2022 AWP Conference Schedule

The #AWP22 Conference & Bookfair in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania schedule is searchable by day, time, title, description, participants, and type of event. This schedule is subject to change. A version accessible to screen readers is also available.

Please note: The schedule you build on awpwriter.org will not transfer to the mobile app or the virtual conference platform as these systems are independent.

Scroll over participants’ names in blue to read their biographies.

 

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Friday, March 25, 2022

7:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F101.

Sober AWP

Daily 12-step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

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8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Broad Street Atrium, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F102.

Vaccination Verification Check-In

The first stop at #AWP22 is the vaccination verification check-in, located at the 155 N Broad Street entrance to the Pennsylvania Convention Center. All attendees must verify proof of valid COVID-19 vaccination through CrowdPass. Once you are verified, you will receive your #AWP22 lanyard, which will serve as indication your vaccination status has been verified. Proceed to the Registration area in Halls D&E on the 200 level to complete the registration process.

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Hall E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F103.

Conference Registration, Sponsored by Philadelphia Stories

Attendees who have registered in advance or who have yet to purchase a registration may secure their registration materials in AWP’s registration area located in Exhibit Hall E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level. Please consult the bookfair map in the conference planner for location details. Students must present a valid student ID to check-in or register at our student rate. Seniors must present a valid ID to register at our senior rate. A $50 fee will be charged for all replacement badges.

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Near Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F103B.

Coat Check

Coat check is available outside of Halls D & E on the 200 level of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. It is $3.00 per item checked, or $5.00 for two items. ATMs can be found in the Broad Street Atrium on the 100 Level, by the Business Center on the 200 Level, and near the Concierge on 200 level.

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Near 126B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F104.

Mamava Nursing Pod

A Mamava lactation suite is located outside of room 126B of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

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110A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F105.

Lactation Room

The Lactation Room is located in room 110A of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. To access the Lactation Room, please see the AWP Help Desk to obtain the key. For reasons of privacy and security, access to the lactation room is granted with permission from AWP only.

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113B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F106.

Dickinson Quiet Space

A dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and
escape the literary commotion. "There is a solitude of space, / A
solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, /
Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul
admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity."—Emily Dickinson

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117, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F106B.

Dickinson Quiet Space 2

A second dedicated quiet space for you to collect your thoughts, unwind, and
escape the literary commotion. “There is a solitude of space, / A
solitude of sea, / A solitude of death, but these / Society shall be, /
Compared with that profounder site, / That polar privacy, / A Soul
admitted to Itself: / Finite Infinity.”—Emily Dickinson

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110B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F107.

Nonfluorescent Quiet Space

A quiet space free of fluorescent lighting located in room 110B of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

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9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Virtual

F129.

Erasure Poetry: Ethics & Best Practices

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This panel will focus on erasure poetry in all of its myriad variations (procedural, self-erasure, blackout, grayscale, etc). Questions we will consider include: When may one take liberties with someone else’s text? How does one reconcile found texts with one’s own voice as a poet? How does one present erasure material from a visual standpoint (meaning its layout on the printed page)? What questions of power and privilege emerge within an erasure project, and how can we be more responsible?

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Kristina Marie Darling is author of thirty books, including Dark Horse and Look to Your Left: The Poetics of Spectacle. She currently serves as editor in chief of Tupelo Press and Tupelo Quarterly, a columnist at the Los Angeles Review of Books, and a contributing writer at Publishers Weekly.

Sam Taylor is the author of three books of poems, Body of the World, Nude Descending an Empire, and The Book of Fools, which applies self-erasure into a book-length poetic elegy for our earth and oceans. He directs the MFA program at Wichita State.


Twitter Username: samtaylorpoet

Srikanth Reddy's most recent book of poetry is Underworld Lit. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA, Creative Capital, and the Guggenheim Foundation, he is currently a professor of English at the University of Chicago.

Virtual

F130.

Ndé-geneity: The Glittering World of Apache Poetics, Orature & Art

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There has never been a panel from/by Apache writers who discuss their written, made, or spoken discourses.The panel addresses ways we engage Apache culture, stories, symbols, and representation through language (Apache, English). Panelists' conversation and poetry readings will make linkages between Ndé identity, story, and historical remnants of mythologies, remaking the memorial, emergence and resurgence of authority through the written word, and the inroads this makes for all Indigenous poets.

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Margo Tamez, author of Father / Genocide (2021), Raven Eye (2007), Naked Wanting (2003), and Alleys & Allies (1990). Her work has appeared in Siwar Mayu, Poem-a-Day, etc. Associate Prof, Indigenous Studies & MFA (Poetry), UBCO. Unceded Syilx Territory (Canada).


Twitter Username: indigifem

Website: http://ccgs.ok.ubc.ca/faculty/tamez.html

Crisosto Apache is an enrolled member of the Mescalero Apache Tribe with descent from Mescalero, Chiricahua Apache, and Diné (Salt Clan born for Towering House Clan). He has an MFA from IAIA. He teaches and pursues the advocacy of Native American/Indigenous LGBTQ social injustice.


Twitter Username: Crisosto_Apache

Website: http://crisostoapache.com

Julian Talamantez Brolaski is the author of Of Mongrelitude, Advice for Lovers, and gowanus atropolis and was recently included in When the Light of the World was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry (2020). Julian is the lead singer in Juan & the Pines.

Virtual

F131.

Poetry Garden: Cultivating Poetry Community Beyond the Page & Stage

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This panel will focus on innovative ways to create poetry programming beyond the traditional poetry reading and slam/poetry performance stage. The panelists will discuss what makes their poetry programming and community unique, what nurtures that programming and community, and what sustains that programming and community long-term. The panel will consist of four curators with forty-plus years' experience combined and significantly diverse followings varying in age, skill, nationality, craft, and culture.

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Tamara J. Madison is a writer, poet, and editor. Her work has been published in various journals and magazines including Poetry International and World Literature Today. She is the author of Threed, This Road Not Damascus and creator of Breakdown: The Poet & the Poems, a YouTube conversation series.


Twitter Username: TamaraJMadison

Website: www.tamarajmadison.com

JP Howard's debut collection Say/Mirror was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. JP’s poetry is widely anthologized. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Lambda Literary, and VONA/Voices. JP curates Women Writers in Bloom Poetry Salon.


Twitter Username: JPHoward_poet

Website: http://www.jp-howard.com

Kai Coggin is the author of three full-length poetry collections, a QWOC, and a teaching artist with the Arkansas Arts Council. Recently named “Best Poet in Arkansas” by the Arkansas Times, her poetry has been nominated three times for the Pushcart, as well as BAP 2015 and Best of the Net 2016 and 2018.


Twitter Username: skailight

Jimmy Pappas won Rattle's 2018 Readers' Choice Award and 2019 Chapbook Contest. His interview with editor Tim Green is on Rattlecast #34. As vice president of the Poetry Society of New Hampshire, he facilitates audience-interactive Zoom events. He has been published in over 100 journals.

Sandra Yannone published her debut collection Boats for Women in 2019 with Salmon Poetry. Her poetry has been nominated for Best of the Net and Pushcart. She currently hosts Cultivating Voices LIVE Poetry weekly on Facebook via Zoom on Sundays. To join, visit her at www.sandrayannone.com.


Twitter Username: slyoly

Virtual

F132.

Truth Sayers: Poetry Collectives as a Twenty-First-Century Political Act

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June Jordan said, “To tell the truth is to become beautiful, to begin to love yourself, value yourself. And that's political, in its most profound way.” The Write On Poetry Babes is a collective of womxn whose truth telling has created protest initiatives and projects that support BIPOC womxn and LGBTQ folks. The collective holds space for each other and the poetry community. This panel will discuss how our experiences can help other communities empower themselves and effect intersectional change.

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Ysabel Y. Gonzalez received her BA from Rutgers University and an MFA in poetry from Drew University. She works as the assistant director for the Poetry Program at the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. She is a CantoMundo fellow and author of Wild Invocations.


Twitter Username: YsabelYGonzalez

Marina Carreira (she/her/hers) is a queer Luso American poet artist from Newark, New Jersey. She is the author of tanto tanto, forthcoming in 2022, Save the Bathwater, and I Sing to That Bird Knowing It Won’t Sing Back.

Kathleen Kremins (she/her) has an MFA from Goddard College and a D.Litt. from Drew University. She is the author of The Ethics of Reading: The Broken Beauties of Toni Morrison, Arundhati Roy, and Nawal el Sadaawi and the forthcoming Undressing the World.


Twitter Username: KathyKremins

Lynne McEniry, poet, is the author of some other wet landscape. Her poems have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and were awarded second place and honorable mention for the Allen Ginsberg Poetry Prize. She teaches at Saint Elizabeth University and is a manuscript consultant for Get Fresh Books.


Twitter Username: LynneMcEniry

Tamara Zbrizher is a poet, educator, and workshop leader. Her first book of poems, Tell Me Something Good, was published by Get Fresh Books. She works as a professor of English and writing at Kean University and at Arts By The People, a nonprofit that offers free writing workshops.

Virtual

F133.

The Medium is the Message?: Writers Working Across Genres

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This panel explores the myths and realities of writers who work across multiple literary genres—nonfiction, poetry, and fiction. Panelists will address the specter of genre mastery, institutional pressures, and how genre pivoting influences personal and professional lives. Craft topics will include the relationship between form and content, voice across genres, polygenre versus hybrid work, and the persistence of genre. The panel affirms writing across genres as transformative practice.

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Suzanne Richardson earned her MFA at the University of New Mexico. She is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton in Binghamton, New York. She is the writer of the Three Things column at No Contact Magazine. Her nonfiction, fiction, and poetry have appeared in various journals.


Twitter Username: oozannesay

Casandra Lopez, a Chicana/Cahuilla/Tongva/Luiseño writer, is the author of the poetry collection Brother Bullet. A CantoMundo fellow and Headlands and Hedgebrook resident, she teaches at Northwest Indian College.


Twitter Username: casandramlopez

Jen Soriano is a Filipinx writer whose work blurs the boundaries between nonfiction, surrealism, and poetry. They are the author of the chapbook Making the Tongue Dry, and Nervous, a lyric essay collection about historical trauma and the neuroscience of healing, forthcoming from Amistad in 2023.


Twitter Username: lionswrite

Website: jensoriano.net

Samantha Tetangco is a queer Filipina multigenre writer and educator. Her works have appeared in dozens of magazines and anthologies. She is artistic director and coproducer of Plume: A Writer’s Podcast and associate director of writing at University of California Merced. https://samanthatetangco.ink.


Twitter Username: SamTetangco

Website: http://samanthatetangco.ink

Lev Keltner is a trans writer, chapbooks editor at Newfound, and author of the novel Goodnight. Their flash autofiction and poems have appeared in Passages North, Peach Mag, [PANK], Anomaly, Hobart, and elsewhere and have been nominated for Best of the Net. They write RPGs at Feverdream Games.


Twitter Username: crystal_ography

Website: https://crystalkeltner.com

Virtual

F134.

Akrilica Series Reading

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The Akrilica series is the first of its kind, focused on innovative Latinx writing. Named after former national poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera's essential text, this series seeks out Latinx writers working in new ways that push us, both formally and conceptually. Hear from new and established writers in the Akrilica series, each with a unique point of view.

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Joshua Escobar (DJ Ashtrae) is the author of the chapbooks Caljforkya Voltage, and xxox fm. He publishes the all-ages zine Orange Mercury. Bareback Nightfall, his first book, will be published in the Akrilica series in 2020. He is a CantoMundo fellow.


Twitter Username: djashtrae17

Sara Borjas is a Xicanx Pocha and a Fresno poet. Her debut collection, Heart Like a Window, Mouth Like a Cliff was published by Noemi in 2019. She is the recipient of the Blue Mesa Poetry Prize, a CantoMundo fellow, and a Postgraduate Writer's Workshop fellow, and she teaches at UC Riverside.

Anthony Cody is the author of Borderland Apocrypha, winner of the 2018 Omnidawn Open Book Prize and a 2020 National Book Award Finalist in Poetry. He is a CantoMundo fellow from Fresno, California, who serves as a poetry editor for Noemi Press and Omnidawn Publishing.


Twitter Username: anthony_cody

Website: www.anthonycody.com

Jasminne Mendez is an award-winning author, performance poet and educator. She received her BA in English literature and her MEd in curriculum and instruction from the University of Houston. She is the author of two hybrid collections of poetry and essays.


Twitter Username: jasminnemendez

Virtual

F135.

Of the Diaspora: Rediscovering 21st-Century Black Literature

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Erica Vital-Lazare, editor of McSweeney's Of the Diaspora series, will discuss the series origin, selection process, and publicity strategy for this remarkable program. Launched in 2020, it identifies and republishes important previously published works by Black Americans with the goal of finding new contemporary audiences for works whose perspectives are more urgent today than ever. Titles include novels like Tragic Magic by Wesley Brown and historic photos with new essays by Lester and Aisha Sloan.

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Erica Vital-Lazare is a professor of English at the College of Southern Nevada. A past recipient of a Hurston/Wright Award, she earned her MFA in creative writing from Virginia Commonwealth University and is editor of the series Of the Diaspora.


Twitter Username: xanmere

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of the essay collections The Fluency of Light and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, as well as the forthcoming Borealis and Captioning the Archives. She is an assistant professor of creative nonfiction at the University of Michigan.

Marita Golden is a novelist and nonfiction writer and co-founder and president emerita of the Hurston/Wright Foundation. Her most recent book is The Strong Black Woman: How a Myth Endangers the Physical and Mental Health of Black Women.


Twitter Username: Marita Golden

Website: www.maritogolden.com

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F111.

Words Made Visible: Lit Centers Change the Landscape

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Literary arts add playful, evocative, poignant, and memorable elements to traditional public art. Literary centers from large and small cities spark ideas, such as installing a poetry or memory mural, poetry and recordings on utility boxes, poems on sidewalks and buses, large-scale banners featuring acclaimed local writers, a sculpture honoring a literary luminary, and more. Presenters will include tips on collaboration, installation, public and private permissions, and securing funding.

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Karen Schubert, founding director of Lit Youngstown in 2015, is a NEOMFA graduate and author of The Compost Reader and five poetry chapbooks. She has taught in numerous academic and community settings. Her awards include residencies at Headlands Center for the Arts and Vermont Studio Center.


Twitter Username: karen_jedemeure

David Hassler is director of the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University. His poetry collection, Red Kimono, Yellow Barn, was awarded Ohio Poet of the Year 2006. His nonfiction works include the play May 4th Voices, based on the Kent State Shootings Oral History Project, and Growing Season: The Life of a Migrant Community.


Twitter Username: DavidWickPoetry

Amy Bagwell's poems are/have appeared in Beloit Poetry Journal, New Ohio Review, Free State Review, Cloudbank, Watershed Review, and elsewhere. She is cofounder of Wall Poems, Inc., a nonprofit public art project with 25+ large-scale poetry murals and installations in and around Charlotte, North Carolina.

Michael Khandelwal writes and publishes fiction and poetry and teaches workshops for the Muse Writers Center in Norfolk, Virginia, for which he is the executive director (and cofounder). He is a columnist for Coastal Virginia Magazine and a former webmaster for the American Council on Education.

Noah Falck is the author of the poetry collection Exclusions (finalist for the 2020 Believer Book Award). He works as education director at Just Buffalo Literary Center and curates the Silo City Reading Series, a multimedia poetry series inside a 130-foot high abandoned grain elevator.


Twitter Username: nofalck

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F112.

A Tenth Anniversary Celebration of the Kenyon Review Fellowships

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The Kenyon Review Fellowships celebrates its tenth anniversary with a reading and Q&A featuring five current and former fellows. The KR Fellows are a diverse group of younger writers who spend two years at Kenyon College teaching creative writing, working on an individual project, and contributing to the editorial life of the Review. They will gather to read from their recent work and answer questions about the fellowships—the highs and the lows, the good and the bad—from audience members.

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Natalie Shapero is the author of the poetry collections Popular Longing, Hard Child, and No Object.


Twitter Username: natalieshapero

Elinam Agbo is the 2021–2023 Kenyon Review Fellow in Prose. She holds an MFA from the Helen Zell Writers' Program. A winner of the 2018 PEN/Dau Short Story Prize, she has received recognition and support from Aspen Words, the Clarion Foundation, and the Hurston/Wright Foundation, among others.


Twitter Username: evagbo

Cristina Correa is the Kenyon Review Fellow in Poetry. She is the recipient of fellowships and awards from CantoMundo, VONA/Voices, Hedgebrook Foundation, and Cornell University. Her work has appeared in the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day series, Best New Poets series, and Missouri Review.


Twitter Username: youmayknowthis

Molly McCully Brown is the author of the essay collection Places I've Taken My Body and the poetry collection The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded. With Susannah Nevison, she coauthored the poetry collection In the Field Between Us. She teaches at Old Dominion University.


Twitter Username: mmccullybrown

Website: http://mollymccullybrown.com

Misha Rai is the 2018–2021 Kenyon Review Fellow in Prose. Her writing has been awarded scholarships and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Dana Award in the novel category, and the Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies.


Twitter Username: RaiMisha

Website: www.misharai.com

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F113.

The Queer Art of Problematizing Masculinity

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Feminist economist Heidi Hartman defines patriarchy as “relations between men, which have a material base, and which, though hierarchical, establish or create interdependence and solidarity among men that enable them to dominate women.” Masculinity is one of the defining forces of our contemporary world; its presence or absence is always a salient choice in prose. This is an exploration of craft choices across genre that problematize masculinity with intentionality and artistic rigor.

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Sarah Madges is a Brooklyn-based writer and literary organizer whose work explores gender, sexuality, and trauma. They hold an MFA from The New School, copy edit for Guernica, and have words in the Rumpus, the Village Voice, A Shadow Map: An Anthology by Survivors of Sexual Assault, and elsewhere.

A.E. Osworth is a transgender novelist. Their first book, We Are Watching Eliza Bright is based on Gamergate and is narrated collectively and unreliably by Reddit. They teach digital storytelling at The New School and fiction at Catapult.


Twitter Username: AEOsworth

Nick White is the author of two books of fiction: Sweet and Low, a collection of stories, and How to Survive a Summer, a novel. He teaches creative writing at Ohio State University.


Twitter Username: nickwhite1985

Website: thenickwhite.com

Meredith Talusan is an award-winning author and journalist who has written for The Guardian, the New York Times, The Atlantic, and WIRED and has contributed to several essay collections. Her debut memoir, Fairest, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: 1demerith

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F114.

Addressing Social Justice & Pedagogy from COVID-19 Talks at SFSU's MFA Program

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Four MFA students (and a faculty moderator) show how the pandemic impacted their experiences in school and inspired them to tackle issues of social justice and creative writing pedagogy. Students will address how the pandemic exacerbated social inequities on a student-run press, impacted international students' visas and travel, and inspired the formation of faculty/student working groups to advance anti-racist pedagogies for discussing the craft and context of diverse literature of the Americas.

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Michael Lukas is the author of The Oracle of Stamboul and The Last Watchman of Old Cairo. Winner of the National Jewish Book Award, the Sophie Brody Medal, and the Sami Rohr Prize, he has received fellowships from the NEA and Bread Loaf. He teaches at San Francisco State University.

Sheila Bare holds an MA in English focusing on Asian American and American Literatures and is an MFA candidate at SFSU. Her work appears in Hay(na)Ku 15, Evidence of Fetus Diversity, and Sitting Room Anthology (2016), among others. She teaches writing in northern California.

Chino Scott-Chung is a trans Chinese/Mexican historical/creative non/fiction writer. Founder and fiction editor of The Asian and Pacific Islander Transmasculine Anthology, he is part of the Latinx Writers Caucus leadership team. His work appears in GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary.

TreVaughn Malik Roach-Carter is a queer Black writer and former fiction editor for Fourteen Hills literary magazine. His work has been featured in Ramblr Magazine, TAYO magazine’s special issue SOFT, Transfer Magazine, bad egg magazine, Borderless Magazine, ANA Magazine, and Stellium magazine.


Twitter Username: Tre_the_author

Hasti Jafari Jozani received a bachelor’s degree in dramatic literature at the University of Tehran. Hasti has written and directed several plays, one of which received a Marcus Recruitment Award, and started the graduate creative writing program at San Francisco State University in the spring of 2021.

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F115.

