Florida and a PhD from Missouri. He is the author of the poetry collection, Curio. He is one of the editors of The Shore Poetry.

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T230.

The Spillover: The Translator’s Memoir/Novel/Imaginary Epistolary Dialog

(, , , )

Four writers translating between English, Japanese, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, French, and Hebrew (over)whelm the conventions that separate reading and writing, writing and translation. They reflect on how their own writing continues their affective, political, and transcultural work of translating literary texts. In their work, they attend to the consequent reconfigurations of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and status that are marked by language and which change over time.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Marcela Sulak has authored three poetry collections and the memoir Mouth Full of Seeds. She coedited Family Resemblance, a hybrid anthology, and her five poetry translations have received an NEA Fellowship and a PEN Award nomination. She edits the Ilanot Review and hosts the podcast Israel in Translation.

John Keene is the author or coauthor of several books, including Annotations; Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse; and Counternarratives. He also is the translator of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst’s novel Letters from a Seducer. He teaches at Rutgers University-Newark.


Twitter Username: jstheater

Website: http://jstheater.blogspot.com

Liliana Valenzuela, a Macondo and CantoMundo fellow, is the author of Codex of Love: Bendita Ternura, and Codex of Journeys: Bendito Camino. She is an award-winning writer, poet, translator, and journalist. Her work has appeared in Edinburgh Review, Indiana Review, and Huizache


Twitter Username: LiliVale

Website: www.LilianaValenzuela.com

Judy Halebsky’s most recent book, Spring and a Thousand Years (Unabridged), was a finalist for the National Poetry Series and the Millar Williams Prize. Currently, she is translating Wago Ryoichi’s post-Fukushima ecopoetry. She directs the low-res MFA program at Dominican University of California.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T230B.

Centering Displaced Narratives: A Craft Perspective

(, , , , )

Viet Thanh Nguyen writes, “True justice is creating a world” where displaced people can “tell their stories and be heard, rather than be dependent on a writer or a representative.” This panel examines representational strategies for writing the stories of refugees and displaced people as justly as possible. The panelists focus on developing a cowriting relationship, interviewing around trauma, structuring narratives, challenging stereotypes, and creating space in a crowded publishing field.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Jessica Goudeau is the author of After the Last Border, which won the Lukas Book Prize, and We Were Illegal (forthcoming). She's written for the New York Times, the Atlantic, Washington Post, and Catapult, among other places. She teaches nonfiction at Sewanee School of Letters.


Twitter Username: jessica_goudeau

Jenna Krajeski is a journalist and author with work in the New Yorker, the New York Times, and VQR. She is the co-author with Nobel laureate Nadia Murad of Ms. Murad's memoir, The Last Girl, and with Mondiant Dogon of Those We Throw Away Are Diamonds, Mr. Dogon's memoir of living as a refugee.


Twitter Username: jenna_krajeski

Ahmed M. Badr is an Iraqi American poet and social entrepreneur. He is the founder and executive director of Narratio, author of While the Earth Sleeps We Travel, a National Geographic Young Explorer, and an EdM Candidate at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Edafe Okporo is an author, speaker, refugee, LGBTQ rights activist, and founder the Pont LLC. He is from Nigeria and has been featured on major media outlets such as Now This News, the Nation Magazine, Yahoo Lifestyle, NPR radio, WNYC, Art Newspaper and GLAAD Media.


Twitter Username: Edafeokporo

Website: Www.edafeokporo.com

Mondiant Nshimiyimana Dogon is a Congolese author, human rights activist, and refugee ambassador. Born into a Congolese Tutsi family in Bagogwe tribe in North Kivu province, he was forced to leave his home village, Bikenke, because of Rwanda Genocide that spilled over into Congo.

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T231.

Close to Zero: Publishing without a Budget

(, , , , )

Every magazine and press starts with an idea, an aesthetic, and a passion. Some also start with grants, a network, and funding. Others don’t. Our presenters will give immediate and practical advice on establishing and maintaining e-journals, print journals, and presses from one’s personal finances. We will discuss web development, printing, distribution, sales, the business aspects of zero-budget publishing, and free ways to expand audiences. Additional resources will be explored and provided.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Jonathan Penton edits the journal Unlikely Stories and its print arm, Unlikely Books. He is the technical director for the New Orleans Poetry Festival and Rigorous and has worked in management and technical roles for a number of arts organizations. His most recent chapbook of poetry is Backstories.


Twitter Username: USDotOrg

Rosalyn Spencer, educator and advocate, holds a BA in English, MLS in public library studies, and MEd in educational leadership. She directs youth art programs and teaches English Language Arts in greater New Orleans. She is a grant writer, advocate, and supporter of the arts in education and equitable curriculum.

