2022 AWP Conference Schedule

The #AWP22 Conference & Bookfair in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. A version accessible to screen readers is also available.

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Thursday, March 24, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T221.

A Misfit of Ghosts: How Haunted Memoir Rethinks the Real

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Haunted memoir unsettles traditional notions of memoir and nonfiction as it engages with ghosts, both metaphoric and actual, to examine what haunts us collectively and individually. In this session, panelists will discuss the various forms hauntings have taken in their work, how haunted memoir pushes against the constraints of normative nonfiction, as well as discuss how they create their ghosts on the page.

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Bruce Owens Grimm is a queer ghost nerd based in Chicago. He is a coeditor of Fat & Queer: An Anthology of Queer & Trans Bodies & Lives. He attended the 2021 Tin House Winter Workshop and taught his "Haunted Memoir" workshop at Story Studio Chicago and the Desert Nights, Rising Stars Conference.


Twitter Username: bruceowensgrimm

Elissa Washuta (Cowlitz Indian Tribe) is the author of White MagicMy Body Is a Book of Rules, and Starvation Mode, and coeditor of the anthology Shapes of Native Nonfiction: Collected Essays by Contemporary Writers. She is an assistant professor at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: elissawashuta

Website: http://washuta.net

Steffan Triplett is a Black, queer writer from Missouri. He received his MFA in nonfiction from the University of Pittsburgh.


Twitter Username: steffantriplett

Jami Nakamura Lin is the author of The Night Parade, a speculative memoir illustrated by her sister Cori. She is a 2016 NEA U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Fellow and a former Catapult columnist. Her work has appeared in the New York Times and Electric Lit.


Twitter Username: jaminlin

J. Nicole Jones received an MFA in creative nonfiction from Columbia University and has held editorial positions at VICE and VanityFair.com. Her essays and writing have appeared in the LA Review of Books and VanityFair.com, among others. Her memoir Low Country was published in 2021 by Catapult.


Twitter Username: jnicolejones

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T226.

Ten Years After Occupy: Writing, Capital, & Power

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In the decade since Occupy Wall Street, American writers have focused on questions of money and power to a degree not seen at least since the 1930s. On this panel, five novelists will discuss how recent critiques of capitalism have shaped their writing, their teaching, and their approach to the literary community.

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Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine, the story collections The Train to Lo Wu and Nobody Ever Gets Lost, and a book of essays, White Flights: Race, Fiction, and the American Imagination.


Twitter Username: rowjess

Website: www.jessrow.com

Rion Amilcar Scott is the author of the story collections The World Doesn't Require You and Insurrections, which won the 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. He earned an MFA from George Mason University and teaches English at the University of Maryland.


Twitter Username: reeamilcarscott

Alexandra Kleeman is the author of You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine, Intimations, and the novel Something New Under the Sun and an assistant professor at the New School. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, the Paris Review, n+1, Harper's, the New York Times Magazine, and Conjunctions.


Twitter Username: alexkleeman

Website: http://www.alexandrakleeman.com

Tracy O'Neill is the author of the novels The Hopeful and Quotients. A National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree and a 2012 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellows, her work has appeared in Granta, VQR, the Atlantic, the New Yorker, Rolling Stone, the Guardian, and the New York Times.


Twitter Username: tracysoneill

Matt Bell is the author of the novels Appleseed, Scrapper, and In the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the Woods, the story collection A Tree or a Person or a Wall, and two works of nonfiction, Refuse to Be Done and Baldur's Gate II. He is an associate professor at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: mdbell79

Website: http://www.mdbell.com

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T205.

More Interesting than Monsters: Resisting the Urge to Villainize in Memoir

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Vivian Gornick instructs memoirists to capture complexity in the people they write about, even those who cause great conflict or pain. “For the drama to deepen,” she asserts, “we must see the loneliness of the monster and the cunning of the innocent.” Memoirists on this panel share their experience portraying difficult people on the page and offer techniques for writing about them in rich and multidimensional ways, resisting the urge to villainize while also not pulling any punches.

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Ronit Plank is the author of the memoir When She Comes Back and the short story collection Home Is A Made-Up Place. She is a creative nonfiction editor at the Citron Review and has work in The Atlantic, The Rumpus, The Washington Post, The Iowa Review, The Seattle Times, and Litro. www.ronitplank.com


Twitter Username: ronitplank

Website: https://ronitplank.com

Lilly Dancyger is the author of Negative Space, a reported and illustrated memoir selected by Carmen Maria Machado as a winner of the 2019 SFWP Literary Awards, and editor of Burn It Down, a critically acclaimed anthology of essays on women's anger. She is an assistant editor at Barrelhouse Books.


Twitter Username: lillydancyger

Allison Hong Merrill is a Taiwanese immigrant who writes in both Chinese and English. She is the creative nonfiction editor at Dialogue Journal and the author of Ninety-Nine Fire Hoops: A Memoir. Her work has won both national and international awards. Visit her at https://www.allisonhongmerrill.com


Twitter Username: xieshou

Website: allisonhongmerrill.com

Michelle Yang is an advocate who speaks and writes about the intersection of Asian American identity, feminism, and mental health. Born ethnic Chinese in South Korea, Michelle grew up as an immigrant takeout kid. Her memoir, Phoenix Girl: How a Fat Asian with Bipolar Found Love, is in progress.


Twitter Username: michellehyang

Website: michelleyangwriter.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

S154.

Writing the Disturbed Essay: Memory & Identity in Creative Nonfiction

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While personal essay often serves as vessel for the exploration of memory and the construction of identity, the disturbed essay stirs up the sediment, allows for memory’s paradoxes, and helps us reevaluate what we reach towards when we write. It allows us to refute dominant narratives about LGBTQIA+, PoC, and disabled lives. Those elements of the past that wake us, interfere with the coherent story of a self, and invade our privacy become the radical heart of a truer story.

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Katie Jean Shinkle is the author of None of This is an Invitation (with Jessica Alexander), Ruination, The Arson People, and Our Prayers After the Fire. She is an assistant professor in the MFA in creative writing, editing, and publishing program at Sam Houston State University.

SJ Sindu is the author of Blue-Skinned Gods and Marriage of a Thousand Lies, which won a Publishing Triangle Award and was an ALA Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Toronto.


Twitter Username: sjsindu

Website: http://sjsindu.com

Monica Prince is an assistant professor of activist and performance writing at Susquehanna University and the managing editor of the Santa Fe Writers Project. Her creative focus is in choreopoems and performance poetry.


Twitter Username: poetic_moni

Website: www.monicaprince.com

Danielle Pafunda is the author of nine books of poetry and prose including Spite, Beshrew, The Book of Scab, and The Dead Girls Speak in Unison. She teaches at Rochester Institute of Technology.

Lily Hoang is the author of five books, including A Bestiary (finalist for the PEN USA Nonfiction Book Award) and Changing (recipient of a PEN Open Books Award). She teaches in the MFA program at University of California San Diego.


Twitter Username: camerainsecura

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S145.

Second Acts

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Like the musician’s “sophomore album,” the poet’s “second act” navigates complex terrain. How much should a poet show aesthetic range? Does introducing a new project threaten the development of poetic voice? When should a poet look for a new publisher? This reading features five poets whose second books have been released in the past year—a trying year for any release, but especially so for early-career poets. These poets will also discuss the diverse paths that brought them to those books.

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Corey Van Landingham is the author of Antidote and Love Letter to Who Owns the Heavens. She is a recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, and she teaches in the MFA program at the University of Illinois.

Jacques J. Rancourt is the author of Brocken Spectre, Novena, and In the Time of PrEP. He has held fellowships from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the Cité Internationale des Arts, and Stanford University, where he was a Wallace Stegner Fellow. 


Twitter Username: jj_rancourt

Chet’la Sebree is the author of Field Study and Mistress. For her work, she has received fellowships and awards from the Academy of American Poets, Hedgebrook, MacDowell, and Yaddo. Currently, she directs the Stadler Center for Poetry & Literary Arts and teaches at Bucknell University.


Twitter Username: Nahtil

Website: http://www.chetlasebree.com

Christopher Kempf is the author of the poetry collections Late in the Empire of Men  and What though the Field Be Lost, as well as the scholarly book Craft Class: The Workshop in American Culture (Johns Hopkins. A former Stegner Fellow, he teaches at Illinois.

Phillip B. Williams is the author of the poetry collections Mutiny and Thief in the Interior. A recipient of a Whiting Award, Kate Tufts Discovery Award, and Lambda Literary Award, he currently teaches at Bennington College and Randolph College low-res MFA.


Twitter Username: pbw_poet

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S193.

Virginia Center for the Creative Arts Fiftieth Anniversary Reading

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Join us for a celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts! With picturesque locations in Amherst, Virginia and Auvillar, France, VCCA has been providing established and emerging artists with the gift of time and space to create for half a century. Five VCCA Fellows will share their residency experiences, and read from new work.

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Patricia Chao’s novels are Monkey King (1995) and Mambo Peligroso (2005), and she has three additional manuscripts in process. Her poetry and essays have appeared in various anthologies and journals. She also reviews and writes about world music, with a specialty in Latin.


Twitter Username: PatriciaChao

E. Ethelbert Miller is a writer and literary activist. He was inducted into the Washington, DC Hall of Fame in 2015. In 2016 he received the AWP George Garrett Award For Outstanding Community Service in Literature. When Your Wife Has Tommy John Surgery is his most recent book.


Twitter Username: ethelbertpoet

Website: www.eethelbertmiller.com

Christina Baker Kline is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of eight novels, including The Exiles, Orphan Train, and A Piece of the World, and is published in forty countries. Her novels have received the New England Prize for Fiction, the Maine Literary Award, and a Barnes & Noble Discover Award, among other awards.


Twitter Username: bakerkline

Website: www.christinabakerkline.com

Patricia Spears Jones is the author of A Lucent Fire: New and Selected Poems. Anthologized in BAX: Best American Experimental Writing  and Reel Verse: Poems about Movies. She was awarded the 2017 Jackson Poetry Prize, and she has taught at Hollins, Barnard, Adelphi, and Hunter.


Twitter Username: pksjones1

Website: www.psjones.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

T240.

Beyond Representation: Intersections of Poetry & Mental Illness

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The intersection of poetry and mental illness has a problematic history in the cultural imagination, from Blake’s mythologized “madness” to Plath’s romanticized suicide. In recent years this connection has been demystified, illuminating that the lived reality of writing with these disabilities is complex—as is the relationship between one’s conditions and their art. How do mental illnesses consciously and subconsciously impact poetics? This panel convenes five poets to discuss their experiences.

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Sara Eliza Johnson is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in poetry, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, among other honors. Her first book, Bone Map, won the 2013 National Poetry Series. Her second book, Vapor, will be published in 2022.


Twitter Username: saraelizaj

Website: saraelizajohnson.com

Rachel Mennies is the author of The Naomi Letters and The Glad Hand of God Points Backwards, winner of the Walt McDonald First-Book Prize in Poetry and finalist for a National Jewish Book Award. She works as an adjunct professor and freelance writer and serves as a member of AGNI's editorial staff.


Twitter Username: rmennies

Website: http://www.rachelmennies.com

Marcelo Hernandez Castillo is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the author of Cenzontle, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Prize, Dulce, and Children of the Land. A Canto Mundo Fellow, he cofounded the Undocupoets campaign.


Twitter Username: marcelo_H_

Aricka Foreman is an American poet and interdisciplinary writer from Detroit, Michigan. Her debut poetry collection, Salt Body Shimmer, earned her the 2021 Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Poetry. She has earned fellowships from Cave Canem, Callaloo, and the Millay Colony for the Arts.


Twitter Username: arickamarie

Website: www.arickaforeman.com

Daniella Toosie-Watson has received fellowships and awards from the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop and the University of Michigan Hopwood Program. Winner of the 92Y 2020 Discovery prize, she received her MFA from the University of Michigan. Daniella is a program coordinator for Lambda Literary.


Twitter Username: ToosieWatson
Saturday, March 26, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S207.

When Form Meets Content: Structuring a Nonfiction Book

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Structuring a book-length work presents unique opportunities and challenges. How does form meet content at over 50,000 words? There are a myriad of different ways to answer this question. This panel brings together a diverse group of nonfiction writers from across the country to discuss their approaches to form in a manuscript, the many craft decisions made during the writing process, and the different storytelling lineages called upon in crafting the final version of the work.

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Daisy Hernández is the author of The Kissing Bug: A True Story of a Family, an Insect, and a Nation's Neglect of a Deadly Disease and the memoir A Cup of Water under My Bed. She coedited the feminist anthology Colonize This! and is an associate professor at Miami University in Ohio.


Twitter Username: daisyhernandez

Website: daisyhernandez.com

Danielle Geller's first book, Dog Flowers, was published in 2021. She is a recipient of the Rona Jaffe Writers’ Award, and her work has appeared in the Paris Review, the New Yorker, and Brevity. She teaches creative writing at the University of Victoria and the Institute of American Indian Arts.


Twitter Username: dellegeller

Maddie Norris, the recipient of Ninth Letter‘s Literary Award in Creative Nonfiction, was the Thomas Wolfe Scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill and earned her MFA at the University of Arizona. Her work can be found in Fourth Genre, Territory, and Essay Daily.


Twitter Username: madnor94

Elissa Washuta (Cowlitz Indian Tribe) is the author of White Magic, My Body Is a Book of Rules, and Starvation Mode, and coeditor of the anthology Shapes of Native Nonfiction: Collected Essays by Contemporary Writers. She is an assistant professor at the Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: elissawashuta

Website: http://washuta.net

Melissa Faliveno is the author of the essay collection Tomboyland, named a best book of 2020 by NPR, New York Public Library, and O, the Oprah Magazine. She was the 2020–21 Kenan Visiting Writer at University of North Carolina and is currently a visiting assistant professor of English at Kenyon College.


Twitter Username: melissafaliveno
Friday, March 25, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F235B.

Bound, Stitched, & Pressed: On Chapbooks & Community

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Why publish a chapbook? Is a chapbook just a short book? What makes a community of poems a successful chapbook? Ephemera, folk tale, town gossip, political tract: the little book pressed into the hands of everyday people has historically connected tale and song with community. This panel focuses on why poets write chapbooks today. Panelists will share our own chapbook stories to reveal how your poems can sing in this morsel of a form, reach readers, and gleam in the gamut of subjects and themes.

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Tyler Mills is the author of the poetry books Hawk Parable and Tongue Lyre, the chapbook City Scattered and collaborative chapbook Low Budget Movie and is finishing a memoir, The Bomb Cloud. She teaches for the Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College and edits the Account.


Twitter Username: TylerMPoetry

Website: http://tylermills.com/

Philip Metres is the author and translator of a number of books, including Shrapnel Maps, The Sound of Listening, Sand Opera, Pictures at an Exhibition, and To See the Earth. His work has garnered Guggenheim and Lannan fellowships, two NEAs, three Arab American book awards, and the Hunt Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

Hadara Bar-Nadav is the author of several poetry collections, most recently The New Nudity, Lullaby (with Exit Sign), The Frame Called Ruin, and Fountain and Furnace. She is also coauthor of Writing Poems, 8th ed. Bar-Nadav is a professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.


Twitter Username: Hadarabar

Website: www.Hadarabar.com

Kwame Dawes is author of eighteen collections of poetry, two novels, several anthologies, and plays. He has won a Pushcart Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an Emmy. He is a Chancellor's Professor of English at the University of Nebraska and Glenna Luschei Editor of Prairie Schooner.


Twitter Username: kwamedawes

Website: www.kwamedawes.com

Brian Teare is the author of six critically acclaimed books of poetry, most recently The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven and Doomstead Days. An associate professor at the University of Virginia, he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T119.

Publishing Your First Story Collection

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Finding a publisher for a collection of short stories continues to be a daunting task. Five prize-winning authors lead a discussion detailing their journeys to publishing their first books. They will talk about how they landed their first publications, how they developed and shaped their short story collections, how they began to look for publishers, and other related topics such as submitting fiction to journals and national contests, querying agents, and overcoming rejection.

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Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, a Russian Armenian, has published fifty stories and won the 2013 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction, the 2015 T. Williams scholarship from the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and the 2020 Raz/Shumaker Prairie Schooner Book Prize for her first collection, What Isn’t Remembered.


Twitter Username: kgnewberry

Matthew Lansburgh's collection of linked stories, Outside Is the Ocean, won the Iowa Short Fiction Award and was a finalist for the thirtieth Annual Lambda Literary Award and the 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction. He has received fellowships from Bread Loaf, Sewanee, Yaddo, and MacDowell.


Twitter Username: senorlansburgh

Website: www.matthewlansburgh.com

Caroline Kim is the author of a collection of short stories about the Korean diaspora, The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories, which won the 2020 Drue Heinz Prize in Literature and was longlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Short Story Collections and the Story Prize.


Twitter Username: carolinewriting

Rachel Swearingen's How to Walk on Water and Other Stories, winner of the 2018 New American Press Prize, was a New York Times "New & Noteworthy" selection and one of Electric Lit's favorite collections for 2020. Her stories have appeared in the Missouri Review, Kenyon Review, and Agni.


Twitter Username: rachelswearinge

Website: www.rachelswearinge.com

Jen Fawkes's debut book, Mannequin and Wife, was a 2020 Shirley Jackson Award Nominee, won two 2020 Foreword INDIES, and was named one of Largehearted Boy's Favorite Short Story Collections of 2020. Her second book, Tales the Devil Told Me, won the 2020 Press 53 Award for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: fawkesontherun

Website: jenfawkes.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S168.

Living as Exposition: Asian American Poets in the Southern United States

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Asian Americans are rarely depicted as Southerners. Ours is an invisible history and a conspicuous existence. So to whom do we write? Whom do we preserve by writing? Heritage has long concealed a threat in Southern lexicon. And yet at the root, heritage is an act of transmission from one generation to the next. Join panelists in a discussion to push Southern poetics towards wholeness by asserting that the Asian American experience in the South is vaster than one generation.

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Asa Drake is a Filipina American writer and public services librarian in central Florida. She has received fellowships from Tin House and Idyllwild Arts and is a 2020 92Y Discovery Poetry Contest winner. Her poems are published in Adroit, Copper Nickel, and the Paris Review.


Twitter Username: AsaLDrake

Website: https://www.asaldrake.com/

Ina Cariño holds an MFA in creative writing from North Carolina State University. Their poetry appears in Apogee, Wildness, Waxwing, New England Review, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. They are the winner of the 2021 Alice James Award for their manuscript Feast, forthcoming from Alice James Books.


Twitter Username: ina_carino

Tiana Nobile is the author of Cleave. She is a Korean American adoptee, Kundiman fellow, recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and a finalist of the National Poetry Series and Kundiman Poetry Prize. 


Twitter Username: tiananob

Website: tiananobile.com

Sasha Pimentel is author of For Want of Water, winner of the National Poetry Series, and Insides She Swallowed, winner of the American Book Award. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, PBS NewsHour, and the American Poetry Review. She was the 2018–19 Picador Professor, is a 2019 NEA fellow, and is an associate professor at the University of Texas at El Paso.


Twitter Username: SashaRPimentel

Adrienne Su is the author of five books of poems, most recently Living Quarters and Peach State. Her awards include an NEA fellowship and several appearances in Best American Poetry. She teaches at Dickinson College.


Twitter Username: adriennesu

Website: adriennesu.ink
Friday, March 25, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

F242.

The World Split Open: Four Women Poets on Memoir

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“What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life?/ The world would split open,” wrote Muriel Rukeyser in the poem “Käthe Kollwitz.” How does truth-telling and the construction of a voice differ in the genres of poetry and memoir? How do gender, class, and race figure into what is told? What world—if any—is split open? These poet/memoirists discuss the urgency of their turn to prose, also reading briefly from their memoirs.

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Sharon Dolin has published seven poetry books, most recently Imperfect Present and the prose memoir Hitchcock Blonde, plus two books of poems by Gemma Gorga in translation, most recently Late to the House of Words. Associate editor at Barrow Street Press, she directs Writing about Art in Barcelona.


Twitter Username: SharonDolin

Website: www.sharondolin.com

Natasha Trethewey served two terms as the nineteenth poet laureate of the United States (2012-2014). In 2007, she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry and in 2019, she was elected to the Board of Chancellors of the Academy of American Poets. Her most recent book is Memorial Drive: A Daughter’s Memoir.

Jennifer Militello is the author of the nonfiction book Knock Wood as well as five collections of poetry: The Pact; A Camouflage of Specimens and Garments; Body Thesaurus; Flinch of Song; and Anchor Chain, Open Sail. She teaches in the MFA program at New England College.


Twitter Username: JenifrMilitello

Website: www.jennifermilitello.com

Natasha Saje is the author of three books of poems (Red Under the Skin, Bend, and Vivarium); Windows and Doors: A Poet Reads Literary Theory; and Terroir: Love, Out of Place, a memoir in essays. She teaches at Westminster College in Salt Lake City and in the Vermont College MFA in Writing Program.


Twitter Username: NatashaLSaje

Website: www.natashasaje.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

S180.

The Last Song, the Last Sweet Bite: A Tribute to Joy Harjo

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Joy Harjo has been a major voice in poetry, in Native Literature, in American Literature, for over four decades. Her influence is immeasurable and her qualities many. Come celebrate with us the beauty, the truth, the strength and musicality of Joy Harjo’s work and the wonderfulness of her as a person.

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Travis Hedge Coke is a writer, editor, and teacher, working with Along the Chaparral to story interred veterans at the Riverside National Cemetery. He is the former writer of the Hugo-nominated Pop Medicine column and current author of the weekly Patricia Highsmash, from Comic Watch.


Twitter Username: travishedgecoke

Oscar Hokeah is a regionalist Oklahoma writer and the author of a forthcoming debut novel, Calling for a Blanket Dance. He is an enrolled member of Cherokee Nation and the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and he has Latinx heritage. He has fiction published in American Short Fiction, Yellow Medicine Review, and other journals.


Twitter Username: OscarHokeah

Website: www.oscarhokeah.com

Tanaya Winder is a writer and artist from the Southern Ute, Duckwater Shoshone, and Pyramid Lake Paiute Nations. She has a BA in English from Stanford University and a MFA from the University of New Mexico. She blends storytelling, singing, and spoken word to teach about different expressions of love.


Twitter Username: tanayawinder

Website: http://tanayawinder.wordpress.com/
Friday, March 25, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F164.

Artists & Archivists: Two-Year College Students Transform a Philadelphia Archive

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In 2019, the Presbyterian Historical Society opened 500 years of archival materials to creative writing students from Community College of Philadelphia. As a result, the archive experienced an influx of energy, and student work took surprising, subversive, and moving directions. Archivists, instructors, and students share how classroom activities and a student exhibit helped demystify archival materials and connect a 170-year-old cultural institution to today’s movements for social justice.

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Fred Tangeman is director of communications at the Presbyterian Historical Society and project leader of Building Knowledge and Breaking Barriers, an archives-based learning project with Community College of Philadelphia. Fred has an MFA in creative writing from the University of Iowa.

Kate Sanchez is an assistant professor of English at Community College of Philadelphia where she teaches courses in composition, literature, creative writing, and First-Year Experience. She partners with the Presbyterian Historical Society to engage her creative writing students with their archive materials.

Jennifer Barr is an outreach and reference archivist at the Presbyterian Historical Society. She works with arts and history instructors to select and contextualize primary sources and supports students as they work with those sources. Jennifer has an MSI from the University of Michigan.

Lumen Lugo-Roman is a student at Community College of Philadelphia whose exhibited poetry at the Presbyterian Historical Society relates to archival materials about women’s empowerment and LGBTQIA+ rights.

Simone Zelitch teaches at Community College of Philadelphia, where she established their creative writing program English degree and participated in their partnership with the Presbyterian Historical Society archives. She has published five novels, most recently Judenstaat.


Twitter Username: simonezelitch

Website: www.simonezelitch.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T152.

Translingual Poetics, Transgression & Resistance

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Poets and translators discuss how translingualism, defined by Dowling as “a set of strategies by which writers engage with diverse linguistic codes in ways that are context-dependent,” can constitute transgressive acts of resistance, in contexts where political, patriarchal, and settler colonial powers have encoded hierarchical values to languages, bodies, and cultures. They consider interlingual dynamics and tensions between translatability and untranslatability at play in translingual poetics.

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Clara Burghelea is a Romanian-born poet, editor, and translator. Winner of the Robert Muroff Prize in Poetry, she received her MFA in poetry from Adelphi University in 2018. Her collection The Flavor of the Other was published in 2020 with Dos Madres Press.


Twitter Username: ioanaclara

Brenda Cárdenas, former Milwaukee poet laureate, has authored Boomerang: Poems and From the Tongues of Brick and Stone, coauthored two chapbooks, and coedited Resist Much/Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance and Between the Heart and the Land: Latina Poets in the Midwest.


Twitter Username: CardenasBrendaE

Joan Naviyuk Kane is the author of eight collections of poetry and prose. Her honors include a Whiting Writer’s Award, the Donald Hall Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She teaches at Harvard and Tufts, and she was founding faculty in the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts.


Twitter Username: naviyuk

Website: thejoankane.com

Beatrice Szymkowiak is a French American writer and the author of Red Zone. Her work has appeared in many poetry magazines. She obtained a MFA in creative writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts, and she is now a PhD candidate and research fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.


Twitter Username: OhOldOcean
Friday, March 25, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F232.

Trying for Fire: A Tribute to & Celebration of Tim Seibles

(, , , , Lynne Thompson)

Born in Philadelphia, Tim Seibles is a renowned performer, professor, mentor and poet, reckoning with race, sensuality, belonging and the Divine. For more than thirty years, he taught at Old Dominion University, but many poems and much of his National Book Award-nominated Fast Animal is set in the City of Brotherly Love. He served as Virginia’s poet laureate from 2016–18. The panelists will celebrate his contributions to the world of literature, and afterward, Tim Seibles will share his work.

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Remica L. Bingham-Risher is a Cave Canem fellow and an Affrilachian Poet. She has published three books of poems, Conversion, What We Ask of Flesh, and Starlight & Error. She is director of quality enhancement plan initiatives at Old Dominion University.


Twitter Username: remicawriter

Website: www.remicabinghamrisher.com

Tyehimba Jess's Olio won the Pulitzer Prize, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Society of Midland Authors Poetry Award, and recognition from the BCALA. His first book, Leadbelly, won the National Poetry Series. A NEA, Whiting, Guggenheim, and Lannan Foundation Award winner, he teaches at College of Staten Island.


Twitter Username: TyehimbaJess

Patricia Smith's books are Incendiary Art, a 2018 Pulitzer finalist and winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah; and Blood Dazzler, a 2008 National Book Award finalist. She is a Guggenheim fellow (2014), two-time Pushcart winner, and a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada's MFA.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

Alan King is the author of Point Blank and Drift. Of Point Blank, US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo said, these "poems are not pop and flash, rather more like a slow dance with someone you’re going to love forever." King is also a journalist, videographer, Cave Canem Fellow, and Stonecoast MFA graduate.