Reverberation: The Book Review as Literary (Labor) Labor

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Reviewers, both traditional and graphic, consider literary labor in relation to other labors and reviewing as an act of literary citizenship. Within the Republic of Letters, they will discuss the review’s power to amplify voices and challenge dominate narratives. They explore the cerebral joy of reading a book, considering it deeply, and constructing an argument about it. As editors, teachers, activists, they end by sharing ideas for encouraging the next generation of reviewers.

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Marcela Sulak has authored three poetry collections and the memoir Mouth Full of Seeds. She coedited Family Resemblance, a hybrid anthology, and her five poetry translations have received an NEA Fellowship and a PEN Award nomination. She edits the Ilanot Review and hosts the podcast Israel in Translation.

Octavio Quintanilla is an associate professor of literature and creative writing at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, Texas. He is the author of the poetry collection If I Go Missing. Instagram: @writeroctavioquintanilla


Twitter Username: OctQuintanilla

Chanda Feldman is the author of Approaching the Fields: Poems. She is a Cave Canem Fellow and has received a NEA Fellowship for Poetry and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. She holds an MFA from Cornell University. Chanda teaches creative writing at Oberlin College.


Twitter Username: chanda_feldman

Website: www.chandafeldman.com

Anna V. Q. Ross is a Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow in poetry and the author of the collections If a Storm, Figuring, and Hawk Weather. Her work appears in The Nation, The Southern Review, and Harvard Review. She teaches at Emerson College and hosts Unearthed Song & Poetry.


Twitter Username: annavqross

Website: annavqross.com

Martha Silano is the author of five books of poetry, including Gravity Assist, Reckless Lovely, and The Little Office of the Immaculate Conception. She also coauthored, with Kelli Russell Agodon, The Daily Poet: Day-by-Day Prompts for Your Writing Practice. She teaches at Bellevue College.


Twitter Username: marthasilano

Website: marthasilano.net

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F116.

The Revolution Will Be Serialized: Literary Journals & Political Movements

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“The literary history of the thirties,” George Orwell warned in 1940, “seems to justify the opinion that a writer does well to keep out of politics.” Yet eighty years later, most literary journals, like most presses and institutions, have felt the need to confront political realities, including assaults on democracy, police brutality, sexual abuse, and more. Are there risks in embracing these aims? What is the effect on the art they produce? Can journals remain relevant without becoming dogmatic?

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J.A. Bernstein is the author of Rachel's Tomb (AWP Award Series Novel Prize), Desert Castles, and Northern Cowboy. He’s won a Fulbright, Hackney Prize, and contests at Crab Orchard and Southern Indiana Review. He’s an assistant professor at the Univ. of So. Mississippi and fiction editor of Tikkun.

Katie Edkins Milligan's stories appear in Fiction, Tahoma Literary Review, and North Dakota Quarterly. She is fiction editor at Gulf Coast, the 2021 recipient of the Inprint Donald Barthelme Prize in Fiction, and an Inprint Brown Foundation Fellow MFA candidate at the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: keddymilligan

Dustin Pearson is the author of A Season in Hell with Rimbaud, Millennial Roost, and A Family Is a House. He holds an MFA from Arizona State University and has served as an editor to the South Carolina Review, Clemson University Digital Press, the Southeast Review, and Hayden's Ferry Review.


Twitter Username: dustinkpearson

Gilad Elbom is the fiction editor of the North Dakota Quarterly and author of the novel Scream Queens of the Dead Sea. He teaches in the School of Writing, Literature, and Film at Oregon State University.

Clayton Bradshaw writes fiction and nonfiction. He holds an MFA in from Texas State and is currently working toward a PhD at Southern Mississippi. He was a 2021 PFTA Emerging Artist and 2021 Kinder-Crump Short Fiction finalist. He currently serves as an assistant editor for Mississippi Review.


Twitter Username: WriterClaytonB

116, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F117.

Revise & Refine: Creating an Inclusive Writing Industry from the Top Down

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In response to the Black Lives Matter protests and #publishingpaidme, many organizations promised to do better, but what does doing better look like? This panel includes book and magazine editors, a multicultural marketer, a bookshop owner, and an editorial director who will discuss the actionable steps they’ve taken to rebuild the industry. They will also explain how to tap into a broad range of storytelling traditions within our country's growing multicultural communities.

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Susette Brooks is an essayist with an MFA in nonfiction from Goucher College. She is also the director of multicultural marketing for Penguin Publishing Group, a public affairs officer in the New Jersey Army National Guard, and a board member at Philadelphia Stories.


Twitter Username: susettebrooks

Website: www.susettebrooks.com

Danielle A. Jackson is a Memphis-born writer and the first African American editor in chief of Oxford American magazine. An MFA student in UGA's narrative nonfiction program, she has had writing appear in the New York Times Book Review, Vulture, the Criterion Collection, and other venues.


Twitter Username: danielleamir

Merry Sun is an editor at Portfolio, an imprint of Penguin Random House, which she joined in in 2015. She acquires and edits nonfiction books by inspiring experts, journalists, academics, entrepreneurs, and advocates in the worlds of business, technology, economics, and finance.

Jeannine A. Cook is a writer, educator, and curator. She is the shopkeeper at Harriett’s Bookshop in Philadelphia and Ida’s Bookshop in Collingswood, New Jersey.


Twitter Username: Harriettsbooks

Maggie Messitt is author of The Rainy Season, longlisted for the 2016 Alan Paton Award. Formerly the executive director of a nonprofit media organization in South Africa and founding national director of Report for America, she is now the Eberly Professor of Practice at Pennsylvania State and faculty in the Goucher MFA program.


Twitter Username: maggiemessitt

Website: www.maggiemessitt.com

118A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F118.

Authentic Friendships Between Women in Literature & Life

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No one breaks your heart like a woman, especially when a woman breaks another woman’s heart. Female friendships make or break us in ways no other relationship can. How do we draw from these experiences that reverberate through lifetimes? How do they impact our work?

Four critically acclaimed authors dynamically engage with one another, drawing from their multigenre works as well as their own experiences to discuss the role of authentically crafting these friendships in literature and in life.

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Krystal Sital is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Secrets We Kept. A PEN Award finalist, her essays have been anthologized in A Map Is Only One Story and Fury: Women’s Lived Experiences of the Trump Era. Her work can also be found in Elle, the New York Times, and Catapult.


Twitter Username: krystalAsital

Amy Jo Burns is the author of Cinderland, a memoir, and Shiner, a novel that was a Barnes and Noble Discover Pick and an NPR Best Book of the Year. Her writing has appeared in Elle, Good Housekeeping, the Paris Review Daily, Electric Literature, Literary Hub, and the anthology Not That Bad.


Twitter Username: amyjoburns

Dantiel W. Moniz is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and the Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction. Her debut collection, Milk Blood Heat, is an Indie Next Pick, and her work has appeared in magazines such as the Paris Review. She is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Twitter Username: dantielwmoniz

Alisson Wood’s award-winning writing has been published in the New York Times, the Paris Review, The Rumpus, Vogue, and Vanity Fair. She is the founder and editor in chief of Pigeon Pages, a literary journal and reading series. Alisson is the author of  Being Lolita.


Twitter Username: literaryTSwift

Steph Auteri has written for the Atlantic, the Guardian, Pacific Standard, VICE, and other publications. Her more literary work has appeared in Poets & Writers, Creative Nonfiction, Under the Gum Tree, and elsewhere. Author of A Dirty Word, she is  the founder of Guerrilla Sex Ed.


Twitter Username: stephauteri

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F119.

Debuting with a Small Press

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Five small press authors will speak to their experiences debuting in 2021 with small presses. They will cover the benefits and challenges of their individual publishing journeys so far, as well as their own tips for a successful book launch.

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Jenn Bouchard’s debut novel First Course was published by TouchPoint Press in 2021. Her short stories have appeared in the Bookends Review, Litbreak Magazine, the Penmen Review, and the Little Patuxent Review. She has taught high school social studies for over twenty years.


Twitter Username: JennBouchardBOS

Khristeena Lute is a writer and English professor residing in upstate New York, where she teaches English at SUNY Adirondack.

Maan Gabriel is a mom, wife, and advocate for women’s stories in literature. She earned her BA in communications from St. Scholastica’s College Manila and MPS public relations and corporate communications from Georgetown University. She works in strategic communications in Washington, DC.


Twitter Username: MaanGabriel

Rachel Mans McKenny is the assistant director of the Writing Center at Iowa State University and writes fiction and nonfiction. She has been recently published in the New York Times, Electric Literature, the Rumpus, and outlets. Her debut novel, The Butterfly Effect, was released in 2020.


Twitter Username: rmmckenny

Joy Lanzendorfer is the author of Right Back Where We Started From. Her work has been in the New York Times, the Atlantic, NPR, Washington Post, Smithsonian, Poetry Foundation, and Ploughshares. Grants include the Discovered Awards for Emerging Artists and the Speculative Literature Foundation.


Twitter Username: joylanzendorfer

Website: ohjoy.org

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F120.

Monsters Keep Us Company: Writing and Publishing Beastly Things

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In Monster of God, science scribe David Quammen writes that monsters “keep us company.” Sea beasts, serial killers, white supremacy, eugenics, xenomorphs—writers obsess over what looms. In this panel, five CNF writers discuss the risks and rewards of confronting monsters. How do we write the ultimate Other when the monster is us? How do we navigate narratives that paint us as monsters? Do we stomp the construct? We offer tips for witnessing, approaching, confronting, and wrangling the fearsome.

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Clinton Crockett Peters, Berry College professor, has authored the books Pandora's Garden and Mountain Madness. His work appears in Best American Essays 2020, Orion, Southern Review, Creative Nonfiction, Hotel Amerika, Catapult, and Fourth Genre. He holds and MFA from the University of Iowa and a PhD from University of North Texas.


Twitter Username: ClintCrockettP

Website: http://clintoncrockettpeters.com/

L. M. Ferreira Cabeza-Vanegas has a creative nonfiction and a literary translation MFA from the University of Iowa. She is the author of Drown Sever Sing and Don’t Come Back from Mad Creek Books. A Rona Jaffe fellow, she works as an assistant professor at the University of Chicago.

A. Kendra Greene is the author, illustrator, and audiobook reader of The Museum of Whales You Will Never See. A former Harvard Library Innovation Lab Fellow and Fulbright grantee, she is associate editor at the Southwest Review and has written for the Guardian, Atlas Obscura, and Wall Street Journal.


Twitter Username: akendragreene

Website: akendragreene.com

Sarah Viren is the author of the essay collection MINE, winner of the River Teeth Book Prize and the GLCA New Writers Award. A contributing writer at the New York Times Magazine, she is also an assistant professor at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: sarahviren

Website: sarahviren@wordpress.com

Michi Trota is a five-time Hugo Award-winning, British Fantasy Award-winning, and Ignyte Award finalist essayist, writer, and editor. She is the first POC editor in chief of Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), senior editor of Prism, and the first Filipina Hugo Award winner.


Twitter Username: geekmelange

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F121.

Contemporary Feminisms

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Exploring multiple genres—poetry, essays, performance, and fiction—this panel opens up feminist traditions to make connections and innovations towards a multiplicity of contemporary feminisms. We’ll share work and talk about intersectional possibilities, including world- and identity-making as a genderqueer practice, interspecies alliances and spinster ecologies, feminist lineages through chronic pain and disability, psych survivor experiences, and quantum gender.

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Megan Kaminski is a poet and essayist and the author of three books of poetry, most recently Gentlewomen, and Prairie Divination, a forthcoming illustrated collection of essays and oracle deck (with artist L. Ann Wheeler). She is an associate professor in English at the University of Kansas.


Twitter Username: megan_kaminski

Website: http://www.megankaminski.com/

Petra Kuppers is a disability culture activist, a community performance artist, and a professor of English, women's studies, theatre, and art and Design at the University of Michigan. She also teaches on the low-residency MFA in interdisciplinary arts at Goddard College.


Twitter Username: OlimpiasDance

Website: www.olimpias.org

Vidhu Aggarwal's book of poems, The Trouble with Humpadori, takes mobile forms in video, comics, and performance. She teaches postcolonial/transnational literature and creative writing at Rollins College.


Twitter Username: vidhuaggarwal

Website: vidhu_aggarwal

Stephanie Heit is a queer/disabled poet, dancer, teacher, Zoeglossia Fellow, and member of Olimpias, a disability performance collective. She codirects Turtle Disco, a somatic writing space in Ypsilanti, Michigan, and is the author of Psych Murders (forthcoming) and The Color She Gave Gravity.


Twitter Username: stephanie_heit

Website: https://stephanie-heit.com/

Teresa Carmody's books include The Reconception of Marie and Maison Femme: A Fiction. With Shameka Cunningham, she cohosts Today Must Be Sunday at Four Queens. A cofounding editor of Les Figues Press, she now lives in Florida, where she directs Stetson University's low-res MFA program.

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F122.

Poetry of Iran & Its Diaspora

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This reading features four of the most significant poets and translators of Iran or Iranian descent. They are representatives of an anthology published by Green Linden Press in September, 2021, Essential Voices: Poetry of Iran and Its Diaspora, which includes 130 poets and translators from ten countries. Collectively, the readers explore themes of identity, oppression, freedom, language, translation, and the potential for poetry to help us understand and navigate social and political complexity.

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Christopher Nelson is the founder and editor of Green Linden Press. His most recent book is Blood Aria.


Twitter Username: GreenLinden1

Website: www.greenlindenpress.com

Kaveh Bassiri is the author of two chapbooks, 99 Names of Exile, winner of the Anzaldúa Poetry Prize, and Elementary English, winner of Rick Campbell Chapbook Prize. He is also the recipient of a 2019 translation fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Sholeh Wolpé is an Iranian-born poet and playwright. Her most recent books include Abacus of Loss: A Memoir in Verse, and The Conference of the Birds. She is presently the current writer in residence at University of California, Irvine. More information: www.sholehwolpe.com


Twitter Username: Sholeh_Wolpe

Website: https://www.sholehwolpe.com//

Athena Farrokhzad is a Swedish poet, literary critic, playwright, and teacher of creative writing. Her debut collection Vitsvit, has been published in fifteen languages and was translated by Jennifer Hayashida under the title White Blight.

Armen Davoudian is the author of Swan Song, which won the 2020 Frost Place Chapbook Competition. He is a PhD candidate in English at Stanford.


Twitter Username: armendavoudian

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F124.

Tell It from All Sides: Writing a Story with Multiple Points of View

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Some stories are told from a single point of view, while others are told by many characters who take turns giving us their own (sometimes conflicting) version of events. How do you decide when to use multiple perspectives? Which characters should serve as narrators? And once you’ve decided on multiple perspectives, how do you create voices that are strong and distinct? We will discuss the when, why, and how of writing an effective multiple-POV story to deliver a powerful, layered narrative.

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Angie Kim is a Korean immigrant and debut author of the international bestseller and Edgar winner Miracle Creek, which is being translated into over twenty languages. She has written for Vogue, the New York Times Book Review, the Washington Post, Glamour, and numerous literary journals.


Twitter Username: AngieKimWriter

Website: www.angiekimbooks.com

​​Julia Phillips is the author of the internationally bestselling novel Disappearing Earth, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. A Fulbright fellow, she has written for the New York Times, ​The Atlantic, and the Paris Review. She teaches at the Randolph College MFA program.


Twitter Username: jkbphillips

Jean Kwok is the international bestselling author of Girl in Translation, Mambo in Chinatown, and Searching for Sylvie Lee, which was a Read with Jenna Today Show Book Club pick and an instant New York Times bestseller. Her work has been published in twenty countries and is taught in schools across the world.


Twitter Username: jeankwok

Website: https://www.jeankwok.com/

Danielle Trussoni is a New York Times, USA Today, and Sunday Times top ten bestselling author whose novels have been translated into thirty-three languages. She has served as the jury chair of the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction and currently writes the Dark Matters column for the New York Times Book Review.


Twitter Username: danitrussoni

Website: www.danielletrussoni.com

Rebecca Makkai's fourth book, The Great Believers, was a finalist for both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award; it won the LA Times Book Prize, the Carnegie Medal, and the Stonewall Award. She is artistic director of StoryStudio Chicago.


Twitter Username: rebeccamakkai

Website: www.rebeccamakkai.com

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F125.

Four Women: Black Experimental Women Writers on Interdisciplinary Craft

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Why would a writer choose to experiment with different forms and work in multiple new and emerging genres? Are there possibilities for newer technologies deepening stories we tell about social justice and change? How can we encourage greater participation from writers with fewer resources or technological access? Four writers will discuss their own daring, insightful work, along with the work of innovative writers Rachel Eliza Griffiths and Duriel Harris, and the ways we build brilliant futures.

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Rochelle Spencer is author of AfroSurrealism: The African Diaspora's Surrealist Fiction and coeditor, with Jina Ortiz, of All About Skin: Short Fiction by Women of Color.


Twitter Username: rochellespencer

Shay Youngblood is an Atlanta-based writer, visual artist, and educator. Author of the novel Black Girl in Paris, her current project is The Architecture of Soul Sound, a multimedia performance about architecture, memory, and the environment, inspired by research in Japan, China, and the United States.


Twitter Username: Shay_Youngblood

Opal Moore serves on the editorial board of Obsidian reading hybrid fiction submissions. Her current writing project, "Children of Passage," is a collaborative suite of poems and images with Panamanian American visual artist Arturo Lindsay.


Twitter Username: opalm13

Chantal James has been published across genres in Catapult, Transition Magazine, and more. Her honors include a Fulbright to Morocco and being named a finalist for the Alex Albright Creative Nonfiction Prize for 2019. Her novel None but the Righteous was published in January 2022.


Twitter Username: chantalalive

Kyla Marshell is a creative and freelance writer whose poems, essays, interviews and reviews have appeared in the Guardian, the Believer, Blackbird, Vinyl Poetry, Kinfolk, and elsewhere. She holds a BA from Spelman College and an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College.


Twitter Username: kylamarshell

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F126.

Navigating Layered Identities in Creative Nonfiction

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In writing nonfiction, we curate versions of ourselves and other characters, making choices as to which aspects of personhood to include on the page. In this panel, writers highlight various aspects of their identities from essay to essay based on subject, audience, style, etc., and discuss our responsibilities to readers and to ourselves.

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Liesel Hamilton is a PhD candidate at Florida State University. She has received fellowships from George Mason University and the Alan Cheuse International Writers Center, is the coauthor of the book Wild South Carolina, and is currently working on a project about war and memory.

Silas Hansen teaches creative writing at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, and is the nonfiction editor for Waxwing. His essays have appeared in Slate, Colorado Review, the Normal School, Hayden's Ferry Review, Redivider, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: silas_hansen

Website: www.silashansen.net

Alysia Sawchyn is a senior features editor at The Rumpus. Her essay collection, A Fish Growing Lungs, was a finalist for the 2020 Believer Awards.


Twitter Username: happiestwerther

Rajpreet Heir is an assistant professor of creative nonfiction at Ithaca College. She has published nonfiction in both commercial and literary venues including the Atlantic, the Washington Post, the New York TimesTeen VogueBrevity, and others. She writes about being Indian in Indiana.


Twitter Username: rajtweet_edu

Robbie Maakestad is a senior features editor for the Rumpus and an assistant professor of writing at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego.


Twitter Username: RobbieMaakestad

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F127.

Admit It, You're Writing a Poem: Ars Poetica & the Awkward Confession

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An ars poetica is a poem about poetry, one that makes an argument about what poetry should be or that explores why we write. In writing an ars poetica, though, poets must also confess to craft, artifice, and intention—to this strange thing we're doing, making art out of life. What else comes out when we pull back the curtain on our own making? What does this form give us permission to say? Panelists will read and discuss both their own work and key examples by others; audience Q&A will follow.

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Chloe Martinez is the author of two collections, Ten Thousand Selves and Corner Shrine, winner of the Backbone Press Chapbook Prize. She works at Claremont McKenna College, where she is staff at the Center for Writing & Public Discourse and lecturer in religious studies.


Twitter Username: chloepoet

Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach is a poet and author of The Many Names for Mother (Wick Poetry Prize), Don't Touch the Bones, and 40 Weeks. She is the Murphy Visiting Fellow in Poetry at Hendrix College in Arkansas.


Twitter Username: jkdpoetry

Diamond Forde is a Tin House and Callaloo fellow whose work has appeared in Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, the Offing, and more. She is a recipient of the Margaret Walker prize and a finalist for the GA Poetry Prize, and her debut book, Mother Body, was published recently.