Kenning (aka Kenyatta) JP García is a performer, antipoet, humorist, and diarist. JP is the author of innovative diary collections such as OF (What Place Meant), Furthermore, and Slow Living. JP is also an organizer for the St. Rocco's Reading Series and is an editor at Rigorous and Dream Pop Press.


Twitter Username: kenningjpgarcia

Jesi Buell is a librarian at Colgate University in Hamilton, NY. She also runs KERNPUNKT Press, a home for experimental literature. She is the author of The Book of the Last Word and KINDERKRANKENHAUS. Her other writing can be found at www.jesibender.com.


Twitter Username: jesibender

Leah Angstman is a historian, editor, publisher, poet, and fiction writer. She is the founder (1993) and editor of Alternating Current Press, editor of The Coil, and copyeditor of Underscore News. Her debut historical novel, Out Front the Following Sea, is available everywhere books are sold.


Twitter Username: leahangstman

Website: leahangstman.com

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T232.

Social Justice in the Writing Classroom

(, , , , )

To celebrate the 1970 founding of Medgar Evers College, the City University of New York, five teachers from the college’s English Department will talk about how they integrate ideas of social justice and human equality into their writing classrooms. Panelists will explore the intersection of artistic integrity with social responsibility, and discuss their concerns and approaches in preparing students of color to develop an aesthetic inclusivity.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Thaddeus Rutkowski is author of seven books, most recently Tricks of Light, a poetry collection. His novel Haywire won an award from the Asian American Writers' Workshop. He teaches at Medgar Evers College and received a fiction writing fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts.


Twitter Username: thadrutkowski

Website: www.thaddeusrutkowski.com

Donna Hill has more than seventy titles in print. She has won numerous awards for her body of work. Three of her novels were adapted for television. She holds an MFA in creative writing and is an assistant professor of professional writing at Medgar Evers College.


Twitter Username: donnahill

Website: www.donnahill.com

Darrel Alejandro Holnes is the author of Stepmotherland and Migrant Psalms; his poetry has appeared in Poetry Magazine, American Poetry Review, Callaloo, and elsewhere. He is the winner of the Andres Montoya Poetry Prize and others. He is an assistant professor for CUNY, and he teaches at New York University.

Tonya Cherie Hegamin is the author of the picture book Most Loved in All the World and the YA historical novels M+O 4evr, Pemba's Song (written with Marilyn Nelson), and Willow, all of which have won national awards and recognition. Hegamin is the creative writing coordinator at CUNY Medgar Evers College.

Joanna Sit was born in China and grew up in New York City. She is the author of My Last Century, In Thailand with the Apostles, and most recently, Track Works. She teaches creative writing at Medgar Evers College, City University of New York.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T233.

Mentorship as a Key to Diversity in Publishing

(, , , , )

In publishing's ongoing work toward greater diversity and access, fellowships and mentorships can be the keys to doors many would otherwise see as closed to them. Focusing on A Public Space's fellowship program as one model for supporting emerging writers and editors, panelists will discuss their involvement with the program and how a fellowship can offer people from a variety of backgrounds and experiences the tools to help shape a more diverse and vibrant publishing community.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Taylor Michael is an emerging editor, essayist, and critic. She is an MFA student at Columbia University School of the Arts and was the inaugural A Public Space Editorial Fellow. She has work in the Columbia Journal, Hyperallergic, and Publisher's Weekly.


Twitter Username: taytaylaytay

Gustavo Rueda has spent several years as a journalist writing articles about writers and film and theater directors—with the intention of absorbing knowledge from the spectator side and hoping to become the author of his own stories.

Jai Chakrabarti’s short fiction has appeared in numerous journals and has been anthologized in The O. Henry Prize Stories and The Best American Short Stories and awarded a Pushcart. He is the author of the debut novel A Play for the End of the World, published by Knopf.


Twitter Username: JaiChakrabarti

Deborah Taffa is the director of the MFA in creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In 2021, her memoir manuscript won awards from PEN America, MacDowell, Tin House, and Kranzberg Arts. Her writing can be found at Boston ReviewA Public Space, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. She is a citizen of the Quechan Nation.


Twitter Username: deborahtaffa

Website: www.deborahtaffa.com

Miguel Coronado is the 2021 Editorial Fellow at A Public Space. He has interned in academic publishing at W.W. Norton and has a BA in English and creative writing from New York University. 

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T234.

The Unseen & the Unsaid

(, , )

Issues of race and culture are pressing topics in the US. However, mainstream commentary rarely considers how these issues are illustrated in working-class literature. Writers from poor and working-class backgrounds read stories and novel excerpts that address the various conceptual and literal conflicts their characters face in their day-to-day lives along the Texas-Mexican border, California’s east bay, and the rural Midwest.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Keenan Norris is a novelist, essayist, and short story writer. His latest novel is The Confession of Copeland Cane. His short work has appeared in numerous forums, including the Los Angeles Review of BooksLos Angeles Times, and Alta. He teaches at San Jose State University.