Twitter Username: aking020881

Website: alanwking.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

T244.

The Blended Memoir: When Memoir Isn't Just Memoir

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Blended memoirs—or books or collections that incorporate other genres and forms into the personal narrative—are increasingly common in today's literary market. But how to strike the right balance between the personal and the critical, the reported, the illustrated, the researched? How to sell it? Our panel will explore the creative process and blunt publishing reality of this emergent form.

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Melissa Febos is the author of Whip Smart, Abandon Me, and Girlhood—a national bestseller. The inaugural winner of the Jeanne Córdova Nonfiction Award from LAMBDA Literary, she is associate professor at the University of Iowa, where she teaches in the nonfiction writing program.


Twitter Username: melissafebos

Website: melissafebos.com

Marcos Gonsalez is a queer Mexican Puerto Rican memoirist, essayist, and assistant professor. Gonsalez's debut blended memoir, Pedro's Theory, (2021) has been reviewed by the New York Times and Kirkus. Gonsalez's essays can be found at Lit Hub, New Inquiry, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: MarcosSGonsalez

Jeanna Kadlec is the author of the forthcoming memoir-in-essays This I Know: A Memoir of Heresy (Mariner Books, 2022). She is a former culture columnist at Longreads, and her work has appeared in ELLE, Glamour, Allure, NYLON, Lit Hub, Catapult, Electric Literature, Autostraddle, and more.


Twitter Username: jeannakadlec

Angela Chen is the author of Ace: What Asexuality Reveals about Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex, which was named one of the Best Books of 2020 by NPR, Electric Literature, and Them. Her reporting and essays have also appeared in the New York Times, the Atlantic, Paris Review, and more.


Twitter Username: chengela

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T198.

Change of Plans: The Pleasure & Pain of Walking Away from Academia

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Did you think you’d finish graduate school and then score a great gig at an institution of higher learning? But now you're tired of the hustle? For many of us, the dream is over as jobs in humanities departments dwindle. So what are the options? Join this diverse panel of professionals who have let go of academic aspirations—some happily, some not so much —and who have found new ways to work while still maintaining their identities as writers.

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Sonia Greenfield is the author of four books of poetry: Letdown, selected for the Marie Alexander Series in 2020; American Parable; Circus Gravitas; and Boy with a Halo at the Farmer's Market, winner of the 2014 Codhill Poetry Prize. She teaches writing at Normandale College in Minneapolis.


Twitter Username: SoniaGreenfield

Website: soniagreenfield.com

Andres Rojas holds an MFA and a JD from the University of Florida. He is the author of a full-length poetry book and two chapbooks and has many journal publications, including translations. As a poetry editor at various literary journals, he has sought to foster the work of new and emerging writers.


Twitter Username: OkAporia

Chloe Martinez is the author of two collections, Ten Thousand Selves and Corner Shrine, winner of the Backbone Press Chapbook Prize. She works at Claremont McKenna College, where she is staff at the Center for Writing & Public Discourse and lecturer in religious studies.


Twitter Username: chloepoet

Sarah Kersey is a poet and x-ray technologist from New Jersey. She is an associate editor of South Florida Poetry Journal and is an assistant features editor for the Rumpus. Kersey attended the 2021 Tin House Summer Workshop. She tweets @sk__poet.


Twitter Username: sk__poet

Pamela Hart is author of Mothers Over Nangarhar, published in 2019. She is writer in residence at the Katonah Museum of Art. She received a poetry fellowship from the NEA. She is a poetry editor for the Afghan Women's Writing Project and As You Were: The Military Review.


Twitter Username: PamelaHart5

Website: https://www.pamelahartpoet.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Virtual

S200.

Barrow Street Press Twentieth Anniversary Reading

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Barrow Street Press began publishing books in 2002 as an offshoot of its poetry magazine, Barrow Street. A significant presence in the small press poetry world, Barrow Street Press continues to publish four books a year through an annual book prize as well as through submissions to the press. Readings by these five representative poets showcase and celebrate the continuing breadth and power of the Barrow Street Press roster of poets.

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Claudia Keelan is a poet, essayist, and translator.  She has published Ecstatic Émigré and also translations of women troubadours. The author of eight books of poetry, she is the editor of Interim and the Test Site Poetry Series.


Twitter Username: claudiakeelan

Timothy Liu is the author of twelve books of poems, most recently Let It Ride. His journals and papers are archived in the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. He is professor of English at William Paterson University.


Twitter Username: arabadjisliu

Website: Http://timothyliu.net

Danielle Legros Georges is a poet, essayist, translator, and professor at Lesley University. She was appointed the second poet laureate of the City of Boston, serving in the role from 2015 to 2019. Her most recent work is a book of translations, Island Heart: The Poems of Ida Faubert.

Sally Ball is the author of three books of poems, most recently Hold Sway. She's a professor of English and the director of creative writing at Arizona State University; she's also the associate director of Four Way Books and a faculty member in the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers.

Miguel Murphy is the author of Shoreditch and two previous collections, Detainee and A Book Called Rats, winner of the Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry. He teaches at Santa Monica College in southern California.


Twitter Username: MiguelMurphy
Friday, March 25, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F172.

How to Win a Book or Chapbook Contest

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Many writers have completed a manuscript of prose or poetry and are ready to publish their book. However, the traditional agent-to-editor route may not be available. This panel discussion will provide advice on finding a suitable book contest and giving your manuscript the best chance of success. Past winners of book and chapbook contests will share their experience and knowledge. Also, a publisher of a small press that holds annual poetry and fiction contests will tell the inside story.

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Joseph J. Capista is the author of Intrusive Beauty, selected for Ohio University Press’s 2018 Hollis Summers Poetry Prize. He has received awards from the NEH, the Maryland State Arts Council, Sewanee, and Bread Loaf. He teaches at Towson University.

Christina Chiu is the winner of the 2040 Books' James Alan McPherson Award and the Kirkus Best Books of 2020. She is the author of Beauty and Troublemaker and Other Saints. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Publisher's Weekly, Electric Literature, NextTribe. She is a founder of AAWW.


Twitter Username: chrischiu13

Website: www.christinachiu.org

Cecilia Martinez-Gil has published two full-length poetry collections, a fix of ink and the multi-award-winning Psaltery and Serpentines, and she cowrote the award-winning experimental video Itinerarios. She publishes poetry and journalism, teaches English and literature, and has four masters.


Twitter Username: cezmartinezgil

Website: www.ceciliamartinezgil.com

Robert L. Giron, poet/writer/editor, has won numerous awards for his own writing. As Gival Press editor/publisher, he runs annual contests for fiction and poetry; these 100+ books have gone on to win over 70 national and international awards since the literary press was established in 1998.


Twitter Username: givalpress

Website: http://www.robertgiron.com

Thaddeus Rutkowski is author of seven books, most recently Tricks of Light, a poetry collection. His novel Haywire won an award from the Asian American Writers' Workshop. He teaches at Medgar Evers College and received a fiction writing fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts.


Twitter Username: thadrutkowski

Website: www.thaddeusrutkowski.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T126.

This Is How We Do It: Periplus Collective Mentoring BIPOC Writers

(, , Kimberly Wong, , )

In an open chat, Periplus mentors Lan Samantha Chang and Adrienne Raphel and fellows Kimberly Wong and Dasia Moore will share their experiences about mentorship. Formed in 2020, the Periplus Collective of more than fifty writers is committed to mentoring fellows—promising BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of color) writers in the US who are at an early stage in their careers. Hear why Periplus was formed, what works or not, and how to make the most of mentorship as a fellow or a mentor!

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Bix Gabriel is a writer, teacher of creative writing, editor at the Offing magazine, 2021 Periplus Fellow, and occasional Tweeter. Her writing appears in the anthology A Map is Only One Story, Longleaf Review, Catapult, Guernica, and Electric Literature, among others.


Twitter Username: BixGabriel

Lan Samantha Chang is the author of The Family Chao, Inheritance, All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost, and Hunger: A Novella and Stories. The recipient of a 2021 Berlin Prize Fellowship, she is director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Adrienne Raphel is the author of Thinking Inside the Box and What Was It For. Her essays, poetry, and criticism appear widely. She holds a PhD from Harvard, an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and a BA from Princeton, where she currently teaches.


Twitter Username: AdrienneRaphel

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T232.

Social Justice in the Writing Classroom

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To celebrate the 1970 founding of Medgar Evers College, the City University of New York, five teachers from the college’s English Department will talk about how they integrate ideas of social justice and human equality into their writing classrooms. Panelists will explore the intersection of artistic integrity with social responsibility, and discuss their concerns and approaches in preparing students of color to develop an aesthetic inclusivity.

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Thaddeus Rutkowski is author of seven books, most recently Tricks of Light, a poetry collection. His novel Haywire won an award from the Asian American Writers' Workshop. He teaches at Medgar Evers College and received a fiction writing fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts.


Twitter Username: thadrutkowski

Website: www.thaddeusrutkowski.com

Donna Hill has more than seventy titles in print. She has won numerous awards for her body of work. Three of her novels were adapted for television. She holds an MFA in creative writing and is an assistant professor of professional writing at Medgar Evers College.


Twitter Username: donnahill

Website: www.donnahill.com

Darrel Alejandro Holnes is the author of Stepmotherland and Migrant Psalms; his poetry has appeared in Poetry Magazine, American Poetry Review, Callaloo, and elsewhere. He is the winner of the Andres Montoya Poetry Prize and others. He is an assistant professor for CUNY, and he teaches at New York University.

Tonya Cherie Hegamin is the author of the picture book Most Loved in All the World and the YA historical novels M+O 4evr, Pemba's Song (written with Marilyn Nelson), and Willow, all of which have won national awards and recognition. Hegamin is the creative writing coordinator at CUNY Medgar Evers College.

Joanna Sit was born in China and grew up in New York City. She is the author of My Last Century, In Thailand with the Apostles, and most recently, Track Works. She teaches creative writing at Medgar Evers College, City University of New York.

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

T131.

The Poetics of Film: Five Poets on the Influence & Impact of Cinema

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Whether seen as adults or children, for pleasure or research, films can be as formative for a writer as any literary text. They can shape our aesthetics and our relationship with language and can provide a sense of lineage. They can awaken our civic consciousness and help us to see and be seen. In this panel, five poets will explore how the cinematic world has informed their poetic one and how films have inspired their craft, identity, and passion for the cross-pollination of artistic mediums.

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Christopher Kondrich is the author of Valuing, a winner of the National Poetry Series and a finalist for the Believer Book Award, as well as Contrapuntal. Recent work appears in the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day, Bennington Review, Kenyon Review, Paris Review, and Poetry Northwest.


Twitter Username: ChrisKondrich

Chase Berggrun is a trans woman poet and the author of R E D). Her work has appeared in Poetry, APR, Jubilat, and elsewhere. She received her MFA from New York University.


Twitter Username: patriphobe

Jericho Brown celebrates his latest book, The Tradition, at this year's AWP. A Guggenheim fellow and the director of the creative writing program at Emory University, he also wrote Please and The New Testament. His poems have appeared in the New York Times, the New Yorker, and TIME magazine.


Twitter Username: jerichobrown

Website: jerichobrown.com

Sara Eliza Johnson is the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in poetry, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, among other honors. Her first book, Bone Map, won the 2013 National Poetry Series. Her second book, Vapor, will be published in 2022.


Twitter Username: saraelizaj

Website: saraelizajohnson.com

Sally Wen Mao is the author of two poetry collections, Oculus and Mad Honey Symposium. She is the recipient of fellowships from the New York Public Library Cullman Center and the Jenny McKean Moore program at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: sallywenmao

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T194.

Indigenous Ecopoetry: Environmental Perspectives from Those Who Came First

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Indigenous peoples are those who have had the longest relationship with any given place. They have the deepest knowledge of the plants and animals, and they are the longest-serving stewards of the land, often for 10,000 years or more. Respect for the land is an integral part of Indigenous cultures. The panelists will discuss what Indigenous writers bring to the broader conversation of poetry concerning environmental preservation, ecosystem damage, and climate change and read representative poems.

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Lucille Lang Day is the award-winning author of eleven poetry collections, including Birds of San Pancho; two children’s books; and a memoir. A coeditor of two poetry anthologies, Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California and Red Indian Road West, she is the founder and publisher of Scarlet Tanager Books.


Twitter Username: LucilleLDay

Website: https://lucillelangday.com

Kimberly Blaeser, past Wisconsin poet laureate, is the author of five poetry collections, most recently Copper Yearning. A professor at UW—Milwaukee and MFA faculty member for Institute of American Indian Arts, Blaeser is Anishinaabe and founding director of Indigenous Nation Poets.


Twitter Username: kmblaeser

Denise Low, Kansas poet laureate 2007–2009, is author of The Turtle’s Beating Heart: One Family’s Story of Lenape Survival and Jackalope, among thirty books. She copublishes Mammoth, a literary press. At Haskell Indian Nations University, Low founded the creative writing program. She is a former AWP board president.


Twitter Username: deniselow9

Website: www.deniselow.net

Craig Santos Perez, PhD, is a native Chamoru from the Pacific Island of Guam. He is the author of five poetry books and the coeditor of five anthologies. He is a professor and former director of the creative writing program in the English department at the University of Hawai’i, Mānoa.


Twitter Username: craigsperez

Website: www.craigsantosperez.wordpress.com

Kimberly Gail Wieser, PhD, author of Texas . . . to get Horses, is associate chair and associate professor of English at the University of Oklahoma and affiliated Native Studies faculty; director of Native Writers Circle of the Americas; and writes poems, screenplays, stories, plays, and articles.


Twitter Username: meonahanehe
Saturday, March 26, 2022

5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Virtual

S232.

What the World Needs Now: Wellness & Healing through Literary Arts

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The literary arts are experiencing more relevance than they have in decades, being more widely regarded as a conduit for healing, a therapeutic modality that benefits mental and physical wellbeing and augments the social and emotional learning of individuals and communities. This panel will feature the work of three nonprofits that employ poetry in therapeutic ways across diverse demographics—from youth in both public schools and nontraditional spaces, to the medically and socially vulnerable.

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Rosemarie Dombrowski is the inaugural poet laureate of Phoenix, Arizona, as well as the founder of rinky dink press, the Revolution (Relaunch), and the therapeutic poetry nonprofit Revisionary Arts. She’s also the recipient of an Arts Hero Award and a 2020 fellowship from the Academy of American Poets.


Twitter Username: poetryprofAZ

Sheree L. Greer, born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, founded Kitchen Table Literary Arts to showcase and support the work of women writers of color. The author of two novels, Let the Lover Be and A Return to Arms, she is a VONA/VOICES alum, Yaddo Fellow, and Ragdale Fellow.


Twitter Username: shereelgreer

Website: https://www.shereelgreer.com/

Justin Rogers is a Black poet from Detroit, Michigan, who shares poems surrounding living and praying as a Black man in America. He explores fantasy through pop culture and is the author of micro-zine Nostalgia as Black Matilda and Black, Matilda.


Twitter Username: blklyfmattering
Friday, March 25, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

116, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F142.

Writing Resilience: A Reading by Neurodiverse Writers

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This reading features writers affected by trauma, addiction, and/or mental illness. Panelists will present their stories to empower themselves and others who have these stigmatized disabilities. Panelists will come out as neurodiverse as they inspire their listeners with their literary memoirs; audience members, including the neurotypical, will be able to identify with their struggles, triumphs, and resilience. The panel will demonstrate that mentally ill does not mean mentally weak.

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Larissa Shmailo is a poet, translator, novelist, and writing coach. She is leader of the workshop Writing Resilience for writers affected by trauma, addiction, and/or mental illness. She is the original English-language translator of the avant-garde opera Victory over the Sun by Alexei Kruchenych.


Twitter Username: larissashmailo

Website: www.larissashmailo.com

Jonathan Penton edits the journal Unlikely Stories and its print arm, Unlikely Books. He is the technical director for the New Orleans Poetry Festival and Rigorous and has worked in management and technical roles for a number of arts organizations. His most recent chapbook of poetry is Backstories.


Twitter Username: USDotOrg

Meg Tuite is the author of four story collections and five chapbooks. She won the Twin Antlers Poetry award for her poetry collection, Bare Bulbs Swinging. She is fiction editor of Bending Genres, associate editor of Narrative Magazine. She teaches writing retreats and online classes hosted by Bending Genres.


Twitter Username: megtuite

Website: megtuite.com

Anna Fridlis graduated from The New School with a nonfiction MFA in 2014 and has been teaching at her alma mater since. She is currently on academic leave to work on her memoir about immigration, trauma, family and identity. Anna also edits for Seventh Wave Magazine and runs an online kids writing camp.

Sandra Kleven is publisher at Cirque Journal and Press, partnering with founding editor, Michael Burwell. Cirque was created to publish the best work of writers in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Kleven is the author of four books, most recently Defiance Street: Poems and Other Writing.


Twitter Username: sandaleena

Website: http://heartworksak.net/poet
Saturday, March 26, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S141.

An Alice James Quartet

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Alice James Books publishes poets whose writing possesses the range, depth, and ability to cultivate greater empathy in our world and to dynamically push against silence. This work is instrumental in driving conversations that help us overcome the barriers we face. Four poets with new or forthcoming collections from Alice James will read from their work and discuss their writing process.

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Carey Salerno is the executive editor and director of Alice James Books. She is the author of Tributary and Shelter and an editor of the anthology Lit from Inside: 40 Years of Poetry from Alice James Books. Her poems, essays, and articles are in print and online.

Jeffrey Thomson is the author of seven books of poems, most recently, Museum of Objects Burned by the Souls in Purgatory from Alice James Books. He was Fulbright Distinguished Scholar in Creative Writing at the Seamus Heaney Centre and is a professor of creative writing at University Maine Farmington.


Twitter Username: jeffreyThomson

Website: www.jeffreythomson.com

Rosebud Ben-Oni won the 2019 Alice James Award for If This Is the Age We End Discovery and is the author of turn around, BRXGHT XYXS. She received fellowships from New York Foundation for the Arts and CantoMundo; her work has been commissioned by the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in NYC.


Twitter Username: RosebudBenOni

Website: 7TrainLove.org

Sumita Chakraborty is a poet, essayist, and scholar. She is Helen Zell Visiting Professor in Poetry at the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, and she is the author of the poetry collection Arrow, published in the US by Alice James Books and in the UK by Carcanet Press in 2020.


Twitter Username: notsumatra

Shara McCallum is the author of six books published in the US and the UK, most recently No Ruined Stone. Her work has received recognition, including the Silver Musgrave Medal and OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Poetry. She teaches at Penn State University. She was appointed the 2021–22 Penn State laureate.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T231.

Close to Zero: Publishing without a Budget

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Every magazine and press starts with an idea, an aesthetic, and a passion. Some also start with grants, a network, and funding. Others don’t. Our presenters will give immediate and practical advice on establishing and maintaining e-journals, print journals, and presses from one’s personal finances. We will discuss web development, printing, distribution, sales, the business aspects of zero-budget publishing, and free ways to expand audiences. Additional resources will be explored and provided.

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Jonathan Penton edits the journal Unlikely Stories and its print arm, Unlikely Books. He is the technical director for the New Orleans Poetry Festival and Rigorous and has worked in management and technical roles for a number of arts organizations. His most recent chapbook of poetry is Backstories.


Twitter Username: USDotOrg

Rosalyn Spencer, educator and advocate, holds a BA in English, MLS in public library studies, and MEd in educational leadership. She directs youth art programs and teaches English Language Arts in greater New Orleans. She is a grant writer, advocate, and supporter of the arts in education and equitable curriculum.

Kenning (aka Kenyatta) JP García is a performer, antipoet, humorist, and diarist. JP is the author of innovative diary collections such as OF (What Place Meant), Furthermore, and Slow Living. JP is also an organizer for the St. Rocco's Reading Series and is an editor at Rigorous and Dream Pop Press.


Twitter Username: kenningjpgarcia

Jesi Buell is a librarian at Colgate University in Hamilton, NY. She also runs KERNPUNKT Press, a home for experimental literature. She is the author of The Book of the Last Word and KINDERKRANKENHAUS. Her other writing can be found at www.jesibender.com.


Twitter Username: jesibender

Leah Angstman is a historian, editor, publisher, poet, and fiction writer. She is the founder (1993) and editor of Alternating Current Press, editor of The Coil, and copyeditor of Underscore News. Her debut historical novel, Out Front the Following Sea, is available everywhere books are sold.


Twitter Username: leahangstman

Website: leahangstman.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S118.

Making the Personal Public: Airing Secrets in Memoir

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In memoir, how do we balance telling the story we need to tell with the discomfort of exposing secrets that can cause harm—especially to those we love? How do we write despite the possible fallout? Five acclaimed memoirists tackle this question through their own candid explorations of family, romantic partners, and careers, exploring what it means to make the personal public. Attendees will come away with tools to dig deep into the truths they must tell.

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Joanna Rakoff is the author of the bestsellers My Salinger Year—recently adapted into a feature film starring Sigourney Weaver—and A Fortunate Age, winner of the Goldberg Prize for Fiction. Her family memoir, The Fifth Passenger, will be out in 2022. She writes for the New York Times and Vogue.


Twitter Username: joannarakoff

Website: http://joannarakoff.com

Maya Shanbhag Lang holds a PhD in comparative literature and is the author of What We Carry and The Sixteenth of June. Her work has been featured in the New York TimesWashington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Times of India


Twitter Username: mayaslang

Website: www.mayalang.com

Leslie Gray Streeter is a journalist, author, speaker, and advocate for grieving people. She released her first book, the memoir Black Widow. She and her work have appeared in Palm Beach Post; Washington Post; O, the Oprah Magazine; Seattle Times; the Atlantic, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and more.


Twitter Username: LeslieStreeter

Julie Metz is the author of the New York Times bestselling memoir Perfection and Eva and Eve: A Search for My Mother's Childhood and What a War Left Behind. She has written for publications including the New York Times, Tablet, Salon, Dame, and Catapult and is a fellow of MacDowell, Yaddo, and VCCA.


Twitter Username: juliemetzwriter

Website: www.juliemetz.com

Jessica Pearce Rotondi is the author of What We Inherit: A Secret War and a Family's Search for Answers, which Oprah Magazine named a best book of summer 2020. She is a a former senior editor at HuffPost and has written for the Boston Globe, History Channel, Reader’s Digest, Salon, and Vogue.


Twitter Username: JessicaRotondi

Website: http://www.jessicapearcerotondi.com/
Friday, March 25, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Virtual

F211.

Concise Punches of Reality: Readings from Five Chapbook Memoirists

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Some shy away from writing memoir because writing a lengthy, personal, emotional narrative of hundreds of pages seems too daunting. Yet, as these memoirists' readings will show, it's possible to craft memorable journeys within a shortened format. These writers utilize first person narration as well as poetry, photography, and social justice essays, reading from works that were made all the more powerful by being published in chapbook form. These are not tomes but concise punches of reality.

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Romaine Washington is the author of two poetry chapbooks, Purgatory Has an Address and Sirens in Her Belly. She is a fellow of The Watering Hole, and her writing has appeared in several publications including Lullwater Review, San Bernardino Singing, and Accolades: WWS.


Twitter Username: poetromaine

Website: www.romainewashington.com

gail butensky, a documentary photographer for many years, chronicles music (working for bands, record labels, and many publications); along with with more documentary work, gail has displayed her photos in several group and solo shows. Every Bend is her first book.

Allen Callaci is the lead singer for the band Refrigerator and an adjunct professor at Mt. San Antonio Community College. He is the author of the memoir Heart like a Starfish, Louder than Goodbye, and 17 & Life who has also blogged for the Huffington Post and Black Knight Nation.

Kendall Johnson is a writer, artist, and former trauma consultant in Upland, California. His literary memoir book Chaos and Ashes was released last June, and his collection of flash memoir Black Box Poetics was recently published.

Juanita E. Mantz is a deputy public defender, podcaster, DJ, and lawyer. Her chapbook Portrait of a Deputy Public Defender (or how I became a punk rock lawyer) was released in 2021. Her memoir about her punk rock childhood is due for release in 2022.


Twitter Username: lifeofjem
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T151.

Flash (Nonfiction) to the Future: A Speculative Brevity Reading

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Brevity has been a celebrated home to flash nonfiction, publishing thousands of essays, craft pieces, and blog responses over its two decades and counting. In an increasingly online era with the popularity of flash rocketing forward, it is a good time to explore what’s next for this incredibly rich, groundbreaking genre. Join our diverse panel of Brevity contributors for a reading and discussion exploring future possibilities for the flash nonfiction form and genre hybrids just now emerging.

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Dinty W. Moore is author of Crafting the Personal Essay: A Guide for Writing and Publishing Creative Nonfiction, the memoir Between Panic & Desire, and numerous other books of nonfiction. 


Twitter Username: brevitymag

Website: www.dintywmoore.com

Ira Sukrungruang is the author of the nonfiction books This Jade WorldBuddha’s Dog & other MeditationsSouthside Buddhist, and Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy. The Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College, he is the editor of Sweet: A Literary Confection.


Twitter Username: sukrungruang

Website: www,sukrungruang.com

Natalie Lima is a Cuban Puerto Rican writer and an MFA candidate in creative nonfiction at the University of Arizona. Her essays and fiction have been published or are forthcoming in Longreads, Guernica, Brevity, the Offing, Catapult, and elsewhere. Find her on Twitter at @natalielime09.


Twitter Username: natalielima09

Deesha Philyaw is the author of The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, winner of the the 2021 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the 2020/2021 Story Prize, and the 2020 Los Angeles Times Book Prize: The Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and a finalist for the 2020 National Book Award for Fiction.


Twitter Username: deeshaphilyaw

Ander Monson is the author of nine books, including the forthcoming Predator: a Memoir. He teaches at the University of Arizona and edits the magazine DIAGRAM, the website Essay Daily, March Xness, and New Michigan Press.


Twitter Username: angermonsoon

Website: http://otherelectricities.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S123.

This IS Women’s Fiction: Asian & Asian American Women & the Global Narrative

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From Tiananmen Square to the London Bombings to Duterte’s dictatorship in the Philippines to the power of Fake News, four women writers’ work reshapes the narrative of contemporary event as it gels into history. Through their novels that deal with the big issues—representation, surveillance, legacy, colonialism, resistance—the work of these award-winning Asian women is working to transfigure the discourse through the political novel as it expands to include diverse, articulate voices.

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Catherine Ciepiela is a scholar and translator of Russian poetry who teaches at Amherst College. Her main interests are Russian modernism, especially the writing of Marina Tsvetaeva, and contemporary Russian poetry. She recently finished translating a book of hybrid essays by Polina Barskova.

Sabina Murray is the author of the novels The Human Zoo, Valiant Gentlemen, Forgery, A Carnivore’s Inquiry, and Slow Burn and two short story collections, the Pen/Faulkner Award winning The Caprices and Tales of the New World. She has received Guggenheim and an NEA. She teaches at UMass Amherst.