Twitter Username: PoemsandCake

Rachel Zucker is the author of ten books, including SoundMachine, MOTHERs, and Museum of Accidents, which was a finalist for the NBCC Award. An adjunct at NYU, Zucker is the host of the podcast Commonplace.


Twitter Username: rachzuck

Website: www.rachelzucker.net

Matthew Olzmann is the author of three collections of poems: Constellation Route, Mezzanines, and Contradictions in the Design. He teaches at Dartmouth College and in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F128.

Widening the Lens: Diversifying Nature Writing

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“Nature writing” has long been associated with privileged people enjoying pristine environments, devoid of human influence, in ways that disregard more complicated realities of race, class, access, colonialism, and more. A diverse group of panelists who publish and teach nature writing will discuss how the old concepts of nature and nature writing have been replaced in recent years with a broader range of writers, experiences, and ideas.

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Kim O'Connell is a writer whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, National Parks Traveler, and Undark. She teaches in the graduate science writing program at Johns Hopkins and has been an artist in residence at Shenandoah and Acadia National Parks.


Twitter Username: kim_oconnell

Ashia Ajani is a Black queer environmental storyteller and educator hailing from Denver, Colorado (unceded territory of the Cheyenne, Ute, Arapahoe, and Comanche peoples). They have been published in Frontier Poetry, World Literature Today, Them.us, and Sierra magazine, among others.


Twitter Username: ashiainbloom

Paola Rosa-Aquino is a Brooklyn-based journalist covering science and environmental justice. Her writing has appeared in Popular Science, The New Republic, and Salon. She is part of the steering committee of the Uproot Project, a growing network for journalists of color who cover the environment.


Twitter Username: prosaaquino

Nancy Lord is the author of environmentally related books including the nonfiction Early Warming and Beluga Days and, most recently, pH: A Novel. She edited the anthology Made of Salmon. She teaches nature and science writing for Johns Hopkins University and is a former Alaska Writer Laureate.

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F108.

AWP Bookfair, Sponsored by Butler University MFA in Creative Writing

With more than 600 literary exhibitors, the AWP Bookfair is the largest of its kind. A great way to meet authors, critics, and peers, the bookfair also provides excellent opportunities to find information about many literary magazines, presses, and organizations. Please consult the bookfair map in the printed conference planner or AWP mobile app for location details.

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Halls D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F109.

Bookfair Concessions, Bar & Lounge

Breakfast and lunch concessions are available inside the Exhibit Hall in the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Cash, debit, and credit cards are accepted at all food and beverage locations. Please consult the maps in the conference program or mobile app for location details. Due to COVID-19 precautions, eating and drinking is limited to designated areas.

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126B, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F110.

The Wick Poetry Center’s Traveling Stanzas Makerspace

The Wick Poetry Center’s Traveling Stanzas Makerspace offers conference attendees an opportunity to creatively engage with themes of health and healing, social and racial justice, nature and environment, and peace and conflict. This interactive exhibit invites participants to share their voice using a suite of digital expressive writing tools, such as Emerge (an erasure poetry app), Thread (community-generated poems), and the Listening Wall (thematically-driven touch-screen poetry displays). Visitors will be able to choose a theme, follow a prompt, then print and share their responses. More information can be found at http://travelingstanzas.com.

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10:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m.

Virtual

F155.

Ancestral (Be)Longings: Queer/Transgender Indigenous Men’s Writing

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Furthering Indigenous, womanist, and queer/trans traditions of color, queer/trans Native men are creating art detailing the struggles and beautiful survival of multiple sovereign territories. Transgender, nonbinary, and queer writers/editors from the Americas, Pacific, and Palestine will discuss how Indigenous interpenetrating bodies—terrestrial, cultural, physical—figure in their work, and how lands and lovers are woven together, families and futures, and the surviving of genocide, intimately linked.

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feras hilal is a Brown queer Muslim Palestinian writer/performer living on Cahuilla land. They were a Radius of Arab American Writers and Los Angeles Review of Books writing workshop fellow. They are completing a speculative mixed-genre fiction/poetry project that imagines a liberated Palestine.

Max Wolf Valerio (Kainai) is author of the Lambda finalist The Testosterone Files, the performance Exile: Vision Quest at the Edge of Identity, and the poetry book The Criminal: The Invisibility of Parallel Forces. His work appears in Yellow Medicine Review and Troubling the Line:Trans and Genderqueer Poetry/Poetics.


Twitter Username: hypotenusewolf

Website: http://hypotenusewolf.wordpress.com/

D. Keali'i MacKenzie is a queer Kanaka Maoli writer and Pacific Tongues poet-facilitator. He is the author of From Hunger to Prayer and coeditor of Bamboo Ridge's speculative issue. His work is in 'Ōiwi: A Native Hawaiian Journal, Foglifter, and Mauri Ola: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English.

Ty Defoe (Giizhig) is an Indigiqueer citizen of the Oneida Nation and Ojibwe Tribe. A First Peoples Fund Cultural Capital Fellow and interdisciplinary performance artist, he has writing that appears in HowlRound, Casting a Movement: The Welcome Table Initiative, Kalihwisaks, and the Pitkin Review.


Twitter Username: tydefoe

Website: tydefoe.com

Virtual

F156.

Creative Activism in Words & Action: Writers & Activists at the United Nations

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Writers and artists have always inspired and influenced the world through literature and art. Many have taken the initiative to impact political and cultural shifts. However, their engagement in civic actions is more needed than ever before. The panel will explore how writers, poets, and artists can join hands to safeguard global interests and find solutions to concerns such as wars, human rights, hunger, illiteracy, climate change, and more by working with the United Nations Associations.

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Kalpna Singh-Chitnis is the author of four poetry books and the editor of Life and Legends. Her work has appeared in notable journals and her poetry has been translated into many languages. Her awards include the Naji Naaman Literary Award, Bihar Rajbhasha Award, and Rajiv Gandhi Global Excellence Award.


Twitter Username: AccessKalpna

Website: www.kalpnasinghchitnis.com

Christopher Merrill has published many books of poetry, translations, and nonfiction, most recently, Boat, Necessities, The Tree of the Doves: Ceremony, Expedition, War, and Self-Portrait with Dogwood. He directs the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa.


Twitter Username: CLMerrill

Website: www.christophermerrillbooks.com

Dunya Mikhail is the author of The Beekeeper: Rescuing the Stolen Women ofّ Iraq, In Her Feminine Sign, The Iraq Nights, Diary of A Wave Outside the Sea, and The War Works Hard. She was awarded the United Nations Human Rights Award for Freedom of Writing in 2001.


Twitter Username: Dunya Mikhail

Megha Sood is Pushcart-nominated, award-winning poet, editor, and literary activist based in New Jersey. She is associate editor at MookyChick and Life and Legends and a literary partner of the project “Life in Quarantine'' with Stanford University. She is a panelist at the Women's National Book Association and member of the United Nations Association, US chapter.


Twitter Username: meghasood16

Website: https://meghasworldsite.wordpress.com/

Rachel Bowen Pittman is the executive director of the United Nations Association of the USA (UNA-USA). She guides the UNA-USA’s strategic work, cultivates partnerships with UN and government officials, oversees membership expansion, and spearheads advocacy initiatives to help US-UN relations.


Twitter Username: RachelBPittman

Virtual

F157.

Behind the Curtain: An Insider's Look at Four Top Literary Journals

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For many writers, publishing work in a top journal can change the trajectory of one’s career. This panel will take us behind the scenes at four of America’s best literary journals. Editors will tell us what they look for in submissions, challenges they face in working with writers and running their journals, how their publications have evolved over time, and advice they have for writers hoping to receive that most wonderful of all emails: “We loved your submission and would like to publish it.”

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Matthew Lansburgh's collection of linked stories, Outside Is the Ocean, won the Iowa Short Fiction Award and was a finalist for the thirtieth Annual Lambda Literary Award and the 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction. He has received fellowships from Bread Loaf, Sewanee, Yaddo, and MacDowell.


Twitter Username: senorlansburgh

Website: www.matthewlansburgh.com

Carolyn Kuebler is the editor of New England Review. Before coming to NER as managing editor in 2004, she was an editor at Library Journal and founding editor of Rain Taxi. She has published her writing in various magazines, literary and otherwise.


Twitter Username: NERweb

Oscar Villalon is the managing editor of ZYZZYVA. He is a former book editor at the San Francisco Chronicle, as well as a past board member of the National Book Critics Circle. He is also a contributing editor to Literary Hub.


Twitter Username: ovillalon

Patrick Ryan is the author of The Dream Life of Astronauts and Send Me, as well as three novels for young adults. His fiction has been included in The Best American Short Stories. He is the former associate editor of Granta and is the editor in chief of One Story


Twitter Username: patrickryannyc

Julia Brown is an editor-at-large at AGNI and a former fiction editor at Gulf Coast. She is a writer, teacher, and doctoral student in the creative writing program at the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: juliabrown

Virtual

F158.

Transnational Writers Speak: Borders, Identity, Solidarity

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What are the pluralities and contradictions we face in pandemic times when fissures the world over have been exacerbated? Five transnational writers read from their works that straddle borders, engaging complex histories of Canada, Haiti, China, India, the Netherlands, Pakistan, and the US. They tell stories rooted in struggles for justice. Their decolonial writings carve out pathways toward solidarity across multiple identities.

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Torsa Ghosal is the author of an experimental novella, Open Couplets, and a book of literary criticism, Out of Mind. Her shorter writings have appeared in Necessary Fiction, Literary Hub, and Entropy. She is a professor of English at California State University and is at work on a second novel.


Twitter Username: TorsaG

Sehba Sarwar's essays, short stories, and poems have appeared in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Creative Times Report, and Callaloo. A second edition of her novel Black Wings was released in 2019. She tackles border and immigration issues through long-term writing and art projects.


Twitter Username: sehbasarwar

Sorayya Khan is the author of the forthcoming memoir To Be Thrown and the novels City of Spies, Five Queen’s Road, and Noor. She is at work on a new novel.


Twitter Username: SorayyaKhan

Website: www.sorayyakhan.com

Fan Wu is a bilingual writer, translator, book reviewer, and charity executive. She's the author of two novels, February Flowers and Beautiful as Yesterday. Her short stories have appeared in Granta, Ploughshares, and the Missouri Review. Her upcoming novels are Souls Left Behind and Hello, Silence.

Myriam J. A. Chancy is a Guggenheim fellow and HBA chair at Scripps College. She was awarded the Guyana Prize for Literature Caribbean Award in Best Fiction for her novel The Loneliness of Angels; her new novel, What Storm, What Thunder, focuses on the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

Virtual

F159.

From MFA to JOB: Making a Living, Making a Difference, Sponsored by WITS Alliance

(, , , Leah Falk)

Tenure-track teaching, publishing, and authorship are often the dream of MFA candidates, yet the competition for jobs and literary achievements has intensified. Creative and nonprofit sectors hold employment possibilities that utilize the craft of writing while making a real difference for communities. This panel ignites the imagination around the journey to meaningful careers that allow MFAs to work within a community of writers and artists, earn income, and sustain a writing life.

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Javan Howard is a poet and writer from Bronx, New York. He truly believes that lived experience is the ultimate teaching tool and uses poetry as a social forum to foster discourse about love, culture, and identity. He is the TAP codirector for Curriculum Mentorship & Facilitation.


Twitter Username: Righteoustpoet

Website: www.javanjhoward.com

Peter Markus has taught with InsideOut Literary Arts for twenty-seven years. In that time he has published seven books, among them a novel, Bob, or Man on Boat; a book of stories, We Make Mud; a book of nonfiction, Inside My Pencil; and most recently a book of poems, When Our Fathers Return to Us as Birds.

Asari Beale is a writer, educator, and leader deeply committed to children’s literacy. She is the executive director of Teachers & Writers Collaborative, a board member of the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable, and a steering committee member of LitNet, a network serving America’s literary community.


Twitter Username: asarinyc

Virtual

F160.

No F*cks to Give: Women on the Poetics of Sex & Raunch

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Women artists have long used raunch as a tool of empowerment and comedic relief to claim space and assert identity in healing and transgressive modes. In this joyful and bawdy reading, five women poets will celebrate sex, profanity, and raunch, asserting what Audre Lorde writes: “In touch with the erotic, I become less willing to accept powerlessness, or those other supplied states of being which are not native to me, such as resignation, despair, self-effacement, depression, self-denial.”

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Kendra DeColo is the author of three poetry collections, I Am Not Trying to Hide My Hungers From the World, My Dinner with Ron Jeremy, Thieves in the Afterlife, and coauthor of the chapbook Low Budget Movie. She received a 2019 NEA poetry fellowship, and she teaches at Hugo House.


Twitter Username: kendradecolo

Dorothy Chan is the author of two poetry books, Revenge of the Asian Woman and Attack of the Fifty-Foot Centerfold. She is an assistant professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and the cofounder and editor in chief of Honey Literary Inc., a 501(c)(3) organization.


Twitter Username: dorothykchan

Tiana Clark is the author of two collections: I Can’t Talk about the Trees without the Blood, winner of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize, and Equilibrium, winner of the Frost Place chapbook competition. She is the Grace Hazard Conkling Writer in Residence at Smith College.


Twitter Username: TianaClarkPoet

Erika Meitner is the author of six books of poems, including Useful Junk, out from BOA Editions in 2022, and Holy Moly Carry Me, which won the 2018 National Jewish Book award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award. She is a professor of English at Virginia Tech.


Twitter Username: rikam99

Website: erikameitner.com

Diane Seuss is the author of five collections of poetry, including Four-Legged Girl, finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; Still Life with Two Dead Peacocks; a Girl, finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and frank: sonnets. She is a 2020 Guggenheim fellow.


Twitter Username: dlseuss

Virtual

F161.

The Colonel: Thirty Years Later

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First published in 1978, Carolyn Forché’s poem “The Colonel," set in El Salvador as the country spiraled toward civil war, has been widely read, critiqued, emulated, and anthologized. Thirty years after the signing of the peace accords that ended the war and the poem's publication, five Salvadoran poets born in El Salvador and in the US—of different generations and affinities with the poem—discuss the impact of “The Colonel” on contemporary writing and on a generation of Central American poets.

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Claudia Castro Luna is an Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow (2019), Washington State poet laureate (2018–2021), and Seattle's first civic poet (2015–2017) She is the author of This City, Killing Marías, One River, A Thousand Voices, and Cipota under the Moon (forthcoming April 2022).


Twitter Username: ClaudiaC_L


Twitter Username: kalinaeditorial

Website: www.alexandralyttonregalado.com

Yvette Siegert is a poet, editor, and Ledbury Critic. Her writing has received support from CantoMundo, Macondo, PEN, the NEA, and Bread Loaf, and her translations of Alejandra Pizarnik won the Best Translated Book Award. She is a PhD candidate in Latin American studies at the University of Oxford.


Twitter Username: thechronotope

Website: thechronotope.wordpress.com

Maryam Ivette Parhizkar’s most recent chapbook is Somewhere Else the Sun is Falling into Someone’s Eyes. She is a scholar, teacher, and graduate student worker at Yale University, a CantoMundo fellow, and member of US Central American collective Tierra Narrative.


Twitter Username: MIParhizkar

Website: http://parhizkar.tumblr.com

William Archila, author of The Art of Exile, winner of the 2010 International Latino Book Award, and The Gravedigger’s Archaeology, winner of the 2013 Letras Latinas/Red Hen Poetry Prize, has been published in American Poetry Review, AGNI, Conjunctions, the Missouri Review, Prairie Schooner, POETRY Magazine, and Tin House.

10:35 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F136.

It Was the Best/Worst of Times: Launching a Youth Literary Arts Organization in 2020

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The art and activism of young people flourished despite 2020’s political, social justice, civil rights, and health crises. In media res, the BreakBread Literacy Project launched a national youth arts organization: publishing BreakBread Magazine and providing free creative writing classes, events, and literary apprenticeships for creatives age 14–24. Project founders will discuss the ups, downs, lessons learned, and future of a literary organization that seeks to change the face of publishing.

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Jamie Danielle Logan has served as managing editor of the Pinch and Product magazines and now does so at BreakBread. She is pursuing a PhD at the University of Southern Mississippi and has work located in the New Ohio Review, El Portal, and QuestLog and forthcoming from Palette Poetry and Rougarou.


Twitter Username: jamiedlogan

W. David Hall is CEO and president of the BreakBread Literacy Project. He has directed the Kenyon Young Writers Program for twenty-one years. He teaches high school English in Los Angeles and co-coaches his school's slam poetry team. He has also published Culture and Context, a writing guide.

Cara Echols is an artist and writer and serves as art director for Bread Bread Literacy Project. She enjoys writing experimental and speculative literature and is currently working on her indie magazine CompoSe Art Magazine, as well as a short story collection, which has yet to be formally titled.

Sean Smith, as Charlie J. Eskew, is the writer of two speculative works, Tales of the Astonishing Black Spark (2018), a speculative work of satire, and Judges: Where the Light Lay Still (2018) a prequel to the Judge Dredd series.


Twitter Username: CJEskew

Website: www.askeweskew.com

Jamie Lyn Smith is a writer and editor. The recipient of an Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Award, she is also fiction editor at BreakBread Magazine and a consulting editor at the Kenyon Review. Her short story collection, Township, was published in December 2021.


Twitter Username: jamielynwrites

Website: http://jamielyn-smith.squarespace.com/

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F137.

The Future of Black: The Advent of 21st-Century Second-Wave Afrofuturism Poetry

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Afrofuturism has experienced a second wave in the 21st-century mainstream propelled by the success of the 2018 blockbuster film Black Panther. This panel explores the impact of this second wave on Afrofuturism poetry. Panelists featured in a new poetry anthology on Afrofuturism, black comics, and superhero culture discuss how their poetry contributes to second-wave Afrofuturism, along with insights to Afrofuturism poetry as a sustainable genre and defining it for future generations.

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Len Lawson is the author of Chime  and the chapbook Before the Night Wakes You. He is also editor of Hand in Hand: Poets Respond to Race  and The Future of Black: Afrofuturism and Black Comics Poetry.


Twitter Username: Lenvillelaws

Cynthia Manick is the author of Blue Hallelujahs, editor of Soul Sister Revue: A Poetry Compilation (Jamii, 2019) and The Future of Black: Afrofuturism, Black Comics, and Superhero Poetry. She is the founder of the quarterly reading series Soul Sister Revue.


Twitter Username: cmanick

Tim Seibles has published several collections of poetry, including Buffalo Head Solos, Fast Animal—a finalist for the National Book Award in 2012—and, most recently, One Turn Around The Sun. His new and selected collection, Voodoo Libretto, will be released in January 2022. 


Twitter Username: Timseibles77@gmail.com

Teri Ellen Cross Davis is the author of a more perfect Union, 2019 Journal/ Charles B. Wheeler Poetry Prize winner, and Haint, a 2017 Ohioana Poetry Book award winner. She's a Cave Canem fellow, a Black Ladies Brunch Collective member, and poetry coordinator for the Folger Shakespeare Library in D.C.


Twitter Username: cross_davis

Steven Leyva's poems have appeared in Nashville Review, jubilat, Vinyl, Prairie Schooner, and Best American Poetry 2020. He is a Cave Canem fellow and author of The Understudy's Handbook, winner of the Jean Feldman Poetry Prize.


Twitter Username: sdleyva

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F138.

Teaching & Writing Asian America in the CW Classroom

(, , , Alexandra Chang)

What does it mean to teach CW as a minority instructor? In the age of "Asian Hate," how can we as Asian Americans specifically incorporate ourselves into courses called simply "Workshop," as if to imply an ossified canon? In these classrooms that have historically ignored us, how can we be sensitive workshop guides to both minority and majority community students while still taking care of ourselves? Students, how can you ask for CW instruction that leaves you feeling included and cared for?

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Piyali Bhattacharya is editor of the collection Good Girls Marry Doctors. Her short stories and essays have appeared in Ploughshares and the New York Times. Her novel-in-progress has been supported by Hedgebrook and VCCA. She is artist-in-residence at UPenn, where she teaches fiction and nonfiction.


Twitter Username: sari_torial_ink

Website: www.piyalibhattacharya.com

Rajiv Mohabir, poet and translator, translated I Even Regret Night (PEN/Heim Award) and is the author of The Cowherd's Son and The Taxidermist's Cut. He is an assistant professor of poetry at Auburn University's creative writing program.