Joseph D. Haske is a writer and critic whose debut novel, North Dixie Highway, was released in October 2013. His fiction appears in journals such as BoulevardFiction International, the Texas Review, the Four-Way ReviewPleiades, and in the Chicago Tribune's literary supplement, Printers Row Journal.


Twitter Username: jhaske4

Website: josephdhaske.com

Daniel M. Mendoza is the editor of Stray Dogs: Interviews with Working-Class Writers. His fiction and essays have appeared in journals across the country. He is managing editor of Dissonance.


Twitter Username: dissonance_lit

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T235.

Women's Caucus

(Melissa Studdard, Jennifer Givhan, Rosebud Ben-Oni, Patricia Spears Jones, Erika Meitner)

The Women's Caucus offers a space to network, plan events, and discuss issues concerning women writers (eg., ways to support each other, lack of access to literary power structures, conference childcare, obstacles to publication, keeping literary events safe, etc.). The Women's Caucus is an inclusive space, and it welcomes the diverse perspectives of women writers. This meeting will be accessible to in-person and virtual attendees.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

T236.

The Donald Justice Poetry Prize: WCU Poetry Center's Tradition of Excellence

(, , , John Foy, )

The West Chester University Poetry Center is excited to showcase the most recent winners of the Donald Justice Prize. Since 2006, the Justice Prize has been awarded to a book-length collection of formal poetry. This panel features the work of four formalist poets from diverse backgrounds. It highlights personal and familial issues as well as national and international cultural concerns.Their masterful approach to poetic form and craft is shifting the landscape of contemporary American poetry.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Cherise A. Pollard, PhD, is director of the poetry center and professor at West Chester University. A Cave Canem and Callaloo Fellow, Pollard was awarded a grant from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund. In 2015, her chapbook Outsiders won The MWC's Mississippi Valley/Susan K. Collins Chapbook Prize.


Twitter Username: cheriapollard

Chad Abushanab is the author of The Last Visit, winner of the Donald Justice Poetry Prize. His poems appear in the New York Times Magazine, the Believer, Best New Poets, Southern Poetry Review, Ecotone, and others. He holds a PhD in English and creative writing from Texas Tech University.


Twitter Username: chadabushanab

Katherine Barrett Swett has published a chapbook, Twenty-one, and a book, Voice Message, selected by Erica Dawson for the 2019 Donald Justice Poetry Prize. Recent work has appeared in Orbis (U.K.) and online in the Evergreen Review. A life-long resident of New York, she teaches high-school English.

Alexis Sears is the author of Out of Order, winner of the 2021 Donald Justice Poetry Prize. She received her bachelor of arts degree in writing seminars at Johns Hopkins University and her MFA in poetry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has been widely published in literary journals.


Twitter Username: alexissearspoet

Virtual

T237.

Breaking the Silence: Ways for Writers to Speak in Workshop

(, , , , )

The writer’s silence may be the writing workshop’s longest tradition. And yet a chorus of recent scholarship problematizes this restriction and teaches us the value of bringing the writer’s voice into the room. This discussion begins, then, not with the writer’s silence but with their speech. How will writers speak in our workshops? Participants will have opportunities to voice their ideas, ask questions, and respond to strategies suggested by the presenters.


This virtual discussion room will take place live and will not be recorded for on-demand viewing.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Erika Luckert is a poet and educator. She holds an MFA from Columbia and won the 2017 92Y Discovery Prize. Erika taught writing at public schools and colleges in New York. She is now a PhD student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where her research focuses on workshops and writing pedagogy.


Twitter Username: erikaluckert

Brandon Som is the author of Babel's Moon and The Tribute Horse, winner of the 2015 Kate Tufts Discovery Award. A former fellow at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, he is an assistant professor in the literature department at the University of California, San Diego.

G'Ra Asim is an assistant professor of creative writing at Washington University in St. Louis and the author of Boyz n the Void: a mixtape to my brother.


Twitter Username: notjadedpunk

Jamaica Baldwin's poetry has appeared in numerous print and online journals. Her first book, Bone Language, is forthcoming in 2023. She is currently pursuing her PhD in English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln where she teaches poetry and composition. www.jamaicabaldwin.com


Twitter Username: JamaicaBaldwin

Website: www.jamaicabaldwin.com

Katie Marya is a writer and translator from Atlanta, Georgia. She earned an MFA in poetry from Bennington College and is currently pursuing a PhD in Lincoln, Nebraska. Her first collection of poetry, Sugar Work, was the Editor's Choice for the 2020 Alice James Award and will be published in June 2022.


Twitter Username: katiemarya13

5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.

Terrace Ballroom I & II, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 400 Level

T244B.