Gina Apostol's last novels, Insurrecto and The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata, explore the Philippine revolutions against America and Spain. Her third novel, Gun Dealers' Daughter, won the 2013 PEN/Open Book Award. Her first two novels won the Juan Laya Prize (Philippine National Book Award).


Twitter Username: GinaApostol

Website: ginaapostol.com

Tracy O'Neill is the author of the novels The Hopeful and Quotients. A National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree and a 2012 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellow, her work has appeared in Granta, VQR, the Atlantic, the New Yorker, Rolling Stone, the Guardian, and the New York Times.


Twitter Username: tracysoneill

Meng Jin’s novel Little Gods was a finalist for the NYPL Young Lions Award and LA Times First Fiction Prize and longlisted for the PEN Open Book Award. A Kundiman fellow, she has short prose appearing in Best American Short Stories, the Pushcart Prize anthology, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jinittowinit
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T144.

Myth & Monsters in Memoir: Using Folklore to Structure Personal Writing

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Folklore, fairy tales, and myths persist because they tell us stories about ourselves—where we come from, what we should value, what we should fear. These stories exist to establish the boundaries of what we see as possible, desirable, and laudable. As writers, we can also make use of folklore to define our own stories—whether we embrace the cultural narrative or reject it. The authors on this panel will discuss how to harness mythological figures and tropes to give shape to personal writing.

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Jess Zimmerman is an editor at Quirk Books and the author of Women and Other Monsters.


Twitter Username: j_zimms

Carmen Maria Machado is the author of National Book Award finalist story collection Her Body and Other Parties and the memoir In the Dream House. She is a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, and her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, Granta, Tin House, Conjunctions, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: carmenmmachado

Website: http://carmenmariamachado.com/

Sofia Samatar is the author of four books, most recently Monster Portraits, a collaboration with her brother, the artist Del Samatar. Her work has received several honors, including the World Fantasy Award. Her memoir The White Mosque is forthcoming.

Jami Nakamura Lin is the author of The Night Parade, a speculative memoir illustrated by her sister Cori. She is a 2016 NEA US–Japan Creative Artists Fellow and a former Catapult columnist. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Electric Lit, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: jaminlin
Friday, March 25, 2022

5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F248.

Indigenous-Aboriginal American Writers Caucus

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Indigenous writers and scholars participate fluidly in AWP, teaching, directing affiliated programs, working as independent writers or scholars, and/or within community language revitalization efforts. Annually imparting field-related craft, pedagogy, celebrations, and concerns as programming understood by Indigenous-Native writers from the Americas and surrounding island nations is necessary. AWP conferences began our caucus discussions in 2010. Essential program development continues in 2022.

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Rena Priest is a poet and enrolled member of the Lummi Nation. She has been appointed to serve as Washington state poet laureate for the term of April 2021–2023, has published two collections of poetry, and is the recipient of an Allied Arts Professional Poets Award.


Twitter Username: RenaPriest

Deborah Taffa is the director of the MFA in creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In 2021, her memoir manuscript won awards from PEN America, MacDowell, Tin House, and Kranzberg Arts. Her writing can be found at Boston ReviewA Public Space, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. She is a citizen of the Quechan Nation.


Twitter Username: deborahtaffa

Website: www.deborahtaffa.com

Shauna Osborn is executive director of Puha Hubiya, a nonprofit literary arts organization, and author of the poetry collection Arachnid Verve, which was a finalist for the Oklahoma Book Awards. They have won awards from the New York Public Library, A Room of Her Own Foundation, and the Taos Summer Writers' Conference and a Crescendo Literary Fellowship.


Twitter Username: tenaciousoz

Website: http://shaunamosborn.wordpress.com/

Kimberly Blaeser, past Wisconsin poet laureate, is the author of five poetry collections, most recently Copper Yearning. A professor at UW—Milwaukee and MFA faculty member for Institute of American Indian Arts, Blaeser is Anishinaabe and founding director of Indigenous Nation Poets.


Twitter Username: kmblaeser
Saturday, March 26, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S188.

Poets Theater

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From Eliot to Okot p'Bitek, poets have stolen theater's ticks and tricks in hybrid forms. Moving on from stylized poetry slams, language poets' performative poetics, and voice-driven poets testing audience credulity, today's poets test new lineations and typography to “theatrify” the page and performance. Five poets display their hybridity to unsettle narratives about race and childhood that control human relations.

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Terese Svoboda has published eighteen books of poetry, fiction, biography, memoir, and translation. Her collection Theatrix: Play Poems from Anhinga was released in 2021.


Twitter Username: teresesvoboda

Website: www.teresesvoboda.com

Rodrigo Toscano is the author of ten books of poetry. His latest is The Charm & The Dread. His Collapsible Poetics Theater was a National Poetry Series selection. His poetry has appeared in Best American Poetry and Best Experimental Poetry. rodrigotoscano.com


Twitter Username: Toscano200

Website: rodrigotoscano.com

Joyelle McSweeney is the author of ten books, including the verse play Dead Youth, or, the Leaks, the critical book The Necropastoral: Poetry, Media, Occults, and the poetry volume Toxicon and Arachne. She edits Action Books and teaches at Notre Dame.


Twitter Username: JoyelleMcS

Neil de la Flor's solo and collaborative publications include An Elephant's Memory of Blizzards, Sinéad O'Connor and Her Coat of a Thousand Bluebirds, Almost Dorothy, and Two Thieves and a Liar. He is the executive director of Reading Queer.

Douglas Kearney is a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Cy Twombly recipient, an award-winning librettist, a Howard/CalArts alum, and a Cave Canem fellow. He’s published seven books of poetry, essays, and libretti. He teaches creative writing at the University of Minnesota.

Friday, March 25, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F223.

Worth a Thousand Words: Integrating Visual Elements into Creative Nonfiction

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Writers trade in words, but sometimes words aren't enough. A panel of award-winning memoirists and essayists will discuss how photos, documents, original artwork, and other visual elements can deepen, complicate, and illuminate creative nonfiction. Discussion will cover craft concerns, like what can be described vs. what must be depicted and how to go about weaving images into text, as well practical ones, like permissions and convincing publishers that images are essential to your work.

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Chelsea Biondolillo is the author of The Skinned Bird: Essays and two prose chapbooks, #Lovesong and Ologies. Her work has appeared in Best American Science & Nature Essays, Orion, Brevity, Diagram, River Teeth, Passages North, and others. She is a former Colgate O'Connor and Oregon Literary fellow.


Twitter Username: c_biondolillo

Website: http://roamingcowgirl.com

Lilly Dancyger is the author of Negative Space, a reported and illustrated memoir selected by Carmen Maria Machado as a winner of the 2019 SFWP Literary Awards, and editor of Burn It Down, a critically acclaimed anthology of essays on women's anger. She is an assistant editor at Barrelhouse Books.


Twitter Username: lillydancyger

Grace Talusan is the Fannie Hurst Writer in Residence at Brandeis University, and her memoir, The Body Papers, won the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing and Massachusetts Book Award in Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: gracet09

Megan Culhane Galbraith is a writer and visual artist. Her debut, hybrid memoir-in-essays The Guild of the Infant Saviour: An Adopted Child's Memory Book was published in 2021 by Mad Creek Books of the Ohio State University Press. She is the associate director at the Bennington Writing Seminars.


Twitter Username: megangalbraith

Website: megangalbraith.com

Mary-Kim Arnold is the author of Litany for the Long Moment and The Fish & The Dove. A former arts administrator, she now teaches in the Nonfiction Writing Program at Brown University.


Twitter Username: mkimarnold

Website: http://mkimarnold.com/

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

F239.

Houses Full of Houses: The Structure & Craft of Building Story Collections

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How can a pile of stories become a cohesive book with a beginning, middle, and end? Many collections are assembled after the pieces are written, which can make vital decisions about structure seem daunting. This craft discussion with five debut authors of small press collections will provide a space for thinking both big-picture about books of stories as well as getting into the weeds about all the small choices that help collections cohere—from arrangement and structure to balance and flow.

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Tyler Barton is the author of Eternal Night at the Nature Museum. He's the communications manager for the Adirondack Center for Writing. Find him at tsbarton.com or @goftyler. 


Twitter Username: goftyler

Website: tsbarton.com

Christopher Gonzalez is the author of I'm Not Hungry but I Could Eat, a collection of flash and short fiction. He currently serves as a fiction editor of Barrelhouse.


Twitter Username: livesinpages

Ye Chun / 叶春 is the author of two books of poetry, Lantern Puzzle and Travel over Water; a novel in Chinese; and three books of translations. Her story collection, Hao, is forthcoming from Catapult. A recipient of an NEA fellowship and three Pushcart Prizes, she teaches at Providence College.

Kate McIntyre is the author of the story collection Mad Prairie, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award. Two stories from the collection received Special Mention for the Pushcart Prize. She is an assistant professor of English at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.


Twitter Username: _katemcintyre

Jen Fawkes's debut book, Mannequin and Wife, was a 2020 Shirley Jackson Award Nominee, won two 2020 Foreword INDIES, and was named one of Largehearted Boy's Favorite Short Story Collections of 2020. Her second book, Tales the Devil Told Me, won the 2020 Press 53 Award for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: fawkesontherun

Website: jenfawkes.com

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

F133.

The Medium is the Message?: Writers Working Across Genres

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This panel explores the myths and realities of writers who work across multiple literary genres—nonfiction, poetry, and fiction. Panelists will address the specter of genre mastery, institutional pressures, and how genre pivoting influences personal and professional lives. Craft topics will include the relationship between form and content, voice across genres, polygenre versus hybrid work, and the persistence of genre. The panel affirms writing across genres as transformative practice.

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Suzanne Richardson earned her MFA at the University of New Mexico. She is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton in Binghamton, New York. She is the writer of the Three Things column at No Contact Magazine. Her nonfiction, fiction, and poetry have appeared in various journals.


Twitter Username: oozannesay

Casandra Lopez, a Chicana/Cahuilla/Tongva/Luiseño writer, is the author of the poetry collection Brother Bullet. A CantoMundo fellow and Headlands and Hedgebrook resident, she teaches at Northwest Indian College.


Twitter Username: casandramlopez

Jen Soriano is a Filipinx writer whose work blurs the boundaries between nonfiction, surrealism, and poetry. They are the author of the chapbook Making the Tongue Dry, and Nervous, a lyric essay collection about historical trauma and the neuroscience of healing, forthcoming from Amistad in 2023.


Twitter Username: lionswrite

Website: jensoriano.net

Samantha Tetangco is a queer Filipina multigenre writer and educator. Her works have appeared in dozens of magazines and anthologies. She is artistic director and coproducer of Plume: A Writer’s Podcast and associate director of writing at University of California Merced. https://samanthatetangco.ink.

Lev Keltner is a trans writer, chapbooks editor at Newfound, and author of the novel Goodnight. Their flash autofiction and poems have appeared in Passages North, Peach Mag, [PANK], Anomaly, Hobart, and elsewhere and have been nominated for Best of the Net. They write RPGs at Feverdream Games.


Twitter Username: crystal_ography

Website: https://crystalkeltner.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

Virtual

T237.

Breaking the Silence: Ways for Writers to Speak in Workshop

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The writer’s silence may be the writing workshop’s longest tradition. And yet a chorus of recent scholarship problematizes this restriction and teaches us the value of bringing the writer’s voice into the room. This discussion begins, then, not with the writer’s silence but with their speech. How will writers speak in our workshops? Participants will have opportunities to voice their ideas, ask questions, and respond to strategies suggested by the presenters.


This virtual discussion room will take place live and will not be recorded for on-demand viewing.

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Erika Luckert is a poet and educator. She holds an MFA from Columbia and won the 2017 92Y Discovery Prize. Erika taught writing at public schools and colleges in New York. She is now a PhD student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where her research focuses on workshops and writing pedagogy.


Twitter Username: erikaluckert

Brandon Som is the author of Babel's Moon and The Tribute Horse, winner of the 2015 Kate Tufts Discovery Award. A former fellow at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, he is an assistant professor in the literature department at the University of California, San Diego.

G'Ra Asim is an assistant professor of creative writing at Washington University in St. Louis and the author of Boyz n the Void: a mixtape to my brother.


Twitter Username: notjadedpunk

Jamaica Baldwin's poetry has appeared in numerous print and online journals. Her first book, Bone Language, is forthcoming in 2023. She is currently pursuing her PhD in English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln where she teaches poetry and composition. www.jamaicabaldwin.com


Twitter Username: JamaicaBaldwin

Website: www.jamaicabaldwin.com

Katie Marya is a writer and translator from Atlanta, Georgia. She earned an MFA in poetry from Bennington College and is currently pursuing a PhD in Lincoln, Nebraska. Her first collection of poetry, Sugar Work, was the Editor's Choice for the 2020 Alice James Award and will be published in June 2022.


Twitter Username: katiemarya13

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T229.

Broadsided Press: Celebrating Fifteen Years of Poetic & Artistic Collaboration

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Broadsided Press has been publishing collaborations between writers and visual artists as monthly broadsides since 2005; this year, Provincetown Arts Press is publishing an anthology of this groundbreaking work. Join founder Elizabeth Bradfield and poets from the anthology Jennifer Perrine, Luiza Flynn-Goodlet, Margaret Noodin, and John Nieves in a celebration of poems, art, and the synergy between. Images of the art will be projected as the poets read work from the anthology.

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Elizabeth Bradfield’s most recent book is Toward Antarctica. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, Poetry, and her honors include the Audre Lorde Prize and a Stegner fellowship. Founder of Broadsided Press, she works as a naturalist/guide and teaches creative writing at Brandeis University.


Twitter Username: e.bradfield

Website: www.ebradfield.com

Jennifer Perrine is the author of four books of poetry: Again; No Confession, No Mass; In the Human Zoo; and The Body Is No Machine. She is a recipient of the Publishing Triangle Audre Lorde Award and fellowships from Literary Arts and the Vermont Studio Center.

Luiza Flynn-Goodlett, editor in chief of Foglifter, is the author of Look Alive—winner of the 2019 Cowles Poetry Book Prize from SEMO Press—along with seven chapbooks, most recently The Undead (Sixth Finch Books' 2020 Chapbook Contest) and Shadow Box (2019 Madhouse Press Editor's Prize).


Twitter Username: luizagurley

Website: luizaflynngoodlett.com

Margaret Noodin is a poet and associate professor at the University of Wisconsin‹Milwaukee. She is the author of Bawaajimo, a book on native literature and Weweni, a collection of bilingual poems in Ojibwe and English. Her poems and essays have been anthologized in numerous journals and collections.


Twitter Username: OjibweNet

Website: www.ojibwe.net

John A Nieves is an associate professor of English and director of graduate studies at Salisbury University in Maryland. He holds an MA from South Florida and a PhD from Missouri. He is the author of the poetry collection, Curio. He is one of the editors of The Shore Poetry.

Saturday, March 26, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S173.

Your Story Ends Here: Flash Fiction, Short Story, or Something Longer?

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You’ve embarked on a work of fiction. You have a tentative starting point and an idea of the characters, the plot, and the tension. You even have a vision of how the work will end. All things considered, you’re off to a great start. But you also find yourself in a familiar predicament, and you ask yourself: is this flash fiction, a short story, or something longer? This panel of fiction writers working in a variety of forms will discuss how they decide what shape their work will take.

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Stephen Pisani is a graduate of the MFA program at Adelphi University and the MA in writing program at Coastal Carolina University. His work has appeared in a variety of publications.

Amina Gautier is the author of three short story collections: At-Risk, Now We Will Be Happy, and The Loss of All Lost Things. For her body of work she has received the PEN/MALAMUD Award for Excellence in the Short Story.


Twitter Username: DrAminaGautier

Website: https://aminagautier.wordpress.com/

Kevin Wilson is the author of a five books, most recently Nothing to See Here. He teaches in the English department at the University of the South.

Liz Moore is the author of four novels, including Heft, The Unseen World, and the internationally bestselling Long Bright River. A winner of the 2014 Rome Prize in Literature, she lives in Philadelphia and works as an associate professor in Temple University's MFA program in creative writing.


Twitter Username: lizmoorebooks
Thursday, March 24, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

T185.

The Business & Pleasures of Editing the Literary Anthology

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Five editors of published or forthcoming poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction anthologies offer advice concerning how to propose an anthology for independent and mainstream presses, and how to query and collaborate with contributors and acquisitions editors, which might include making calls for submissions, setting and meeting deadlines, publicizing a new anthology, and handling contributor remuneration. They will also discuss any pitfalls they've encountered during the editorial process.

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Christine Sneed is the faculty director of Northwestern University's graduate writing program; she also teaches for Regis University's low-residency MFA program and was an AWP W2W mentor. She has published four books; her first, Portraits of a Few of the People I've Made Cry, won the Grace Paley Prize for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: ChristineSneed

Website: http://www.christinesneed.com

Phong Nguyen is the author of Bronze Drum, Roundabout, The Adventures of Joe Harper, Pages from the Textbook of Alternate History, and Memory Sickness. He edited two books: one on author Nancy Hale and the Best Peace Fiction anthology. He teaches creative writing at the University of Missouri.


Twitter Username: AlternaHistory

Website: http://www.phongvnguyen.com

Kevin Prufer is the author most recently of How He Loved Them, Churches, In a Beautiful Country, and National Anthem. He is codirector of the Unsung Masters Series and a professor at the University of Houston's creative writing program and the Lesley University low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: Prufer_Kevin

Website: www.kevinprufer.com

Jennifer Baker is a publishing professional, creator of the Minorities in Publishing podcast, faculty member of BayPath University's Creative Nonfiction MFA program, a former contributing editor to Electric Literature, & editor of Everyday People: The Color of Life—A Short Story Anthology (2018).


Twitter Username: jbakernyc

Website: www.jennifernbaker.com

Jason Lee Brown is the author of three books and former editor in chief of River Styx literary magazine, director of the River Styx Reading Series, and series editor of New Stories from the Midwest. He also coedited the poetry anthology The Book of Donuts.

Friday, March 25, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F203.

Creating an Anthology for the First Time: The Poet as Editor

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What are the processes by which poets create and edit thematic anthologies and why? Five poet-editors discuss their experiences with compiling and launching recent anthologies. They consider the challenges of doing this during the pandemic, as well as methods of finding contributors by direct solicitation versus open submissions, making acceptance decisions, organizing the anthology, answering rights questions, looking for a publisher, creating effective publicity, and finding an audience.

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Susana H. Case, a retired professor, is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently Dead Shark on the N Train, which won a Pinnacle Book Award for Best Poetry Book and a NYC Big Book Award Distinguished Favorite and was a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book Award.


Twitter Username: susana_h_case

Website: https://susanahcase.com

Margo Stever’s collections include Cracked Piano, Ghost Moose,The Lunatic Ball, The Hudson Line, Frozen Spring, and Reading the Night Sky. She is the founder of the Hudson Valley Writers Center and founding and current coeditor of Slapering Hol Press. She currently teaches poetry at Case Western Reserve University.


Twitter Username: margotaftstever

Website: www.margotaftstever.com

Caridad Moro-Gronlier is the author of Tortillera. She is a contributing editor of Grabbed: Writers Respond to Sexual Assault and associate editor for SWWIM Every Day. A career educator, she is an English professor in Miami, Florida.


Twitter Username: CaridadMoro1

Katherine Hoerth is the author of four poetry books, including Goddess Wears Cowboy Boots, which won the Helen C. Smith Prize from the Texas Institute of Letters. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Lamar University and serves as editor in chief of Lamar University Literary Press.

Diana Whitney's poetry anthology for teen girls, You Don't Have to Be Everything, became a YA bestseller. She is the former poetry columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, and her personal essays and literary criticism have appeared in the New York Times, Kenyon Review, and Longreads.


Twitter Username: dianawhitney31

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F220.

Unmake the Patriarchy of Your Mind

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For millennia, patriarchal expectations have shaped literature’s socioeconomic context and making. This intersectional panel brings together five award-winning writers who rewrite the patriarchy's impact on our lives and art as Black, Latinx, South Asian, and white women—from persona poems as a Black womanist or in the voice of Baba Yaga, to centering Latinxs in tales of settler colonialism, to poems that confront workplace sexism, to a mother's essays about wringing the toxic from her son.

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Kristen Millares Young is a prizewinning journalist, essayist, and author of the novel Subduction (Red Hen Press). Named a Paris Review staff pick, Subduction won Nautilus and IPPY awards. Kristen reviews books for the Washington Post, and she is the editor of Seismic, a Washington State Book Award finalist.


Twitter Username: kristenmillares

Website: www.kristenmyoung.com

Alexandra Teague is the author of the novel Or What We’ll Call Desire and two poetry books, The Wise and Foolish Builders and Mortal Geography, as well as coeditor of Bullets into Bells. A former Stegner and NEA fellow, she is a professor at University of Idaho.

Anastacia-Reneé is a queer writer, educator, podcaster, and interdisciplinary artist, She is the author of (v.) and Forget It. Here in the (Middle) of Nowhere and Sidenotes from the Archivist are forthcoming from Amistad.

Laura Read is the author of Dresses from the Old Country, Instructions for My Mother’s Funeral, and The Chewbacca on Hollywood Boulevard Reminds Me of You. She served as poet laureate for Spokane, Washington, from 2015–2017. She teaches English at Spokane Falls Community College.


Twitter Username: lauraread70

Sonora Jha is the author of the essay collection How to Raise a Feminist Son: Motherhood, Masculinity, and the Making of My Family and the novel Foreign. Her essays are in the New York Times, Seattle Times, etc. She is a professor of journalism at Seattle University.


Twitter Username: ProfSonoraJha

Website: www.sonorajha.com

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F112.

A Tenth Anniversary Celebration of the Kenyon Review Fellowships

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The Kenyon Review Fellowships celebrates its tenth anniversary with a reading and Q&A featuring five current and former fellows. The KR Fellows are a diverse group of younger writers who spend two years at Kenyon College teaching creative writing, working on an individual project, and contributing to the editorial life of the Review. They will gather to read from their recent work and answer questions about the fellowships—the highs and the lows, the good and the bad—from audience members.

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Natalie Shapero is the author of the poetry collections Popular Longing, Hard Child, and No Object.


Twitter Username: natalieshapero

Elinam Agbo is the 2021–2023 Kenyon Review Fellow in Prose. She holds an MFA from the Helen Zell Writers' Program. A winner of the 2018 PEN/Dau Short Story Prize, she has received recognition and support from Aspen Words, the Clarion Foundation, and the Hurston/Wright Foundation, among others.


Twitter Username: evagbo

Cristina Correa is the Kenyon Review Fellow in Poetry. She is the recipient of fellowships and awards from CantoMundo, VONA/Voices, Hedgebrook Foundation, and Cornell University. Her work has appeared in the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day series, Best New Poets series, and Missouri Review.


Twitter Username: youmayknowthis

Molly McCully Brown is the author of the essay collection Places I've Taken My Body and the poetry collection The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded. With Susannah Nevison, she coauthored the poetry collection In the Field Between Us. She teaches at Old Dominion University.


Twitter Username: mmccullybrown

Website: http://mollymccullybrown.com

Misha Rai is the 2018–2021 Kenyon Review Fellow in Prose. Her writing has been awarded scholarships and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Dana Award in the novel category, and the Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies.


Twitter Username: RaiMisha

Website: www.misharai.com

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F139.

Winning Over the Haters: Fostering Student Appreciation for Poetry

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Time and time again, undergraduates—even those with a self-professed interest in literature—will come to creative writing classes claiming they don’t “get” or care for poetry. How do we engage students in a genre they’re certain they don’t like or understand? On this panel, professors will discuss strategies across a range of university courses detailing how they open students’ minds to poetry and what lessons, prompts, and activities have helped foster a love for poetry among their students.

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Lindsay Tigue is the author of System of Ghosts, winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize. She is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at Eastern New Mexico University.


Twitter Username: lindsaytigue

Website: http://lindsaytigue.wordpress.com

Paisley Rekdal is the author, most recently, of Appropriate: A Provocation and Nightingale. A Guggenheim fellow and Utah's poet laureate, she teaches at the University of Utah, where she edits the web archive project Mapping Literary Utah.


Twitter Username: paisleyrekdal

Chen Chen is the author of When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities, which was longlisted for the National Book Award and won the Thom Gunn Award. He has received a Pushcart and a NEA fellowship. He teaches at Brandeis University as the Jacob Ziskind Poet-in-Residence.


Twitter Username: chenchenwrites

Website: chenchenwrites.com

Tomás Q. Morín is the author of the poetry collection Machete and the memoir Let Me Count the Ways. He teaches at Rice University and at Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Jennifer Popa is a short story writer, essayist, and occasional poet. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Gannon University, where she’s working on a collection of short stories and a novel.


Twitter Username: jelopapopa

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

F189.

Anticipatory Archives & Ancestral Assemblages: LGBTQ Editors/Publishers of Color

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Queer/trans people of color editing/publishing build stronger activist, artistic, and scholarly communities. Editors/publishers will discuss production and maintenance of Indigenous, people of color, womanist, queer/trans, and multicultural journals and solo/coauthored books, anthologies, and presses. Collaboratively producing diverse texts, panelists will discuss navigating economic, logistical, and institutional challenges while centering issues of culture, politics, aesthetics, and diversity.

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Ahimsa Timoteo Bodhrán, an NEA and Tulsa Artist Fellow, is the author of Archipiélagos, Antes y después del Bronx: Lenapehoking, and South Bronx Breathing Lessons. He edited Yellow Medicine Review's global queer Indigenous issue and coedited Movement Research Performance Journal's Native issue.

Leiana San Agustin Naholowaʻa (CHamoru/Hawaiian) coedited Kinalamten gi Pasifiku: Insights from Oceania and Storyboard: A Journal of Pacific Imagery. A University of Hawai'i English PhD student, she directed Mothering Guåhan and is coediting Queernesia: An Anthology of Indigenous Queer Oceania.

Zeyn Joukhadar is the author of The Map of Salt and Stars and Stonewall and Lambda Literary award-winning The Thirty Names of Night. He edited Mizna's Queer + Trans Voices issue. His work appears in Salon, the Paris Review, and Kink. He is a Radius of Arab American Writers member and Periplus mentor.


Twitter Username: ZeynJoukhadar

Website: ZeynJoukhadar.com

Chino Scott-Chung is a trans Chinese/Mexican historical/creative non/fiction writer. Founder and fiction editor of The Asian and Pacific Islander Transmasculine Anthology, he is part of the Latinx Writers Caucus leadership team. His work appears in GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary.

D. Keali'i MacKenzie is a queer Kanaka Maoli writer and Pacific Tongues poet-facilitator. He is the author of From Hunger to Prayer and coeditor of Bamboo Ridge's speculative issue. His work is in 'Ōiwi: A Native Hawaiian Journal, Foglifter, and Mauri Ola: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T176.