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Jane Wong is the author of How to Not Be Afraid of Everything and Overpour. She is an associate professor of creative writing at Western Washington University.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F139.

Winning Over the Haters: Fostering Student Appreciation for Poetry

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Time and time again, undergraduates—even those with a self-professed interest in literature—will come to creative writing classes claiming they don’t “get” or care for poetry. How do we engage students in a genre they’re certain they don’t like or understand? On this panel, professors will discuss strategies across a range of university courses detailing how they open students’ minds to poetry and what lessons, prompts, and activities have helped foster a love for poetry among their students.

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Lindsay Tigue is the author of System of Ghosts, winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize. She is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at Eastern New Mexico University.


Twitter Username: lindsaytigue

Website: http://lindsaytigue.wordpress.com

Paisley Rekdal is the author, most recently, of Appropriate: A Provocation and Nightingale. A Guggenheim fellow and Utah's poet laureate, she teaches at the University of Utah, where she edits the web archive project Mapping Literary Utah.


Twitter Username: paisleyrekdal

Chen Chen is the author of When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities, which was longlisted for the National Book Award and won the Thom Gunn Award. He has received a Pushcart and a NEA fellowship. He teaches at Brandeis University as the Jacob Ziskind Poet-in-Residence.


Twitter Username: chenchenwrites

Website: chenchenwrites.com

Tomás Q. Morín is the author of the poetry collection Machete and the memoir Let Me Count the Ways. He teaches at Rice University and at Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Jennifer Popa is a short story writer, essayist, and occasional poet. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Gannon University, where she’s working on a collection of short stories and a novel.


Twitter Username: jelopapopa

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F140.

Fiction, Memoir, Poetry: LGBTQ+ Persons in Rural Spaces

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How does LGBTQIA writing inform an understanding of life in rural spaces? Writers from a range of racial/ethnic, national, generational, and occupational identities will read from work set in Mexico, Alabama, Vermont, and beyond. Our work includes novels under contract, published memoirs, poems, and biomythography.

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Catharine Wright teaches courses such as Writing Gender and Sexuality and Outlaw Women at Middlebury College. She has earned prizes for her fiction, nonfiction, and poetry in literary, queer, and feminist magazines. She just wrote a novel about a queer town clerk in a rural town.

François Clemmons, PhD, won a Grammy for a recording of Porgy and Bess, founded the Harlem Spiritual Ensemble, and was famously Officer Clemmons, the neighborhood policeman on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. His recently published memoir intimately details his life story as an artist with rural roots.

Alex Bacchus—hyperpolyglot, Fulbright alum, and multidisciplinary artist—is expected to graduate in 2022. Their artistry is inspired by holding queer, racialized identities; descending from free and forced migrations; and unpacking these profound meanings while living in North America.


Twitter Username: mxtheydiealex

Estela González's narratives on race, class, gender, sexuality, and environmental justice appear in the Barcelona Review, Flash Frontier, Flyway, Label Me Latina, Solstice Literary Magazine, and several anthologies. Her novel Arribada was a finalist for the Feminist Press’s Louise Meriwether Award.


Twitter Username: 5estelagonzalez

Website: estelagonzalez.net

Patricia Powell is the author of Me Dying Trial, A Small Gathering of Bones, The Pagoda, and The Fullness of Everything. She is the recipient of a PEN award, a Lila Wallace Reader's Digest Writer's Award, and the Ferro-Grumley award for queer fiction. Powell teaches in the MFA program at Mills College.


Twitter Username: patriciapowell

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F141.

Beyond Motherhood: Ritual, Myth, & Self-Fashioning in Poetry

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This panel combines readings by four lively poets with a discussion centered around the following questions: How do suppressed or redirected desires for motherhood (or nonmaternity) reside in our poems? How do our identities as cisgender or nonbinary, Black or white, immigrant or native-born make their way into poems that critique, reject, or resurrect the maternal? How do our forms give voice to the silenced or forbidden? Our collaborative conversation invites audience participation.

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Karen Kovacik is the author of the poetry collections Metropolis Burning and Beyond the Velvet Curtain, translator of Jacek Dehnel's Aperture, and editor of Scattering the Dark, anthology of Polish women poets. Recipient of an NEA translation fellowship, she teaches at IUPUI in Indianapolis.


Twitter Username: KarenKovacik

Ewa Chrusciel has three books in English: Of Annunciations, Contraband of Hoopoe, and Strata and three in Polish: Furkot, Sopiłki, Tobołek. Her translations include books by Jorie Graham, Joseph Conrad, IB Singer, and Jack London. Her book Contraband of Hoopoe came out in Italy in 2019.


Twitter Username: ewachrusciel

Website: www.echrusciel.net

Maudelle Driskell is the executive director of The Frost Place. She holds an MFA in poetry from Warren Wilson College and is the recipient of the Ruth Lilly Fellowship, awarded by Poetry Magazine and the Modern Language Association. 


Twitter Username: Frost_Place

Vievee Francis is the author of three poetry collections, Blue-Tail Fly, Horse in the Dark, and Forest Primeval. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry and Angles of Ascent: A Norton Anthology of Contemporary African American Poetry, among other journals. Her latest work is The Shared World.

116, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F142.

Writing Resilience: A Reading by Neurodiverse Writers

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This reading features writers affected by trauma, addiction, and/or mental illness. Panelists will present their stories to empower themselves and others who have these stigmatized disabilities. Panelists will come out as neurodiverse as they inspire their listeners with their literary memoirs; audience members, including the neurotypical, will be able to identify with their struggles, triumphs, and resilience. The panel will demonstrate that mentally ill does not mean mentally weak.

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Larissa Shmailo is a poet, translator, novelist, and writing coach. She is leader of the workshop Writing Resilience for writers affected by trauma, addiction, and/or mental illness. She is the original English-language translator of the avant-garde opera Victory over the Sun by Alexei Kruchenych.


Twitter Username: larissashmailo

Website: www.larissashmailo.com

Jonathan Penton edits the journal Unlikely Stories and its print arm, Unlikely Books. He is the technical director for the New Orleans Poetry Festival and Rigorous and has worked in management and technical roles for a number of arts organizations. His most recent chapbook of poetry is Backstories.


Twitter Username: USDotOrg

Meg Tuite is the author of four story collections and five chapbooks. She won the Twin Antlers Poetry award for her poetry collection, Bare Bulbs Swinging. She is fiction editor of Bending Genres, associate editor of Narrative Magazine. She teaches writing retreats and online classes hosted by Bending Genres.


Twitter Username: megtuite

Website: megtuite.com

Anna Fridlis graduated from The New School with a nonfiction MFA in 2014 and has been teaching at her alma mater since. She is currently on academic leave to work on her memoir about immigration, trauma, family and identity. Anna also edits for Seventh Wave Magazine and runs an online kids writing camp.

Sandra Kleven is publisher at Cirque Journal and Press, partnering with founding editor, Michael Burwell. Cirque was created to publish the best work of writers in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Kleven is the author of four books, most recently Defiance Street: Poems and Other Writing.


Twitter Username: sandaleena

Website: http://heartworksak.net/poet

118A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F143.

Both/And: Boosting Women, Genderquee,r & LGBT Writers

(, , , Emma Eisenberg, )

The Claw—a Philadelphia-based salon for genderqueer, trans, and cis women writers—invites you to imagine diverse communal spaces beyond the writing workshop. Members of The Claw discuss how they create safe spaces and promote mentorship and collaboration between writers. Participants will introduce frameworks, guidelines, and rituals fostering connection rather than competition, boosting rather than boasting. Audience members are given tools to return home and launch their own collectives.

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Liz Moore is the author of four novels, including Heft, The Unseen World, and the internationally bestselling Long Bright River. A winner of the 2014 Rome Prize in Literature, she lives in Philadelphia and works as an associate professor in Temple University's MFA program in creative writing.


Twitter Username: lizmoorebooks

Carmen Maria Machado is the author of National Book Award finalist story collection Her Body and Other Parties and the memoir In the Dream House. She is a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, and her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, Granta, Tin House, Conjunctions, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: carmenmmachado

Website: http://carmenmariamachado.com/

Asali Solomon is the author of two novels, The Days of Afrekete and Disgruntled, as well as the short story collection Get Down. She teaches fiction writing and the literature of the African diaspora at Haverford College.

Annie Liontas's novel, Let Me Explain You, was featured in the New York Times Book Review as Editor's Choice. She is the coeditor of the anthology A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors. She teaches at George Washington University.


Twitter Username: aliontas

Website: www.annieliontas.com

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F144.

Workshops for the Working Class: How We Build Learning Spaces outside Academia

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How do learning spaces rally in service of their community members and bridge the access-gap between art literacy and class? In this panel, four diverse LA area workshop founders open a dialogue on their community outreach, operating practices, and pedagogies. Each panelist will outline achievements and challenges they’ve encountered in their work to uplift, mentor, teach, and advocate new models that center multiculturalism and deny systems of domination and white supremacy in the classroom.

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Marcus Omari is a dedicated poet, writer, and performer. He has been a featured poet on Verses & Flow on TV One, authored several poetry chapbooks, and contributed poetic vocals for various multigenre music albums. He currently teaches creative writing in Orange County, California. www.marcusomari.com


Twitter Username: marcusomariPRP

Nancy Lynée Woo is an MFA candidate at Antioch University and the recipient of fellowships from PEN America, Arts Council for Long Beach, and Idyllwild Writers Week. As the creator of Surprise the Line poetry workshops, she believes in the power of the arts to bring people together.


Twitter Username: fancifulnance

Alyesha Wise is a writer and poet from Camden, New Jersey. Currently residing in Los Angeles, she is the cofounder of Spoken Literature Art Movement and the director of program development for Street Poets Inc. Alyesha is also the cofounder of The Philly Pigeon and has appeared on OWN, BET, and PBS.


Twitter Username: mswise

Hiram Sims is a poet, essayist, and creative writing professor teaching with The Community Literature Initiative in Los Angeles, California.

Danielle Mitchell is a feminist poet, teaching artist, and entrepreneur. She is the founding director of The Poetry Lab and author of Makes the Daughter-in-Law Cry, winner of the Clockwise Chapbook Prize. Her poems have appeared in Hayden’s Ferry Review, Vinyl, and Transom.


Twitter Username: the_poetry_lab

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F145.

Fifty Years of the American Poetry Review: A Celebration

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The American Poetry Review has been in continuous publication since 1972. In honor of our anniversary, we are proud to present four writers whose work is exemplary of the excellence and range we publish. Contributing poets will read in honor of the occasion.

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Elizabeth Scanlon is the editor in chief of the American Poetry Review. She is the author of Lonesome Gnosis, The Brain Is Not the United States/The Brain Is the Ocean, and Odd Regard.


Twitter Username: bizscanlon

Major Jackson is the author of five volumes of poetry, most recently The Absurd Man. A recipient of Guggenheim Fellowship, Jackson is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in the Humanities at Vanderbilt University. He serves as poetry editor of the Harvard Review.


Twitter Username: Poet_Major

Website: majorjackson.com

Jason Schneiderman is the author of four poetry collections, most recently, Hold Me Tight and Primary Source. He is the editor of the anthology Queer and is an associate professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY.


Twitter Username: kafkaboy

Ada Limón is the author of five books of poetry, including The Carrying, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Bright Dead Things, which was named a finalist for the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Kingsley Tufts Award.


Twitter Username: adalimon

Website: adalimon.com

Megan Fernandes is an assistant professor of English at Lafayette College and holds an MFA in poetry from Boston University and a PhD in English from University of California Santa Barbara. Her work has appeared in journals such as the New Yorker, Tin House, Rattle, Guernica, Pank, the Common, among others.

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F146.

Rest as an Act of Activism

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Exploring a pedagogy of showing up, not just for our students and colleagues, but for ourselves. How do we find moments to rest while setting boundaries, finding and sharing resources of rest, and embracing the power of moving back? We will look at ways to restore and repair in a time when faculty (especially those with marginalized identities) are asked to do unrecognized and uncompensated work for social justice and campus equity.

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Rachel M. Simon is the author of the poetry collections Theory of Orange and Marginal Road. She works in diversity, equity, and inclusion at Pace University. She has taught at Bedford Hills Women's Prison and as the director of the Social Justice Collective at Sarah Lawrence College.

Olivia Worden is a multigenre writer who has taught creative writing at Pace University and Sarah Lawrence College. Her essay “Held by Strangers” was selected for Pigeon Pages 2019 Essay Contest and for Best of the Net 2020. Her work has appeared in Post Road, CutBank, and Pilgrimage.

Melissa Faliveno is the author of the essay collection Tomboyland, named a best book of 2020 by NPR, New York Public Library, and O, the Oprah Magazine. She was the 2020–21 Kenan Visiting Writer at University of North Carolina and is currently a visiting assistant professor of English at Kenyon College.


Twitter Username: melissafaliveno

Jimin Han is the author of A Small Revolution and an as-yet-untitled forthcoming novel. She teaches or has taught at the Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College and Pace University.


Twitter Username: jiminhanwriter

Website: jiminhan.net

Juan J. Morales is the author of three poetry collections including The Handyman's Guide to End Times. He is a CantoMundo Fellow, the editor of Pilgrimage Magazine, an associate dean in the College of Humanities Arts & Social Sciences, and a Professor of English at Colorado State University Pueblo.


Twitter Username: moralesjuanj

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F147.

Feedforward: Empowering Student Writers through Inclusive Feedback

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What kinds of feedback help our students thrive? We draw from professional experience as well as from research in education and composition studies in sharing best practices in written and oral feedback. Our recommendations take into account student difference such as race, gender, class, and neurodivergence and apply to online, hybrid, and in-person creative writing classrooms for every level from high school to continuing education.

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Micah Bateman teaches library and information science at the University of Iowa, where he has produced Massive Open Online Courses and taught creative writing online since 2013. He is coauthor of Mapping the Imaginary: Supporting Creative Writers through Programming, Prompts, and Research.


Twitter Username: Micah_Bateman

Amish Trivedi is the author of three books and has poems in American Poetry Review, Bennington Review, Kenyon, and Typo. He has an MFA from Brown University's program in literary arts and has a PhD in English and critical theory from Illinois State University.


Twitter Username: amishtrivedi

Website: www.amishtrivedi.com

Helen Betya Rubinstein has taught at CUNY schools, University of Iowa, Yale, and The New School, where her current courses follow an inquiry-to-action model. Her essays have appeared in Literary Hub, Jewish Currents, and Gulf Coast, and she works one-on-one with other writers as a coach.


Twitter Username: helenbetya

Bureen Ruffin is an assistant professor in the first-year writing program at The New School’s Eugene Lang College. She has taught literature, creative writing, and English composition since 2011. A recipient of a Callaloo Fellowship, her work has most recently appeared in Of Note magazine.

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F147B.

"If I Speak for the Dead": Jewish Poems of Ancestry

(, , , Elvira Basevich, )

A growing body of contemporary Jewish poetry imagines its way into the worlds of our recent ancestors, whether literal, literary, or in spirit. What are the challenges of writing to investigate or recover these lineages through layers of diaspora and receded languages? What are the possibilities? Each poet will read their own poems and speak to their writing process and related craft considerations.

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Dan Alter’s poems and reviews have been published in journals including Field, Fourteen Hills, PANK, and ZYZZYVA; his first collection My Little Book of Exiles is forthcoming. He works as an IBEW electrician.


Twitter Username: arlozorof

Website: https://danalter.net

Daniel Khalastchi is an Iraqi Jewish American. He is the author of three books, including American Parables, winner of the Brittingham Prize in Poetry. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, a former fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and a founding editor of Rescue Press.

Jennifer Kronovet is the author of two books of poetry, The Wug Test, which was selected for the National Poetry Series, and Awayward. She cotranslated Empty Chairs, poems by Chinese writer Liu Xia, and The Acrobat, poems by Yiddish writer Celia Dropkin. She is the editor of Circumference Books.


Twitter Username: jennykr

Gail Newman, child of Holocaust survivors, was born after WW II in a displaced persons camp. Her new collection, Blood Memory, chosen by Marge Piercy for The Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize, was published in 2020. The book won the NCPA Gold Award for Poetry. Gail teaches genocide poetry for educators and students.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F148.

Poetic License vs. Fair Use

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A lawyer well versed in fair use doctrine will moderate the panel: a publisher who has been on various sides of copyright battles and two poet/professors. The moderator will introduce fair use engaging the panelists in conversation about experience and case law. The conversation will highlight the difference between creative risks with derivative material and plagiarism to the point the artist must decide between creating or getting published. The panel will take questions from the audience.

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Han VanderHart (she/they) is the author of the chapbook Hands like Birds and the poetry collection What Pecan Light. Han is the reviews editor at EcoTheo Review and edits Moist Poetry Journal.


Twitter Username: hmvanderhart

Website: www.hanvanderhart.com

Gerry LaFemina, poet and fiction writer, is the author of thirteen books of fiction, poetry, prose poetry, and criticism. A former AWP board member and cofounder of the two-year caucus, he's a professor of English at Frostburg State University and he serves as a poetry mentor in the MFA Program at Carlow University.


Twitter Username: PoetinAmerica

Richard Peabody's Gargoyle Magazine (founded 1976) will release issue 75 by March 2022. He has edited (or coedited) twenty-six anthologies including Mondo Barbie and A Different Beat. His recent books include the Richard Peabody Reader and Guinness on the Quay.


Twitter Username: Gargoyle65

Website: www.gargoylemagazine.com

Cathy Wittmeyer is a lawyer/engineer/poet from Buffalo, New York. She works in Dornbirn, Austria, as corporate counsel. She has her BS from the University of Dayton, her JD from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and her MFA from Carlow University. She is the founder of Word to Action, a poetry retreat.


Twitter Username: CathyWittmeyer

Website: cathywittmeyer.com

Jessica Q. Stark is the author of Savage Pageant, which was named one of the Best Books of 2020 in the Boston Globe and in Hyperallergic. Her work appears in Pleiades and Verse, and she is a poetry editor for AGNI and the comics editor for Honey Literary.


Twitter Username: jezzbah

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F149.

Agented & on Submission: A Special Kind of Torture

(, , , , Allison Hubbard)

Finding an agent is surely the end of the journey, right? You’ve got an agent, you’re on submission—now what? Our panelists discuss feelings of both excitement and angst and answer these vital questions. As an agented author on submission, what are the best ways to handle the uncertainty of publishing? And what are best practices to combat imposter syndrome and stay focused on your individual journey before, during, and after submission?

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Shinelle L. Espaillat teaches at Dutchess Community College in New York. Her work has appeared in Tahoma Literary Review, Two Hawks Quarterly, Minerva Rising, the Westchester Review, Ghost Parachute, Cleaver Magazine, and Midway Journal. She is represented by Annie Bomke of Annie Bomke Literary Agency.


Twitter Username: shinelle20

Website: www.shinelleespaillat.com

Mohamed (Moe) Shalabi is a Palestinian American author, educator, neuroscientist, and former junior literary agent. He writes literary fiction with elements of magical realism and speculative and science fiction. He is represented by Kat Kerr of the Donald Maass Literary Agency.


Twitter Username: Agent_Moe

Tonya Abari is a writer, editor, and book reviewer. A 2021 We Need Diverse Books mentee, Abari is a Carnegie Hall NeOn Arts ten-week nonfiction writing intensive alum as well as the 2020 Hurston Wright Foundation Writers Week creative nonfiction alum. She is currently agented and on submission.


Twitter Username: Tabaris_World

KL Burd is a speculative fiction writer who lives in Austin, Texas, with his wife and two boys. Passionate about social issues and creating change through writing, KL writes so that underrepresented kids, especially young Black boys and girls, can see themselves in every type of story imaginable.


Twitter Username: authorklburd

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F150.

Page to Stage: Pathways to Production in a Virtual and In-Person World

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Five playwrights describe their varied pathways to production before and during the pandemic. From play contests to networking to agent submissions to using directories, each will describe how their work came to be staged and how play development differs from all other creative writing forms. They will finish the session with an open discussion on how the virtual world may change how theater may be shared in the future.

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Bonnie Culver’s plays have been produced nationwide. Her one-woman show, A Ticket to the Circus, based upon the memoir of Norris Church Mailer, is scheduled for production in 2021 at the Edgemar Center, California, starring Anne Archer. She is the cofounder of Wilkes University's MA/MFA program.