A Reading & Conversation with Elizabeth Acevedo, Dawn Lundy Martin, and Deesha Philyaw, Sponsored by Blue Flower Arts

(, , )

Join Blue Flower Arts for a reading and conversation featuring Elizabeth Acevedo, Dawn Lundy Martin, and Deesha Philyaw—three phenomenal women of color working across mediums to give voice to the most urgent stories of our time. From novel-in-verse and YA lit, story collections and poetry, TV pilots, essay, and memoir, these writers truly do it all, challenging the limits of genre and reflecting a diversity of stories through a wide range of storytelling methods.



This event will be livestreamed. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

Add to schedule

Elizabeth Acevedo, National Poetry Slam Champion, received the 2018 National Book Award for her New York Times best selling novel, The Poet X. Acevedo holds a BA in performing arts from the George Washington University and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Maryland.


Twitter Username: acevedowrites

Website: www.acevedopoetry.com

Dawn Lundy Martin, PhD, is professor in the English Department at the University of Pittsburgh. Her books include A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering; DISCIPLINE; Life in a Box is a Pretty Life; and GOOD STOCK, STRANGE BLOOD, winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award.


Twitter Username: dawnlundy

Website: http://www.writing.pitt.edu/people/faculty/dawn-lundy-martin

Deesha Philyaw is the author of The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, winner of the the 2021 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the 2020/2021 Story Prize, and the 2020 Los Angeles Times Book Prize: The Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and a finalist for the 2020 National Book Award for Fiction.


Twitter Username: deeshaphilyaw

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T245.

Two-Year College Creative Writing Caucus

(, , , , )

The annual two-year caucus meeting provides a space to connect, report, archive, and initiate conversations about creative writing at two-year colleges as related to AWP. Additionally, this annual meeting gives the caucus an opportunity to recruit and support new members, align our work with AWP, and plan and prepare for AWP Conferences. The annual meeting is supported with an email list serve, webpage, and Facebook account to continue and sustain the work until we can meet again. This meeting will be accessible to in-person and virtual attendees.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Michelle Cruz Gonzales is the author of The Spitboy Rule: Tales of a Xicana in a Female Punk Band. She has published in LA Review of Books, Longreads, Razorcake, Mitu Fierce, Latino Rebels, and Hip Mama magazine. Michelle teaches English and creative writing at Las Positas Community College.


Twitter Username: xicanabrava

Amy Fladeboe is a multigenre writer, former lit radio program host of KFAI's Write On Radio, reading series curator, and a creative writing instructor at Century College in the Minnstate College & University system, the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop, and the Loft Literary Center.

Marlys Cervantes serves as department chair of humanities and communication and director of the creative writing program at Cowley College in Arkansas City, Kansas. She teaches literature and writing courses, as well as serving as codirector of the Multicultural Scholars Program.


Twitter Username: MsCerv

Joe Baumann teaches composition, literature, and creative writing at St. Charles Community College, where he leads the creative writing program. He possesses a PhD in creative writing from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Stephanie M. Lindberg is a 2011 graduate of Antioch University LA’s MFA program. She has taught for various writing and high school equivalency programs in the Denver, Colorado, area for the past eight years. She currently teaches at Pikes Peak Community College and Arapahoe Community College.


Twitter Username: smlindbe

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T246.

Sober AWP

Daily 12-step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

Add to schedule

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T247.

Disabled & D/deaf Writers Caucus

(, , , )

The Disabled & D/deaf Writers Caucus allows for those who are disabled or living with chronic illness and their allies to network and discuss common challenges related to identity, writing, and teaching while professionally leading a literary life. By meeting annually at the AWP conference, we aim to archive our interests, challenges, and concerns in order to increase our visibility and emphasize our importance both to this organization and to the communities where we live, teach, and work. This meeting will be accessible to in-person and virtual attendees.

Add to schedule

Cade Leebron writes nonfiction and poetry. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, American Literary Review, Electric Literature, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: CadeyLadey

Website: www.mslifeisbestlife.com

Jess Silfa is an Afro-Latinx, disabled, and queer writer and poet. They graduated from Columbia University and are currently in the MFA program at Vanderbilt. They are working on their first novel about a tight-knit immigrant community as well as a chapbook of poems about the body.


Twitter Username: jesilfa

Molly McCully Brown is the author of the essay collection Places I've Taken My Body and the poetry collection The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded. With Susannah Nevison, she coauthored the poetry collection In the Field Between Us. She teaches at Old Dominion University.


Twitter Username: mmccullybrown

Website: http://mollymccullybrown.com

Emily Rose Cole is the author of the full-length poetry collection Thunderhead and the chapbook Love & a Loaded Gun, a collection of persona poems in women's voices. She holds an MFA in poetry from Southern Illinois University Carbondale and is a PhD candidate at the University of Cincinnati.