Who Gets to Tell Our Stories: Analyzing Power & Ethics of Storytelling

(Marcos Damián León, , , , )

Responding to the controversy over American Dirt, author Jeanine Cummins claimed she wanted "to humanize 'the faceless brown mass' of Mexican migrants coming to the US." Literary critics defended her despite community outcry that it wasn’t her story to tell. This panel asks: Who gets to tell whose stories? The goal of the conversation is to develop an onsite ethics of authorship that considers the agency of racialized and gendered subjects within the field of storytelling.

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Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez got her masters of divinity from Vanderbilt University. The bulk of her work is around making the theories and heavy material that is oftentimes only taught in racist/classist institutions accessible through storytelling.


Twitter Username: priscadorcas


Twitter Username: MigrantScribble

Website: www.alanpelaez.com

Ashia Ajani is a Black queer environmental storyteller and educator hailing from Denver, Colorado (unceded territory of the Cheyenne, Ute, Arapahoe, and Comanche peoples). They have been published in Frontier Poetry, World Literature Today, Them.us, and Sierra magazine, among others.


Twitter Username: ashiainbloom

Raquel Reichard is an Orlando-based award-winning storyteller with an editorial objective to engage, educate, and empower. As a journalist, she centers her reporting on body politics and Latinx culture. She has a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Central Florida and a master's degree in Latinx media studies from New York University.


Twitter Username: raquelreichard

Website: www.raquelreichard.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F222.

The Subtle Ethics of Writing About Others

(, , , Elizabeth Miki Brini)

Nonfiction writers often grapple with how to write ethically about others. Memoirists, biographers, essayists, journalists: all worry about hurting loved ones, misrepresenting those of differing cultures, or disrespecting nonhuman nature in their work. This panel explores the various ways writers navigate these tricky issues. Panelists and audience will share their experiences of developing moral standards in this area with the aim of expanding our vision of the challenges and possibilities.

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Helena de Bres is associate professor of philosophy at Wellesley. Her creative writing has appeared in the Point, the New York Times, Aeon, the Los Angeles Review, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and the Rumpus. Her book, Artful Truths: The Philosophy of Memoir, was published in 2021.


Twitter Username: helenadebres

Courtney Kersten is the author of Daughter in Retrograde. She teaches creative writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and is at work on a hybrid biography about the American astrologer Linda Goodman.

Gina Arnold is a writer and professor of rhetoric and creative nonfiction. She holds a PhD from Stanford and is the author of four books, including Route 666: On the Road to Nirvana (1993) and Half a Million Strong (2018). She recently coedited the Oxford Handbook of Punk.


Twitter Username: ginanarchy

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F209.

Wanting a Seat at the Table without Being Eaten Alive: The Elusivity of Success

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Writing is a solitary occupation, but once a book enters the world, it belongs to readers, critics, and marketplace alike. Capitalism’s gaze (which of course is, by default, white, male, cis-het, abled, etc.) fetishizes, tokenizes, sexualizes, and centralizes certain writers, while erasing/overlooking others. At the same time, writers need/want to publish and also to market/sell their book. How can one be an artist without pandering to or becoming complicit with the hegemonies of the gaze?

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Lee Ann Roripaugh is the author of five volumes of poetry, most recently Tsunami vs. the Fukushima 50. She directs the creative writing program at the University of South Dakota, and is editor in chief of South Dakota Review.


Twitter Username: artichokeheart

Website: http://southdakota.academia.edu/LeeAnnRoripaugh

Nana-Ama Danquah is author of the groundbreaking memoir Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman's Journey through Depression and editor of four anthologies, including Accra Noir, which is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: DanquahReads

Website: www.danquah.com

Jan Beatty's sixth book, The Body Wars, was published by University of Pittsburgh Press. She won the Red Hen Nonfiction Award for her memoir, American Bastard. Beatty worked as a waitress and abortion counselor and in maximum security prisons. She directs creative writing at Carlow University.


Twitter Username: janbeatty27

Website: www.janbeatty.com

Allison Adelle Hedge Coke (2021 George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature winner)'s books include Look at This Blue, Burn, Streaming, Blood Run, and Effigies III. Distinguished professor at UC Riverside, she teaches in creative writing and the School of Medicine, directs UCR Writers Week, Lit Sandhill CraneFest, and Along the Chaparral.


Twitter Username: AAHedgeCoke

Website: www.allisonhedgecoke.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S112.

What Kind of Times Are These?: Immigrant Poets & the New Politics of Resistance

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Adrienne Rich writes: “I've walked there picking mushrooms at the edge of dread, but don't be fooled / this isn’t a Russian poem, this is not somewhere else but here.” This panel is about English language poets from Eastern Europe writing about the parallels between their homes and the US: nationalism, nativism, homophobia, and human rights abuses. We discuss new strategies of resistance for more than one culture and explore how poets co-opt the language of oppressors for their own power.

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Olga Livshin is the author of A Life Replaced: Poems with Translations from Anna Akhmatova and Vladimir Gandelsman. Her work explores finding a place as a queer refugee. She is the co-organizer of From Across the Waters: Voices for Immigration.


Twitter Username: olgalivshin

Website: olga-livshin.com

Mariya Deykute is a teacher, writer, performing artist, and translator. Mariya received her MFA from University of Massachusetts Boston and has taught at University of Massachusetts, the OLLI Institute, PEN New England, and Tohatchi High School. She currently teaches creative writing at Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan.

Lana Spendl, a Bosnian American writer, is the author of the chapbook We Cradled Each Other in the Air. Her work focuses on displacement, trauma, and queer identities and has appeared in The Rumpus, New Ohio Review, The Greensboro Review, Zone 3, Epiphany, and Baltimore Review.

Larissa Shmailo is a poet, translator, novelist, and writing coach. She is leader of the workshop Writing Resilience for writers affected by trauma, addiction, and/or mental illness. She is the original English-language translator of the avant-garde opera Victory over the Sun by Alexei Kruchenych.


Twitter Username: larissashmailo

Website: www.larissashmailo.com

Anna Halberstadt is a poet, translator, and author of two poetry collections in English—Vilnius Diary and Green in a Landscape with Ashes—and two in Russian—Transit and Gloomy Sun—as well as American poetry translations Selected Selected by Eileen Myles and Nocturnal Fire by Edward Hirsch.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T178.

Urgent Wonder: The Practice & Paradox of Teaching Environmental Writing

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Teaching environmental writing is critical, rewarding, and often overwhelming. How can we urge students to express deep-felt awe for the natural world and address urgent ecological crises? How can we nurture creativity, offer solace, and spur action? How can we decolonize nature writing tropes? As writers, how do we strike the balance of wonder and terror ourselves? In this panel, we grapple with these questions and share practical approaches for the classroom and beyond.

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Ana Maria Spagna is the author of several books of creative nonfiction including Uplake and Reclaimers and the poetry chapbook, Mile Marker Six. A four-time finalist for the Washington State Book Award, she is currently Viebranz Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at St. Lawrence University.


Twitter Username: amspagna

Website: www.anamariaspagna.com

Laura Pritchett is an author and a conservationist. She is the author of The Blue Hour; Red Lightning; Stars Go Blue; Sky Bridge; Hell's Bottom, Colorado; and several books of nonfiction. More at www.laurapritchett.com


Twitter Username: authorlaura

Nicole Walker is the author of Processed Meats: Essays on Food, Flesh, and Navigating Disaster; Sustainability: A Love Story; Egg; Microcosm; Quench Your Thirst with Salt; and This Noisy Egg. She edited, with Margot Singer, Bending Genre: Essays on Creative Nonfiction. She teaches at Northern Arizona University.


Twitter Username: nikwalkottter

Website: http://nikwalk.com

Derek Sheffield's collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. He is the poetry editor of Terrain.org and a coeditor of Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy and Cascadia: A Field Guide through Art, Ecology, and Poetry.


Twitter Username: terrainorg

Website: www.dereksheffield.com

CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems and coeditor of Native Voices. Cmarie is director of Elk River Writers Workshop and faculty in the graduate program in creative writing at Western Colorado University.

Saturday, March 26, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S115.

Bowling Green State University MFA's Fiftieth Anniversary Reading

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Celebrating our fiftieth year of fostering original literary voices, BGSU presents five writers from various eras of our program’s history. Writers from BGSU have published more than 400 books and been recognized with the Yale Younger Poets Award, the Flannery O’Connor Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Poetry, the Drue Heinz Award, and the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, among other honors. This reading will showcase the quality and diversity of BGSU’s writers over the decades.

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Carolyn Forché’s books of poetry include Blue Hour; The Angel of History, which received the Los Angeles Times Book Award; and The Country Between Us. She is also the editor of Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness and the coeditor of Poetry of Witness: The Tradition in English 1500–2001. Her honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. She is the director of the Lannan Center for Poetry and Poetics and holds the Lannan Chair in Poetry at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.


Twitter Username: carolynforche

Website: www.carolynforche.com

Charles Fort is author of The Town Clock Burning, We Did Not Fear the Father, Darvil, Frankenstein Was a Negro, and Mrs. Belladonna’s Supper Club Waltz. His poems appear in The Best American Poetry (2001, 2003, and 2016). Fort's novel The Last Black Hippie in Connecticut is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: charlesfortpoet

Website: https://www.poetcharlesfort.com/

Karen Craigo is the author of Passing through Humansville and No More Milk. She served as the fifth poet laureate of the state of Missouri. She is a 2000 graduate of BGSU's MFA program.


Twitter Username: karenkawrites

Website: betterviewofthemoon.blogspot.com

MIchael Czyzniejewski is the author of three collections of stories: I Will Love You for the Rest of My Life: Breakup Stories, Chicago Stories, and Elephants in Our Bedroom. He teaches at Missouri State University, where he edits for Moon City Press and Moon City Review.


Twitter Username: MCzyzniejewski

Matt Bell is the author of the novels Appleseed, Scrapper, and In the House upon the Dirt between the Lake and the Woods, the story collection A Tree or a Person or a Wall, and two works of nonfiction, Refuse to Be Done and Baldur's Gate II. He is an associate professor at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: mdbell79

Website: http://www.mdbell.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

118A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F143.

Both/And: Boosting Women, Genderqueer, & LGBT Writers

(, , , Emma Eisenberg, )

The Claw—a Philadelphia-based salon for genderqueer, trans, and cis women writers—invites you to imagine diverse communal spaces beyond the writing workshop. Members of The Claw discuss how they create safe spaces and promote mentorship and collaboration between writers. Participants will introduce frameworks, guidelines, and rituals fostering connection rather than competition, boosting rather than boasting. Audience members are given tools to return home and launch their own collectives.

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Liz Moore is the author of four novels, including Heft, The Unseen World, and the internationally bestselling Long Bright River. A winner of the 2014 Rome Prize in Literature, she lives in Philadelphia and works as an associate professor in Temple University's MFA program in creative writing.


Twitter Username: lizmoorebooks

Carmen Maria Machado is the author of National Book Award finalist story collection Her Body and Other Parties and the memoir In the Dream House. She is a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, and her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, Granta, Tin House, Conjunctions, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: carmenmmachado

Website: http://carmenmariamachado.com/

Asali Solomon is the author of two novels, The Days of Afrekete and Disgruntled, as well as the short story collection Get Down. She teaches fiction writing and the literature of the African diaspora at Haverford College.

Annie Liontas's novel, Let Me Explain You, was featured in the New York Times Book Review as Editor's Choice. She is the coeditor of the anthology A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors. She teaches at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: aliontas

Website: www.annieliontas.com

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F192.

Writing Southeast Asia Away from the Western Gaze

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How can we tell our stories on our own terms? Five anglophone writers from Myanmar, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand talk about reclaiming perspectives and writing that does not pander to orientalist expectations. What does it mean to use English, an imperial language, in this decolonial work, particularly in such multicultural, multilingual countries, and what is the role of translation in navigating this cultural and linguistic fluidity?

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Jeremy Tiang won the Singapore Literature Prize in 2018 for his novel State of Emergency. He has translated over twenty books from Chinese, most recently Lo Yi-Chin's Faraway, and is currently Princeton University's translator in residence. He also writes and translates plays. www.JeremyTiang.com


Twitter Username: JeremyTiang

Website: www.JeremyTiang.com

YZ Chin is the author of Edge Case, a novel, and the story collection Though I Get Home, which won the Louise Meriwether First Book Prize and the Asian/Pacific American Award For Literature honor title. Her translation of The Age of Goodbyes by Li Zishu is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: yz_chin

Sunisa Manning is a Thai and American novelist. She’s the author of A Good True Thai, which was a finalist for the 2020 Epigram Books Fiction Prize for Southeast Asian Writers. She is the recipient of the Steinbeck Fellowship, a residency from Hedgebrook, and other honors.


Twitter Username: sunisasn

Website: www.sunisamanning.com

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the novel The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, A Haven, which won an Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, and Names for Light: A Family History, which won the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize.


Twitter Username: thiriimkm

Gina Apostol's last novels, Insurrecto and The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata, explore the Philippine revolutions against America and Spain. Her third novel, Gun Dealers' Daughter, won the 2013 PEN/Open Book Award. Her first two novels won the Juan Laya Prize (Philippine National Book Award).


Twitter Username: GinaApostol

Website: ginaapostol.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S144.

Excavating Story & Silence: The Poetics of Erasure

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We are innovative writers who unearth hidden stories through erasure poetry, peeling away language to reveal invisible worlds beneath given texts. We examine letters, visual artifacts, pharmaceutical data, and Ancestry.com reports to excavate buried narratives through erasures, a dynamic form that potentially reenacts and heals silences related to family, race, illness, and trauma. We discuss techniques for writing erasures and unearthing hidden texts to reveal vital voices and revelations.

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Hadara Bar-Nadav is the author of several poetry collections, most recently The New NudityLullaby (with Exit Sign)The Frame Called Ruin, and Fountain and Furnace. She is also coauthor of Writing Poems, 8th ed. Bar-Nadav is a professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.


Twitter Username: Hadarabar

Website: www.Hadarabar.com

Donika Kelly is the author of the full-length collections The Renunciations and Bestiary. She is an assistant professor at the University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: officialdonika

Diana Khoi Nguyen is a poet, multimedia artist, author of Ghost Of, and recipient of a 2021 NEA fellowship. A Kundiman fellow, she is core faculty in the Randolph College low-residency MFA and an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh.

Kiki Petrosino is professor of poetry at the University of Virginia. She is the author of four books of poetry, including White Blood: A Lyric of Virginia and Witch Wife. She is a National Endowment for the Arts Fellow in Literature.

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

S225.

Fostering a Virtual Poetic Community

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Panelists will explain how they adapted to the new virtual world of poetry during the pandemic. The panelists will share insights into how they found ways to forge an inclusive online poetry community that encompasses virtual readings, podcasts, reviews, and newsletters to provide a poetic voice and connection throughout the country. Then the panelists will host a Q&A to provide tips on how to authentically market your own work and support other poets through the internet.

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Hannah Rousselot (she/her) is a queer French American poet. She has published two long works, Fragments of You and Ocean Currents. A reviewer  on hannahrousselot.com, she is the host of the podcast Poetry Aloud.


Twitter Username: hannahrousselot

Trish Hopkinson is a poet and advocate for the literary arts. You can find her online at SelfishPoet.com and provisionally in Colorado, where she runs the regional group Rock Canyon Poets. Hopkinson happily answers to atheist, feminist, and empty nester and enjoys traveling and live music.


Twitter Username: trishhopkinson

Website: https://trishhopkinson.com/

Kai Coggin is the author of three full-length poetry collections, a QWOC, and a teaching artist with the Arkansas Arts Council. Recently named “Best Poet in Arkansas” by the Arkansas Times, her poetry has been nominated three times for the Pushcart, as well as BAP 2015 and Best of the Net 2016 and 2018.


Twitter Username: skailight

Marion Gomez is a program specialist at the Loft Literary Center. She has received grants from the Minnesota State Arts Board, Intermedia Arts, and the Loft Literary Center. Her work has appeared in La Bloga, Mizna, Waterstone Review, and Saint Paul Almanac, among others.

Karen Paul Holmes has two poetry books, most recently No Such Thing as Distance. She has been in top literary journals and featured on The Writer's Almanac and The Slowdown. Karen has hosted a monthly critique group in Atlanta and an open mic in a mountain town for more than ten years.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T202.

Beyond the Immigrant Narrative: The Poetics, Politics & Craft at the Margins

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The immigrant narrative has long posed questions about borders, traditions, assimilation, and multiple identities. Writers and artists have worked across genres and media to create these experiential portraits. In this conversation, we'll explore the effects, consequences, and stories that emerge when writers and artists invoke characters from second- and third-generation immigrant heritages that journey through intersectional communities while creating one for themselves.

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Juan Carlos Reyes has published the novella A Summer's Lynching and the fiction chapbook Elements of a Bystander. His fiction and essays have appeared in Waccamaw Journal, Florida Review, and Moss. He teaches creative writing at Seattle University and serves as executive editor at BigFiction.


Twitter Username: JCReyesian

Shin Yu Pai is the author of many books including Virga, ENSO, and AUX ARCS. She has taught at Vermont College of Fine Arts, University of Texas at Dallas, Southern Methodist University, and was a Peter Taylor Fellow at Kenyon College.


Twitter Username: shinyupai

Website: www.shinyupai.com

Kristen Millares Young is a prize-winning journalist, essayist and author of the novel Subduction. Named a Paris Review staff pick, Subduction won Nautilus and IPPY awards. The editor of Seismic, a Washington State Book Award finalist, Kristen reviews books for the Washington Post.


Twitter Username: kristenmillares

Website: www.kristenmyoung.com

Jason Magabo Perez is the author of This is for the mostless. Currently, Perez is an assistant professor of ethnic studies at California State University San Marcos.


Twitter Username: jsnmgbprz

Website: jasonmagaboperez.art

David Heska Wanbli Weiden is the author of the novel, Winter Counts, nominated for the 2021 Edgar Award and named a New York Times Editors' Choice, Indie Next Pick, Amazon Best Book, and Book of the Month Club main selection. He was a 2018 MacDowell and PEN America Fellow. davidweiden.com


Twitter Username: WanbliWeiden

Website: www.DavidWeiden.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F195.

Imagining Invisible Borders: Uniting International African Diaspora Poets

(, , , , )

In December 2020, during the global pandemic, Uganda-born, London-based poet Nick Makoha founded his vision for an international poetry collective in the African diaspora called Obsidian Foundation. A panel of poets who were selected to attend Obsidian's first virtual retreat discuss their experiences in poetry craft during the event and the effects of uniting with the global African diaspora on their work. They also read from their poetry and engage with attendees to discuss Makoha's process.

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Nick Makoha is founder of the Obsidian Foundation. His debut collection, Kingdom of Gravity, was shortlisted for the Forward Prize Best First Collection. He's a Cave Canem Graduate Fellow, Complete Works alumnus, and winner of the 2015 Brunel African Poetry Prize and the 2016 Toi Derricotte & Cornelius Eady Prize.


Twitter Username: NickMakoha

Len Lawson is the author of Chime  and the chapbook Before the Night Wakes You. He is also editor of Hand in Hand: Poets Respond to Race  and The Future of Black: Afrofuturism and Black Comics Poetry.


Twitter Username: Lenvillelaws

Raina J. León is cofounder and editor in chief of the Acentos Review and the author of three poetry books: Canticle of Idols, Boogeyman Dawn, and sombra: (dis)locate. She is a member of the Cave Canem, CantoMundo, Macondo, and Carolina African American Writers Collective communities.


Twitter Username: rainaleon

Website: http://www.rainaleon.com

Saddiq Dzukogi’s poetry collection Your Crib, My Qibla was named one of twenty-nine best poetry collections by Oprah Daily. He is the recipient of fellowships and grants from Nebraska Arts Council, Pen America, Obsidian Foundation, and University of Nebraska–Lincoln.


Twitter Username: SaddiqDzukogi

Alexa Patrick is a poet from Connecticut. She holds fellowships from Cave Canem, Obsidian, and The Watering Hole. You may find Alexa's work in publications including Split This Rock's The Quarry, ArLiJo, CRWN Magazine, and The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic.


Twitter Username: getfreealexap

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F116.

The Revolution Will Be Serialized: Literary Journals & Political Movements

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“The literary history of the thirties,” George Orwell warned in 1940, “seems to justify the opinion that a writer does well to keep out of politics.” Yet eighty years later, most literary journals, like most presses and institutions, have felt the need to confront political realities, including assaults on democracy, police brutality, sexual abuse, and more. Are there risks in embracing these aims? What is the effect on the art they produce? Can journals remain relevant without becoming dogmatic?

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J.A. Bernstein is the author of Rachel's Tomb (AWP Award Series Novel Prize), Desert Castles, and Northern Cowboy. He’s won a Fulbright, Hackney Prize, and contests at Crab Orchard and Southern Indiana Review. He’s an assistant professor at the Univ. of So. Mississippi and fiction editor of Tikkun.

Katie Edkins Milligan's stories appear in Fiction, Tahoma Literary Review, and North Dakota Quarterly. She is fiction editor at Gulf Coast, the 2021 recipient of the Inprint Donald Barthelme Prize in Fiction, and an Inprint Brown Foundation Fellow MFA candidate at the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: keddymilligan

Dustin Pearson is the author of A Season in Hell with Rimbaud, Millennial Roost, and A Family Is a House. He holds an MFA from Arizona State University and has served as an editor to the South Carolina Review, Clemson University Digital Press, the Southeast Review, and Hayden's Ferry Review.


Twitter Username: dustinkpearson

Gilad Elbom is the fiction editor of the North Dakota Quarterly and author of the novel Scream Queens of the Dead Sea. He teaches in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film at Oregon State University.

Clayton Bradshaw writes fiction and nonfiction. He holds an MFA in from Texas State and is currently working toward a PhD at Southern Mississippi. He was a 2021 PFTA Emerging Artist and 2021 Kinder-Crump Short Fiction finalist. He currently serves as an assistant editor for Mississippi Review.


Twitter Username: WriterClaytonB
Saturday, March 26, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S217.

In Order to Be Totally Free: Teaching via the Writing Constraint

(, , , , Amie Whittemore)

Oulipo writer Georges Perec says, “I set myself rules in order to be totally free.” From word limits to time limits, writing with constraints can be a powerful tool when teaching writers to expand their first-draft strategies as well as further hone their craft through imposed limitations. In this panel, five instructors discuss what specific rule-based exercises they employ in the writing classroom and how those constraining prompts allow students to find greater freedoms in their own work.

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Alexander Lumans was awarded a 2018 NEA Grant in Prose. He was the Spring 2014 Philip Roth Resident at Bucknell, and he received a fellowship to the 2015 Arctic Circle Residency. He teaches at the University of Colorado Denver and at Lighthouse Writers Workshop.


Twitter Username: oldmanlumans

Website: http://www.alexanderlumans.com/

Joanna Luloff is the author of the short story collection The Beach at Galle Road and the novel Remind Me Again What Happened. She is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver where she edits fiction and nonfiction for the journal Copper Nickel.


Twitter Username: joluloff

Website: www.joannaluloff.com

Jane Wong is the author of How to Not Be Afraid of Everything and Overpour. She is an associate professor of creative writing at Western Washington University.

Hasanthika Sirisena's essays and stories have appeared in Electric LiteratureMichigan Quarterly ReviewEpoch, and Narrative. She is a recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writers' Award and the 2015 Juniper Prize for Fiction. Her essay collection Dark Tourist will be released December 2021.


Twitter Username: thinkhasie

Website: http://hasanthikasirisena.com/
Friday, March 25, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F152.

When Do We Eat? Food & Feasts as Narrative Potential in Fiction

(Temim Fruchter, , , )

In fiction, as in life, communal meals can be realms of possibility. Lavish holiday tables can be pivotal sites of magic, mess, or tension. Feasts convene characters both close and estranged, friendly and inimical. Dominant ideas of "family dinner: can be queered, bent, defamiliarized. And the food, vivid and specific, can be a character, too. This will be a conversation between fiction writers to whom food and meals are culturally significant in their lived lives, as well as in their stories.

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Gina Chung is a Korean American writer based in New York City. She is the communications manager at PEN America and holds an MFA in fiction from The New School. Her work appears or is forthcoming in the Kenyon Review, Catapult, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, Pleiades, and elsewhere. Find her at gina-chung.com.


Twitter Username: ginathechung

Kayla Kumari Upadhyaya is a lesbian writer of essays, short stories, and pop culture criticism. She is the assistant managing editor of TriQuarterly and a writer for Autostraddle. She previously was a restaurant reporter for Eater NY and recently held a fellowship with Lambda Literary.


Twitter Username: KaylaKumari

Chelsey Johnson is the author of the novel Stray City, a New York Times Editors’ Choice. Her writing has appeared in Gulf Coast, One Story, Ploughshares, NPR's Selected Shorts, and elsewhere. She received an MFA from Iowa and a Stegner fellowship and now teaches at Northern Arizona University.


Twitter Username: chelseyhotel

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

F157.

Behind the Curtain: An Insider's Look at Four Top Literary Journals

(, , , , )

For many writers, publishing work in a top journal can change the trajectory of one’s career. This panel will take us behind the scenes at four of America’s best literary journals. Editors will tell us what they look for in submissions, challenges they face in working with writers and running their journals, how their publications have evolved over time, and advice they have for writers hoping to receive that most wonderful of all emails: “We loved your submission and would like to publish it.”

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Matthew Lansburgh's collection of linked stories, Outside Is the Ocean, won the Iowa Short Fiction Award and was a finalist for the thirtieth Annual Lambda Literary Award and the 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction. He has received fellowships from Bread Loaf, Sewanee, Yaddo, and MacDowell.


Twitter Username: senorlansburgh

Website: www.matthewlansburgh.com

Carolyn Kuebler is the editor of New England Review. Before coming to NER as managing editor in 2004, she was an editor at Library Journal and founding editor of Rain Taxi. She has published her writing in various magazines, literary and otherwise.


Twitter Username: NERweb

Oscar Villalon is the managing editor of ZYZZYVA. He is a former book editor at the San Francisco Chronicle, as well as a past board member of the National Book Critics Circle. He is also a contributing editor to Literary Hub.


Twitter Username: ovillalon

Patrick Ryan is the author of The Dream Life of Astronauts and Send Me, as well as three novels for young adults. His fiction has been included in The Best American Short Stories. He is the former associate editor of Granta and is the editor in chief of One Story


Twitter Username: patrickryannyc

Julia Brown is an editor-at-large at AGNI and a former fiction editor at Gulf Coast. She is a writer, teacher, and doctoral student in the creative writing program at the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: juliabrown

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F208.

Expanding the Fictional Terrain: Four Writers, Four Collections, Four Awards

(, , , )

From social realism to speculative fiction, from American tales to immigrant lit, from heterosexual narratives to LGBTQ stories—Caroline Kim (the 2020 Drue Heinz Literature Prize), Michael X. Wang (the 2021 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize), Rachel Swearingen (the 2018 New American Fiction Prize), and Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry (the 2020 Raz/Shumaker Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Fiction) will read from their award-winning collections on themes of love, loss, and cultural identity.

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Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, a Russian Armenian, has published fifty stories and won the 2013 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction, the 2015 T. Williams scholarship from the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and the 2020 Raz/Shumaker Prairie Schooner Book Prize for her first collection, What Isn’t Remembered.