Matthew Hinton holds his MA and MFA in creative writing from Wilkes University and is the author of Quiet Cowboy and other plays. Hinton is a founding member of Gaslight Theatre Company (Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) and is coordinator of writing and assistant director of student success at Misericordia University.

Rachel Luann Strayer is a published playwright with an MFA from Wilkes University. Plays: Drowning Ophelia, The Poe Asylum, Songbird, A Decameron for the Apocalypse, and The Last Daughter (Jane Chambers Feminist Playwriting Award Finalist). She is currently the lead writer for NYC theatre group Stage Fright.


Twitter Username: RLStrayerWrites

Jean Klein has been a semifinalist in the O’Neill competition; a one-act play Snapshots was a winner in the Kernodle Play competition at the University of Arkansas. She currently teaches playwriting at Wilkes University and owns Blue Moon Plays, a dramatic publishing company.


Twitter Username: Blue Moon Plays

Website: www.bluemoonplays.com

Sérgio-Andreo Bettencourt Urbina (a.k.a. s.a.b.u.) is a US-based nonbinary, first-generation Luso-Peruvian American playwright. Their writing credits include Hungry, Hungry, Demon, Started from the Convent Now We’re Here, and CRIMSON.RUST.AMBER.

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F151.

Saturnalia Books Twentieth Anniversary Reading

(, , , , )

Saturnalia Books makes its home in Philadelphia and is celebrating its twentieth Anniversary in 2022. Timothy Liu, editor in chief, will moderate this celebratory reading to include a diverse lineup of Saturnalia poets inclusive of African American, Asian American, and LGBTQ communities as well as the current Mississippi state poet laureate.

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Timothy Liu is the author of twelve books of poems, most recently Let It Ride. His journals and papers are archived in the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. He is professor of English at William Paterson University.


Twitter Username: arabadjisliu

Website: Http://timothyliu.net

Kayleb Rae Candrilli is the recipient of a Whiting Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts. They are the author of Water I Won’t Touch, All the Gay Saints, and What Runs Over.

Diamond Forde is a Tin House and Callaloo fellow whose work has appeared in Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, the Offing, and more. She is a recipient of the Margaret Walker prize and a finalist for the GA Poetry Prize, and her debut book, Mother Body, was published recently.


Twitter Username: PoemsandCake

Catherine Pierce is the poet laureate of Mississippi and the author of four books of poems, most recently, Danger Days. An NEA Fellow and two-time Pushcart Prize winner, she codirects the creative writing program at Mississippi State University.


Twitter Username: katieppierce

Website: www.catherinepierce.net

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F152.

When Do We Eat? Food & Feasts as Narrative Potential in Fiction

(Temim Fruchter, , , )

In fiction, as in life, communal meals can be realms of possibility. Lavish holiday tables can be pivotal sites of magic, mess, or tension. Feasts convene characters both close and estranged, friendly and inimical. Dominant ideas of "family dinner: can be queered, bent, defamiliarized. And the food, vivid and specific, can be a character, too. This will be a conversation between fiction writers to whom food and meals are culturally significant in their lived lives, as well as in their stories.

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Gina Chung is a Korean American writer based in New York City. She is the communications manager at PEN America and holds an MFA in fiction from The New School. Her work appears or is forthcoming in the Kenyon Review, Catapult, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, Pleiades, and elsewhere. Find her at gina-chung.com.


Twitter Username: ginathechung

Kayla Kumari Upadhyaya is a lesbian writer of essays, short stories, and pop culture criticism. She is the assistant managing editor of TriQuarterly and a writer for Autostraddle. She previously was a restaurant reporter for Eater NY and recently held a fellowship with Lambda Literary.


Twitter Username: KaylaKumari

Chelsey Johnson is the author of the novel Stray City, a New York Times Editors’ Choice. Her writing has appeared in Gulf Coast, One Story, Ploughshares, NPR's Selected Shorts, and elsewhere. She received an MFA from Iowa and a Stegner fellowship and now teaches at Northern Arizona University.


Twitter Username: chelseyhotel

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F153.

What Happens When What We Tell Ourselves Changes?

(, , , )

This nonfiction panel will discuss writing to meet the key of our present moment. Have paradigm shifts related to race, justice, consent, gender, identity, and the pandemic impacted our understandings of life before now, and if so, how do we accept this charge to deepen and expand our work to meet the times? How do we keep writing with imagination, complexity, and grace during periods of cultural transformation? What is the creative nonfiction writer's role in histories still unfolding?

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Barrie Jean Borich is the author of Apocalypse, Darling. Her memoir Body Geographic won a Lambda Literary Award, and her book-length essay My Lesbian Husband won a Stonewall Book Award. She’s a professor at DePaul in Chicago, where she edits Slag Glass City, a journal of the urban essay arts.


Twitter Username: BOOKofBJB

Website: barriejeanborich.com

Gabrielle Civil is a Black feminist writer, poet, and performance artist. Her texts and translations have appeared in Small Axe, Two Lines, Obsidian, and more. She is the author of Swallow the Fish, Experiments in Joy, (ghost gestures), and the déjà vu. The aim of her work is to open up space.

Cooper Lee Bombardier is the author of Pass with Care, a Firecracker Award finalist. His writing appears in the Malahat Review, the Kenyon Review, CutBank, Foglifter, and in the Lambda Award-winning anthology The Remedy, as well as in Meanwhile, Elsewhere, winner of the ALA Stonewall Book Award.


Twitter Username: CooperLeeB

Website: www.cooperleebombardier.com

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of the essay collections The Fluency of Light and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit, as well as the forthcoming Borealis and Captioning the Archives. She is an assistant professor of creative nonfiction at the University of Michigan.

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F154.

Lily Poetry Review Books

(eileen cleary, Laura Van Prooyen, Max Heinegg, Robbie Gamble)

Join Lily Poetry Review Books for a reading by Shari Caplan, David P. Miller, Beth Mercurio, Martha McCollough, Robbie Gamble, Laura Van Prooyen, Rikki Santer, and Max Heinegg.

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12:10 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

Virtual

F183.

Crip Time in Pandemic Times

(, , Travis Chi Wing Lau, , )

As we emerge into a new stage of the COVID-19 pandemic, conversations continue about how time felt different this past year. A key part of those conversations has been the concept of “crip time,” a disability community term that entered the mainstream this year. Crip time offers both liberation from rigid time schedules and constriction within the limits of disabled bodies and minds. These five disabled authors will speak to the reality of crip time in pandemic times.

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Emily Rose Cole is the author of the full-length poetry collection Thunderhead and the chapbook Love & a Loaded Gun, a collection of persona poems in women's voices. She holds an MFA in poetry from Southern Illinois University Carbondale and is a PhD candidate at the University of Cincinnati.


Twitter Username: EmilyColeWrites

Website: www.emilyrosecolepoetry.com

Ellen Samuels is a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her writing recently appeared in Brevity, Copper Nickel, Colorado Review, Rogue Agent, and Disability Visibility. She is the author of a verse memoir, Hypermobilities, and is working on a nonfiction book titled "Sick Time."


Twitter Username: ehlastigirl

Marlena Chertock has two books of poetry, Crumb-Sized and On That One-Way Trip to Mars. She is queer, disabled, and serves as cochair of OutWrite, Washington, D.C.'s annual LGBTQ literary festival, and on the Board of Split This Rock, a nonprofit cultivating poetry that bears witness to injustice.


Twitter Username: mchertock

Website: http://marlenachertock.com/

Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet and writer. K. has featured in New York Times, PBS News Hour, the Rumpus, VIDA Review, and Race Forward. They are a MacDowell and Lambda Literary Fellow. Their book, More Than Organs, received a 2021 Stonewall Honor Award and is a 2021 Lambda Literary Award Finalist.


Twitter Username: brownroundboi

Virtual

F184.

The Craft of Teaching on Black Life & Literature

(, , , )

This discussion features contributing writers to Teaching Black: The Craft of Teaching on Black Life and Literature. In a conversation moderated by the anthology’s coeditors, participating authors speak about the significance of writing and teaching Black literature, the labor it requires, and the beauty that comes from it. They will read excerpts from the anthology and discuss how their work reflects pedagogies, experiences, and practices of teaching Black literature and centering Black life.

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drea brown is a poet/scholar and assistant professor of English at Texas State University. The author of dear girl:a reckoning, drea has writing featured in various academic, creative, and public scholarship magazines and journals.

Ana-Maurine Lara, PhD, is a national award-winning poet, novelist, and scholar. She is the author of several books; Lara’s work focuses on questions of Black and Indigenous people and freedom. She has been published in literary and scholarly journals and is an associate professor in women, gender, and sexuality studies at University of Oregon.


Twitter Username: zorashorse

Aricka Foreman is an American poet and interdisciplinary writer from Detroit, Michigan. Her debut poetry collection, Salt Body Shimmer, earned her the 2021 Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Poetry. She has earned fellowships from Cave Canem, Callaloo, and the Millay Colony for the Arts.


Twitter Username: arickamarie

Website: www.arickaforeman.com

Virtual

F185.

Desi Mythpunk: Indian Mythologies in Futurist Writing by South Asian Authors

(, , , , )

Myths are often viewed as stories from “the past.” But a number of recent works shows that they can be used to engage with contemporary sociopolitical questions and imagine futuristic modes of being. This panel explores how and why South Asian authors employ myths in their poetry, graphic novels, and more. Authors discuss the refashioning of myths as a world-making force that may cultivate a sense of cultural heritage, subvert orientalist stereotypes, and bring alternative futures into being.

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Vidhu Aggarwal's book of poems, The Trouble with Humpadori, takes mobile forms in video, comics, and performance. She teaches postcolonial/transnational literatures and creative writing at Rollins College.


Twitter Username: vidhuaggarwal

Website: vidhu_aggarwal

Bishakh Som is an Indian American trans femme visual artist. Her graphic novel Apsara Engine was the winner of a 2020 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and a 2020 Lambda Literary Award for Best LGBTQ Comic. Her graphic memoir Spellbound  is also a Lambda finalist.

Rajiv Mohabir, poet and translator, translated I Even Regret Night (PEN/Heim Award) and is the author of The Cowherd's Son and The Taxidermist's Cut. He is an assistant professor of poetry at Auburn University's creative writing program.


Twitter Username: rajivmohabir

Website: rajivmohabir.com

Hari Alluri is the author of The Flayed City and an editor at Locked Horn Press. A winner of the 2020 Leonard A. Slade, Jr. Poetry Fellowship, he has received grants from the BC Arts Council and Canada Council of the Arts and fellowships from VONA/Voices and Las Dos Brujas writers workshops.


Twitter Username: harialluri

SJ Sindu is the author of Blue-Skinned Gods and Marriage of a Thousand Lies, which won a Publishing Triangle Award and was an ALA Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Toronto.


Twitter Username: sjsindu

Website: http://sjsindu.com

Virtual

F186.

Research & Reckoning: How Nonfiction Research Allows Us to Reckon with the Past

(, , , , )

In an interview, Melissa Febos writes, “The page has always been a place of reckoning for me.” In this panel, five writers—all from different backgrounds—will discuss how research in nonfiction has allowed them to reckon with the past. We will explore how different forms of research—from interviews to old letters to library archives to photographs to literary theory—led us to the centers of our own stories and took us deeper into larger conversations about race, disability, and sexuality.

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Nikki Lyssy is an MFA candidate at the University of South Florida, where she studies creative nonfiction. She is working on a memoir about her experiences as a person who is blind and teaches composition and creative writing courses. Her work can be found in Hobart, Sweet, and Essay Daily.


Twitter Username: blindnikkii

Julia Koets is the author of The Rib Joint: A Memoir in Essays, PINE, and Hold Like Owls. Her work has been published in Creative Nonfiction, Indiana Review, the Los Angeles Review, the Journal, and others. She teaches creative writing at the University of South Florida in Tampa.


Twitter Username: JuliaKoets

Natalie Lima is a Cuban Puerto Rican writer and an MFA candidate in creative nonfiction at the University of Arizona. Her essays and fiction have been published or are forthcoming in Longreads, Guernica, Brevity, the Offing, Catapult, and elsewhere. Find her on Twitter at @natalielime09.


Twitter Username: natalielima09

Minda Honey is a Louisville, Kentucky-based writer. Her debut collection of essays, An Anthology of Assholes, is forthcoming summer 2023. Find her work at ESPN’s the Undefeated, Longreads, Catapult, Salon.com, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: mindahoney

LaTanya McQueen is the author of the essay collection And It Begins Like This and the novel When the Reckoning Comes. She is an assistant professor at Coe College.


Twitter Username: LT_MCQ

Website: www.latanyamcqueen.com

Virtual

F187.

Writing Death, Grief, & the Afterlife across Cultures

(, , , , )

In a time when death and grief are heavily present in the global consciousness, this panel asks the following question: How do poets approach writing about death, grief, and the afterlife, and how are such approaches informed and complicated by a poet’s cultural background? Panelists will hold a craft-based conversation about these themes as explored both within their own writing and the work of poets throughout history. They will also give a brief reading and engage with audience questions.

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Caitlin Doyle's work has appeared in the Guardian, the Yale Review, the Atlantic, and others. Her honors include fellowships through Yaddo, MacDowell, and the James Merrill House. She is currently visiting assistant professor of English and writer in residence at Washington & Jefferson College.


Twitter Username: CaitlinCDoyle1

Megan Fernandes is an assistant professor of English at Lafayette College and holds an MFA in poetry from Boston University and a PhD in English from University of California Santa Barbara. Her work has appeared in journals such as the New Yorker, Tin House, Rattle, Guernica, Pank, the Common, among others.

Chad Abushanab is the author of The Last Visit, winner of the Donald Justice Poetry Prize. His poems appear in the New York Times Magazine, the Believer, Best New Poets, Southern Poetry Review, Ecotone, and others. He holds a PhD in English and creative writing from Texas Tech University.


Twitter Username: chadabushanab

Mary Leauna Christensen is of Indigenous, Latinx, and Caucasian background and is an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Mary received her MFA from EWU and is a PhD candidate at USM. Her work has appeared in New Ohio Review, Puerto del Sol, cream city review, and the Laurel Review.

Su Cho (PhD/MFA/BA) is the author of The Symmetry of Fish, which won the National Poetry Series, and is a visiting assistant professor at Franklin & Marshall College. She currently serves as consulting editor for Poetry Magazine after serving as guest editor.


Twitter Username: su__cho

Virtual

F188.

Trauma, Tresses, & Truth: Untangling Our Hair through Personal Narrative

(, , , )

From schools to boardrooms to military squadrons, Black and Afro-Latina natural hair continues to transfix, confound, and enrage members of white society. Why is this still the case? The perception, policing, and persecution of our hair is an incontrovertible form of structural oppression. Four contributors read essays from the upcoming book of the same name (Chicago Review Press, 2022). Their work interrogates a systemic bias that is cognizable, legible, and in need of course correction.

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Lyzette Wanzer's work appears in 25+ journals and books, reflecting peri-racial, social, and economic African American experiences. Her research interests are in critical race theory, Black feminism, and intersectionality. Her book Trauma, Tresses, & Truth is due out from a Chicago press next year.


Twitter Username: TraumaTresses

Website: http://www.lyzettewanzermfa.com

Carmen Bardeguez-Brown is a poet and educator from Puerto Rico. She migrated to the United States in 1984. Her work is showcased in the documentary Latino Poets in the United States by Ray Santiesteban. She has read at the Nuyorican Poets Café, the Fez, Mad Alex Foundation, Smoke, and the Soho Arts Fest.


Twitter Username: https://twitter.com/Barde

Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa's debut novel, Daughters of the Stone (2009), was shortlisted for the 2010 for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. The English and Spanish language editions of her second novel, A Woman of Endurance, will be released in April 2022.


Twitter Username: writer1949

Website: www.DahlmaLlanosFigueroa.com

Lyndsey Ellis is a fiction writer, essayist, editor, and author of the novel Bone Broth. She was a recipient of the San Francisco Foundation's Joseph Henry Jackson Literary Award and Barbara Deming Memorial Fund and was awarded a Kimbilio Fellowship. Her work appears in several publications.


Twitter Username: lyellis

Virtual

F189.

Anticipatory Archives & Ancestral Assemblages: LGBTQ Editors/Publishers of Color

(, , , , )

Queer/trans people of color editing/publishing build stronger activist, artistic, and scholarly communities. Editors/publishers will discuss production and maintenance of Indigenous, people of color, womanist, queer/trans, and multicultural journals and solo/coauthored books, anthologies, and presses. Collaboratively producing diverse texts, panelists will discuss navigating economic, logistical, and institutional challenges while centering issues of culture, politics, aesthetics, and diversity.

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Ahimsa Timoteo Bodhrán, an NEA and Tulsa Artist Fellow, is the author of Archipiélagos, Antes y después del Bronx: Lenapehoking, and South Bronx Breathing Lessons. He edited Yellow Medicine Review's global queer Indigenous issue and coedited Movement Research Performance Journal's Native issue.

Leiana San Agustin Naholowaʻa (CHamoru/Hawaiian) coedited Kinalamten gi Pasifiku: Insights from Oceania and Storyboard: A Journal of Pacific Imagery. A University of Hawai'i English PhD student, she directed Mothering Guåhan and is coediting Queernesia: An Anthology of Indigenous Queer Oceania.

Zeyn Joukhadar is the author of The Map of Salt and Stars and Stonewall and Lambda Literary award-winning The Thirty Names of Night. He edited Mizna's Queer + Trans Voices issue. His work appears in Salon, the Paris Review, and Kink. He is a Radius of Arab American Writers member and Periplus mentor.


Twitter Username: ZeynJoukhadar

Website: ZeynJoukhadar.com

Chino Scott-Chung is a trans Chinese/Mexican historical/creative non/fiction writer. Founder and fiction editor of The Asian and Pacific Islander Transmasculine Anthology, he is part of the Latinx Writers Caucus leadership team. His work appears in GenderQueer: Voices From Beyond the Sexual Binary.

D. Keali'i MacKenzie is a queer Kanaka Maoli writer and Pacific Tongues poet-facilitator. He is the author of From Hunger to Prayer and coeditor of Bamboo Ridge's speculative issue. His work is in 'Ōiwi: A Native Hawaiian Journal, Foglifter, and Mauri Ola: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English.

12:10 p.m. to 1:25 p.m.

Terrace Ballroom I & II, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 400 Level

F162.

Milkweed Presents: Landscape and Literary Culture

(, , )

Milkweed authors discuss the intersections of literary culture and the natural world: Aimee Nezhukumatathil, author of World of Wonders; Kazim Ali, author of Northern Light; and Kerri ní Dochartaigh, author of Thin Places. Deep attentiveness to the environment—with its diverse landscapes, wild creatures, and shifting climates—provides these writers with dynamic pathways to explore regeneration, identity, and wonder in their work. Moderated by Animals Strike Curious Poses author Elena Passarello. This event will be livestreamed. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

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Aimee Nezhukumatahil is the author of World of Wonders (essays), Barnes & Noble’s Book of the Year, and four books of poetry, most recently, Oceanic. Awards for her writing include Guggenheim and NEA fellowships. She is the poetry editor of The Sierra Club’s SIERRA magazine and teaches in the MFA program at the University of Mississippi.


Twitter Username: aimeenez

Website: www.aimeenez.net

Kazim Ali is a poet, translator, essayist, and fiction writer. His most recent books are The Voice of Sheila Chandra (poems) and a nonfiction book, Northern Light: Power, Land, and the Memory of Water. He is a professor in the literature department at the University of California, San Diego


Twitter Username: kazimalipoet

Website: www.kazimali.com

Elena Passarello is the author of two essay collections, the most recent of which, Animals Strike Curious Poses, made the year-end Best Book lists in New York Times, the Guardian, and Publisher’s Weekly. In 2018, Outside listed her among its “25 Essential Authors Writing about the Wild.” The winner of a Whiting Award, her recent essays appear in Audubon and National Geographic. She teaches at Oregon State University and appears weekly on the PRX radio program LiveWire!


Twitter Username: elenavox

Website: www.elenapassarello.com

Michael A. Nutter Theater, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F162B.

Honoring the Endeavor! Sponsored by Cave Canem

(Toi Derricotte, Cornelius Eady)

Twenty-five years ago, Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady came together in friendship and solidarity with a determination to create a home for Black poetry, and Cave Canem was born. Since that time, the organization has grown into a fellowship of more than 500 Fellows, an eminent roll of Elders and a dedicated Faculty, who—in community—have worked to build a foundation for poets now and in the future. Join Derricotte, Eady, and surprise guests for this celebratory reading to honor the work of their minds and hearts.