Twitter Username: EmilyColeWrites

Website: www.emilyrosecolepoetry.com

6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Room 302-303, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 3

T247A.

Rosemont College MFA in Creative Writing and MA in Publishing Reception

An open reception and meet and greet for Rosemont College MFA in Creative Writing and MA in Publishing students, faculty, alumni, and friends.

Add to schedule

Room 308, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 3

T248.

Meet the BreakBread Literacy Project!

Calling all teachers, peer organizations, literary mentors, and youth advocates: Meet the editors, board, and staff of the BreakBread Literacy Project. Join us to learn more about our work with young creatives. First ten people in the door get a free copy of BreakBread Magazine.

Add to schedule

Salon J, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 5

T250A.

National Writer-Parent Meetup

Sponsored by Pen Parentis, this is a place to mingle with other writers who have kids (they don't have to be with you!) Discover networking opportunities, fellowships, accountability groups, and other resources to help you stay on creative track. Both newbies and alumni of salons welcome!

Add to schedule

6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

Virtual

T251.

The Personal Voice of Perception: Teaching at the Intersection of Writing & Art

(, , , )

This presentation will examine teaching at the intersection of writing and visual art to help student artists find meaningful connections between self, learning, and world. The goal is to share ways for art school writing faculty to invite every student to build informed conversations about their work. This meeting will be held virtually.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Ryan G. Van Cleave directs the creative writing program at the Ringling College of Art + Design. He is the author of more than twenty books, including Memoir Writing for Dummies and The Weekend Book Proposal. www.ryangvancleave.com


Twitter Username: ryangvancleave

Website: www.ryangvancleave.com

Jeanette Luise Eberhardy, PhD, MFA, is an essayist, book artist, and educator. At MassArt, Eberhardy serves as associate professor of the practice of writing. She has delivered seminars on crafting stories to business leaders in Egypt, Sweden, Italy, Czechoslovakia, Germany, and the US.


Twitter Username: jleberhardy

Website: wivinc.com

Mairéad Byrne works at the intersection of Academy and Chalkstone in Providence and teaches at Rhode Island School of Design. With Will Schutt, she cocurates Policromia, an international festival of poetry and translation held annually in Siena in association with the Siena Art Institute.

Daphne Strassman is a memoirist who writes about the intangible space between her Latina heritage and her American life. She teaches writing to college students and runs writing workshops


Twitter Username: birdrobot

Website: daphnestrassmann.com

Virtual

T252.

Latinx Writers Caucus

(, , , , Ruben Quesada)

Latinx writers are becoming increasingly visible in literary spaces. However, there is still work to be done to address inequalities in access and visibility. The Latinx Writers Caucus creates space for new, emerging, and established writers of varied Latinx identities to network, discuss obstacles to publication (i.e., active oppression and the cultural marginalization of Latinx writers), and discuss panel and event planning that will increase Latinx participation at future AWP conferences. This meeting will be held virtually on the virtual conference platform.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Amy M. Alvarez coedited Essential Voices: A COVID-19 Anthology (WVU Press). Her poetry appears in numerous literary journals as well as anthologies and textbooks. A CantoMundo, Macondo, VONA, Furious Flower Poetry Center, and VCCA fellow, she teaches at West Virginia University.


Twitter Username: Amy__Writes

Website: https://amymalvarez.com

Lydia Cheshewalla is an Osage/Xicana transdisciplinary artist and writer from Tulsa, Oklahoma. She facilitates writing-as-ceremony moments within the framework of community circles, public art installations, and arts education curriculum. She is a member of the Latinx Caucus leadership team.

Chino Scott-Chung is a trans Chinese/Mexican historical/creative non/fiction writer. Founder and fiction editor of The Asian and Pacific Islander Transmasculine Anthology, he is part of the Latinx Writers Caucus leadership team. His work appears in GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary.

Karina Muñiz-Pagán is a queer Xicana writer and former Community Engagement Fellow at Mills College (MFA 2017). She cofounded the writers' collective Las Malcriadas, which centers Latina immigrant storytelliing. She is a VONA alumna, literary translator, and community organizer.


Twitter Username: KarinaM_P

Website: https://karinamp.contently.com/

8:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Terrace Ballroom I & II, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 400 Level

T253.

#AWP22 Keynote Address by Toi Derricotte, Sponsored by Wilkes University Creative Writing

Toi Derricotte is the recipient of the 2020 Frost Medal from Poetry Society of America. Her sixth collection of poetry, "I”: New and Selected Poems, was published in 2019 and shortlisted for the 2019 National Book Award. Other books of poetry include The Undertaker’s Daughter, Tender, Captivity, Natural Birth, and The Empress of the Death House.