Twitter Username: kgnewberry

Caroline Kim is the author of a collection of short stories about the Korean diaspora, The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories, which won the 2020 Drue Heinz Prize in Literature and was longlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Short Story Collections and the Story Prize.


Twitter Username: carolinewriting

Michael X. Wang, born in China's mountainous interior, immigrated to the United States when he was six. He is the author of the story collection Further News of Defeat, which won the PEN/Bingham Prize. His stories can be found in the New England Review and Hayden’s Ferry Review.


Twitter Username: MichaelXWang3

Rachel Swearingen's How to Walk on Water and Other Stories, winner of the 2018 New American Press Prize, was a New York Times "New & Noteworthy" selection and one of Electric Lit's favorite collections for 2020. Her stories have appeared in the Missouri ReviewKenyon Review, and Agni.


Twitter Username: rachelswearinge

Website: www.rachelswearinge.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S134.

Writing Our Whole Selves: Mixed Writers Challenge the Narrow Literary Landscape

(, , , , )

In a society that favors the unambiguous over the complex, how do mixed authors of color write the truth of ourselves? Do we depict the ambiguity of our backgrounds or default to the recognizable and marketable? Do we reframe the issue by writing nonhuman characters? How do we embrace our in-betweenness and how do we influence structural change to reflect the nuances of the mixed experience? Five writers discuss how their work fits in the literary landscape now and in a more inclusive future.

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Donna Miscolta is the author of three books of fiction. Living Color: Angie Rubio Stories (2020) is her latest. Her work reflects her Filipino and Mexican heritage. Recent essays appear in Poetry Northwest and The Museum of Americana. She recently retired as a project manager in local government.


Twitter Username: donnamiscolta

Website: donnamiscolta.com

Jeni McFarland holds an MFA in fiction from the University of Houston and is a 2016 Kimbilio Fellow. Her debut novel, The House of Deep Water, is out now.


Twitter Username: jeni_mcfarland

Website: jenimcfarland.com

Talia Lakshmi Kolluri is a mixed South Asian American writer living in California's Central Valley. Her short fiction has been published in the Minnesota Review, Ecotone, Southern Humanities Review, and the Common. She is currently at work on a collection of short stories and a novel.


Twitter Username: TaliaKolluri

Aliah Lavonne Tigh is the author of Weren’t We Natural Swimmers, a forthcoming 2022 chapbook with Tram Editions. Her poems have appeared in Guernica, The Texas Review, Matter Monthly, and The Rupture.


Twitter Username: Alovetigh

Website: AliahLavonneTigh.com

Dawn Pichon Barron lives and works at the south end of the Salish Sea. She is the director of the Native Pathways Program at the Evergreen State College and Creative Writing Indigenous Studies faculty. Her chapbook, Escape Girl Blues, is out in the world.


Twitter Username: pigeongirlsgot
Thursday, March 24, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T128.

The Vast Importance of Small Spaces in Nature

(, , , , )

How do creative nonfiction writers craft layered or intricate essays by focusing on small spaces, or what others might somehow overlook? A creek, a garden, a park, a tide pool, an ant hill, a sand dune, a river’s reach, a prairie dog burrow, an owl’s nest—our panel will discuss how we apply close observation and contemplation to reveal larger issues about the environment in our work. Protest or preservation can take root in the most commonly known or miniature and otherwise unseen places.

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Allen Gee is the DL Jordan Endowed Professor of creative writing and editor of CSU Press at Columbus State University. He is author of My Chinese-America (essays), and At Little Monticello (a forthcoming biography of James Alan McPherson).


Twitter Username: allenrgee

Website: www.allengee.com

Susan Fox Rogers is the author of My Reach: A Hudson River Memoir and the editor of eleven anthologies including Antarctica: Life on the Ice, compiled via an NSF grant, and When Birds Are Near: Dispatches from Contemporary Writers. She has been writer in residence at Bard College since 2001.


Twitter Username: SusanFoxRogers1

Sean Hill, the author of two books of poems, Dangerous Goods and Blood Ties & Brown Liquor, directs the Minnesota Northwoods Writers Conference. His honors and awards include a fellowship from the NEA. His poems have appeared in journals and in anthologies including Black Nature and Villanelles.


Twitter Username: adamalzeal

Website: http://www.seanhillpoetry.com

Renata Golden has published numerous essays online and in print about the natural world. She is working on an essay collection about the Chiricahua Mountains where the borders of two states and two countries meet. She holds an MFA from the University of Houston.

CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems and coeditor of Native Voices. Cmarie is director of Elk River Writers Workshop and faculty in the graduate program in creative writing at Western Colorado University.

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

T154.

What’s Form Got to Do with It: Finding Shape in Memoir Projects

(, , , )

How do you write the story of your life if words are not enough? Panelists interrogate traditional forms to explore how resisting, reimagining, and rebuilding memoir expectations allows writers to more accurately tell true stories. Panelists will discuss their diverse projects, including memoirs-in-essays, memoirs in stories and essays, memoirs incorporating research and theory, memoirs using image, and illustrated memoir, offering strategies for discovering the form for your memoir.

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Sarah Fawn Montgomery is the author of Quite Mad: An American Pharma Memoir and three poetry chapbooks. She is an assistant professor at Bridgewater State University.


Twitter Username: SF_Montgomery

Tyrese Coleman is an essayist and fiction writer. She is the author of How to Sit, a 2019 PEN Open Book Award Finalist, and the forthcoming Spectacle.


Twitter Username: tylachelleco

Marcos Gonsalez is a queer Mexican Puerto Rican memoirist, essayist, and assistant professor. Gonsalez's debut blended memoir, Pedro's Theory, (2021) has been reviewed by the New York Times and Kirkus. Gonsalez's essays can be found at Lit Hub, New Inquiry, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: MarcosSGonsalez

Krys Malcolm Belc is a transmasculine essayist. He has published a chapbook of flash nonfiction, In Transit, and his essays have been featured in Granta, Brevity, the Rumpus, and elsewhere. His work has been supported by the Sustainable Arts Foundation.


Twitter Username: krysmalcolmbelc
Saturday, March 26, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S121.

The Value & Use of Ecopoetry Anthologies in a Time of Environmental Crisis

(, , , , Laura-Gray Street)

Five ecopoetry anthology editors will discuss editing and publicizing anthologies (international, national, or local) encouraging action on our environmental crisis and environmental injustice that can help readers feel a sense of both urgency and hope. Some of us have collaborated with scientific or environmental organizations, donating royalties and developing action guides. We will discuss organizing the book, finding a publisher, and working with the publisher to develop a unique point of view.

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Elizabeth J. Coleman is the editor of Here: Poems for the Planet  and the author of two poetry collections from Spuyten Duyvil Press, two poetry chapbooks, and a poetry translation. She is a public interest attorney, environmental advocate, and mindfulness teacher.


Twitter Username: ejcpoetry

Ruth Nolan, MFA, MA, is the author of Ruby Mountain (poems), editor of No Place for a Puritan: The Literature of CA's Deserts, and coeditor of Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of CA. She is professor of English, creative writing, and Native American literature at College of the Desert, Palm Desert, California.


Twitter Username: ruthnolan

Ann Fisher-Wirth's sixth book is The Bones of Winter Birds. Her fifth book, Mississippi, is a poetry/photography collaboration with Maude Schuyler Clay. Coeditor of The Ecopoetry Anthology, fellow of the Black Earth Institute, Ann teaches English and directs environmental studies at the University of Mississippi.

Craig Santos Perez, PhD, is a native Chamoru from the Pacific Island of Guam. He is the author of five poetry books and the coeditor of five anthologies. He is a professor and former director of the creative writing program in the English department at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.


Twitter Username: craigsperez

Website: www.craigsantosperez.wordpress.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F194.

Journeys to Print: Embracing & Cultivating Your Publishing Niche

(, , , , Krys Belc)

What is the right press for your work? Hear five nonfiction authors share all we wish we’d known about the quest for agent, contract, and publication. We have written books published or soon-to-be-published by an undergraduate student-run press, an independent press, university presses, a literary imprint of Amazon Publishing, and one of the Big Five. We will discuss book proposals, book advances, focus vs. flexibility in content and genre, and the editing and marketing processes.

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Jill Sisson Quinn has authored two essay collections: Sign Here if You Exist and Deranged. She has received a John Burroughs Essay Award and a Rona Jaffe Writers Award. Her work has appeared in Orion, Natural History, and has been reprinted in the Best American series.


Twitter Username: quinn_jill

Carrie Hagen is a writer, researcher, and editor with an eye for compelling historical nonfiction narratives. Passionate about connecting generations through stories, she lives in Philadelphia, where she contributes to Smithsonian.com and Mountain Home magazine.

Helena Rho, a former assistant professor of pediatrics, has practiced and taught at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Pittsburgh. Her memoir, American Seoul, is forthcoming from Little A in 2022.


Twitter Username: helena_rho

Stephanie Gorton is the author of Citizen Reporters, a work of journalism history. She has written for the New Yorker online, Smithsonian, and the Paris Review, among others. Previously, she held editorial roles at Canongate Books, The Overlook Press, and Open Road.


Twitter Username: sdgortonwords
Saturday, March 26, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S182.

Sum = {Poetry + New Media + Politics + Performance}

(, , , , )

Akin to how printing technologies revolutionized verse to create a print culture, new media advancements have led to another tectonic shift in how audiences experience language and how poets explore identity and embodiment. Now poets are transforming language and performance for a digital culture by exploring social media, visualization, code, VR, and mobile applications. This reading will showcase work from diverse poets that have incorporated new media into their craft and performances.

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Vincent A. Cellucci wrote Absence Like Sun and An Easy Place / To Die. Vincent performed "Diamonds in Dystopia," an interactive poetry web app, internationally and at SXSW in 2017, and the poem was anthologized in Best American Experimental Writing 2018.   


Twitter Username: theexceptionali

Ronaldo V. Wilson, PhD, is a poet, interdisciplinary artist, and cultural critic. His latest book is Lucy 72. He is a professor of literature and creative writing, and Principal Faculty of Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Atom Atkinson is the director of writing programs at Catapult and a doctoral student at the University of Utah. They are also one-sixth of the poetry collective Line Assembly. Previously, they served as the inaugural director of literary arts at Chautauqua Institution.


Twitter Username: AtomAtkinson

Lillian-Yvonne Bertram is the author of Travesty Generator, a book of computational poetry longlisted for the 2020 National Book Award in Poetry. The author of several works, they currently direct the MFA program at UMASS Boston and edit for Black Ocean Books and Persea Press.

Vincent A. Cellucci wrote Absence Like Sun and An Easy Place / To Die. Vincent performed "Diamonds in Dystopia," an interactive poetry web app, internationally and at SXSW in 2017, and the poem was anthologized in Best American Experimental Writing 2018.  


Twitter Username: theexceptionali
Friday, March 25, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F151.

Saturnalia Books Twentieth Anniversary Reading

(, , , , )

Saturnalia Books makes its home in Philadelphia and is celebrating its twentieth Anniversary in 2022. Timothy Liu, editor in chief, will moderate this celebratory reading to include a diverse lineup of Saturnalia poets inclusive of African American, Asian American, and LGBTQ communities as well as the current Mississippi state poet laureate.

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Timothy Liu is the author of twelve books of poems, most recently Let It Ride. His journals and papers are archived in the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. He is professor of English at William Paterson University.


Twitter Username: arabadjisliu

Website: Http://timothyliu.net

Kayleb Rae Candrilli is the recipient of a Whiting Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts. They are the author of Water I Won’t Touch, All the Gay Saints, and What Runs Over.

Diamond Forde is a Tin House and Callaloo fellow whose work has appeared in Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, the Offing, and more. She is a recipient of the Margaret Walker prize and a finalist for the GA Poetry Prize, and her debut book, Mother Body, was published recently.


Twitter Username: PoemsandCake

Catherine Pierce is the poet laureate of Mississippi and the author of four books of poems, most recently, Danger Days. An NEA Fellow and two-time Pushcart Prize winner, she codirects the creative writing program at Mississippi State University.


Twitter Username: katieppierce

Website: www.catherinepierce.net
Thursday, March 24, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T219.

Racially-Conscious Literary Criticism

(, , )

Just as astute fiction writers build their racial awareness to portray racial realities outside their own, discerning literary critics can develop such awareness to review books with unfamiliar racial experience. How can critics deepen understanding of an author’s racially informed artistic tradition? Should critics seek editorial guidance to identify potential racial blind spots? This diverse panel brings together critics and creative writers to explore these and other questions.

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Erik Gleibermann is a San Francisco social justice journalist, memoirist, and poet. He has written for the Atlantic, New York Times, Washington Post, Guardian, Black Scholar, and World Literature Today, where he is contributing editor. He recently completed Jewfro American: An Interracial Memoir.


Twitter Username: erikgleibermann

Emily Bernard is the author of Black Is the Body, winner of the Christopher Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose. She is a 2020 Andrew Carnegie Fellow and the Julian Lindsay Green and Gold Professor of English at the University of Vermont.


Twitter Username: emilyebernard

David Mura is the author of the memoirs Turning Japanese and Where the Body Meets Memory; the novel Famous Suicides of the Japanese Empire; and four poetry books, including The Last Incantations. His latest book is A Stranger's Journey: Race, Identity & Narrative Craft in Writing. He teaches at the Loft and VONA Writers’ Conference.


Twitter Username: MuraDavid

Website: davidmura.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

S128.

The Empire Writes Back from the Program Era: CW in Asia & Beyond

(, , , , )

While books like MFA vs. NYC echo AWP reports on the rise of creative writing (CW) educations in the US, and their popularity in Australia reveals this rise is not limited to North America, non-English countries have been slower to enter “the program era.” Two new anthologies from Routledge and Bloomsbury chart the rise of CW educations around the world and the next major chapter in tertiary CW education—the multilingual student. Anthology editors and contributors discuss global tertiary CW ed.

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Darryl Whetter is the author of two poetry collections and four books of fiction, most recently the climate crisis novel Our Sands. A Canadian, he was the inaugural program director of the first creative writing master’s program in Singapore. www.darrylwhetter.ca


Twitter Username: darrylwhetter

Website: www.darrylwhetter.ca

Xu Xi 許素細 has published fourteen books of fiction and nonfiction and edited five anthologies. Her newest title is The Art and Craft of Asian Stories. She is the founder of Mongrel Writers Residence™ and Authors at Large and is currently the Jenks Chair in Contemporary Letters at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.


Twitter Username: xuxiwriter

Website: www.xuxiwriter.com

Dai Fan has taught one of the few creative writing courses in English as a foreign language in China since 2009. She publishes in both Chinese and English. She is professor of English and director of the Sun Yat-sen Center for English-language Creative Writing and runs the Sun Yat-sen University Writers' Residency.

Sam Meekings is the author of Under Fishbone Clouds (called "a poetic evocation of the country and its people" by the New York Times), The Book of Crows, and The Afterlives of Dr. Gachet. He is assistant professor of creative writing at Northwestern University in Qatar.


Twitter Username: SMeekings

Marshall Moore is a course leader and senior lecturer at Falmouth University in the UK. He teaches creative writing and publishing and holds a PhD in creative writing from Aberystwyth University. Prior to moving to Britain, he worked in higher education in Hong Kong and Korea for fifteen years.


Twitter Username: marshallsmoore
Thursday, March 24, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T123.

Writing Disaster: Imagine, Reveal, Reckon, Repair

(, , , )

What role can writers play in an era of compounding environmental disasters? Some writers use their craft to bear witness to an increasingly unlivable world; others go further, not only addressing the connections between hazard and harm, violence and vulnerability, but also taking action to repair and compelling others to do the same. These writers will discuss how our work makes possible (or fails to make possible) ways of reimagining how we can evolve in this moment of unprecedented urgency.

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Emily Raboteau is the author of a novel, The Professor's Daughter, and a work of creative nonfiction, Searching for Zion: The Quest for Home in the African Diaspora, winner of an American Book Award. She is a professor in the MFA program at the City College of New York.


Twitter Username: emilyraboteau

Website: www.emilyraboteau.com

Kerri Arsenault is a book critic, teacher, book editor at Orion Magazine, contributing editor at Literary Hub, and author of Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains.


Twitter Username: kerriarsenault

Cinelle Barnes is the Philippine-born author of Monsoon Mansion and Malaya: Essays on Freedom and editor of A Measure of Belonging: Twenty-One Writers of Color on the New American South. She's received support from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, Capita, VONA, and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund, among others.

Lacy M. Johnson is a Houston-based professor, curator, activist, and is author of the essay collection The Reckonings, the widely acclaimed memoir The Other Side, and Trespasses: A Memoir. She teaches creative nonfiction at Rice University.


Twitter Username: lacymjohnson

Website: www.lacymjohnson.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

S127.

Opening the Gate: Poetry Reviewing as an Agent of Inclusivity

(, , , , )

What is the role of the book reviewer? Are current critics engaging with new poetry in ways that are illuminating and rewarding for readers and writers of different genders, races, and ethnicities? As readers demand that institutions support poets who write into the many traditions outside the historical center, what’s the responsibility of the critic? This diverse group of poet/critics considers these questions and others within the context of the changing landscape of writing and publishing.

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Ruben Quesada is a gay, first-generation Costa Rican American poet and critic who was raised by immigrant parents. He is the author of the poetry collections Revelations and Next Extinct Mammal. He is currently producing a documentary about Latinx poetry.


Twitter Username: rubenquesada

Website: www.rubenquesada.com

Emily Pérez is the author of House of Sugar, House of Stone; Made and Unmade; and Backyard Migration Route. With Nancy Reddy she coedited The Long Devotion: Poets Writing Motherhood. A CantoMundo fellow, she has received funding from Bread Loaf, Community of Writers, and Jack Straw.


Twitter Username: emilytheperez

Emilia Phillips (she/her/hers) is the author of four books, including Embouchure (2021). Her poetry appears in AGNI, Boston Review, Kenyon Review, and Ploughshares. She is an associate professor of poetry in the MFA writing program at UNC-Greensboro.

Victoria Chang's books are Obit and Dear Memory: Letters on Writing, Silence, and Grief. Her children's books are Love, Love and Is Mommy?.


Twitter Username: VChangPoet

Website: www.victoriachangpoet.com

Mandana Chaffa is founder and editor in chief of Nowruz Journal, a periodical of Persian arts and letters, and a writer and editor at Chicago Review of Books. She serves on the board of the Flow Chart Foundation and was named a 2021–2022 Emerging Critics Fellow by the National Book Critics Circle.


Twitter Username: recycledgiraffe
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

T155.

Story & Sound: The McSweeney's Audio Issue

(, , , )

Join us for a discussion about and live performance of McSweeney's Quarterly's first ever audio issue—a riotous exploration of audiovisual storytelling, coproduced with Radiotopia from PRX. We'll talk about the the way sound and text can come together to create an immersive experience of story and experience live excerpts of a handful of pieces in the issue.

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Andrew Leland's book about blindness is forthcoming from Penguin Press. He hosted and produced the Organist for KCRW and has been an editor at the Believer since 2003. His writing has been featured in the New York Times Magazine, 99% Invisible, McSweeney’s, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: quailty

Rion Amilcar Scott is the author of story collections The World Doesn't Require You and Insurrections, which won the 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. He earned an MFA from George Mason University and teaches English at the University of Maryland.


Twitter Username: reeamilcarscott

Andy Slater is a media artist, researcher, and disability advocate living in Berwyn, Illinois. His heroes are Jim Rockford, Pauline Oliveros, and Darryl McDaniels. 

Shayla Lawz is a writer and interdisciplinary artist from Jersey City, New Jersey. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Jack Jones Literary Arts, and CAAPP. Her debut collection speculation, n. was chosen by Ilya Kaminsky for the 2020 Autumn House Poetry Prize. She teaches at Pratt Institute.


Twitter Username: shaylalawz
Friday, March 25, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

F135.

Of the Diaspora: Rediscovering 21st-Century Black Literature

(, , )

Erica Vital-Lazare, editor of McSweeney's Of the Diaspora series, will discuss the series origin, selection process, and publicity strategy for this remarkable program. Launched in 2020, it identifies and republishes important previously published works by Black Americans with the goal of finding new contemporary audiences for works whose perspectives are more urgent today than ever. Titles include novels like Tragic Magic by Wesley Brown and historic photos with new essays by Lester and Aisha Sloan.

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Erica Vital-Lazare is a professor of English at the College of Southern Nevada. A past recipient of a Hurston/Wright Award, she earned her MFA in creative writing from Virginia Commonwealth University and is editor of the series Of the Diaspora.


Twitter Username: xanmere

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of the essay collections The Fluency of Light and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, as well as the forthcoming Borealis and Captioning the Archives. She is an assistant professor of creative nonfiction at the University of Michigan.

Marita Golden is a novelist and nonfiction writer and co-founder and president emerita of the Hurston/Wright Foundation. Her most recent book is The Strong Black Woman: How a Myth Endangers the Physical and Mental Health of Black Women.


Twitter Username: Marita Golden

Website: www.maritogolden.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T116.

Telling Tales (& Tankas) Out of School: University Presses Seeking Creative Work

(, , , , )

Most University Presses (UPs) can’t bestow six-figure advances, fly authors to events around the globe, or dedicate months to building media buzz, but because they aren’t profit-driven, UPs take risks and champion voices other houses may overlook. As a result, their creative titles regularly win awards, break conventions, and enrich the literary conversation. The directors and editors on this panel will discuss the many benefits of publishing with UPs as well as share manuscript wish lists.

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Katie Cortese is the author of Girl Power and Other Short-Short Stories and Make Way for Her and Other Stories. Her work recently appeared in Indiana Review, Wigleaf, Animal, and elsewhere. She teaches at Texas Tech University, and she is the fiction editor for Iron Horse Literary Review.


Twitter Username: KatieCortese

Website: www.katiecortese.com

Lisa Bayer is director of the University of Georgia Press, where she launched the Crux creative nonfiction series and secured Roxane Gay as current judge of the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction. Her publishing career spans thirty years and began with a paid internship.


Twitter Username: lisambayer

Courtney Ochsner is an associate acquisitions editor at the University of Nebraska Press, where she acquires trade creative works and oversees their series-based poetry program. She has worked in scholarly publishing since 2009.

Jim McCoy is the director of the University of Iowa Press. He has worked in the book world since 1992 for Waterstone's, the University of Chicago Press, and the University of Iowa Press. He received his BA in English from Indiana University.

Parneshia Jones is the author of Vessel: Poems, winner of the Midwest Book Award. She is recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award and the Aquarius Press Legacy Award. Jones serves as director at Northwestern University Press.


Twitter Username: parneshia

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T206.

Fatherhood & Grief: Writers Reflect on the Most Difficult Story

(, , , Catherine Ricketts)

Three poets and one novelist reflect on the traumas of child loss, reproductive loss, and geographical/genocidal loss through the lens of fatherhood. These writers will explore what it means to name the unsayable nature of grief in their writing as both a craft and personal issue. Deconstructing societal taboos around emotion and masculinity, these writers will explore the particular nature of fatherly grief, what it means to “lose all father now” as the poet Ben Jonson wrote centuries ago.

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Aaron Brown is the author of Acacia Road, winner of the 2016 Gerald Cable Book Award. He has published work in Image, World Literature Today, Tupelo Quarterly, Waxwing, and Transition, among others. Brown grew up in Chad and is an English professor at LeTourneau University.

Shann Ray is the author of American Masculine: Stories; the nonfiction book, Forgiveness and Power in the Age of Atrocity; Balefire: Poems; and the novel, American Copper. His work has been honored with an American Book Award and an NEA Literature Fellowship. He teaches leadership and forgiveness studies at Gonzaga University.

Saddiq Dzukogi’s poetry collection Your Crib, My Qibla was named one of twenty-nine best poetry collections by Oprah Daily. He is the recipient of fellowships and grants from Nebraska Arts Council, Pen America, Obsidian Foundation, and University of Nebraska–Lincoln.


Twitter Username: SaddiqDzukogi
Friday, March 25, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F122.

Poetry of Iran & Its Diaspora

(, , , , )

This reading features four of the most significant poets and translators of Iran or Iranian descent. They are representatives of an anthology published by Green Linden Press in September, 2021, Essential Voices: Poetry of Iran and Its Diaspora, which includes 130 poets and translators from ten countries. Collectively, the readers explore themes of identity, oppression, freedom, language, translation, and the potential for poetry to help us understand and navigate social and political complexity.

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Christopher Nelson is the founder and editor of Green Linden Press. His most recent book is Blood Aria.


Twitter Username: GreenLinden1

Website: www.greenlindenpress.com

Kaveh Bassiri is the author of two chapbooks, 99 Names of Exile, winner of the Anzaldúa Poetry Prize, and Elementary English, winner of Rick Campbell Chapbook Prize. He is also the recipient of a 2019 translation fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Sholeh Wolpé is an Iranian-born poet and playwright. Her most recent books include Abacus of Loss: A Memoir in Verse, and The Conference of the Birds. She is presently the current writer in residence at University of California, Irvine. More information: www.sholehwolpe.com


Twitter Username: Sholeh_Wolpe

Website: https://www.sholehwolpe.com//

Athena Farrokhzad is a Swedish poet, literary critic, playwright, and teacher of creative writing. Her debut collection Vitsvit, has been published in fifteen languages and was translated by Jennifer Hayashida under the title White Blight.

Armen Davoudian is the author of Swan Song, which won the 2020 Frost Place Chapbook Competition. He is a PhD candidate in English at Stanford.


Twitter Username: armendavoudian

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F137.

The Future of Black: The Advent of 21st-Century Second-Wave Afrofuturism Poetry

(, , , , )

Afrofuturism has experienced a second wave in the 21st-century mainstream propelled by the success of the 2018 blockbuster film Black Panther. This panel explores the impact of this second wave on Afrofuturism poetry. Panelists featured in a new poetry anthology on Afrofuturism, black comics, and superhero culture discuss how their poetry contributes to second-wave Afrofuturism, along with insights to Afrofuturism poetry as a sustainable genre and defining it for future generations.

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Len Lawson is the author of Chime  and the chapbook Before the Night Wakes You. He is also editor of Hand in Hand: Poets Respond to Race  and The Future of Black: Afrofuturism and Black Comics Poetry.


Twitter Username: Lenvillelaws

Cynthia Manick is the author of Blue Hallelujahs, editor of Soul Sister Revue: A Poetry Compilation (Jamii, 2019) and The Future of Black: Afrofuturism, Black Comics, and Superhero Poetry. She is the founder of the quarterly reading series Soul Sister Revue.


Twitter Username: cmanick

Tim Seibles has published several collections of poetry, including Buffalo Head Solos, Fast Animal—a finalist for the National Book Award in 2012—and, most recently, One Turn Around The Sun. His new and selected collection, Voodoo Libretto, will be released in January 2022. 