This event will be prerecorded and available on the virtual conference platform, in addition to being screened onsite. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

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109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F163.

Game On 3.0: Teaching Branching Narratives

(, , , , Gabrielle Lawrence)

What can branching narratives in video games teach us about narrative structure? This panel investigates how branching narratives can break up linearity and show how choice and interactivity can expand traditional notions of character, plot, setting, and story. This panel also explores ways of integrating branching narratives into the creative writing classroom by considering craft implications and providing a discussion of useful technical tools.

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Julialicia Case is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin—Green Bay, where she teaches creative writing and literature, with a particular emphasis on game studies and interactive storytelling. She writes fiction, creative nonfiction, and digital work.

Trent Hergenrader is an associate professor at Rochester Institute of Technology. His short stories have appeared in Fantasy & Science Fiction, Best Horror of the Year, and elsewhere. He coedited Creative Writing in the Digital Age and Creative Writing Innovations and wrote Collaborative Worldbuilding for Writers and Gamers.


Twitter Username: thergenrade

Website: http://www.trenthergenrader.com

Margot Douaihy is the author of Scranton Lace and Girls Like You. She has taught creative writing at Franklin Pierce University and Marywood University. She serves as editor of Northern New England Review and section editor of Journal of Creative Writing Studies.


Twitter Username: MargotDouaihy

Website: www.margotdouaihy.com

Eric Freeze teaches at Wabash College. He has published fiction and essays in periodicals including the Southern Review, Harvard Review, and Boston Review. He is author of Dominant Traits (stories), Hemingway on a Bike (essays), and Invisible Men (stories). He lives in Indiana and Nice, France.

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F164.

Artists & Archivists: Two-Year College Students Transform a Philadelphia Archive

(, , , , )

In 2019, the Presbyterian Historical Society opened 500 years of archival materials to creative writing students from Community College of Philadelphia. As a result, the archive experienced an influx of energy, and student work took surprising, subversive, and moving directions. Archivists, instructors, and students share how classroom activities and a student exhibit helped demystify archival materials and connect a 170-year-old cultural institution to today’s movements for social justice.

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Fred Tangeman is director of communications at the Presbyterian Historical Society and project leader of Building Knowledge and Breaking Barriers, an archives-based learning project with Community College of Philadelphia. Fred has an MFA in creative writing from the University of Iowa.

Kate Sanchez is an assistant professor of English at Community College of Philadelphia where she teaches courses in composition, literature, creative writing, and First-Year Experience. She partners with the Presbyterian Historical Society to engage her creative writing students with their archive materials.

Jennifer Barr is an outreach and reference archivist at the Presbyterian Historical Society. She works with arts and history instructors to select and contextualize primary sources and supports students as they work with those sources. Jennifer has an MSI from the University of Michigan.

Lumen Lugo-Roman is a student at Community College of Philadelphia whose exhibited poetry at the Presbyterian Historical Society relates to archival materials about women’s empowerment and LGBTQIA+ rights.

Simone Zelitch teaches at Community College of Philadelphia, where she established their creative writing program English degree and participated in their partnership with the Presbyterian Historical Society archives. She has published five novels, most recently Judenstaat.


Twitter Username: simonezelitch

Website: www.simonezelitch.com

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F164B.

Book Tour Revolution: Strategies for the Current World, Sponsored by the Authors Guild

(, , , , )

The traditional book tour model of launch parties and bookstore signings became completely untenable the last two years. Authors had to pivot to virtual events and come up with new and creative ways to get the attention of potential readers. These strategies can be applied to future in-person events to mix things up, grow a bigger audience, and sell more books. Arranged by the Authors Guild to help writers with the business side of authorship, this panel will discuss event formats, promotions, and media strategies to revolutionize your next book tour.

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Erin Lowry is the author of the three-part Broke Millennial series, including: Broke Millennial, Broke Millennial Takes On Investing, and Broke Millennial Talks Money: Scripts, Stories and Advice to Navigate Awkward Financial Conversations. Erin has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and on CBS Sunday Morning, CNBC, and The Rachael Ray Show. She has written for The New York Times, USA Today, and Bloomberg Opinion.

Priyanka Champaneri received her MFA in creative writing from George Mason University and has been a fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts numerous times. Her debut novel, The City of Good Death, won the 2018 Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing and was recently shortlisted for the 2021 Center for Fiction First Novel Prize.

Chloe Gong is the New York Times bestselling author of These Violent Delights and its sequel Our Violent Ends. She is a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, where she double-majored in English and International Relations. Born in Shanghai and raised in Auckland, New Zealand, Chloe is now located in New York pretending to be a real adult.

Tim Herrera is the founder of Freelancing With Tim, a suite of educational resources designed to help journalists navigate the industry. He previously worked at The New York Times, where he helped launch then edited Smarter Living, the home for service journalism at the Times. Prior to that he lived in the nation's capital working as a reporter and social media producer for The Washington Post, before which he was a reporter in New York at Newsday and amNewYork. He graduated from NYU with degrees in journalism and anthropology, and he lives in Manhattan with his platonic life partner and two cats, Strudel and Streets.

Kwame Mbalia is a husband, father, writer, a New York Times bestselling author, and a former pharmaceutical metrologist, in that order. His debut middle-grade novel, Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky was awarded a Coretta Scott King Author Honor, and he is the co-author of Last Gate of the Emperor with Prince Joel Makonnen, from Scholastic Books, and the editor of the number one New York Times bestselling anthology Black Boy Joy, published by Delacorte Press. A Howard University graduate and a Midwesterner now in North Carolina, he survives on Dad jokes and Cheez-Its.

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F166.

Emotional Pacing in the Trauma Narrative

(, , , )

Trauma memoirs require careful emotional pacing, which means modulating the presentation of emotionally charged material. Emotional pacing involves decisions about which events to include, how to withhold or present details, and how to sequence events, often using narrative techniques to manipulate the distance between the narrator and events. In this panel, four memoirist offer strategies for guiding the reader’s experience in memoirs of near death, family secrets, and other difficult stories.

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Aggie Stewart is a Rhode Island-based writer and a fourth semester student in the Newport MFA program at Salve University. Her MFA focus is creative nonfiction. She is currently writing a memoir about growing up in the shadow of her mother’s sister’s murder, a closely guarded family secret.

Grace Talusan is the Fannie Hurst Writer in Residence at Brandeis University, and her memoir, The Body Papers, won the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing and Massachusetts Book Award in Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: gracet09

Katherine E. Standefer is the author of Lightning Flowers: My Journey to Uncover the Cost of Saving a Life, which was a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice/Staff Pick. Her writing appeared in Best American Essays 2016. She teaches at Ashland University's low-res MFA and works as a trauma writing doula.


Twitter Username: girlmakesfire

Alden Jones is the author of the books The Wanting Was a Wilderness, Unaccompanied Minors, and The Blind Masseuse. Her fiction and essays have appeared in BOMB, the Rumpus, the Cut, AGNI, and Best American Travel Writing. She teaches at Emerson College and the Newport MFA program.


Twitter Username: aldenejones

Website: aldenjones.com

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F167.

How to Publish a Literary Anthology

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Four panelists discuss the process of birthing a regional anthology from its inception to curation, assembly, publication, and marketing. Represented are editors from The Boom Project: Voices of a Generation (Butler Books, 2019), The Women of Appalachia Project's Women Speak annual anthology, and The Louisville Anthology (Belt Publishing, 2020).

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Kimberly Garts Crum, MSW, MFA, writes creative nonfiction, teaches personal narrative, and is coeditor of The Boom Project: Voices of a Generation—a literary anthology of the Ohio River Valley. Kim is past chair of Louisville Literary Arts and current director of Women Who Write KY.


Twitter Username: boomerswrite

Website: shapeandflowwritingservices.com

Bonnie Omer Johnson, author and coeditor of The Boom Project: Voices of a Generation, teaches at Bellarmine University and teaches food and travel writing and fiction classes at The Write Place in Louisville, Kentucky.

Erin Keane is editor in chief at Salon.com and author of three collections of poetry. She teaches at Spalding University's School of Creative and Professional Writing. She edited The Louisville Anthology, part of Belt Publishing's city series, and her memoir is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: eekshecried

Website: http://sensilla.com/

Kari Gunter-Seymour is the founder/director of the Women of Appalachia Project and editor of the WOAP "Women Speak" anthology series. She is the author of two books of poetry, the 2020 Ohio Poet of the Year, a recipient of an Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, and Ohio's poet laureate.


Twitter Username: KGunterSeymour

Website: www.karigunterseymourpoet.com

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F168.

Documenting the Undocumented: Writing the US/Mexico Border across Genres

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The border. ICE. The wall. Asylum. Human cages. How can we truthfully represent the current immigration crisis at the border in our writing? What are political and philosophical concerns, particularly when authors inherit stories they are in effect still living and when readers might expect a happy ending? Authors across categories—fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young adult and children’s books—talk frankly about the struggles and benefits of writing la frontera.

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Jennifer De Leon is the author of Don’t Ask Me Where I’m From and White Space: Essays on Culture, Race, and Writing. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Framingham State University and a GrubStreet board member.


Twitter Username: jdeleonwriter

René Colato Laínez is the award-winning author of many bilingual/multicultural children's books. She earned her master's degree from Vermont College of Fine Arts in writing for children and young adults. She teaches at a bilingual elementary school in Los Angeles.


Twitter Username: https://twitter.com/renec

Website: www.renecolatolainez.com

Aida Salazar​ is an author, translator, and arts activist. Her books include the multiple-award-winning verse novels, The Moon Within and Land of the Cranes. She is a founding member of Las Musas, a Latinx kidlit author collective. Learn about her forthcoming projects at AidaSalazar.com.


Twitter Username: aida_writes

Ricardo Nuila is a practicing doctor, teacher, and writer. His nonfiction has appeared in the New Yorker and VQR, and his fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories. A former Yaddo, MacDowell, and Dobie Paisano Fellow, his first book on safety-net hospitals will be published by Scribner.


Twitter Username: riconuila

Website: ricardonuila.com

Marcelo Hernandez Castillo is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the author of Cenzontle, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Prize, Dulce, and Children of the Land. A Canto Mundo Fellow, he cofounded the Undocupoets campaign.


Twitter Username: marcelo_H_

116, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F169.

Signifyin' & Shade: Black Queer Writers' Interventions into the Black Canon

(, , , , ) Toni Morrison implores us to write the books that we want to read. No more is this true than for Black queer writers searching for ourselves in the Black literary canon. The works that we create talk back/signify (Gates, Jr.) to the very books that shaped us as writers while ostracizing us as community members. In this reading, five Black queer writers share excerpts of their work and the specific interventions or engagements that they make in Black canonical texts. Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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M Shelly Conner, PhD, is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Central Arkansas. Her writing uses black queer womanhood to explore the intersections of race, culture, and sustainable living. She is the creator of the webisode Quare Life and author of everyman: a novel.


Twitter Username: mshellyconner

Marci Blackman is the author of the novels, Po Man's Child, recipient of the ALA’s Stonewall Award for Best Fiction, and Tradition, noted in Band of Thebes as one of the Best LGBTQ Books of the year. Blackman’s third novel, Elephant, is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: MarciBlackman

Cheryl Clarke is the author of five books of poetry, Narratives (1982; digitized 2014), Living as a Lesbian (1986; reprinted 2014), Humid Pitch (1989), Experimental Love (1993), By My Precise Haircut (2016), Also after Mecca (2005), and The Days of Good Looks: The Prose and Poetry of Cheryl Clarke, 1980–2005 (2006).


Twitter Username: cherylclarke4

Darnell Moore is the author of the 2019 Lambda Literary Award-nominated memoir No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black & Free in America, which was listed as a 2018 New York Times Notable Book and a 2018 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers pick.

Mecca Jamilah Sullivan is the author of Blue Talk and Love, The Poetics of Difference, and More of Everything, forthcoming. She has earned honors from Lambda Literary, the Center for Fiction, Bread Loaf, Yaddo, and the NEA. She is an assistant professor of English at Bryn Mawr College.


Twitter Username: mecca_jamilah

Website: www.meccajamilahsullivan.com

118A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F170.

Freedom's Just Another Word (for Nothing Left to Lose)

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How free can the creative writing workshop be in this time of great cultural division? Event facilitators will generate a conversation that contemplates conflicts erupting with greater frequency in what should be a nurturing and unified communal space. Presenters will share techniques for seizing on divisive incidents as opportunities for growth, encouraging attendees to discuss their experiences and to pose questions related to protecting both freedom and safety in the writing workshop.

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Lynn Pruett has published a novel and numerous stories, essays, and articles. She has taught fiction and CNF workshops at North Carolina State, University of Alabama, University of Kentucky, Vanderbilt University, the Murray State MFA program, and the Carnegie Center for Literacy, and she has earned fellowships to Yaddo and Squaw Valley.


Twitter Username: julep_pruett

Kathryn Locey is professor of English at Brenau University in Gainesville, Georgia. Her short fiction and poetry have appeared in such places as the History Will Be Kind anthology, the Copperfield Review, Able Muse, Paper Nautilus, and the Christian Science Monitor.

Lorraine M. López, Gertrude Conaway Chair, teaches in the MFA program and latino and latina studies program at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of seven books of fiction and editor of three essay collections. Her most recent publication is Postcards from the Gerund State: Stories.

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F171.

The Best Apology Is Changed Behavior: An Editorial Call to Action

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The permanent impacts of COVID and the Black Lives Matter movement on the publishing industry have yet to be determined, but the early ripples prove a need for a top-down reassessment of editorial practices. Small presses and literary magazines must reckon with patriarchal white supremacy if they plan to survive this social justice moment. Writers/editors discuss how identity impacts editorial biases, while offering strategies such as apprenticeships and training, to create lasting change.

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Adrienne Perry is a Kimbilio Fellow and Hedgebrook alumna teaching nonfiction at Villanova University. Adrienne's work appears in multiple journals and has received funding from The Elizabeth George Foundation and Friends of Writers. From 2014–2016, she served as editor in chief of Gulf Coast.

Monica Prince is an assistant professor of activist and performance writing at Susquehanna University and the managing editor of the Santa Fe Writers Project. Her creative focus is in choreopoems and performance poetry.


Twitter Username: poetic_moni

Website: www.monicaprince.com

Somayeh Shams has an MFA from Warren Wilson College. She is an alumna of Hedgebrook, and her work has appeared in multiple journals. Her novel was a finalist of the Larry Levis Fellowship prize and the Ruby's Artist Grant. She is the prose editor of Nimrod International Journal.

Julia Brown is an editor-at-large at AGNI and a former fiction editor at Gulf Coast. She is a writer, teacher, and doctoral student in the creative writing program at the University of Houston.


Twitter Username: juliabrown

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F172.

How to Win a Book or Chapbook Contest

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Many writers have completed a manuscript of prose or poetry and are ready to publish their book. However, the traditional agent-to-editor route may not be available. This panel discussion will provide advice on finding a suitable book contest and giving your manuscript the best chance of success. Past winners of book and chapbook contests will share their experience and knowledge. Also, a publisher of a small press that holds annual poetry and fiction contests will tell the inside story.

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Joseph J. Capista is the author of Intrusive Beauty, selected for Ohio University Press’s 2018 Hollis Summers Poetry Prize. He has received awards from the NEH, the Maryland State Arts Council, Sewanee, and Bread Loaf. He teaches at Towson University.

Christina Chiu is the winner of the 2040 Books' James Alan McPherson Award and the Kirkus Best Books of 2020. She is the author of Beauty and Troublemaker and Other Saints. Her work has appeared in Tin House, Publisher's Weekly, Electric Literature, NextTribe. She is a founder of AAWW.


Twitter Username: chrischiu13

Website: www.christinachiu.org

Cecilia Martinez-Gil has published two full-length poetry collections, a fix of ink and the multi-award-winning Psaltery and Serpentines, and she cowrote the award-winning experimental video Itinerarios. She publishes poetry and journalism, teaches English and literature, and has four masters.


Twitter Username: cezmartinezgil

Website: www.ceciliamartinezgil.com

Robert L. Giron, poet/writer/editor, has won numerous awards for his own writing. As Gival Press editor/publisher, he runs annual contests for fiction and poetry; these 100+ books have gone on to win over 70 national and international awards since the literary press was established in 1998.


Twitter Username: givalpress

Website: http://www.robertgiron.com

Thaddeus Rutkowski is author of seven books, most recently Tricks of Light, a poetry collection. His novel Haywire won an award from the Asian American Writers' Workshop. He teaches at Medgar Evers College and received a fiction writing fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts.


Twitter Username: thadrutkowski

Website: www.thaddeusrutkowski.com

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F173.

Pictures of Books in Progress: Visualizing the Craft of Research & Writing

(, , , , Alexandra Chang)

If you pop the hood on craft, what would you see? Four women demystify writing and researching by showing images of their works in progress and discussing the visual element of inspiration and organization. Across genres (novels, biography, memoir, and YA), they show you photographs, letters, spreadsheets, and maps and offer examples of visuals that changed their grasp of their material. Writing a book is solitary; join panelists who invite you right to their desks and into their process.

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Amy Reading is the author of The Mark Inside: A Perfect Swindle, a Cunning Revenge and a Short History of the Big Con. She is under contract for a biography of Katharine S. White, first fiction editor of the New Yorker, for which she was awarded a National Endowment of the Humanities fellowship.

Sorayya Khan is the author of the forthcoming memoir To Be Thrown and the novels City of Spies, Five Queen’s Road, and Noor. She is at work on a new novel.


Twitter Username: SorayyaKhan

Website: www.sorayyakhan.com

Eleanor Henderson is the author of the novels Ten Thousand Saints and The Twelve-Mile Straight and the memoir Everything I Have Is Yours. She is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Writing at Ithaca College.

Laura McNeal is the author of The Practice House, a historical novel set in the 1930s, and Dark Water, which was a finalist for the National Book Award in Young People's Literature. She's writing a trilogy about the romance and marriage of 19th-century poets Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning.


Twitter Username: themcneals

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F174.

Total Strangers: Undergrads, Authors, & Editors on Amplifying International Voices

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How does a group of undergrads who have never met collaborate strategically with far-flung authors and editors to create a publication drawing submissions from writers working in 47 countries (plus 48 US states) in its first six months of existence? This panel—comprised of intergenerational "lit nerds" building global dialogue and community via a digital venue recently recognized as an extraordinary debut magazine by the CLMP—seeks to answer questions of reach, resources, and representation.

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Arisa White is a Cave Canem graduate fellow and author of Who's Your Daddy and Home Is Where You Queer Your Heart. She collaborates with other artists to expand readership for poetry and to center the narratives of queer BlPOC. White is an assistant professor of creative writing at Colby College.


Twitter Username: arisaw

Website: arisawhite.com

Shannon Sutorius graduated from SUNY Oswego with a bachelor's in English. She is an editor and over 20 times published author who was the senior editor and then editor in chief for Her Campus Oswego, where she coedited fiction and cohosted Subnivean's Spring 2021 Awards. She currently freelances.


Twitter Username: shanwritesat3am

Edward Sourby is a creative writing major at SUNY Oswego. He focuses on poetry and nonfiction, with a bit of fiction on the side. His work incorporates important parts of his identity, such as being Jewish, bisexual, transgender, and neurodivergent.


Twitter Username: edwardsourboy

Pamela Toussaint is a senior at SUNY Oswego, majoring in both creative writing and cinema and screen studies. She is a published author; her work primarily consists of fiction, fantasy, and poetry. As a Black bisexual woman, she enjoys writing humor and happy endings for Black LGBTQ+ youths.

Soma Mei Sheng Frazier's work has earned nods and awards from entities ranging from HBO to Zoetrope: All-Story. You can find it in ZYZZYVA, Hyphen Magazine, and elsewhere. Represented by Victoria Sanders & Associates, Frazier is nose-to-grindstone on a novel. She founded Subnivean and ENIZAGAM.


Twitter Username: somameisheng

Website: http://enizagam.org

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F175.