Her literary memoir, The Black Notebooks, won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Nonfiction and was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Her numerous literary awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. She was awarded the 2012 Paterson Poetry Prize for Sustained Literary Achievement, a Distinguished Pioneering of the Arts Award from the United Black Artists, the 2012 PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry, and the Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. With Cornelius Eady, Derricotte cofounded the Cave Canem Foundation in 1996. They are corecipients of the Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award, the City of Literature Paul Engle Prize, and the MLA Phyllis Franklin Award. She is professor emerita from University of Pittsburgh and a former chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.

This event will be livestreamed. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

Add to schedule

10:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m.

Virtual

T254.

Old School Slam & Open Mic

(, )

AWP welcomes students to return to the roots of Slam! Open Mic, where special guests and then undergraduate and graduate students partake in a hardcore-break-your-heart-strut-out-the-good-stuff slam competition. Students are welcome to sign up to participate on Thursday, March 24, 2022, and Friday, March 25, 2022, at the Wilkes University/Etruscan Press booth, and read original pieces (three minutes or less with no props) at the slam later that night. Sponsors: Wilkes University and Etruscan Press.

Add to schedule

Jason Carney, a performance poet from Dallas, Texas, is a four-time National Poetry Slam finalist, honored as a Legend of the Slam in 2007. He appeared on three seasons of the HBO television series Russell Simmons’ Def Poets. Jason's memoir, Starve the Vulture, was released in 2015.


Twitter Username: jasoncarney5

Stanton Hancock is a writer, musician, and educator from Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley. He has an MFA in creative writing from Wilkes University, and his poems have been published in several anthologies, most recently the forthcoming Keystone: Contemporary Poets on Pennsylvania.


Twitter Username: stanton_hancock
Friday, March 25, 2022

7:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F101.

Sober AWP

Daily 12-step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

Add to schedule

8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Broad Street Atrium, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F102.

Vaccination Verification Check-In

The first stop at #AWP22 is the vaccination verification check-in, located at the 155 N Broad Street entrance to the Pennsylvania Convention Center. All attendees must verify proof of valid COVID-19 vaccination through CrowdPass. Once you are verified, you will receive your #AWP22 lanyard, which will serve as indication your vaccination status has been verified. Proceed to the Registration area in Halls D&E on the 200 level to complete the registration process.

Add to schedule

Hall E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F103.

Conference Registration, Sponsored by Philadelphia Stories

Attendees who have registered in advance or who have yet to purchase a registration may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

Add to schedule

Near Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F103B.

Coat Check

Coat check is available outside of Halls D & E on the 200 level of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. It is $3.00 per item checked, or $5.00 for two items. ATMs can be found in the Broad Street Atrium on the 100 Level, by the Business Center on the 200 Level, and near the Concierge on 200 level.

Add to schedule

Near 126B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F104.

Mamava Nursing Pod

A Mamava lactation suite is located outside of room 126B of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Add to schedule

110A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F105.

Lactation Room

The Lactation Room is located in room 110A of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. To access the Lactation Room, please see the AWP Help Desk to obtain the key. For reasons of privacy and security, access to the lactation room is granted with permission from AWP only.

Add to schedule

113B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F106.

Dickinson Quiet Space

A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and
escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A
solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, /
Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul
admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity."—Emily Dickinson

Add to schedule

117, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F106B.

Dickinson Quiet Space 2

A second dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and
escape the literary commotion. “There is a solitude of space, / A
solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, /
Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul
admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity.”—Emily Dickinson

Add to schedule

110B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F107.

Nonfluorescent Quiet Space

A quiet space free of fluorescent lighting located in room 110B of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Add to schedule

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

F129.

Erasure Poetry: Ethics & Best Practices

(, , )

This panel will focus on erasure poetry in all of its myriad variations (procedural, self-erasure, blackout, grayscale, etc). Questions we will consider include: When may one take liberties with someone else’s text? How does one reconcile found texts with one’s own voice as a poet? How does one present erasure material from a visual standpoint (meaning its layout on the printed page)? What questions of power and privilege emerge within an erasure project, and how can we be more responsible?

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Kristina Marie Darling is author of thirty books, including Dark Horse and Look to Your Left: The Poetics of Spectacle. She currently serves as editor in chief of Tupelo Press and Tupelo Quarterly, a columnist at the Los Angeles Review of Books, and a contributing writer at Publishers Weekly.

Sam Taylor is the author of three books of poems, Body of the World, Nude Descending an Empire, and The Book of Fools, which applies self-erasure into a book-length poetic elegy for our earth and oceans. He directs the MFA program at Wichita State.


Twitter Username: samtaylorpoet

Srikanth Reddy's most recent book of poetry is Underworld Lit. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA, Creative Capital, and the Guggenheim Foundation, he is currently a professor of English at the University of Chicago.

Virtual

F130.