Twitter Username: Timseibles77@gmail.com

Teri Ellen Cross Davis is the author of a more perfect Union, 2019 Journal/ Charles B. Wheeler Poetry Prize winner, and Haint, a 2017 Ohioana Poetry Book award winner. She's a Cave Canem fellow, a Black Ladies Brunch Collective member, and poetry coordinator for the Folger Shakespeare Library in D.C.


Twitter Username: cross_davis

Steven Leyva's poems have appeared in Nashville Review, jubilat, Vinyl, Prairie Schooner, and Best American Poetry 2020. He is a Cave Canem fellow and author of The Understudy's Handbook, winner of the Jean Feldman Poetry Prize.


Twitter Username: sdleyva
Saturday, March 26, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S215.

Reclaiming the Collection: Putting Together—and Selling—a Story Collection

(, Sidik Fofana, , , )

In publishing and academic contexts, short stories almost always come with a caveat: they're not marketable or they're just what fits most easily in the workshop format. What if we stopped comparing books of short stories to novels? This panel looks at the story collection as its own art form, rather than a prelude to a debut novel. From contest to indie press to the Big Five, the panelists are writers who have come together to discuss how to write, arrange, edit, and sell a collection.

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Megan Cummins is a Brooklyn-based writer and the managing editor of A Public Space. Her book, If the Body Allows It (Nebraska), was longlisted for the Story Prize and the PEN/Bingham Award for Debut Short Story Collection.


Twitter Username: cummins_megan

Arinze Ifeakandu is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop where he won the Richard Yates Short Story Contest. He is a Caine Prize finalist and an A Public Space Emerging Writer Fellow. His debut collection of stories is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: Ary_Ifeakandu

Kate Doyle is the author of the forthcoming short story collection I Meant It Once which will be published by Algonquin Books. A  2021 A Public Space Fellow, she received an MFA from NYU, and her work has appeared in No Tokens, Electric Literature, Anomaly, Cordella, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: sometimes_k8

Ada Zhang is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a Maytag Fellow and recipient of the Richard E. Guthrie Memorial Fellowship. She is the author of a forthcoming short story collection.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

T241.

Brutal or Traumatic Scenes in Creative Nonfiction: Is There a Veil?

(, , , , )

Most of the time, creative nonfiction books deal with something traumatic or brutal. As writers, how mindful are we in recreating these scenes on the page? When we engage with topics like physical, mental, or sexual abuse, rape, self-harm, debilitating illness, and deaths of our loved ones, how intentional are we when narrating readers through these moments? Do we create a veil to protect our readers or draw the readers right in as though they’re experiencing these things themselves? 

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Lara Lillibridge (she/zher) is the author of Mama, Mama, Only Mama and Girlish: Growing Up in a Lesbian Home and coeditor of the anthology Feminine Rising. The interviews editor for Hippocampus Magazine, she holds an MFA from West Virginia Wesleyan College, and she is a mentor for Writer to Writer.


Twitter Username: only_mama

Krystal Sital is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Secrets We Kept. A PEN Award finalist, her essays have been anthologized in A Map Is Only One Story and Fury: Women’s Lived Experiences of the Trump Era. Her work can also be found in Elle, the New York Times, and Catapult.


Twitter Username: krystalAsital

Athena Dixon, a native of northeast Ohio, is the author of The Incredible Shrinking Woman  and No God in This Room. Her work also appears in The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic (Haymarket Books). Learn more at www.athenadixon.com.


Twitter Username: AthenaDDixon

Website: http://www.athenadixon.com

Carol Smith is an award-winning journalist and editor for NPR affiliate KUOW Public Radio in Seattle. Her essays and other writings have appeared in more than a dozen literary journals. Her memoir, Crossing the River: Seven Stories that Saved My Life, A Memoir, came out in May 2021.


Twitter Username: clsmith321

Christine Hyung-Oak Lee is the author of the memoir Tell Me Everything You Don't Remember. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, ZYZZYVA, Guernica, the Rumpus, Hyphen Magazine, and BuzzFeed.


Twitter Username: xtinehlee

Website: http://www.christinehlee.com/
Saturday, March 26, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S186.

Building a Successful Young Writers Program

(, , , , )

Young writers programs allow literary organizations to expand their reach and inspire a new generation of readers and writers, but such programs require months of thoughtful planning and attention to detail. Panelists representing a diversity of offerings for young writers (mentorship programs, in-person and virtual classes, yearlong and summer programs) will offer tips for structuring, marketing, and facilitating a young writers program while also considering issues of access and equity.

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Marian Crotty is the author of What Counts as Love, which was longlisted for the PEN/Bingham Prize and won the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize. She is an associate professor at Loyola University Maryland and an assistant editor at the Common where she works with the Common Young Writers Program.


Twitter Username: mgcrotty


Twitter Username: dinaportnoy

Karin Gottshall’s most recent book is The River Won't Hold You. Her poems have appeared in the Kenyon Review, the Colorado Review, Crazyhorse, and FIELD. Gottshall teaches at Middlebury College and directs the New England Young Writers' Conference at Bread Loaf.


Twitter Username: KarinGottshall

J. Joseph Kane is the director of youth programs for the Porch—a Nashville-based creative writing nonprofit. Before moving to Tennessee, Joe taught poetry in Detroit Public Schools through the Inside Out Literary Arts Project. He has an MA in poetry from Central Michigan University.

Richard Z. Santos's debut novel, Trust Me, was published in March 2020. He is a board member of The National Book Critics Circle. Recent work can be found in Texas Monthly, Awst Press, Kirkus Reviews, and Crime Reads.


Twitter Username: richardzsantos

Website: http://www.richardzsantos.com/
Friday, March 25, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F127.

Admit It, You're Writing a Poem: Ars Poetica & the Awkward Confession

(, , , , )

An ars poetica is a poem about poetry, one that makes an argument about what poetry should be or that explores why we write. In writing an ars poetica, though, poets must also confess to craft, artifice, and intention—to this strange thing we're doing, making art out of life. What else comes out when we pull back the curtain on our own making? What does this form give us permission to say? Panelists will read and discuss both their own work and key examples by others; audience Q&A will follow.

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Chloe Martinez is the author of two collections, Ten Thousand Selves and Corner Shrine, winner of the Backbone Press Chapbook Prize. She works at Claremont McKenna College, where she is staff at the Center for Writing & Public Discourse and lecturer in religious studies.


Twitter Username: chloepoet

Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach is a poet and author of The Many Names for Mother (Wick Poetry Prize), Don't Touch the Bones, and 40 Weeks. She is the Murphy Visiting Fellow in Poetry at Hendrix College in Arkansas.


Twitter Username: jkdpoetry

Diamond Forde is a Tin House and Callaloo fellow whose work has appeared in Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, the Offing, and more. She is a recipient of the Margaret Walker prize and a finalist for the GA Poetry Prize, and her debut book, Mother Body, was published recently.


Twitter Username: PoemsandCake

Rachel Zucker is the author of ten books, including SoundMachine, MOTHERs, and Museum of Accidents, which was a finalist for the NBCC Award. An adjunct at NYU, Zucker is the host of the podcast Commonplace.


Twitter Username: rachzuck

Website: www.rachelzucker.net

Matthew Olzmann is the author of three collections of poems: Constellation Route, Mezzanines, and Contradictions in the Design. He teaches at Dartmouth College and in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T192.

Her/Story: Appropriately Hers in Literature Featuring Young Characters

(, , , , Ellen Hagan)

This panel—comprised of diverse female writers and academics—explores the narratives and counternarratives intrinsic to the self: LGBTQIA+, the Latinx and Caribbean American voice, Black, Caucasian, and biracial. We depart from the idea that it is imperative for authors to employ their culture and gender of origin. Sometimes characters from different backgrounds inhabit our work. This raises questions: Are we entitled to do this? Is a sensitivity reader sufficient? Is this acceptable—or not?

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Pamela L. Laskin teaches graduate children's writing and directs the Poetry Outreach Center at the City College. She is the 2019 winner of the Leapfrog International Fiction contest for Why No Bhine. Atmosphere Press will soon be publishing The Lost Language of Crazy, a book about mental illness.


Twitter Username: RonitandJamil

Suzanne Weyn is best known for her award-winning Bar Code Tattoo trilogy and her eco thriller, Empty. She teaches writing and children's literature at the City University of New York. Her comedic middle grade novel, Snapstreak, came out in 2018. Find her at suzanneweynbooks.com.


Twitter Username: SuzanneWeyn

Website: suzanneweynbooks.com

DuEwa Frazier is a Brooklyn-born poet, educator, author, and speaker. She received the 2021 Voices of Color Writing Fellowship from MVICW. Her stories for young readers include Alice's Musical Debut, Quincy Rules, and Deanne in the Middle. She earned an MFA in creative writing at The New School.


Twitter Username: DuEwaFrazier1

Website: www.duewaworld.com

JP Howard's debut collection Say/Mirror was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. JP’s poetry is widely anthologized. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Lambda Literary, and VONA/Voices. JP curates Women Writers in Bloom Poetry Salon.


Twitter Username: JPHoward_poet

Website: http://www.jp-howard.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

S179.

Rethinking Creative-Writing Workshop Feedback in the 21st Century

(, , , , )

This panel examines modes of feedback as a genre that necessitates critique in light of implicit pedagogical traditions and biases that dehumanize the writing workshop. We will discuss how to collaboratively unpack power dynamics and cultural assumptions to build equitable, inclusive workshops. We will discuss different forms and levels of workshops, drawing upon a range of techniques and perspectives from small colleges to HBCUs to large state universities and points in between.

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Jameelah Lang is an assistant professor at Rockhurst University. Her work appears in the Kenyon Review, Cincinnati Review, Pleiades, and more. She has received awards from Bread Loaf, Sewanee Writers Conference, VCCA, and HUB-BUB. She's a board member for Radius of Arab American Writers.

Barney T. Haney teaches English at the University of Indianapolis, where he is chair of the Kellogg Writers Series. Winner of the Chris O'Malley Fiction Prize, he has work appearing in or forthcoming from Mid-American Review, Marathon Literary Review, and Barely South Review, among others.

Shonda Buchanan, author of Black Indian and a journalist for over twenty-five years, is an award-winning poet and educator teaching at Loyola Marymount University. She's working on a second memoir, two novels and a fourth book of poetry: https://www.amazon.com/Black-Indian-Made-Michigan-Writers/dp/0814345808.


Twitter Username: shondabuchanan

Website: shondabuchanan.com

Alexandra Kleeman is the author of You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine, Intimations, and the novel Something New Under the Sun and an assistant professor at the New School. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, the Paris Review, n+1, Harper's, the New York Times Magazine, and Conjunctions.


Twitter Username: alexkleeman

Website: http://www.alexandrakleeman.com

Christopher Coake is the author of the novel You Came Back and the story collection We're in Trouble, for which he won the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship. In 2006 he was named a Best Young American Novelist by Granta. He teaches and directs the MFA program at the University of Nevada, Reno.

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S221.

Exorcising Your Demons: Mental Illness in YA & New Adult Literature

(, , , K. Ibura)

Mental Illness has young people going to extreme lengths to stay afloat. The isolation post-COVID has presented new challenges for this audience (and their families) struggling for acceptance amid increased alcoholism, divorce, family rejection, voices in their heads, and larger judgmental voices in the world. Our group of diverse gendered panelists of different ages, ethnicities, and orientations, will explore these challenges and how the act of writing has enabled us to exorcise our demons.

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Pamela L. Laskin teaches graduate children's writing and directs the Poetry Outreach Center at the City College. She is the 2019 winner of the Leapfrog International Fiction contest for Why No Bhine. Atmosphere Press will soon be publishing The Lost Language of Crazy, a book about mental illness.


Twitter Username: RonitandJamil

Suzanne Weyn is best known for her award-winning Bar Code Tattoo trilogy and her eco thriller, Empty. She teaches writing and children's literature at the City University of New York. Her comedic middle grade novel, Snapstreak, came out in 2018. Find her at suzanneweynbooks.com.


Twitter Username: SuzanneWeyn

Website: suzanneweynbooks.com

Hiram Lorenzen is a graduate student in the City College of New York's creative writing program. He focuses on queer-positive narratives, trauma, and remarkable resilience.

6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S239.

Arab American Caucus

(, , , , )

This will be a town-hall-style meeting, creating a much needed space for SWANA writers to build and connect within AWP. We invite established and emerging writers, editors, students, scholars, and organizers and aim for the caucus to facilitate networking and exchange on Arab American literary endeavors, craft, publishing, poetics, and praxis. Our caucus seeks to empower and center the voices of underrepresented Americans with roots in the Arab world.

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Jameelah Lang is an assistant professor at Rockhurst University. Her work appears in the Kenyon Review, Cincinnati Review, Pleiades, and more. She has received awards from Bread Loaf, Sewanee Writers Conference, VCCA, and HUB-BUB. She's a board member for Radius of Arab American Writers.

Glenn Shaheen is the author of four books, most recently, the fiction collection Carnivalia. He teaches at Prairie View A&M University and is the executive dIrector of the Radius of Arab American Writers.


Twitter Username: glennshaheen

Aiya Sakr is completing an MFA in poetry at Purdue University, where she serves as poetry editor for the Sycamore Review. She has a master’s degree in literature and writing from Utah State University. Her poems have appeared in Palette Poetry and Mizna.


Twitter Username: aiyaness

George Abraham is a Palestinian American poet. His debut Birthright (Button Poetry, 2020) won the Arab American Book Award, and he was a Lambda Literary Award nominee. He is a Kundiman fellow, a board member for the Radius of Arab American Writers, and a Litowitz MFA+MA candidate at Northwestern.


Twitter Username: IntifadaBatata

Angie Mazakis is a PhD student in creative writing at Ohio University. Her first book of poetry, I Was Waiting to See What You Would Do First, was chosen by Billy Collins as a finalist for the Miller Williams Poetry Prize. She is a former staff member of AWP and is a member of RAWI.


Twitter Username: angiekm111

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

S153.

Not a License for Inaccuracy: Artistic Liberties & Truth in Historical Fiction

(, , , , )

Philippa Gregory's controversial historical fiction is igniting passionate conversation about the fine line between erasing facts and taking artistic liberties. This panel will discuss how to craft historical narratives that captivate readers without sacrificing accuracy, especially about groups of people who are often misunderstood. With wisdom from academia, publishing, and play- and novel-writing, we will discuss how to combine vivid characters and intriguing plots with reality and solid research.

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Ryan Neighbors is a lecturer at Texas A&M University where he teaches writing, literature, and film courses. His research interests include indigenous studies, historical fiction, and the South. His writing has appeared in Tampa Review, Stoneboat Literary Journal, and Barely South Review.


Twitter Username: rcneighbors

Colin Mustful is the founder and editor of History Through Fiction. He is the author of four historical novels about the settlement and Native history of the Upper Midwest. His books combine elements of fiction and nonfiction to tell compelling and educational stories.


Twitter Username: colinmustful

Sandra Warren has publications in multiple genres, including two award-winning historical fiction novels, We Bought A WWII Bomber and Obsessed By A Promise. Contact her at www.sandrawarren.com.


Twitter Username: SandraWarrenNC

Website: www.sandrawarren.com

Richelle Lee Slota writes novels, nonfiction, plays, and poetry. Her historical novel, Stray Son, set in 1942 America, and a nonfiction book, Captive Market: Commercial Kidnapping Stories from Nigeria, were published recently. Until recently, her pen name has been Richard Slota.

Zara Miller is a contributor to the worldwide online platform the Teen Magazine and one of the Creator Institute´s published authors. A vivacious blogger, book reviewer, and social media enthusiast, Miller's young adult novel I Am Cecilia was created to inspire youngsters to dream big and bold.

Friday, March 25, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Virtual

F215.

Writing the Wound: How to Write Trauma Ethically

(, , , , )

Our wounds are the openings to our deepest selves. The craving for connection in these soft and tender places and the instinct to seek out witnesses to our scars are universal. But how can we ensure we are writing toward healing, rather than retraumatization? And how do we write ethically about those who have hurt us? Panelists working in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and graphic storytelling will discuss their personal experiences and best practice principals for writing trauma ethically.

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Aubrey Hirsch is the author of Why We Never Talk About Sugar. Her stories, essays, and comics have appeared in American Short Fiction, the New York Times, Vox, the Nib, Black Warrior Review, the Florida Review, Gay Magazine, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: aubreyhirsch

Website: www.aubreyhirsch.com

Roxane Gay is the author of An Untamed State, Bad Feminist, Difficult Women, and Hunger. She has work in Best American Mystery Stories 2014, Best American Short Stories 2012, Oxford American, Virginia Quarterly Review, and others. She is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.


Twitter Username: rgay

Sumita Chakraborty is a poet, essayist, and scholar. She is Helen Zell Visiting Professor in Poetry at the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, and she is the author of the poetry collection Arrow, published in the US by Alice James Books and in the UK by Carcanet Press in 2020.


Twitter Username: notsumatra

Saeed Jones is the author of the memoir How We Fight for Our Lives, winner of the 2019 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction. He is also the author of the poetry collection Prelude to Bruise, a finalist for the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award.


Twitter Username: theferocity

Website: https://www.readsaeedjones.com/

Maggie Smith is the author of five books, including Goldenrod, Good Bones, and the national bestseller Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change. Her poems and essays have appeared in the New Yorker, the Paris Review, the New York Times, Tin House, and The Best American Poetry.


Twitter Username: maggiesmithpoet

Website: www.maggiesmithpoet.com

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F147B.

"If I Speak for the Dead": Jewish Poems of Ancestry

(, , , Elvira Basevich, )

A growing body of contemporary Jewish poetry imagines its way into the worlds of our recent ancestors, whether literal, literary, or in spirit. What are the challenges of writing to investigate or recover these lineages through layers of diaspora and receded languages? What are the possibilities? Each poet will read their own poems and speak to their writing process and related craft considerations.

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Dan Alter’s poems and reviews have been published in journals including Field, Fourteen Hills, PANK, and ZYZZYVA; his first collection My Little Book of Exiles is forthcoming. He works as an IBEW electrician.


Twitter Username: arlozorof

Website: https://danalter.net

Daniel Khalastchi is an Iraqi Jewish American. He is the author of three books, including American Parables, winner of the Brittingham Prize in Poetry. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, a former fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and a founding editor of Rescue Press.

Jennifer Kronovet is the author of two books of poetry, The Wug Test, which was selected for the National Poetry Series, and Awayward. She cotranslated Empty Chairs, poems by Chinese writer Liu Xia, and The Acrobat, poems by Yiddish writer Celia Dropkin. She is the editor of Circumference Books.


Twitter Username: jennykr

Gail Newman, child of Holocaust survivors, was born after WW II in a displaced persons camp. Her new collection, Blood Memory, chosen by Marge Piercy for The Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize, was published in 2020. The book won the NCPA Gold Award for Poetry. Gail teaches genocide poetry for educators and students.

Saturday, March 26, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S160.

Pretending to Write About the Future: Speculative Fiction as a Lens on the Now

(, , , , )

“Science fiction is a great way to pretend you are writing about the future when in reality you are attacking the recent past and the present.” As Ray Bradbury suggests in this quote, many readers and writers turn to speculative fiction not to wonder about what might happen so much as to think about what’s already happening. Five writers and editors will share their experiences working with sci-fi that, rather than being an escape, serves as an engagement or confrontation with the present.

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David Ebenbach is the author of eight books of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, including the novel How to Mars. He teaches creative writing and literature at Georgetown University and is a project manager at Georgetown’s teaching center, the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship.


Twitter Username: debenbach

Website: www.davidebenbach.com

Elly Bangs is a Seattle-based science fiction and fantasy author. Her recently released debut novel, Unity, explores the human condition and contemporary global issues through an explosion-rich, post-apocalyptic cyberpunk lens.


Twitter Username: elly_bangs

Jaymee Goh writes, reviews, and edits speculative fiction. Her work has been published in Science Fiction Studies, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy. She is a graduate from the Clarion Workshop and works for Tachyon Publications.


Twitter Username: jhameia

Rone Shavers is author of the experimental Afrofuturist novel Silverfish, recently shortlisted for a CLMP Firecracker Award. His writing has appeared in Big Other, Black Warrior Review, and Bomb. He is also a fiction editor at Obsidian: Literature and Arts in the African Diaspora.

Sheree Renée Thomas is the editor of the two-time World Fantasy Award-winning Dark Matter anthologies, author of Nine Bar Blues: Stories from an Ancient Future, Sleeping Under the Tree of Life, and is the associate editor of Obsidian and the editor of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction.


Twitter Username: blackpotmojo

Website: https://www.shereereneethomas.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F197.

Writer & Righter of Wrongs: One Hundred Years of Influence through Sol Plaatje’s Mhudi

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Writer and activist Sol Plaatje was more than just the first Black African to write a novel in English. His female-centric allegory, concerned with injustice and land dispossession, maintains relevancy in academic discussion, essay, and course curricula. Reading from his life and work, highlighting his political as well as his literary importance, panelists will examine how Plaatje explored issues of race, culture, gender, and language to make a lasting impact and remain influential today.

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Sabata-mpho Mokae is the author of the Setswana (southern African language) novels Ga ke Modisa and Moletlo wa Manong. He is the winner of the South African MNET Literary Award for Best Setswana Novel and MNET Film Award. He teaches creative writing at Sol Plaatje University in Kimberley, South Africa.


Twitter Username: mokaewriter

Lesego Malepe taught at a college for many years before retiring and turning to writing full-time. She writes both fiction and nonfiction about South Africa and has contributed a chapter on land issues in a recently published collection of essays on Mhudi.

Brian Willan is a historian and former publisher, currently Extraordinary Professor at Sol Plaatje University in Kimberley, South Africa. He has written a biography of Sol Plaatje and coedited several books books about him, including Sol Plaatje's Mhudi and Sol Plaatje: A Life in Letters.


Twitter Username: brianwillan

MarLa Sink Druzgal is the director of WriteChange.org—a nonprofit organization in global coordination with The Writers Project of Ghana and Sol Plaatje University (SPU) of South Africa. Ms. Druzgal teaches in the US and South Africa, where she is working with SPU on an MA travel writing program.


Twitter Username: travelingmarla

Website: http://www.marlasinkdruzgal.com

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F146.

Rest as an Act of Activism

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Exploring a pedagogy of showing up, not just for our students and colleagues, but for ourselves. How do we find moments to rest while setting boundaries, finding and sharing resources of rest, and embracing the power of moving back? We will look at ways to restore and repair in a time when faculty (especially those with marginalized identities) are asked to do unrecognized and uncompensated work for social justice and campus equity.

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Rachel M. Simon is the author of the poetry collections Theory of Orange and Marginal Road. She works in diversity, equity, and inclusion at Pace University. She has taught at Bedford Hills Women's Prison and as the director of the Social Justice Collective at Sarah Lawrence College.

Olivia Worden is a multigenre writer who has taught creative writing at Pace University and Sarah Lawrence College. Her essay “Held by Strangers” was selected for Pigeon Pages 2019 Essay Contest and for Best of the Net 2020. Her work has appeared in Post Road, CutBank, and Pilgrimage.

Melissa Faliveno is the author of the essay collection Tomboyland, named a best book of 2020 by NPR, New York Public Library, and O, the Oprah Magazine. She was the 2020–21 Kenan Visiting Writer at University of North Carolina and is currently a visiting assistant professor of English at Kenyon College.


Twitter Username: melissafaliveno

Jimin Han is the author of A Small Revolution and an as-yet-untitled forthcoming novel. She teaches or has taught at the Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College and Pace University.


Twitter Username: jiminhanwriter

Website: jiminhan.net

Juan J. Morales is the author of three poetry collections including The Handyman's Guide to End Times. He is a CantoMundo Fellow, the editor of Pilgrimage Magazine, an associate dean in the College of Humanities Arts & Social Sciences, and a Professor of English at Colorado State University Pueblo.


Twitter Username: moralesjuanj

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

F244.

Call Me by My Name: Poetry of Black Womanhood & the Erotic

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Audre Lorde declared without hesitation that the erotic is power. When that force is an expression of Black feminine sexuality, it can be an act of resistance and liberation. What gives us pleasure? How do we write about that pleasure from a place of joy that welcomes vulnerability? To name a thing is to address but also affirm it. When the erotic energy of Black womanhood is allowed to name itself, pleasure becomes unconfined and writing that pleasure, limitless.

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Katy Richey’s work has appeared in Rattle, Cincinnati Review, RHINO, and The Offing. She received an honorable mention for the 2015 Cave Canem Poetry Prize and has received fellowships from Fine Arts Work Center, Maryland State Arts Council, and The Cave Canem Foundation.

Tafisha A. Edwards is the author of two chapbooks: In the Belly of the Mirror and The Bloodlet. She is poetry editor at Gigantic Sequins, and she has published work in the Georgia Review, Poetry Northwest, Washington Square Review, Apogee Journal, Sundress Publications’ Lyric Essentials series, and elsewhere.

Saida Agostini is a queer Afro-Guyanese poet and activist. A Cave Canem graduate fellow, her work is featured or forthcoming in Origins, Drunk in the Midnight Choir, the Black Ladies Brunch Collective's anthology Not Without Our Laughter, pluck!, the Little Patuxent Review, and other publications.


Twitter Username: saidaagostini

Teri Ellen Cross Davis is the author of a more perfect Union, 2019 Journal/ Charles B. Wheeler Poetry Prize winner, and Haint, a 2017 Ohioana Poetry Book award winner. She's a Cave Canem fellow, a Black Ladies Brunch Collective member, and poetry coordinator for the Folger Shakespeare Library in D.C.


Twitter Username: cross_davis
Saturday, March 26, 2022

5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Virtual

S235.

Breakthrough Nonfiction Forms

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Forms do more than contain: they exclude. They break down. They free. When forms disrupt expectations, they can shatter paradigms. This panel joins five essayists in conversation about how structures we reconstruct expand access, inquiry, and dialogue. They will discuss how new nonfiction forms can be used to increase intimacy, forge inroads into others’ experiences, address global crises that defy traditional structures, and reframe a more comprehensive social context.

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Ira Sukrungruang is the author of the nonfiction books This Jade World, Buddha’s Dog & other Meditations, Southside Buddhist, and Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy.The Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College, he is the editor of Sweet: A Literary Confection.


Twitter Username: sukrungruang

Website: www,sukrungruang.com

Rebecca McClanahan’s eleventh book is In the Key of New York City. Her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, and the Pushcart Prize series. Recipient of the Glasgow Award in nonfiction, she teaches in the MFA programs of Rainier Writing Workshop and Queens University.

Eric LeMay teaches in the writing program at Ohio University. He serves as an editor for Alimentum and New Ohio Review and is a host on the New Books Network. He is the author of three books, including In Praise of Nothing, a collection of traditional and multimedia essays. Find him at www.ericlemay.org.


Twitter Username: eclemay

Website: www.ericlemay.org

Jericho Parms is the author of Lost Wax. Her work has appeared in The Normal School, Hotel Amerika, American Literary Review, and Brevity. She holds an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts and is a consulting editor at Fourth Genre.