Where Words & Music Meet: Writerly Revelations of Deep Listening

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Everyone listens to music, but writers can listen with a special ear for the lessons of craft and artistic structure, for sparking hidden pockets of forgotten or suppressed autobiography, or for guides to one’s cultural identity. Music, like writing, is multivocal. Writers attempt to translate the music we hear into metaphor, images, narratives, and revelations as we recount the often-unexpected journeys music offers and describe the places we might then arrive at in our writing.

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Philip Graham is the author of seven books of fiction and nonfiction. His work has appeared in the New Yorker, Paris Review, and McSweeney's. He is a professor emeritus of creative writing at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and he is a cofounder and editor at large of Ninth Letter.

Francesca Royster is author of two books: Sounding Like a No-No: Queer Sounds and Eccentric Acts in the Post-Soul Era and Becoming Cleopatra. She has published essays on music, culture, and identity in the Los Angeles Review of Books and Slag Glass City. She teaches English at DePaul University.

Karen Tongson is the author of Why Karen Carpenter Matters, and Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries. She received Lambda Literary’s Jeanne Córdova Award for Lesbian and Queer Nonfiction in 2019. She is the chair of gender and sexuality studies, and professor of GSS, English, and ASE at the University of Southern California.


Twitter Username: inlandemperor

Desirae Matherly is the chair of English and languages at Tusculum University where she teaches writing and serves as nonfiction editor for the Tusculum Review. Desirae earned a PhD in creative nonfiction from Ohio University in 2004 and is a former Harper Fellow at the University of Chicago.

Thomas Larson is the author of Spirituality and the Writer: A Personal Inquiry, The Sanctuary of Illness: A Memoir of Heart Disease, The Saddest Music Ever Written: The Story of Samuel Barber’s' Adagio for Strings', and The Memoir and the Memoirist: Reading and Writing Personal Narrative.

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F176.

Is My Writing Queer Enough?

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Writers from across genres, gender and sexual identities, and educational and cultural backgrounds come together to share how they manage their talents, life, and career for success within the LGBTQ community. In an attempt to both celebrate and give voice to queer experiences, they ask, "Is my writing queer enough?"

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Faylita Hicks (she/they) is the author of HoodWitch, a finalist for the 2020 Lambda Literary Award for Bisexual Poetry. They are a 2021 Shearing Fellow with Black Mountain Institute and currently serve as the 2021 poet in residence for the Civil Rights Corps.


Twitter Username: FaylitaHicks

David Woo is the author of two books of poetry: Divine Fire and The Eclipses. His work has appeared in the New Yorker, New RepublicThreepenny Review, and in the Library of America’s American Religious Poems. He is a reviewer at the Poetry Foundation.


Twitter Username: DavidWooPoet

Website: davidwoo.info

Vanessa Angélica Villarreal is the author of the poetry collection Beast Meridian and a recipient of a 2019 Whiting Award. She is a 2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellow and lives with her son in Los Angeles, where she is a doctoral candidate at the University of Southern California.


Twitter Username: Vanessid

Nicky Beer is a bi/queer writer and the author of Real Phonies and Genuine Fakes, The Octopus Game, and The Diminishing House. She is an associate professor at the University of Colorado-Denver, where she coedits the journal Copper Nickel.


Twitter Username: nbeerpoet

Website: nickybeer.com

Celeste Chan works across fiction, creative nonfiction, oral histories, and documentary filmmaking. A Hedgebrook, Lambda, and VONA fellow, she facilitates creative writing workshops for LGBTQ youth. She's published in AWAY, cream city review, the Rumpus, and beyond.


Twitter Username: celestechan2020

Website: www.celestechan.com

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F177.

Voices of Exile: Translating a Lost Homeland, Sponsored by ALTA

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Exile has inspired a diverse body of literature from around the world. Translating exile-themed writing takes into consideration the cultural, historical, personal, and especially political differences unique to each language and country. This panel of writers and scholars, translating from such languages as Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Chinese, French, and Spanish, will briefly discuss, then read bilingual examples of the many faces of exile, then address audience questions.

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Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored twelve titles, including eight translations. A BTBA and CLMP finalist, she is a recipient of two grants from the NEA and one from the Maryland Arts Council and was decorated with the French Academic Palms. An Infusion of Violets was named "new & noteworthy" by the New York Times.

Ye Chun / 叶春 is the author of two books of poetry, Lantern Puzzle and Travel over Water; a novel in Chinese; and three books of translations. Her story collection, Hao, is forthcoming from Catapult. A recipient of an NEA fellowship and three Pushcart Prizes, she teaches at Providence College.

Mauricio Espinoza is a researcher, poet, and translator. He is assistant professor of Latin American literature at the University of Cincinnati. He has translated the work of twentieth century Costa Rican poet Eunice Odio and of several contemporary Central American and US Central American authors.

Jennifer Rathbun is a Spanish professor and chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Classics at Ball State University. She has published fourteen books of poetry in translation by Hispanic authors and is the author of the poetry collection The Book of Betrayals. She is associate editor of APP.

Russell Scott Valentino is the author of two books on Russian literature and translator of eight book-length literary works from Italian, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, and Russian into English. His translation of Miljenko Jergovic's Rod (Kin) is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: rsvalentino

Website: www.russellv.com

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F178.

Reunions Revised & Revisited: Writing About (Re)Connecting with Birth Families

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Writers who are adopted or otherwise estranged from their biological parents face particularly challenging artistic questions about how familial reconciliation (or lack thereof) can be transformed from raw experience into poems, stories, or essays. These five writers will discuss how they’ve crafted their own experiences facing adoption, parentage, and identity into literary work—and, in doing so, explore the relationship between experience and art and how each informs the other.

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John Gallaher is the author of two chapbooks and five books of poetry, most recently, In a Landscape (2014), as well as coeditor of the Akron Series in Poetics, the Laurel Review, and Time Is a Toy: The Selected Poems of Michael Benedikt.

Nari Kirk holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of New Mexico and has work published or forthcoming in Hobart, Poetry Northwest's website, the anthology All the Women in My Family Sing, and elsewhere.

Gary Jackson is author of of origin story  and Missing You, Metropolis, which won the 2009 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, and he coedited the anthology The Future of Black. He teaches in the MFA program at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina.

Diana Joseph is the author of the short story collection Happy or Otherwise and the memoir I'm Sorry You Feel That Way, winner of the Great Lakes Colleges Association Award for Creative Nonfiction. Joseph teaches at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs is the author of Paper Pavilion, Interrogation Room, and the chapbooks Notes from a Missing Person and Necro Citizens (German, English). A cotranslator of Sami poetry, she is also poetry editor at AGNI and professor of English at St. Olaf College.


Twitter Username: jkwondobbs

Website: www.jkwondobbs.com

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F179.

2021/2022 Writers’ Conferences & Centers (WC&C) Meeting

This meeting is an opportunity for members of Writers’ Conferences & Centers to meet one another and for the staff of AWP to discuss issues pertinent to building a strong community of WC&C programs. AWP’s WC&C Chair, Mimi Herman, will conduct this meeting.

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125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F180.

The Importance of Pleasure: Representations of Sex & the Body in Pleasure

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Writing about the body experiencing sensual pleasure—especially female-identifying and queer bodies—is often outweighed by writing featuring the body-shamed and sexually traumatized. This panel is shaped by questions centered on the comparative absence of pleasure on the page. As practicing writers whose work, in varied ways, celebrates the body, the panelists will discuss the importance of representations of pleasure and offer craft practices they employ when writing the sensual and sexual.

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Angie Dell is a queer, nonbinary writer, printer, and book artist. They worked for many years as a sex worker and pleasure-based sex educator and are currently the associate director of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing and the proprietor of Shut Eye Press.

Jenny Irish is the author of the hybrid poetry collection Common Ancestor and the short story collection I Am Faithful. She teaches creative writing at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: jenny__irish

K-Ming Chang is a Kundiman fellow, a Lambda Literary Award finalist, and a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree. She is the author of the New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice novel Bestiary and the forthcoming short story collection Gods of Want.

Taylor Byas is a third-year PhD student at the University of Cincinnati and an assistant features editor for the Rumpus. She won both the 2020 Poetry Super Highway and Frontier Poetry Award for New Poets contests. She is the author of Bloodwarm (2021) and is represented by the Deborah Harris Agency.


Twitter Username: TaylorByas3

Jessica Q. Stark is the author of Savage Pageant, which was named one of the Best Books of 2020 in the Boston Globe and in Hyperallergic. Her work appears in Pleiades and Verse, and she is a poetry editor for AGNI and the comics editor for Honey Literary.


Twitter Username: jezzbah

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F181.

Radical Jewish American Labor Poetry: A Reading

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This reading explores new work in the tradition of Jewish labor poetry: writing at the nexus of radicalism, labor, and identity. In Jewish poetics, writing about labor spans our international, multilingual literature; emerging poets are (re)interpreting this inheritance in terms of its politics and imaginative possibilities. These poets—including writers from the Rust Belt—write about their work as taxi drivers, electricians, motel staff, retail grocers, and parents.

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Allison Pitinii Davis is the author of Line Study of a Motel Clerk, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award in Poetry and the Ohioana Book Award, and Poppy Seeds, winner of the Wick Poetry Chapbook Prize. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2016, POETS.org, and elsewhere.

Joshua Gottlieb-Miller received his PhD and MFA in creative writing from the University of Houston. Joshua has been a fellow at MacDowell as well as the Tent Writing Conference at the Yiddish Book Center. Now Joshua works the back desk at the Menil Collection, tutors writing, and teaches for Inprint at the Jewish Community Center.


Twitter Username: JoshuaG_M

Sean Singer is the author of Discography, winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America; Honey & Smoke; and Today in the Taxi.


Twitter Username: SeanSingerPoet

Website: https://www.seansingerpoetry.com

Dan Alter’s poems and reviews have been published in journals including Field, Fourteen Hills, PANK, and ZYZZYVA; his first collection My Little Book of Exiles is forthcoming. He works as an IBEW electrician.


Twitter Username: arlozorof

Website: https://danalter.net

Joy Katz’s latest poetry collection is All You Do Is Perceive. Her work in progress, White: An Abstract, attempts to document American whiteness. A former NEA fellow, Katz collaborates in the activist art collective Ifyoureallyloveme. She teaches at Carlow University.


Twitter Username: Joy_Katz

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F182.

Madville on Stage

(Luanne Smith, Gerry LaFemina, Mike Hilbig, Pauletta Hansel)

This reading brings together poetry, essay, creative nonfiction, and fiction from recently released or upcoming Madville titles. Madville Publishing offers a diverse range of styles, voices, and interests. The reading presents noted writers and emerging voices to provide variety and interest for all potential audience members.

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1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Virtual

F210.

Home in Florida: A Home Tour & Discussion by Latinx Writers

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Contributors explore the themes of home and uprootedness and how they must sometimes coexist. For a different joint reading that uses the full advantages of the Zoom platform, we will bring attendees into our homes for a two-minute tour focusing on those spaces that allow us to write (and why), followed by a three-minute reading. Then we will discuss and take questions from the audience.

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Anjanette Delgado is a novelist and journalist who writes about identity, displacement, and heartbreak, often through immigrant characters from Caribbean countries. Author of The Heartbreak Pill and The Clairvoyant of Calle Ocho, she holds an MFA in CRW from FIU.


Twitter Username: anjanettedelgad

Richard Blanco is the youngest, first Latino, and first openly gay person to serve as the presidential inaugural poet. Author of two memoirs and three poetry books, his honors include awards from the University of Pittsburgh, PEN, the Paterson Prize, Lambda Literary, and Education Ambassador for the Academy of American Poets.

Ariel Francisco is the author of Under Capitalism If Your Head Aches They Just Yank Off Your Head  and A Sinking Ship is Still a Ship). He is an assistant professor of poetry at Louisiana State University.


Twitter Username: AriCisco

Virtual

F211.

Concise Punches of Reality: Readings from Five Chapbook Memoirists

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Some shy away from writing memoir because writing a lengthy, personal, emotional narrative of hundreds of pages seems too daunting. Yet, as these memoirists' readings will show, it's possible to craft memorable journeys within a shortened format. These writers utilize first person narration as well as poetry, photography, and social justice essays, reading from works that were made all the more powerful by being published in chapbook form. These are not tomes but concise punches of reality.

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Romaine Washington is the author of two poetry chapbooks, Purgatory Has an Address and Sirens in Her Belly. She is a fellow of The Watering Hole, and her writing has appeared in several publications including Lullwater Review, San Bernardino Singing, and Accolades: WWS.


Twitter Username: poetromaine

Website: www.romainewashington.com

gail butensky, a documentary photographer for many years, chronicles music (working for bands, record labels, and many publications); along with with more documentary work, gail has displayed her photos in several group and solo shows. Every Bend is her first book.

Allen Callaci is the lead singer for the band Refrigerator and an adjunct professor at Mt. San Antonio Community College. He is the author of the memoir Heart like a Starfish, Louder than Goodbye, and 17 & Life who has also blogged for the Huffington Post and Black Knight Nation.

Kendall Johnson is a writer, artist, and former trauma consultant in Upland, California. His literary memoir book Chaos and Ashes was released last June, and his collection of flash memoir Black Box Poetics was recently published.

Juanita E. Mantz is a deputy public defender, podcaster, DJ, and lawyer. Her chapbook Portrait of a Deputy Public Defender (or how I became a punk rock lawyer) was released in 2021. Her memoir about her punk rock childhood is due for release in 2022.


Twitter Username: lifeofjem

Virtual

F212.

The Thing with Feathers: Poetry of Witness to Illness, Disability, & Trauma

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How might a poet respond to serious illness or disability? Whether the poet is ill or witness to suffering, the harsh, immutable facts of such conditions may generate fear, anger, despair. Sometimes the poet finds strength in a hopeless situation. What in us persists in singing, regardless of how dire the facts? Five published poets discuss work (their own and others’) that grapples with disease or disability and what these poems reveal about hope, what Dickinson called "the thing with feathers."

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Jennifer Franklin (Brown AB, Columbia MFA) is the author of No Small Gift (Four Way Books, 2018) and Looming. Her poetry has been published in the Paris Review, the Nation, and Boston Review and on poets.org. She is coeditor of Slapering Hol Press and teaches at the Hudson Valley Writers' Center.


Twitter Username: JFranklinPoetry

Oliver de la Paz is the author of five books of poetry. His most recent book is The Boy in the Labyrinth. A founding member of Kundiman, he teaches at the College of the Holy Cross and in the low-res MFA program at PLU.


Twitter Username: @Oliver_delaPaz

Website: http://www.oliverdelapaz.com

Michelle Whittaker is a Caribbean American poet and author of Surge, awarded a Next Generation Indie Book Award for Poetry. She received a Pushcart Special Mention and NYFA Fellowship in Poetry. She has also served as poetry editor for the Southampton Review and teaches at Stony Brook University.

Brian Komei Dempster's debut book of poems, Topaz, received the 15 Bytes Book Award in Poetry. His second poetry collection, Seize, was Silver Winner of a Human Relations Indie Book Award and a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Award, Julie Suk Award, and National Indie Excellence Award in Poetry.

Fred Marchant is the author of five books of poetry, the most recent of which is Said Not Said. He is the editor of Another World Instead: Early Poetry of William Stafford and the founding director of the Suffolk University Poetry Center in Boston. He teaches workshops in venues around the country.


Twitter Username: FredMarchant

Virtual

F213.

Publishing Books in Translation: An Overview of Best Practices, Sponsored by CLMP

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Editors of indie presses and magazines demystify the process of publishing works in translation, including what they need to know to acquire works, managing international rights, how they handle the editing process, and how translators can submit their work.

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Bruna Dantas Lobato received her MFA in fiction from NYU and is currently an MFA candidate in literary translation at the University of Iowa. Her stories, essays, and translations have appeared in BOMB, Harvard Review, Ploughshares, the Common, and elsewhere. She is a 2018 A Public Space Fellow.


Twitter Username: bdantaslobato

Khaled Mattawa's latest collection of poetry is Mare Nostrum from Sarabande Books. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of Michigan and is the editor of Michigan Quarterly Review.

CJ Evans is the editor in chief of Two Lines Press and the author of Lives, forthcoming in June 2022, and A Penance. More information is available on his website: www.cjevans.org


Twitter Username: snavejc

Website: www.cjevans.org

Sunyoung Lee is the publisher of award-winning literary nonprofit Kaya Press, where she has worked for the past twenty-two years.

Virtual

F214.

The Buzz on Book Doctors: When Hiring an Editor Is Worth Your Time & Money

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Writing a book can be a lonely endeavor. You learn your craft, draft a manuscript, and get feedback from critique partners. What comes next? Hiring an independent editor can be the invaluable next step toward unlocking a book's potential. But whom to hire, how to afford it, and how to get your money's worth? Two former Big Five editors, writers who've worked with independent editors, and a literary agent discuss vetting book doctors, maximizing the relationship, and locating sources of funding.

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Christine Pride is a writer, editor and fifteen-year publishing veteran. She has held editorial posts at various Big Five imprints, including Doubleday, Broadway, Crown, and Hyperion. Her first novel, We Are Not Like Them, written with Jo Piazza, was recently published.

Britt Tisdale is a writer and psychotherapist with an MFA from Seattle Pacific University. A fellow of Hambidge Center, Wedgwood Circle, and Buinho Creative Hub, she has taught for Rollins College and the Abroad Writers Conference. Her work has appeared in Sonora Review and Pleiades.


Twitter Username: brittalive

Alka Joshi has has a BA from Stanford University and an MFA from California College of Arts. Her debut novel, The Henna Artist, became a New York Times bestseller and a Reese Witherspoon Bookclub Pick and was longlisted for the Center for FIction First Novel Prize. Her second book was released in June 2021.


Twitter Username: alkajoshi

Brenda Copeland is an editor with more than twenty years’ experience at the big five publishers and over ten years as an adjunct professor in the graduate publishing program at NYU. Now an independent editor, she works closely with authors of all levels, helping them reach their creative potential.


Twitter Username: BrendaCopeland

Iwalani Kim represents adult upmarket and literary fiction and select narrative nonfiction at Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. As the senior assistant and foreign rights liaison to Heide Lange, Iwalani has the pleasure of working with extraordinary clients such as Dan Brown and Brad Thor.


Twitter Username: IwalaniKim

Virtual

F215.

Writing the Wound: How to Write Trauma Ethically

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Our wounds are the openings to our deepest selves. The craving for connection in these soft and tender places and the instinct to seek out witnesses to our scars are universal. But how can we ensure we are writing toward healing, rather than retraumatization? And how do we write ethically about those who have hurt us? Panelists working in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and graphic storytelling will discuss their personal experiences and best practice principals for writing trauma ethically.

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Aubrey Hirsch is the author of Why We Never Talk About Sugar. Her stories, essays, and comics have appeared in American Short Fiction, the New York Times, Vox, the Nib, Black Warrior Review, the Florida Review, Gay Magazine, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: aubreyhirsch

Website: www.aubreyhirsch.com

Roxane Gay is the author of An Untamed State, Bad Feminist, Difficult Women, and Hunger. She has work in Best American Mystery Stories 2014, Best American Short Stories 2012, Oxford American, Virginia Quarterly Review, and others. She is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.


Twitter Username: rgay

Sumita Chakraborty is a poet, essayist, and scholar. She is Helen Zell Visiting Professor in Poetry at the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, and she is the author of the poetry collection Arrow, published in the US by Alice James Books and in the UK by Carcanet Press in 2020.


Twitter Username: notsumatra

Saeed Jones is the author of the memoir How We Fight for Our Lives, winner of the 2019 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction. He is also the author of the poetry collection Prelude to Bruise, a finalist for the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award.


Twitter Username: theferocity

Website: https://www.readsaeedjones.com/

Maggie Smith is the author of five books, including Goldenrod, Good Bones, and the national bestseller Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change. Her poems and essays have appeared in the New Yorker, the Paris Review, the New York Times, Tin House, and The Best American Poetry.


Twitter Username: maggiesmithpoet

Website: www.maggiesmithpoet.com

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Terrace Ballroom I & II, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 400 Level

F190.

Beyond Genres: A Panel with Patrick Rosal, K-Ming Chang & T Kira Māhealani Madden, Moderated by J. Mae Barizo, Sponsored by Kundiman

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Renowned writers Patrick Rosal, K-Ming Chang, and T Kira Māhealani Madden will take the stage for a crossgenre panel discussion. As acclaimed writers of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, this panel will discuss the expansive possibilities within Asian American identity and storytelling through a navigation across genres. A conversation on craft moderated by J. Mae Barizo will follow. This event will be livestreamed. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

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Patrick Rosal is author of The Last Thing: New and Selected Poems. He is a professor of English and campus codirector of the Institute for the Study of Global Racial Justice at Rutgers-Camden. He has been awarded the Lenore Marshall Prize, as well as fellowships from the NEA, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and the Fulbright Program.