Ndé-geneity: The Glittering World of Apache Poetics, Orature & Art

(, , )

There has never been a panel from/by Apache writers who discuss their written, made, or spoken discourses.The panel addresses ways we engage Apache culture, stories, symbols, and representation through language (Apache, English). Panelists' conversation and poetry readings will make linkages between Ndé identity, story, and historical remnants of mythologies, remaking the memorial, emergence and resurgence of authority through the written word, and the inroads this makes for all Indigenous poets.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Margo Tamez, author of Father / Genocide (2021), Raven Eye (2007), Naked Wanting (2003), and Alleys & Allies (1990). Her work has appeared in Siwar Mayu, Poem-a-Day, etc. Associate Prof, Indigenous Studies & MFA (Poetry), UBCO. Unceded Syilx Territory (Canada).


Twitter Username: indigifem

Website: http://ccgs.ok.ubc.ca/faculty/tamez.html

Crisosto Apache is an enrolled member of the Mescalero Apache Tribe with descent from Mescalero, Chiricahua Apache, and Diné (Salt Clan born for Towering House Clan). He has an MFA from IAIA. He teaches and pursues the advocacy of Native American/Indigenous LGBTQ social injustice.


Twitter Username: Crisosto_Apache

Website: http://crisostoapache.com

Julian Talamantez Brolaski is the author of Of Mongrelitude, Advice for Lovers, and gowanus atropolis and was recently included in When the Light of the World was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry (2020). Julian is the lead singer in Juan & the Pines.

Virtual

F131.

Poetry Garden: Cultivating Poetry Community Beyond the Page & Stage

(, , , , )

This panel will focus on innovative ways to create poetry programming beyond the traditional poetry reading and slam/poetry performance stage. The panelists will discuss what makes their poetry programming and community unique, what nurtures that programming and community, and what sustains that programming and community long-term. The panel will consist of four curators with forty-plus years' experience combined and significantly diverse followings varying in age, skill, nationality, craft, and culture.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Tamara J. Madison is a writer, poet, and editor. Her work has been published in various journals and magazines including Poetry International and World Literature Today. She is the author of Threed, This Road Not Damascus and creator of Breakdown: The Poet & the Poems, a YouTube conversation series.


Twitter Username: TamaraJMadison

Website: www.tamarajmadison.com

JP Howard's debut collection Say/Mirror was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. JP’s poetry is widely anthologized. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Lambda Literary, and VONA/Voices. JP curates Women Writers in Bloom Poetry Salon.


Twitter Username: JPHoward_poet

Website: http://www.jp-howard.com

Kai Coggin is the author of three full-length poetry collections, a QWOC, and a teaching artist with the Arkansas Arts Council. Recently named “Best Poet in Arkansas” by the Arkansas Times, her poetry has been nominated three times for the Pushcart, as well as BAP 2015 and Best of the Net 2016 and 2018.


Twitter Username: skailight

Jimmy Pappas won Rattle's 2018 Readers' Choice Award and 2019 Chapbook Contest. His interview with editor Tim Green is on Rattlecast #34. As vice president of the Poetry Society of New Hampshire, he facilitates audience-interactive Zoom events. He has been published in over 100 journals.

Sandra Yannone published her debut collection Boats for Women in 2019 with Salmon Poetry. Her poetry has been nominated for Best of the Net and Pushcart. She currently hosts Cultivating Voices LIVE Poetry weekly on Facebook via Zoom on Sundays. To join, visit her at www.sandrayannone.com.


Twitter Username: slyoly

Virtual

F132.

Truth Sayers: Poetry Collectives as a Twenty-First-Century Political Act

(, , , , )

June Jordan said, “To tell the truth is to become beautiful, to begin to love yourself, value yourself. And that's political, in its most profound way.” The Write On Poetry Babes is a collective of womxn whose truth telling has created protest initiatives and projects that support BIPOC womxn and LGBTQ folks. The collective holds space for each other and the poetry community. This panel will discuss how our experiences can help other communities empower themselves and effect intersectional change.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Ysabel Y. Gonzalez received her BA from Rutgers University and an MFA in poetry from Drew University. She works as the assistant director for the Poetry Program at the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. She is a CantoMundo fellow and author of Wild Invocations.


Twitter Username: YsabelYGonzalez

Marina Carreira (she/her/hers) is a queer Luso American poet artist from Newark, New Jersey. She is the author of tanto tanto, forthcoming in 2022, Save the Bathwater, and I Sing to That Bird Knowing It Won’t Sing Back.

Kathleen Kremins (she/her) has an MFA from Goddard College and a D.Litt. from Drew University. She is the author of The Ethics of Reading: The Broken Beauties of Toni Morrison, Arundhati Roy, and Nawal el Sadaawi and the forthcoming Undressing the World.