Amy Wright is the author of Paper Concert: A Conversation in the Round, as well as three poetry books. She is senior editor of Zone 3 and the 2022 Wayne G. Basler Chair of Excellence at East Tennessee State University.


Twitter Username: amymwright

Website: www.awrightawright.com

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S216.

Craft Lessons from the Submission Queue: Writing & Editing Short Fiction

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Many lit mag editors participate on both sides of the submission process: reading unsolicited stories and sending out their own for consideration. What do editors learn about writing from reading and editing submissions? How does evaluating, accepting, and declining stories change the work of drafting new short fiction? This panel dives into the editorial selection process on a craft level, with editors from American Short Fiction, Apogee, The Common, The Offing, and One Story.

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Emily Everett is managing editor of the Common magazine. Her short fiction appears in the Kenyon Review, Tin House online, Electric Lit, Mississippi Review, and other publications. She studied literature at Smith College, University College London, and Queen Mary University of London.


Twitter Username: Public_Emily

Alex Watson is a fiction writer and poet from Syracuse, New York currently based in Newburgh, New York. She writes about mixed race identity, class, mental illness, and addiction. She’s the executive editor of Apogee Journal, and a lecturer in Barnard College's First-Year Writing Program.


Twitter Username: watsonlexis

Lena Valencia is the managing editor of One Story and teaches writing at the Sackett Street Writers Workshop and Catapult. She has held positions at A Public Space and BOMB Magazine. She has an MFA in fiction from The New School and is the recipient of an Elizabeth George Foundation grant.


Twitter Username: lenavee

Adeena Reitberger is the editor and codirector of American Short Fiction. Her stories and essays have been published in FenceBlack Warrior ReviewMississippi ReviewCimarron ReviewNimrod International, and Sierra Nevada Review.


Twitter Username: AdeenaR

Mimi Wong is editor in chief of The Offing. Her work has appeared in The Believer, Catapult, Electric Literature, Hyperallergic, Literary Hub and Refinery29. Her fiction has been published in Cicada, Crab Orchard Review, Day One, Joyland, and Wildness. She teaches writing at The New School.


Twitter Username: whoismims

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S162.

The Poet’s Voice: Conversations with the Archive

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Poetry Centered, a new podcast from the University of Arizona Poetry Center, invites poets to curate selections from Voca, the center’s online audiovisual archive of 1,000+ recorded readings from 1963 to today. In each episode, new constellations of meaning emerge, coalescing as intergenerational conversations across time and space. The producers and three poets who have hosted episodes will reflect on voices they encountered in the archive and how this experience shaped their present thinking.

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Diana Marie Delgado is the author of the poetry collection Tracing the Horse. She graduated with a master of fine arts in poetry from Columbia University and is the literary director at the University of Arizona Poetry Center.


Twitter Username: pompomrituals

Website: http://flavors.me/dianamarie

Julie Swarstad Johnson is a poet and the archivist and outreach librarian for the University of Arizona Poetry Center. She is the author of the poetry collection Pennsylvania Furnace and the chapbook Orchard Light. She is the coeditor of the anthology Beyond Earth's Edge: The Poetry of Spaceflight.

Allison Adelle Hedge Coke (2021 George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature winner)'s books include Look at This BlueBurnStreamingBlood Run, and Effigies III. Distinguished professor at UC Riverside, she teaches in creative writing and the School of Medicine, directs UCR Writers Week, Lit Sandhill CraneFest, and Along the Chaparral.


Twitter Username: AAHedgeCoke

Website: www.allisonhedgecoke.com

Francisco Aragón is the author of Puerta del Sol, and Glow of Our Sweat. He is also the editor of the award-winning anthology, The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry. A third book, After Rubén, is forthcoming. He directs Letras Latinas, the literary program at Notre Dame's Institute for Latino Studies.


Twitter Username: fjaragon1965

Website: http://franciscoaragon.net

Urayoán Noel is an associate professor of English and Spanish at NYU and also teaches at Stetson University's MFA of the Americas. Noel's books include Buzzing Hemisphere/Rumor Hemisférico and Transversal.


Twitter Username: urayoannoel

1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Virtual

S202.

Playwriting & Beyond: Playwrights Discuss Moving into Writing Different Forms

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Between COVID and the shuttering of theaters, low-paying playwriting commissions, and the proliferation of writers needed for online television and performance, many playwrights are venturing into other areas of writing beyond the proscenium. Hear from some of the top writers in our field about how they made the shift into other forms, how their playwriting skills helped/hurt their writing in these forms, and what to do if you are interested in working in areas outside the theater.

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Jacqueline Goldfinger is an award-winning playwright and librettist who seeks out unique collaborations, working across disciplines to create singular works of theatre and opera. Awards include: Yale Prize, OA Discovery Grant, and Smith Prize. Published by Routledge. www.jacquelinegoldfinger.com

Dan O’Brien is a playwright, poet, essayist, and librettist whose recognitions includes a Guggenheim Fellowship in Drama and two PEN America Awards. His fourth poetry collection, Our Cancers, and a collection of his essays on playwriting, A Story That Happens, were published in 2021.


Twitter Username: danobrienwriter

Website: www.danobrien.org

Charise Castro Smith is a writer, producer, director, and actor. Playwrighting credits include El huracán (Yale Rep) and Feathers and Teeth (Goodman Theatre). Film/television credits include The Haunting of Hill House (Netflix), Sweetbitter (Starz), and Encanto (Walt Disney Animation Studios).

Beth Kander is an author, playwright, and educator. The granddaughter of immigrants, she writes stories that explore worlds old and new. Honors include Henry Awards, Getchell, PitchWars, Indie Forward, etc. She is the resident playwright at Ashland New Plays Festival and is represented by Allison Hellegers/Stimola. www.bethkander.com


Twitter Username: ByBethKander
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

T159.

Asian Diasporic Poets Writing into Mythology

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Each of the poets on this panel uses mythology as a centering device in their own writing. Each poet will begin by reading one or two poems. We will then explore questions such as: What is the mythic? What is the value of writing through and alongside mythology for Asian diasporic poets? How can poetic myth and mythmaking serve as productive scaffolding and sites of new narrative possibilities? How does myth allow poets to access intergenerational, cultural, and communal discourses?

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Jasmine An is the author of two chapbooks of poetry: Naming the No-Name Woman and Monkey Was Here. She has been awarded residencies at Hedgebrook and Willapa Bay AiR. Poetry editor for Agape Editions, she is pursuing a PhD in women’s studies and English at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: JasmineAn

Maria Isabelle Carlos is a writer from Missouri. A graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill and the MFA program at Vanderbilt University, she is the assistant nonfiction editor of Zone 3 Press and the editor of Inch, a quarterly series of microchapbooks from Bull City Press. Read more at www.mariaisabellecarlos.com

Lo Kwa Mei-en is the author of Yearling and The Bees Make Money in the Lion. She works in Cincinnati, Ohio.


Twitter Username: loekwa

Website: www.lokwameien.com

Nandini Dhar is a bilingual poet who writes in English and her native language, Bangla. She is the author of three books, one in English, and two in Bangla—Historians of Redundant Moments), Jitakshara), and Ma-Rupak Khelchhi Na.

Carlina Duan is the author of Alien Miss and I Wore My Blackest Hair. She received her MFA in poetry from Vanderbilt University and she is currently a PhD student in the Joint Program in English and Education at the University of Michigan.


Twitter Username: ccduan

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T120.

Poetry & Place: Connecting Who We Are to Where We Are

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Poems of place not only describe and document locations: they reveal how we internalize place and how it impacts our lives. It can be said that where we are is who we are. Whether we are Indigenous, lifelong residents, recent transplants, or just passing through, places change us, and we in turn change them. US poets representing Alaska, Hawai‘i, the Mojave Desert, northern California, and the East Coast will read and discuss poems showing relationship to place, including cities and wilderness.

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Lucille Lang Day is the award-winning author of eleven poetry collections, including Birds of San Pancho; two children’s books; and a memoir. A coeditor of two poetry anthologies, Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California and Red Indian Road West, she is the founder and publisher of Scarlet Tanager Books.


Twitter Username: LucilleLDay

Website: https://lucillelangday.com

Anne Coray’s novel Lost Mountain is a love story inspired by the Pebble Mine project. Author of three poetry collections, her work has appeared in North American Review, Kestrel, Poetry, and AQR. She has received fellowships from the Alaska State Council on the Arts and the Rasmuson Foundation.

Ruth Nolan, MFA, MA, is the author of Ruby Mountain (poems), editor of No Place for a Puritan: The Literature of CA's Deserts, and coeditor of Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of CA. She is professor of English, creative writing, and Native American literature at College of the Desert, Palm Desert, California.


Twitter Username: ruthnolan

Eric Paul Shaffer is author of seven poetry volumes, including Even Further West; A Million-Dollar Bill; Lāhaina Noon; and Portable Planet. He received Hawai‘i’s 2002 Elliot Cades Award for Literature and two Ka Palapala Po‘okela Book Awards. He is a professor at Honolulu Community College.

Ron Welburn (Accomac Cherokee) grew up in Philadelphia and is an emeritus English professor at University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he costarted the Native Studies program. His poems have appeared in over 125 literary outlets, and his seventh poetry book is Council Decisions: Selected Poems, Expanded Edition.

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

T184.

L’Chaim! Celebrating Jewish Poetry in the Third Millennium

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What is a "Jewish poem"? Come find out as we read from 101 Jewish Poems for the Third Millennium, a new anthology, featuring voices that range from emerging to established, both Jewish and non-Jewish, as well as several translations. The themes range from observing Jewish traditions to more modern ones, such as same-sex marriage and nonfaith. With the rise in anti-Semitism and other hate crimes in this country, it is more important now than ever before to celebrate diversity.

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M.E. Silverman founded Blue Lyra Review. His books include The Floating Door andThe Breath before Birds Fly. He edited three anthologies including Bloomsbury’s Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry, The Plume Anthology of Longish Poems, and one on the Holocaust.


Twitter Username: 4ME2Silver

Website: http://mesilverman.com

Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored twelve titles, including eight translations. A BTBA and CLMP finalist, she is a recipient of two grants from the NEA and one from the Maryland Arts Council and was decorated with the French Academic Palms. An Infusion of Violets was named "new & noteworthy" by the New York Times.

Ilya Kaminsky was born in Odessa, Ukraine, and currently lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

Joy Ladin is the author of nine books of poetry, including newly reissued The Book of Anna, Lambda Literary Award finalists Transmigration and Impersonation, a memoir, National Jewish Book Award finalist Through the Door of Life, and Triangle Award finalist The Soul of the Stranger.


Twitter Username: joyladin

Website: joyladin.com

Zilka Joseph is the author of five books. She has been nominated for Pushcart and PEN awards and was a finalist for the Foreword Indies Book Award. In Our Beautiful Bones is her newest book. Her work is influenced by Indian/Eastern and Western cultures and her Bene Israel roots. www.zilkajoseph.com

Friday, March 25, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F115.

Reverberation: The Book Review as Literary (Labor) Labor

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Reviewers, both traditional and graphic, consider literary labor in relation to other labors and reviewing as an act of literary citizenship. Within the Republic of Letters, they will discuss the review’s power to amplify voices and challenge dominate narratives. They explore the cerebral joy of reading a book, considering it deeply, and constructing an argument about it. As editors, teachers, activists, they end by sharing ideas for encouraging the next generation of reviewers.

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Marcela Sulak has authored three poetry collections and the memoir Mouth Full of Seeds. She coedited Family Resemblance, a hybrid anthology, and her five poetry translations have received an NEA Fellowship and a PEN Award nomination. She edits the Ilanot Review and hosts the podcast Israel in Translation.

Octavio Quintanilla is an associate professor of literature and creative writing at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, Texas. He is the author of the poetry collection If I Go Missing. Instagram: @writeroctavioquintanilla


Twitter Username: OctQuintanilla

Chanda Feldman is the author of Approaching the Fields: Poems. She is a Cave Canem Fellow and has received a NEA Fellowship for Poetry and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. She holds an MFA from Cornell University. Chanda teaches creative writing at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: chanda_feldman

Website: www.chandafeldman.com

Anna V. Q. Ross is a Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow in poetry and the author of the collections If a Storm, Figuring, and Hawk Weather. Her work appears in The Nation, The Southern Review, and Harvard Review. She teaches at Emerson College and hosts Unearthed Song & Poetry.


Twitter Username: annavqross

Website: annavqross.com

Martha Silano is the author of five books of poetry, including Gravity Assist, Reckless Lovely, and The Little Office of the Immaculate Conception. She also coauthored, with Kelli Russell Agodon, The Daily Poet: Day-by-Day Prompts for Your Writing Practice. She teaches at Bellevue College.


Twitter Username: marthasilano

Website: marthasilano.net
Thursday, March 24, 2022

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T195.

AAWW at AWP: Stories in Solidarity for Asian Artists

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Piyali Bhattacharya, Mira Jacob, Nayomi Munaweera, and Jafreen Uddin ask each other: why is it often difficult to build writing coalitions of color? What does it mean to build artistic community among Asian women, and why are these spaces so often riddled with drama? Is the root of the problem internalized racial oppression? That white supremacy tells us "there can only be one?" If so, what can we do in our writing communities to address this elephant in the room when or even before it comes up?

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Jafreen Uddin is the executive director of the Asian American Writers' Workshop. She is the first woman to lead the organization since its founding in 1991. With over a decade of experience working in the public sector, she specializes in communications, education, and fundraising.


Twitter Username: jafreenmu

Piyali Bhattacharya is editor of the collection Good Girls Marry Doctors. Her short stories and essays have appeared in Ploughshares and the New York Times. Her novel-in-progress has been supported by Hedgebrook and VCCA. She is artist-in-residence at UPenn, where she teaches fiction and nonfiction.


Twitter Username: sari_torial_ink

Website: www.piyalibhattacharya.com

Mira Jacob is the author and illustrator of Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations. Her critically acclaimed novel The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing was a Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers pick and was shortlisted for India’s Tata First Literature Award.


Twitter Username: mirajacob

Website: mirajacob.com

Nayomi Munaweera's debut novel, Island of a Thousand Mirrors, won the 2013 Commonwealth Prize for Asia. The New York Times called it "incandescent." Her second novel, What Lies Between Us, drew comparisons to the voices of Michael Ondatjee and Jumpha Lahiri.

Friday, March 25, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F166.

Emotional Pacing in the Trauma Narrative

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Trauma memoirs require careful emotional pacing, which means modulating the presentation of emotionally charged material. Emotional pacing involves decisions about which events to include, how to withhold or present details, and how to sequence events, often using narrative techniques to manipulate the distance between the narrator and events. In this panel, four memoirist offer strategies for guiding the reader’s experience in memoirs of near death, family secrets, and other difficult stories.

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Aggie Stewart is a Rhode Island-based writer and a fourth semester student in the Newport MFA program at Salve University. Her MFA focus is creative nonfiction. She is currently writing a memoir about growing up in the shadow of her mother’s sister’s murder, a closely guarded family secret.

Grace Talusan is the Fannie Hurst Writer in Residence at Brandeis University, and her memoir, The Body Papers, won the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing and Massachusetts Book Award in Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: gracet09

Katherine E. Standefer is the author of Lightning Flowers: My Journey to Uncover the Cost of Saving a Life, which was a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice/Staff Pick. Her writing appeared in Best American Essays 2016. She teaches at Ashland University's low-res MFA and works as a trauma writing doula.


Twitter Username: girlmakesfire

Alden Jones is the author of the books The Wanting Was a Wilderness, Unaccompanied Minors, and The Blind Masseuse. Her fiction and essays have appeared in BOMB, the Rumpus, the Cut, AGNI, and Best American Travel Writing. She teaches at Emerson College and the Newport MFA program.


Twitter Username: aldenejones

Website: aldenjones.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T149.

Writing Young Protagonists: YA or A & Who Decides?

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Why do we write young protagonists? Are coming-of-age stories YA? What happens when our young protagonist is defined as YA contrary to our intentions? What craft choices do we make when we intend to write YA? Panelists discuss when writer intentions and reader perceptions coincide and when they diverge with respect to writing young protagonists. They share the changes they did or didn’t make in the writing, revising, and marketing of their work to satisfy their own intentions and perceptions.

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Donna Miscolta is the author of three books of fiction. Living Color: Angie Rubio Stories (2020) is her latest. Her work reflects her Filipino and Mexican heritage. Recent essays appear in Poetry Northwest and The Museum of Americana. She recently retired as a project manager in local government.


Twitter Username: donnamiscolta

Website: donnamiscolta.com

Leslie Pietrzyk is the author of Admit This to No One, Silver Girl, and This Angel on My Chest, a collection of short stories that won the Drue Heinz Literature Prize. She teaches fiction at the Converse College low-residency MFA program.


Twitter Username: lesliepwriter

Website: www.workinprogressinprogress.com

Jessica Barksdale’s second poetry collection, Grim Honey, and her fifteenth novel, The Play’s the Thing, were both published in 2021. She teaches novel writing for UCLA EX and in the MFA program at SNHU.


Twitter Username: jessicainclan

Website: https://www.jessicbarksdaleinclan.com

Lan Samantha Chang is the author of The Family Chao, Inheritance, All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost, and Hunger: A Novella and Stories. The recipient of a 2021 Berlin Prize Fellowship, she is director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Amanda Floresca is a graduate student at the University of South Carolina earning a master’s in library and information science. She has a BA in English with a concentration in creative writing and an MFA from Converse College. Her current project is a YA #OwnVoices novel.


Twitter Username: AJFloresca
Saturday, March 26, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S164.

New Directions in the American Sonnet

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The American sonnet is having a moment. This panel features scholars and poets discussing the contemporary sonnet and the ways in which today’s writers subvert, revise, and creatively destroy the sonnet as an inherited form. How, the panel asks, do poets reimagine this prescribed form to engage questions of race, class, gender, sexuality, and power in America? How do today’s sonnets negotiate constraint and agency, tradition and innovation?

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Ted Mathys is the author of Gold Cure and three previous books of poetry. The recipient of fellowships and awards from the NEA, NYFA, and Poetry Society of America, he teaches at Saint Louis University and is president of the board of Saint Louis Poetry Center.

Kazim Ali is a poet, translator, essayist, and fiction writer. His most recent books are The Voice of Sheila Chandra (poems) and a nonfiction book, Northern Light: Power, Land, and the Memory of Water. He is a professor in the literature department at the University of California, San Diego.


Twitter Username: kazimalipoet

Website: www.kazimali.com

Dora Malech is the author of four books of poetry: Flourish, Stet, Say So, and Shore Ordered Ocean. A former Amy Clampitt Fellow and Ruth Lilly Fellow, her poems have appeared in the New Yorker, Poetry, and elsewhere. She is an assistant professor in The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University.


Twitter Username: DoraMalech

Website: www.doramalech.net

John Murillo is the author of the poetry collections Up Jump the Boogie and Kontemporary Amerikan Poetry. His honors include the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award and the Four Quartets Prize. He is an assistant professor of English and the director of creative writing at Wesleyan University.

Simone Muench is the author of six poetry books including Wolf Centos and Suture (written with Dean Rader). Coeditor of the collaborative writing anthology They Said and a recipient of NEA, VSC, and Yaddo fellowships, she serves as advisor for Jet Fuel Review and poetry editor for Tupelo Quarterly.

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S220.

The Dimensional Essay: A Multiform Performance

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This reading will feature five writers who have been invited to perform their written work "dimensionally" using sound, image, objects, and other performance strategies. The goal of the dimensional essay is to provide the space and equipment for writers to engage audiences by using elements that compliment and extend the work of language. This event invites readers to question the formal conventions of a literary reading and offers writers the opportunity to stretch out, collaborate, and play.

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Sarah Minor is an interdisciplinary artist and the author of Slim Confessions, Bright Archive, and the chapbook The Persistence of the Bonyleg: Annotated. She is assistant professor of creative nonfiction at the Cleveland Institute of Art.


Twitter Username: sarahceniaminor

Douglas Kearney is a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Cy Twombly recipient, an award-winning librettist, a Howard/CalArts alum, and a Cave Canem fellow. He’s published seven books of poetry, essays, and libretti. He teaches creative writing at the University of Minnesota.

Brandon Shimoda is the author of seven books of poetry and prose. His books include The Grave on the Wall, which received the PEN Open Book Award, and Evening Oracle, which received the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America.


Twitter Username: brandonshimoda

Keith S. Wilson is an Affrilachian poet, Cave Canem fellow, graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and recipient of three Bread Loaf scholarships. He holds an MFA in poetry from Chicago State University. Keith works as a writer and game designer in Chicago.


Twitter Username: robottomulatto

Zoë Bossiere is a doctoral candidate at Ohio University, where she studies creative nonfiction and rhetoric & composition. She serves as the managing editor of Brevity: A Journal of Concise Literary Nonfiction and is a podcast host for the New Books Network. Find her at zoebossiere.com.


Twitter Username: zoebossiere

Website: zoebossiere.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

T134.

Staying in Key: Recognizing & Avoiding the False Notes of Anachronism

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Unless you’re writing in an intentionally anachronistic form, like steampunk, you probably know better than to allow your Victorian characters to refer to fax machines or the Beatles. But staying in key involves more than historical and technological accuracy—especially if you write cross-cultural fiction. This panel discusses the many hidden dimensions of anachronism and how to avoid their false notes.

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Aimee Liu is the author of the novels Glorious Boy, Flash House, Cloud Mountain, and Face. Her nonfiction includes the memoirs Gaining and Solitaire. Her bestsellers have been published in more than a dozen countries. She teaches in Goddard College's MFA program in creative writing.


Twitter Username: aimee_liu

Website: https://aimeeliu.net/

Keenan Norris is a novelist, essayist, and short story writer. His latest novel is The Confession of Copeland Cane. His short work has appeared in numerous forums, including the Los Angeles Review of Books, Los Angeles Times, and Alta. He teaches at San Jose State University.

Jennifer Steil is a novelist, memoirist, and journalist. She is the author of Exile Music, which won the Grand Prize in the Eyelands 2020 Book Awards and is a finalist for the 2021 Lambda Literary Lesbian Fiction Award; the novel The Ambassador’s Wife; and the memoir The Woman Who Fell From the Sky.


Twitter Username: jfsteil7

Website: www.jennifersteil.net

Donna Hemans is the author of two novels: River Woman and Tea by the Sea. Her fiction and essays have appeared in Slice, Crab Orchard Review, Witness, Ploughshares, and Ms. Magazine, among others. She is the owner of DC Writers Room, a coworking studio for writers, and an editor at Pree.


Twitter Username: donna_hemans

Janet Benton's novel Lilli de Jong is the diary of an unwed Quaker in 1883 Philadelphia who fights to keep her baby despite fierce prejudice. She has taught writing at five universities and in private workshops for decades and has been an editor and mentor to hundreds of writers. janetbentonauthor.com


Twitter Username: janet_benton
Saturday, March 26, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S140.

Structure as Muse: The Generative Rewards of Daily Practice & Constraint

(, , , , )

The blank page looms. What if self-imposed rules and practices could help you generate your most inspired work? This panel explores ways in which writers across genres pair daily ordinary activities (morning walks, art-making) with self-imposed writing constraints (mandated vocabulary, word limits) to unlock creative potential and create full-length books. Panelists will discuss their practices and constraints and offer tips and exercises to help audience members begin their own projects.

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Aaron Angello is a writer and theatre artist who lives in Frederick, MD. He teaches theatre and creative writing in the new MFA program at Hood College. His first book, Close Reading, is forthcoming from Rose Metal Press (2022).


Twitter Username: aaronangello

CA Conrad is the author of eight books and has received fellowships from Lannan Foundation, MacDowell Colony, Headlands, and Pew Center for the Arts. For his books and details on the documentary The Book of Conrad (Delinquent Films, 2016), please visit http://CAConrad.blogspot.com.


Twitter Username: CAConrad88

Website: http://CAConrad.blogspot.com

Julie Carr is the author of five books of poetry, most recently 100 Notes on Violence, Sarah—Of Fragments and Lines, RAG, and Think Tank. Prose books include Surface Tension: Ruptural Time and the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry and Objects from a Borrowed Confession.


Twitter Username: carrcarrjuli

Website: juliealicecarr.com

Alexis Almeida is a poet. She teaches writing at Bard College, and she is the author of several chapbooks and the translator of several books by Argentine and Chilean authors. She also edits 18 Owls Press.


Twitter Username: alexisfalmeida

J. Michael Martinez is the author of Museum of the Americas, selected for the National Poetry Series and longlisted for the National Book Award, and Heredities, winner of the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets. He is an assistant professor of poetry at San Jose State University.

Friday, March 25, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

116, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F117.

Revise & Refine: Creating an Inclusive Writing Industry from the Top Down

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In response to the Black Lives Matter protests and #publishingpaidme, many organizations promised to do better, but what does doing better look like? This panel includes book and magazine editors, a multicultural marketer, a bookshop owner, and an editorial director who will discuss the actionable steps they’ve taken to rebuild the industry. They will also explain how to tap into a broad range of storytelling traditions within our country's growing multicultural communities.

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Susette Brooks is an essayist with an MFA in nonfiction from Goucher College. She is also the director of multicultural marketing for Penguin Publishing Group, a public affairs officer in the New Jersey Army National Guard, and a board member at Philadelphia Stories.


Twitter Username: susettebrooks

Website: www.susettebrooks.com

Danielle A. Jackson is a Memphis-born writer and the first African American editor in chief of Oxford American magazine. An MFA student in UGA's narrative nonfiction program, she has had writing appear in the New York Times Book Review, Vulture, the Criterion Collection, and other venues.


Twitter Username: danielleamir

Merry Sun is an editor at Portfolio, an imprint of Penguin Random House, which she joined in in 2015. She acquires and edits nonfiction books by inspiring experts, journalists, academics, entrepreneurs, and advocates in the worlds of business, technology, economics, and finance.

Jeannine A. Cook is a writer, educator, and curator. She is the shopkeeper at Harriett’s Bookshop in Philadelphia and Ida’s Bookshop in Collingswood, New Jersey.


Twitter Username: Harriettsbooks

Maggie Messitt is author of The Rainy Season, longlisted for the 2016 Alan Paton Award. Formerly the executive director of a nonprofit media organization in South Africa and founding national director of Report for America, she is now the Eberly Professor of Practice at Pennsylvania State and faculty in the Goucher MFA program.


Twitter Username: maggiemessitt

Website: www.maggiemessitt.com
Saturday, March 26, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S210.

Strike a Chord: The Lyric Essay Forms of A Harp in the Stars

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This panel features craft talks by essayists whose work appears in the University of Nebraska Press anthology A Harp in the Stars, which Aimee Nezhukumatathil calls “a fascinating look into the bright heart of what the lyric essay can be.” Contributors will read brief excerpts of a segmented essay, a braided essay, a hermit crab essay in the form of a word search puzzle, and a hybrid lyric craft essay, then discuss practical strategies as well as theoretical concerns when writing in these forms.