Twitter Username: KathyKremins

Lynne McEniry, poet, is the author of some other wet landscape. Her poems have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and were awarded second place and honorable mention for the Allen Ginsberg Poetry Prize. She teaches at Saint Elizabeth University and is a manuscript consultant for Get Fresh Books.


Twitter Username: LynneMcEniry

Tamara Zbrizher is a poet, educator, and workshop leader. Her first book of poems, Tell Me Something Good, was published by Get Fresh Books. She works as a professor of English and writing at Kean University and at Arts By The People, a nonprofit that offers free writing workshops.

Virtual

F133.

The Medium is the Message?: Writers Working Across Genres

(, , , , )

This panel explores the myths and realities of writers who work across multiple literary genres—nonfiction, poetry, and fiction. Panelists will address the specter of genre mastery, institutional pressures, and how genre pivoting influences personal and professional lives. Craft topics will include the relationship between form and content, voice across genres, polygenre versus hybrid work, and the persistence of genre. The panel affirms writing across genres as transformative practice.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Suzanne Richardson earned her MFA at the University of New Mexico. She is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton in Binghamton, New York. She is the writer of the Three Things column at No Contact Magazine. Her nonfiction, fiction, and poetry have appeared in various journals.


Twitter Username: oozannesay

Casandra Lopez, a Chicana/Cahuilla/Tongva/Luiseño writer, is the author of the poetry collection Brother Bullet. A CantoMundo fellow and Headlands and Hedgebrook resident, she teaches at Northwest Indian College.


Twitter Username: casandramlopez

Jen Soriano is a Filipinx writer whose work blurs the boundaries between nonfiction, surrealism, and poetry. They are the author of the chapbook Making the Tongue Dry, and Nervous, a lyric essay collection about historical trauma and the neuroscience of healing, forthcoming from Amistad in 2023.


Twitter Username: lionswrite

Website: jensoriano.net

Samantha Tetangco is a queer Filipina multigenre writer and educator. Her works have appeared in dozens of magazines and anthologies. She is artistic director and coproducer of Plume: A Writer’s Podcast and associate director of writing at University of California Merced. https://samanthatetangco.ink.


Twitter Username: SamTetangco

Website: http://samanthatetangco.ink

Lev Keltner is a trans writer, chapbooks editor at Newfound, and author of the novel Goodnight. Their flash autofiction and poems have appeared in Passages North, Peach Mag, [PANK], Anomaly, Hobart, and elsewhere and have been nominated for Best of the Net. They write RPGs at Feverdream Games.


Twitter Username: crystal_ography

Website: https://crystalkeltner.com

Virtual

F134.

Akrilica Series Reading

(, , , )

The Akrilica series is the first of its kind, focused on innovative Latinx writing. Named after former national poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera's essential text, this series seeks out Latinx writers working in new ways that push us, both formally and conceptually. Hear from new and established writers in the Akrilica series, each with a unique point of view.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Joshua Escobar (DJ Ashtrae) is the author of the chapbooks Caljforkya Voltage, and xxox fm. He publishes the all-ages zine Orange Mercury. Bareback Nightfall, his first book, will be published in the Akrilica series in 2020. He is a CantoMundo fellow.


Twitter Username: djashtrae17

Sara Borjas is a Xicanx Pocha and a Fresno poet. Her debut collection, Heart Like a Window, Mouth Like a Cliff was published by Noemi in 2019. She is the recipient of the Blue Mesa Poetry Prize, a CantoMundo fellow, and a Postgraduate Writer's Workshop fellow, and she teaches at UC Riverside.

Anthony Cody is the author of Borderland Apocrypha, winner of the 2018 Omnidawn Open Book Prize and a 2020 National Book Award Finalist in Poetry. He is a CantoMundo fellow from Fresno, California, who serves as a poetry editor for Noemi Press and Omnidawn Publishing.


Twitter Username: anthony_cody

Website: www.anthonycody.com

Jasminne Mendez is an award-winning author, performance poet and educator. She received her BA in English literature and her MEd in curriculum and instruction from the University of Houston. She is the author of two hybrid collections of poetry and essays.


Twitter Username: jasminnemendez

Virtual

F135.

Of the Diaspora: Rediscovering 21st-Century Black Literature

(, , )

Erica Vital-Lazare, editor of McSweeney's Of the Diaspora series, will discuss the series origin, selection process, and publicity strategy for this remarkable program. Launched in 2020, it identifies and republishes important previously published works by Black Americans with the goal of finding new contemporary audiences for works whose perspectives are more urgent today than ever. Titles include novels like Tragic Magic by Wesley Brown and historic photos with new essays by Lester and Aisha Sloan.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

Add to schedule

Erica Vital-Lazare is a professor of English at the College of Southern Nevada. A past recipient of a Hurston/Wright Award, she earned her MFA in creative writing from Virginia Commonwealth University and is editor of the series Of the Diaspora.


Twitter Username: xanmere