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Randon Billings Noble is an essayist. She is the author of the essay collection Be with Me Always and the editor of A Harp in the Stars: An Anthology of Lyric Essays. She teaches in the MFA in nonfiction program at Goucher and the low-residency MFA in creative writing at West Virginia Wesleyan.


Twitter Username: randonnoble

Website: www.randonbillingsnoble.com

Heidi Czerwiec, essayist and poet, is the author of the lyric essay collection Fluid States, winner of Pleiades Press’ 2018 Robert C. Jones Prize for Short Prose, and the poetry collection Conjoining. She is an editor at Assay and teaches in Minneapolis and with the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop.


Twitter Username: HeidiCzerwiec

Website: http://www.heidiczerwiec.com

Angie Chuang is a nonfiction writer and an associate professor of journalism at University of Colorado Boulder. Her first book, The Four Words for Home, won an Independent Publishers Award. Her work has appeared in Creative Nonfiction, Litro, the Asian American Literary Review, Vela, and others.


Twitter Username: angiechuang

Sayantani Dasgupta is the author, most recently, of the short story collection Women Who Misbehave. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the UNC Wilmington and has also taught in India, Italy, and Mexico. She is also the author of Fire Girl: Essays on India, America, and the In-Between.


Twitter Username: sayan10e

Website: www.sdasgupta.com

Laurie Easter is the author of All the Leavings. Her essays have been awarded fellowships by the Vermont Studio Center and Playa, listed as notable in Best American Essays, and published in the Rumpus, Chautauqua, Brevity, and The Shell Game: Writers Play with Borrowed Forms, among other publications.


Twitter Username: EasterLaurie
Friday, March 25, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F176.

Is My Writing Queer Enough?

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Writers from across genres, gender and sexual identities, and educational and cultural backgrounds come together to share how they manage their talents, life, and career for success within the LGBTQ community. In an attempt to both celebrate and give voice to queer experiences, they ask, "Is my writing queer enough?"

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Faylita Hicks (she/they) is the author of HoodWitch, a finalist for the 2020 Lambda Literary Award for Bisexual Poetry. They are a 2021 Shearing Fellow with Black Mountain Institute and currently serve as the 2021 poet in residence for the Civil Rights Corps.


Twitter Username: FaylitaHicks

David Woo is the author of two books of poetry: Divine Fire and The Eclipses. His work has appeared in the New Yorker, New RepublicThreepenny Review, and in the Library of America’s American Religious Poems. He is a reviewer at the Poetry Foundation.


Twitter Username: DavidWooPoet

Website: davidwoo.info

Vanessa Angélica Villarreal is the author of the poetry collection Beast Meridian and a recipient of a 2019 Whiting Award. She is a 2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow and lives with her son in Los Angeles, where she is a doctoral candidate at the University of Southern California.


Twitter Username: Vanessid

Nicky Beer is a bi/queer writer and the author of Real Phonies and Genuine Fakes, The Octopus Game, and The Diminishing House. She is an associate professor at the University of Colorado-Denver, where she coedits the journal Copper Nickel.


Twitter Username: nbeerpoet

Website: nickybeer.com

Celeste Chan works across fiction, creative nonfiction, oral histories, and documentary filmmaking. A Hedgebrook, Lambda, and VONA fellow, she facilitates creative writing workshops for LGBTQ youth. She's published in AWAY, cream city review, the Rumpus, and beyond.


Twitter Username: celestechan2020

Website: www.celestechan.com

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F227.

Fulbright Information Session

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The Fulbright information panel is composed of past Creative Writing Fulbright Fellows who tell of the application process; the experience; and the professional, creative, and personal benefits of this prestigious award. The Fulbright Program funds undergraduates, graduates, and at-large writers to study, conduct research, or pursue creative activities abroad for a year. Our panelists went to Mexico, Barbados, Bulgaria, India, and Paraguay to write poetry, memoirs, nonfiction, and novels.

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Katherine Arnoldi (Fulbright, Paraguay 2008–09), created the graphic novel The Amazing True Story of a Teenage Single Mom (Graymalkin 2016), All Things Are Labor: Stories (2007, University of Massachusetts Press). Her awards include two New York Foundation of the Arts Awards, DeJur, Henfield, Juniper, and Newhouse.


Twitter Username: karnoldi2001

Website: http://www.katherinearnoldi.com

Rashaun J. Allen is a tenure-track professor at Westchester Community College and the first Fulbright scholar in SUNY Stony Brook’s MFA in Creative Writing & Literature program history. He is a Vermont Studio Center residency recipient whose three poetry collections became Amazon Kindle Best Sellers.


Twitter Username: rashaunjallen

Website: www.rashaunjallen.com

Serena Chopra is a teacher, writer, dancer, filmmaker, soundscape designer, and a visual and performance artist. She has a PhD in creative writing from the University of Denver and was a 2016–2017 Fulbright Scholar (Bangalore, India). She has two books and two films.

Eireene Nealand's stories, poems, and translations have appeared in ZYZZYVA, Drunken Boat, Chicago Quarterly, and the St. Petersburg Review. She has won multiple awards including an Elizabeth Kostova Fellowship and two Fulbright Fellowships to write and teach in Bulgaria.


Twitter Username: e7iir

Daniel Peña is a Pushcart Prize-winning writer and assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of Houston-Downtown. Formerly, he was a Fulbright-Garcia Robles Scholar in Mexico City, where he finished his first novel, BANG. He's a regular contributor to the Ploughshares Blog.


Twitter Username: danimalpena
Saturday, March 26, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

S146.

Veterans Online: A Field Guide for Navigating the Digital Writing Sphere

(, , , , Kara Krauze)

Iraq and Afghanistan military and veteran writers have enthusiastically embraced the internet to amplify their voices and build audiences through blogging, online publishing, remote workshopping, and social media promotion and as a bridge to traditional print publication. The members of the panel, all accomplished authors or online journal editors in the veteran-writing field, offer a range of perspectives regarding best online publishing practices, lessons learned, and future possibilities.

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Peter Molin, the keeper of the blog Time Now: The Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan in Art, Film, and Literature, has written and presented often on war-writing and literature and has led and participated in numerous veterans-writing workshops. An Afghanistan vet, he teaches at Rutgers University, New Jersey.


Twitter Username: TimeNowBlog

Teresa Fazio is a former Marine Corps officer and the author of the memoir Fidelis. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Foreign Policy, Washington Post, Lit Hub, and several anthologies, among other outlets. She has an MFA in nonfiction from the Bennington Writing Seminars.


Twitter Username: DoctorFaz

Jennifer Orth-Veillon, PhD, is a writer and translator based in Lyon, France. Published in the New York TimesThe War HorseLunch TicketConsequence, and The Wrath-Bearing Tree, her anthology on WWI and today's veterans is forthcoming in 2022. Her first novel, Mice in the Shadows, is based on WWII.


Twitter Username: orthveillon

Ron Capps the founder and director of the Veterans Writing Project, a 501(c)(3) that has served more than 3,500 veterans and family members in 24 states. He is the publisher of the literary journal O-Dark-Thirty. His memoir, Seriously Not All Right: Five Wars in Ten Years, was published in 2014.


Twitter Username: ron_capps

Website: seriouslynotallright.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F119.

Debuting with a Small Press

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Five small press authors will speak to their experiences debuting in 2021 with small presses. They will cover the benefits and challenges of their individual publishing journeys so far, as well as their own tips for a successful book launch.

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Jenn Bouchard’s debut novel First Course was published by TouchPoint Press in 2021. Her short stories have appeared in the Bookends Review, Litbreak Magazine, the Penmen Review, and the Little Patuxent Review. She has taught high school social studies for over twenty years.


Twitter Username: JennBouchardBOS

Khristeena Lute is a writer and English professor residing in upstate New York, where she teaches English at SUNY Adirondack.

Maan Gabriel is a mom, wife, and advocate for women’s stories in literature. She earned her BA in communications from St. Scholastica’s College Manila and MPS public relations and corporate communications from Georgetown University. She works in strategic communications in Washington, DC.


Twitter Username: MaanGabriel

Rachel Mans McKenny is the assistant director of the Writing Center at Iowa State University and writes fiction and nonfiction. She has been recently published in the New York Times, Electric Literature, the Rumpus, and outlets. Her debut novel, The Butterfly Effect, was released in 2020.


Twitter Username: rmmckenny

Joy Lanzendorfer is the author of Right Back Where We Started From. Her work has been in the New York Times, the Atlantic, NPR, Washington Post, Smithsonian, Poetry Foundation, and Ploughshares. Grants include the Discovered Awards for Emerging Artists and the Speculative Literature Foundation.


Twitter Username: joylanzendorfer

Website: ohjoy.org
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T145.

Artist & Scholar: What to Expect & How to Thrive in a Creative Writing PhD

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PhD programs require artists to deftly navigate academia in ways that are distinct from MFA programs. Panelists will share what aspects of the PhD experience can aid the creative process and prepare candidates for post-PhD careers. Topics include how to utilize critical research—such as course work and comprehensive exams—to build a creative bank, how to establish a committee, and how to fashion an inspiring writing community while fulfilling the challenging requirements of a PhD program.

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Tatiana Duvanova is a writer born and raised in Russia. She holds an MFA degree in creative writing from the University of New Mexico and she is currently working toward her PhD in English/creative writing at the University of Rhode Island, where she also teaches creative writing and literature courses.

Afua Ansong is scholar and artist currently pursuing a PhD in English literature at the University of Rhode Island. Her work interrogates representations of Black female subjectivities in African Diaspora literature. She is currently working on a collection of poems about the material culture.

A.H. Jerriod Avant is from Longtown, Mississippi. The recipient of scholarships from Vermont Studio Center and Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, Jerriod has received two Winter Fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and he is currently a PhD English student at the University of Rhode Island.


Twitter Username: AHJerriodAvant

Sue Y. Kim is currently a creative writing PhD candidate at the University of Rhode Island. She hails from Seoul, Korea, and her writing and research interests include the transnational novel and narrative spatio-temporality.


Twitter Username: sueyon_kim
Friday, March 25, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F221.

Multimodal Identities: How Podcasting Can Unbind Creative Voices

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Considering how much the multimodal pedagogical framework lives within the realm of multicultural literacies, there is a strong case to be made that the inclusion of podcasts into the creative writing classroom could prove invaluable, especially given that many workshops fail to serve a significant portion of students who either don’t feel welcome or don’t feel capable. This panel will discuss how podcasts exist within an a priori cultural space, almost as if tailor-made to address these issues.

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Saul Lemerond is an assistant professor of English at Hanover College. He received his PhD in English with an emphasis in creative writing–fiction. He is dyslexic. His book, Digital Voices: Podcasting in the Creative Writing Classroom, has been contracted by Bloomsbury Academic.


Twitter Username: SaulLemerond

Leigh Camacho Rourks is the author of the St. Lawrence Book Award winner Moon Trees and Other Orphans and the recipient of the Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Award and the Robert Watson Literary Review Prize. She is also an assistant professor of English and humanities at Beacon College.


Twitter Username: DrScaredWriter

Website: lcrourks.com

Billie R. Tadros is the author of three books of poems: Graft Fixation, Was Body, and The Tree We Planted and Buried You In, as well as three chapbooks of poetry. She is an assistant professor at the University of Scranton, where she teaches in the Department of English & Theatre.


Twitter Username: BillieRTadros

Website: www.BillieRTadros.com

Kase Johnstun is the author of Let the Wild Grasses Grow  and Beyond the Grip of Craniosynostosis. He is host of the LITerally podcast, one that asks writers about writing, the writing life, and craft, interviewing more than fifty authors in the last four years.


Twitter Username: kasejohnstun

Rebecca Hazelwood is an essayist/memoirist who has been published widely in literary magazines. She currently teaches at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. She holds an MFA in creative writing and a PhD in English/creative writing. She is currently finishing a memoir.


Twitter Username: rlhazelwood

1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Virtual

F210.

Home in Florida: A Home Tour & Discussion by Latinx Writers

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Contributors explore the themes of home and uprootedness and how they must sometimes coexist. For a different joint reading that uses the full advantages of the Zoom platform, we will bring attendees into our homes for a two-minute tour focusing on those spaces that allow us to write (and why), followed by a three-minute reading. Then we will discuss and take questions from the audience.

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Anjanette Delgado is a novelist and journalist who writes about identity, displacement, and heartbreak, often through immigrant characters from Caribbean countries. Author of The Heartbreak Pill and The Clairvoyant of Calle Ocho, she holds an MFA in CRW from FIU.


Twitter Username: anjanettedelgad

Richard Blanco is the youngest, first Latino, and first openly gay person to serve as the presidential inaugural poet. Author of two memoirs and three poetry books, his honors include awards from the University of Pittsburgh, PEN, the Paterson Prize, Lambda Literary, and Education Ambassador for the Academy of American Poets.

Ariel Francisco is the author of Under Capitalism If Your Head Aches They Just Yank Off Your Head  and A Sinking Ship is Still a Ship). He is an assistant professor of poetry at Louisiana State University.


Twitter Username: AriCisco

Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

T157.

Mi Casa Es Su Casa: A Bilingual Event for Latinx Writers

(, , , Daniel Reschinga)

Uprooted writers discuss themes of home, displacement, and rerooting in aid of diverse literature. These authors had one more barrier: their work had to be translated or reconceived to reflect their uprootedness for this book, giving us a view we seldom see: the path of the writer before he becomes acculturated. What happens to the work of those "just-arriveds"? Is it lost? How can we prevent it if so? (This event will be held mostly in Spanish.)

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Anjanette Delgado is a novelist and journalist who writes about identity, displacement, and heartbreak, often through immigrant characters from Caribbean countries. Author of The Heartbreak Pill and The Clairvoyant of Calle Ocho, she holds an MFA in CRW from FIU.


Twitter Username: anjanettedelgad

Hernán Vera Álvarez, sometimes known as “Vera,” is the author of La librería del mal salvaje, winner of a Florida Book Award; Grand Nocturno; La vida enferma; and Los románticos eléctricos. He is editor of the anthologies Viaje One WayMiami (Un)plugged; Don´t cry for me, América; and Escritorxs Salvajes.


Twitter Username: HVeraAlvarez

Caridad Moro-Gronlier is the author of Tortillera. She is a contributing editor of Grabbed: Writers Respond to Sexual Assault and associate editor for SWWIM Every Day. A career educator, she is an English professor in Miami, Florida.


Twitter Username: CaridadMoro1

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T200.

Dear You, Love Me: Queer(ing) as/and Epistolary Form

(, , )

What about the letter appeals to queer writers across multiple genres? How, when, and why do queer writers turn to/make use of epistolary form? Working with and within the form of the letter, this diverse panel of three transgenerational queer-identified writers reveals epistolarity as an aperture for vulnerability, renewed intimacy with the body, and access for/to past and future selves. In writing to an imagined audience of everyone, how might we use the letter to express desires yet to come?

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Ames Hawkins is a trans writer and author of the award-winning book These Are Love(d) Letters. A professor of English and creative writing at Columbia College Chicago, Ames has been a Lambda Fellow and in residence at Bread Loaf, Banff Centre, and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.


Twitter Username: amesthehawk

Website: ameshawkins.com

CM Burroughs is associate professor of poetry at Columbia College Chicago. Her books are The Vital System and Master Suffering. She has been awarded fellowships from organizations including Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, and Cave Canem Foundation.

Samuel Ace is the author most recently of Our Weather Our Sea (Black Radish), and Meet Me There (Belladonna* Germinal Texts). A recipient of an Astraea Writer's Award, he is a multitime finalist for the Lambda Literary Award and the National Poetry Series. He teaches at Mount Holyoke College.


Twitter Username: samuel_ace

Website: https://www.samuelace.com

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

T182.

Building the South Asian Avant-Garde

(Nur Ibrahim, , , )

This panel explores the process of building a digital anthology of South Asian creative work from beginning to release, centered around the avant-garde. We address concept development, fundraising, community building, and outreach, particularly through a progressive lens. We discuss the creation process during a pandemic, navigating time zones, illnesses, and challenges in South Asia. We discuss how BIPOC creatives draw from their radical traditions to build new creative forms and futures.

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Kamil Ahsan is currently a doctoral student in History at Yale University with a prior doctorate in Biology from the University of Chicago. Originally from Lahore, Pakistan, he is also a freelance journalist, critic, and the editor of South Asian Avant-Garde (SAAG). 


Twitter Username: kamuleosaurus

Abeer Y. Hoque is a Nigerian-born Bangladeshi American writer and photographer. Her books include a monograph of travel photographs and poems (The Long Way Home, 2013), a book of linked stories, poems, and photographs (The Lovers and the Leavers, 2015), and a memoir (Olive Witch, 2017).


Twitter Username: olivewitch

Aditya Desai's stories, essays, and poems have appeared in B O D Y, the Rumpus, the Millions, the Margins, District Lit, the Kartika Review, the Aerogram, and others. He received his MFA in fiction from the University of Maryland, College Park. He currently teaches writing in Baltimore.


Twitter Username: atwittya
Saturday, March 26, 2022

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

Virtual

S224.

Creative Politics, Political Poetics: Asian American Literary Activism

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Our discussion room will explore literary activism, art and community-building, and literary and academic change-making through five different vantages. In particular, we will share Asian American approaches to crossracial organizing, improvisational pedagogies, neurodiversity, and literary activism in and beyond the academy. We will include examples, generative writing, and somatic and embodied activities for participants to engage, interact, and create so we move toward liberation collectively.


This virtual discussion room will take place live and will not be recorded for on-demand viewing.

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Purvi Shah's favorite art practices are her sparkly eyeshadow and raucous laughter. Terrain Tracks and Miracle Marks, her poetry books, explore gender and racial equity. At the tenth anniversary of 9/11, she led Together We Are New York, a community poetry project to highlight Asian American voices.


Twitter Username: PurviPoets

Website: http://purvipoets.net

Cathy Linh Che is the author of the poetry collection Split, winner of the Kundiman Poetry Prize, the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the Best Poetry Book Award from the Association of Asian American Studies.

Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, PhD, is founding director of the arts nonprofit Asian American Literary Review and coeditor in chief of its critically acclaimed literary journal. He is also a curator for the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Sejal Shah writes across genres and dances in her study in Western New York. Her debut essay collection, This Is One Way to Dance, was named an NPR Best Book of 2020 and selected as a finalist for the 2021 CLMP Firecracker Award in Creative Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: SejalShahWrites

Website: www.sejal-shah.com

Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart's Traffic, recombinant, to make black paper sing, Kundiman for Kin and coeditor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence within Activist Communities. They are part of Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole, Macondo, and VONA communities.


Twitter Username: chinginchen

Website: www.chinginchen.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F150.

Page to Stage: Pathways to Production in a Virtual and In-Person World

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Five playwrights describe their varied pathways to production before and during the pandemic. From play contests to networking to agent submissions to using directories, each will describe how their work came to be staged and how play development differs from all other creative writing forms. They will finish the session with an open discussion on how the virtual world may change how theater may be shared in the future.

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Bonnie Culver’s plays have been produced nationwide. Her one-woman show, A Ticket to the Circus, based upon the memoir of Norris Church Mailer, is scheduled for production in 2021 at the Edgemar Center, California, starring Anne Archer. She is the cofounder of Wilkes University's MA/MFA program.

Matthew Hinton holds his MA and MFA in creative writing from Wilkes University and is the author of Quiet Cowboy and other plays. Hinton is a founding member of Gaslight Theatre Company (Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) and is coordinator of writing and assistant director of student success at Misericordia University.

Rachel Luann Strayer is a published playwright with an MFA from Wilkes University. Plays: Drowning Ophelia, The Poe Asylum, Songbird, A Decameron for the Apocalypse, and The Last Daughter (Jane Chambers Feminist Playwriting Award Finalist). She is currently the lead writer for NYC theatre group Stage Fright.


Twitter Username: RLStrayerWrites

Jean Klein has been a semifinalist in the O’Neill competition; a one-act play Snapshots was a winner in the Kernodle Play competition at the University of Arkansas. She currently teaches playwriting at Wilkes University and owns Blue Moon Plays, a dramatic publishing company.


Twitter Username: Blue Moon Plays

Website: www.bluemoonplays.com

Sérgio-Andreo Bettencourt Urbina (a.k.a. s.a.b.u.) is a US-based nonbinary, first-generation Luso-Peruvian American playwright. Their writing credits include Hungry, Hungry, Demon, Started from the Convent Now We’re Here, and CRIMSON.RUST.AMBER.

Thursday, March 24, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T172.

The Power of Podcasting: Finding Creative Autonomy in the Audio Form

(, , , , Annmarie Kelly-Harbaugh)

Authors are turning to podcasting to find new audiences and expand their platform—but podcasting isn't just about promotion. A National Book Award finalist, a feature film novelist, an International Women's Podcast Awards winner, and two NYT bestselling authors talk about what podcasting gave them that publishing couldn’t: quick, consistent deadlines; tools to develop their craft; an antidote to perfectionism; and a space to connect, critique the industry, and collaborate with fellow creators.

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Laura Joyce Davis is the host and producer of Shelter in Place, a podcast about coming together in a world that pulls us apart. She is a Fulbright scholar, a WNYC podcast accelerator finalist, a Pushcart Prize nominee, and the winner of the Poets & Writers Exchange Award for fiction.


Twitter Username: laurajoycedavis

Website: http://www.laurajoycedavis.com/

Sarah Enni is the author of Tell Me Everything and the creator and host of the First Draft with Sarah Enni podcast, which features weekly conversations with storytellers about how their art affects their life.


Twitter Username: sarahenni

Claribel A. Ortega is a former reporter who writes middle grade and young adult fantasy inspired by her Dominican heritage. Her debut middle grade novel Ghost Squad is out now and is being made into a feature film. Her forthcoming books include Witchlings and the graphic novel Frizzy.


Twitter Username: claribel_ortega

Dhonielle J. Clayton is the cofounder of CAKE Literary, a boutique book development company with a decidedly diverse bent. She is the coauthor of Tiny Pretty Things and Shiny Broken Pieces with Sona Charaipotra and the author of The Belles. She is COO of We Need Diverse Books.


Twitter Username: brownbookworm

Website: www.CAKELiterary.com
Friday, March 25, 2022

12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

F188.

Trauma, Tresses, & Truth: Untangling Our Hair through Personal Narrative

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From schools to boardrooms to military squadrons, Black and Afro-Latina natural hair continues to transfix, confound, and enrage members of white society. Why is this still the case? The perception, policing, and persecution of our hair is an incontrovertible form of structural oppression. Four contributors read essays from the upcoming book of the same name (Chicago Review Press, 2022). Their work interrogates a systemic bias that is cognizable, legible, and in need of course correction.

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Lyzette Wanzer's work appears in 25+ journals and books, reflecting peri-racial, social, and economic African American experiences. Her research interests are in critical race theory, Black feminism, and intersectionality. Her book Trauma, Tresses, & Truth is due out from a Chicago press next year.


Twitter Username: TraumaTresses

Website: http://www.lyzettewanzermfa.com

Carmen Bardeguez-Brown is a poet and educator from Puerto Rico. She migrated to the United States in 1984. Her work is showcased in the documentary Latino Poets in the United States by Ray Santiesteban. She has read at the Nuyorican Poets Café, the Fez, Mad Alex Foundation, Smoke, and the Soho Arts Fest.


Twitter Username: https://twitter.com/Barde

Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa's debut novel, Daughters of the Stone (2009), was shortlisted for the 2010 for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. The English and Spanish language editions of her second novel, A Woman of Endurance, will be released in April 2022.


Twitter Username: writer1949

Website: www.DahlmaLlanosFigueroa.com

Lyndsey Ellis is a fiction writer, essayist, editor, and author of the novel Bone Broth. She was a recipient of the San Francisco Foundation's Joseph Henry Jackson Literary Award and Barbara Deming Memorial Fund and was awarded a Kimbilio Fellowship. Her work appears in several publications.


Twitter Username: lyellis

Virtual

F185.

Desi Mythpunk: Indian Mythologies in Futurist Writing by South Asian Authors

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Myths are often viewed as stories from “the past.” But a number of recent works shows that they can be used to engage with contemporary sociopolitical questions and imagine futuristic modes of being. This panel explores how and why South Asian authors employ myths in their poetry, graphic novels, and more. Authors discuss the refashioning of myths as a world-making force that may cultivate a sense of cultural heritage, subvert orientalist stereotypes, and bring alternative futures into being.

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Vidhu Aggarwal's book of poems, The Trouble with Humpadori, takes mobile forms in video, comics, and performance. She teaches postcolonial/transnational literatures and creative writing at Rollins College.


Twitter Username: vidhuaggarwal

Website: vidhu_aggarwal

Bishakh Som is an Indian American trans femme visual artist. Her graphic novel Apsara Engine was the winner of a 2020 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and a 2020 Lambda Literary Award for Best LGBTQ Comic. Her graphic memoir Spellbound  is also a Lambda finalist.

Rajiv Mohabir, poet and translator, translated I Even Regret Night (PEN/Heim Award) and is the author of The Cowherd's Son and The Taxidermist's Cut. He is an assistant professor of poetry at Auburn University's creative writing program.


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Hari Alluri is the author of The Flayed City and an editor at Locked Horn Press. A winner of the 2020 Leonard A. Slade, Jr. Poetry Fellowship, he has received grants from the BC Arts Council and Canada Council of the Arts and fellowships from VONA/Voices and Las Dos Brujas writers workshops.


Twitter Username: harialluri

SJ Sindu is the author of Blue-Skinned Gods and Marriage of a Thousand Lies, which won a Publishing Triangle Award and was an ALA Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Toronto.


Twitter Username: sjsindu

Website: http://sjsindu.com
Thursday, March 24, 2022

10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

T158.

New Poetry from Graywolf Press

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Five extraordinary poets will present and read from their new collections published by Graywolf Press, one of the leading independent publishers in the country. In singular, profound voices, these poets reckon with the gravity of what it is to witness and live through the vital struggles and issues of our time—colonialism, domestic violence, police murders, racism, sexuality, existential grief, mortality—and, with care, disrupt the borders between our interior and political realities.

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Tracy K. Smith is a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, memoirist, translator, and librettist who served as poet laureate of the United States from 2017–19. She is a professor of English and African and African American Studies at Harvard University.

Vijay Seshadri is the author of five collections of poems: Wild Kingdom, The Long Meadow, The Disappearances, 3 Sections, and That Was Now, This Is Then. His work has been recognized with a number of honors, including the Pulitzer Prize.

Jim Moore's book of poetry, Prognosis, was published by Graywolf in November, 2021. He is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in poetry and has been writing poems for more than fifty years. 

Donika Kelly is the author of the full-length collections The Renunciations and Bestiary. She is an assistant professor at the University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: officialdonika

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

118A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

T142.

The Narrative 4 Story Exchange: Building Empathy & Bridging Divides

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How can we move from discord to understanding and positive action? What practices can we use to scaffold students towards high-level thinking and SEL skills? Listening and retelling someone else's story can be a powerful first step.The Narrative 4 (N4) Story Exchange is an authentic process designed to bridge difference. Through the lens of an N4 artist, educator, and student, this panel will explore practical applications of the Story Exchange in classrooms and communities.

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