Twitter Username: patrickrosal

Website: www.patrickrosal.com

K-Ming Chang is a Kundiman fellow, a Lambda Literary Award finalist, and a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree. She is the author of the New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice novel Bestiary  and the forthcoming short story collection Gods of Want.

T Kira Mahealani Madden is a lesbian, APIA author of New York Times Editors' Choice memoir Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls, and founding editor in chief of No Tokens. Winner of the 2021 Lambda Judith A. Markowitz Award, she is an assistant professor at College of Charleston.


Twitter Username: tkiramadden

J. Mae Barizo is a prize-winning poet, critic, and performer. She is the recipient of awards from Bennington College, the Jerome Foundation, and Poets House. A champion of crossgenre work, she's collaborated with artists such as Mark Morris, Salman Rushdie, and the American String Quartet.

Michael A. Nutter Theater, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F191.

A Reading by Arthur Sze, Meg Day, and Kemi Alabi, Sponsored by the Academy of American Poets

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Join the Academy of American Poets for a reading by Academy Chancellor Emeritus Arthur Sze and award-winning poets Meg Day and Kemi Alabi. Executive Director Jennifer Benka will introduce the event. ASL interpretation will be provided. Founded in 1934, the Academy of American Poets is the nation’s leading champion of poets and poetry, with supporters in all fifty states.

This event will be prerecorded and available on the virtual conference platform, in addition to being screened onsite. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

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Jen Benka is the executive director of the Academy of American Poets. She worked previously as the managing director of Poets & Writers and for 826 National. She is the author of Pinko and A Box of Longing With Fifty Drawers. Jen holds an MFA from the New School.

Arthur Sze is the author of eleven books of poetry, including The Glass Constellation: New and Collected Poems, Sight Lines, Compass Rose, The Ginkgo Light, Quipu, and The Redshifting Web. He received the 2021 Shelley Memorial Award and the 2019 National Book Award in Poetry.

Meg Day is the 2015–2016 recipient of the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship, a 2013 recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Poetry, and the author of Last Psalm at Sea Level. Day is assistant professor of English and creative writing at Franklin & Marshall College.


Twitter Username: themegdaystory

Website: www.megday.com

Kemi Alabi (they/them) is the author of Against Heaven (Graywolf Press, April 2022), selected by Claudia Rankine as winner of the 2021 Academy of American Poets First Book Award. Alabi is coeditor of The Echoing Ida Collection (Feminist Press, 2021).


Twitter Username: kemiaalabi

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F192.

Writing Southeast Asia Away from the Western Gaze

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How can we tell our stories on our own terms? Five anglophone writers from Myanmar, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand talk about reclaiming perspectives and writing that does not pander to orientalist expectations. What does it mean to use English, an imperial language, in this decolonial work, particularly in such multicultural, multilingual countries, and what is the role of translation in navigating this cultural and linguistic fluidity?

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Jeremy Tiang won the Singapore Literature Prize in 2018 for his novel State of Emergency. He has translated over twenty books from Chinese, most recently Lo Yi-Chin's Faraway, and is currently Princeton University's translator in residence. He also writes and translates plays. www.JeremyTiang.com


Twitter Username: JeremyTiang

Website: www.JeremyTiang.com

YZ Chin is the author of Edge Case, a novel, and the story collection Though I Get Home, which won the Louise Meriwether First Book Prize and the Asian/Pacific American Award For Literature honor title. Her translation of The Age of Goodbyes by Li Zishu is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: yz_chin

Sunisa Manning is a Thai and American novelist. She’s the author of A Good True Thai, which was a finalist for the 2020 Epigram Books Fiction Prize for Southeast Asian Writers. She is the recipient of the Steinbeck Fellowship, a residency from Hedgebrook, and other honors.


Twitter Username: sunisasn

Website: www.sunisamanning.com

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the novel The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, A Haven, which won an Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, and Names for Light: A Family History, which won the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize.


Twitter Username: thiriimkm

Gina Apostol's last novels, Insurrecto and The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata, explore the Philippine revolutions against America and Spain. Her third novel, Gun Dealers' Daughter, won the 2013 PEN/Open Book Award. Her first two novels won the Juan Laya Prize (Philippine National Book Award).


Twitter Username: GinaApostol

Website: ginaapostol.com

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F193.

From URL to IRL: What Online Tools Do We Take Back into the Classroom?

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As the pandemic wanes, campuses and classrooms have reopened and our workshops can resume in person. What have we, as educators, discovered in the virtual classroom that can enhance our face-to-face instruction and build stronger creative communities? How can some of those resources and practices become part of our pedagogy's new normal?

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Lise Funderburg is the author of the memoir Pig Candy and the oral history Black, White, Other. She was a fellow at the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Thurber House, and MacDowell, and she teaches creative nonfiction at the University of Pennsylvania and in the MFA program at Rutgers-Camden.


Twitter Username: LiseFunderburg

Clifford Thompson is the author of Love for Sale and Other Essays, Twin of Blackness: A Memoir, and the novel Signifying Nothing. In 2013, he won a Whiting Writers' Award for nonfiction. He has been an adjunct professor at Columbia University, New York University, and Queens College.


Twitter Username: 616Clifford

Christy Davids is the author of Wanton, Dysphoric / Geography, and On Heat. She is a teacher and cocurates the Philly-based series Charmed Instruments. Some of her work can be found in VOLT, Openhouse, bedfellows, Jacket2, DUSIE, the Tiny, and the Poetry Foundation’s Harriet Books, among others.


Twitter Username: wootchristywoot

Donna Masini's books include 4:30 Movie, Turning to Fiction, That Kind of Danger, and a novel, About Yvonne. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Paris Review, APR, and Best American Poetry. She is professor of English/creative writing at Hunter College


Twitter Username: donnamasini

Julia Bloch (MFA, PhD) is director of the Creative Writing Program at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a Pew Fellow and the author of three books of poetry, including Letters to Kelly Clarkson, a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award, and is coeditor of the poetry and poetics journal Jacket2.


Twitter Username: julivox

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F194.

Journeys to Print: Embracing & Cultivating Your Publishing Niche

(, , , , Krys Belc)

What is the right press for your work? Hear five nonfiction authors share all we wish we’d known about the quest for agent, contract, and publication. We have written books published or soon-to-be-published by an undergraduate student-run press, an independent press, university presses, a literary imprint of Amazon Publishing, and one of the Big Five. We will discuss book proposals, book advances, focus vs. flexibility in content and genre, and the editing and marketing processes.

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Jill Sisson Quinn has authored two essay collections: Sign Here if You Exist and Deranged. She has received a John Burroughs Essay Award and a Rona Jaffe Writers Award. Her work has appeared in Orion, Natural History, and has been reprinted in the Best American series.


Twitter Username: quinn_jill

Carrie Hagen is a writer, researcher, and editor with an eye for compelling historical nonfiction narratives. Passionate about connecting generations through stories, she lives in Philadelphia, where she contributes to Smithsonian.com and Mountain Home magazine.

Helena Rho, a former assistant professor of pediatrics, has practiced and taught at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Pittsburgh. Her memoir, American Seoul, is forthcoming from Little A in 2022.


Twitter Username: helena_rho

Stephanie Gorton is the author of Citizen Reporters, a work of journalism history. She has written for the New Yorker online, Smithsonian, and the Paris Review, among others. Previously, she held editorial roles at Canongate Books, The Overlook Press, and Open Road.


Twitter Username: sdgortonwords

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F195.

Imagining Invisible Borders: Uniting International African Diaspora Poets

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In December 2020, during the global pandemic, Uganda-born, London-based poet Nick Makoha founded his vision for an international poetry collective in the African diaspora called Obsidian Foundation. A panel of poets who were selected to attend Obsidian's first virtual retreat discuss their experiences in poetry craft during the event and the effects of uniting with the global African diaspora on their work. They also read from their poetry and engage with attendees to discuss Makoha's process.

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Nick Makoha is founder of the Obsidian Foundation. His debut collection, Kingdom of Gravity, was shortlisted for the Forward Prize Best First Collection. He's a Cave Canem Graduate Fellow, Complete Works alumnus, and winner of the 2015 Brunel African Poetry Prize and the 2016 Toi Derricotte & Cornelius Eady Prize.


Twitter Username: NickMakoha

Len Lawson is the author of Chime  and the chapbook Before the Night Wakes You. He is also editor of Hand in Hand: Poets Respond to Race  and The Future of Black: Afrofuturism and Black Comics Poetry.


Twitter Username: Lenvillelaws

Raina J. León is cofounder and editor in chief of the Acentos Review and the author of three poetry books: Canticle of Idols, Boogeyman Dawn, and sombra: (dis)locate. She is a member of the Cave Canem, CantoMundo, Macondo, and Carolina African American Writers Collective communities.


Twitter Username: rainaleon

Website: http://www.rainaleon.com

Saddiq Dzukogi’s poetry collection Your Crib, My Qibla was named one of twenty-nine best poetry collections by Oprah Daily. He is the recipient of fellowships and grants from Nebraska Arts Council, Pen America, Obsidian Foundation, and University of Nebraska–Lincoln.


Twitter Username: SaddiqDzukogi

Alexa Patrick is a poet from Connecticut. She holds fellowships from Cave Canem, Obsidian, and The Watering Hole. You may find Alexa's work in publications including Split This Rock's The Quarry, ArLiJo, CRWN Magazine, and The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic.


Twitter Username: getfreealexap

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F196.

Abracadabra!: Writers’ Most (and Least) Wanted Transformations

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Our creative practices have transformed along with our identities as writers, creators, and teachers. Our panel frankly discusses the literary expectations and practices we aspire to, are sometimes broken by, and seek to transform. Learning and imagination are necessary to craft and survival, but sometimes literary change comes at a steep cost. We celebrate and assess our nontraditional paths, encourage writers at all levels, and critique the systems that hinder our dream of "The Writer's" lives.

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Alison Kinney is the author of Avidly Reads Opera  and Hood. Her essays have been published in the Paris Review Daily, the New Yorker, Lapham’s Quarterly, and the New York Times. She is assistant professor of writing (nonfiction) at Eugene Lang College at The New School.


Twitter Username: Alison_Kinney

Minda Honey is a Louisville, Kentucky-based writer. Her debut collection of essays, An Anthology of Assholes, is forthcoming summer 2023. Find her work at ESPN’s the Undefeated, Longreads, Catapult, Salon.com, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: mindahoney

Anjali Enjeti is the author of the collection of essays Southbound and the novel The Parted Earth. She teaches in the MFA program at Reinhardt University. Her other writing has appeared in the Oxford American, Harper's Bazaar, the Atlanta Journal Constitution, the Boston Globe, and elsewhere.


Twitter Username: anjalienjeti

Website: anjalienjeti.com

Edgar Gomez is a Florida-born writer with roots in Nicaragua and Puerto Rico. He has written for PopSugar, Narratively, Longreads, Catapult, Ploughshares, the Rumpus, and elsewhere online and in print. He is also the author of the recent memoir High-Risk Homosexual. For more, visit EdgarGomez.net.


Twitter Username: otroedgargomez

Denne Michele Norris is the editor in chief of Electric Literature. Her writing appears in McSweeney's, American Short Fiction, and The Undefeated and has been supported by MacDowell, Tin House, VCCA, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. Find her on Twitter and Instagram @thedennemichele


Twitter Username: thedennemichele

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F197.

Writer & Righter of Wrongs: One Hundred Years of Influence through Sol Plaatje’s Mhudi

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Writer and activist Sol Plaatje was more than just the first Black African to write a novel in English. His female-centric allegory, concerned with injustice and land dispossession, maintains relevancy in academic discussion, essay, and course curricula. Reading from his life and work, highlighting his political as well as his literary importance, panelists will examine how Plaatje explored issues of race, culture, gender, and language to make a lasting impact and remain influential today.

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Sabata-mpho Mokae is the author of the Setswana (southern African language) novels Ga ke Modisa and Moletlo wa Manong. He is the winner of the South African MNET Literary Award for Best Setswana Novel and MNET Film Award. He teaches creative writing at Sol Plaatje University in Kimberley, South Africa.


Twitter Username: mokaewriter

Lesego Malepe taught at a college for many years before retiring and turning to writing full-time. She writes both fiction and nonfiction about South Africa and has contributed a chapter on land issues in a recently published collection of essays on Mhudi.

Brian Willan is a historian and former publisher, currently Extraordinary Professor at Sol Plaatje University in Kimberley, South Africa. He has written a biography of Sol Plaatje and coedited several books books about him, including Sol Plaatje's Mhudi and Sol Plaatje: A Life in Letters.


Twitter Username: brianwillan

MarLa Sink Druzgal is the director of WriteChange.org—a nonprofit organization in global coordination with The Writers Project of Ghana and Sol Plaatje University (SPU) of South Africa. Ms. Druzgal teaches in the US and South Africa, where she is working with SPU on an MA travel writing program.


Twitter Username: travelingmarla

Website: http://www.marlasinkdruzgal.com

116, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F198.

Nice Moms, Dark Hearts: Using Art to Challenge Expectations of Motherhood

(, , , , Brenda Peynado)

Panelists will discuss the experience of writing and publishing a book as mothers of young children, focusing particularly on the specific angst that comes with sharing a private part of oneself that might not perfectly align with what society expects of mothers. The conversation will also include an examination of what constitutes “acceptable motherhood” and how art can subvert and challenge those expectations.

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Alison Wisdom's debut novel We Can Only Save Ourselves was published in February 2021 by Harper Perennial. She holds degrees from Baylor University and Vermont College of Fine Arts and will be publishing her sophomore novel in 2022. 


Twitter Username: alisonlwisdom

Katie Gutierrez's writing has appeared in the Washington Post, Harper's Bazaar, Texas Monthly, and more. Her debut novel, More Than You'll Ever Know, is forthcoming in 2022.


Twitter Username: katie_gutz

Jessamine Chan’s short stories have appeared in Tin House and EPOCH. A former reviews editor at Publishers Weekly, she holds an MFA from Columbia University. The School for Good Mothers is her first novel.


Twitter Username: jessaminechan

Nefertiti Austin writes about the erasure of diverse voices in motherhood in Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America. Her work can be found in the New York Times, Washington Post, MUTHA, the Nation, etc. She has appeared on the 3rd Hour of the TODAY Show, 1A, NPR, and numerous podcasts.


Twitter Username: nefertitiaustin

Website: www.nefertitiaustin.com

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F199.

On Biogoir: Blending Biography & Memoir

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What happens when a project sets out to examine one life but winds up connecting to another—your own? Panelists discuss the blurring of biography and memoir: What shape might a fused form take? What ethical issues arise when your story creeps into someone else’s? What does research look like? Is there a market? Sharing from their own projects across a range of media, including podcasts, magazines, and books, panelists examine the problems and possibilities of the "biogoir" mashup.

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Jeremy Jones is the author of the memoir Bearwallow, which was awarded gold in the 2015 IPPY awards. His essays appear in Oxford American, Brevity, the Iowa Review, and others. The series coeditor of In Place, he is an associate professor of English at Western Carolina University.


Twitter Username: thejeremybjones

Website: thejeremybjones.com

Sarah Viren is the author of the essay collection MINE, winner of the River Teeth Book Prize and the GLCA New Writers Award. A contributing writer at the New York Times Magazine, she is also an assistant professor at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: sarahviren

Website: sarahviren@wordpress.com

Lucas Mann is the author of Captive Audience: On Love and Reality Television, Lord Fear: A Memoir, and Class A: Baseball in the Middle of Everywhere. A recipient of fellowships from United States Artists and the National Endowment for the Arts, he teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.


Twitter Username: lucaswmann

Website: lucasmann.com

Eric Mennel is a senior producer at Pineapple Street Studios and host of the podcast Stay Away from Matthew MaGill. His reporting has appeared on This American Life, NPR, Marketplace, 99% Invisible, and other programs. He is a cocreator of the podcast Criminal.


Twitter Username: ericmennel

L.M. Ferreira Cabeza-Vanegas has a creative nonfiction and a literary translation MFAs from the University of Iowa. She is the author of Drown Sever Sing, and Don’t Come Back from Mad Creek Books. She is a Rona Jaffe fellow and works as an assistant professor at the University of Chicago.

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F200.

Empowering New Writers: Strategies for Teaching the Hesitant Poetry Student

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Poetry can be intimidating for readers and writers who are unfamiliar with the genre and enter the classroom with assumptions about what they’ll encounter. Discomfort can prevent exploration and learning, holding students in a space where they are self-effacing or resistant. This panel gathers teachers with academic and community experience to discuss strategies and successes in introducing poetry to new readers and writers, with a focus on engaging and empowering students in their learning.

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Jenny Irish is the author of the hybrid poetry collection Common Ancestor and the short story collection I Am Faithful. She teaches creative writing at Arizona State University.


Twitter Username: jenny__irish

Isaac Pickell is a passing poet and PhD student in Detroit, where he teaches and studies the borderlands of black literature. His poetry can be found in Black Warrior Review, Crazyhorse, Fence, Sixth Finch, and in his 2021 chapbook everything saved will be last. He received his MFA from Miami University.


Twitter Username: isaacpickell

Amorak Huey is author of four books of poetry, most recently Dad Jokes from Late in the Patriarchy. He teaches at Grand Valley State University in Michigan.


Twitter Username: amorak

Website: http://amorakhuey.net

Mag Gabbert holds a PhD from Texas Tech and an MFA from UC Riverside. She has received a 92Y Discovery Award as well as fellowships from Idyllwild Arts and Poetry at Round Top. Her chapbook is titled Minml Poems. Mag teaches creative writing at Southern Methodist University and for Writing Workshops Dallas.


Twitter Username: mag_gabbert

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F201.

Permission to Dream: Students of Color in Creative Writing Workshops

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How do creative writing professors encourage students of color to dream on the page? How do they reconcile the act of storytelling with its problematic history of being dominated and defined, in many of its genres, by white males? In what ways is storytelling an act of resistance? Participants will answer these questions and also discuss the ways in which anti-racist pedagogy can be deployed in creative writing workshops in order to liberate the imaginations of students of color.

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Gail Upchurch writes young adult/adult fiction and holds a PhD in creative writing from Binghamton University. A 2021 Tin House YA Scholar, she is an English professor at PG Community College. She is represented by Lucy Irvine of Peters Fraser and Dunlop Literary Agency and is currently on submission.


Twitter Username: upchurch_gail

Brenda DeMartini-Squires, an associate professor at Dutchess Community College, has published work in The Sun, Confrontations, Paterson Literary Review, Minnesota Review, Kansas Quarterly, and Southern Indiana Review. She holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop and a PhD from the University of Missouri.

Keith O’Neill is a professor of English at SUNY-Dutchess, where he teaches creative writing and composition. His work has appeared in McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Andromeda Spaceways Magazine, and Bewildering Tales.

Amina Henry is a Brooklyn-based playwright, adjunct lecturer, and arts educator with the Teachers & Writers Collaborative and the Hunts Point Alliance for Children. She is a graduate of Yale University and has an MA in performance studies (NYU) and an MFA in playwriting (Brooklyn College).


Twitter Username: henryamina

Racquel Goodison is an associate professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY. She has been a resident at Yaddo and the Saltonstall Arts Colony, as well as a recipient of the Astraea Emerging Lesbian Writer’s Grant and a scholarship to the Fine Arts Works Center.

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F202.

A Reading & Conversation with Krystyna Dąbrowska

(, , , Sean Bye)

A bilingual reading by Krystyna Dąbrowska, one of Poland’s most acclaimed younger poets, and her three award-winning translators, followed by a conversation on multiple techniques for translating the same poet, as well as collaborative strategies for promoting her work throughout the English-speaking world. Known for her inviting poems that investigate cultural exchange, family history, and language itself, Dąbrowska is the winner of Poland’s distinguished Wisława Szymborska Prize.

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Karen Kovacik is the author of the poetry collections Metropolis Burning and Beyond the Velvet Curtain, translator of Jacek Dehnel's Aperture, and editor of Scattering the Dark, anthology of Polish women poets. Recipient of an NEA translation fellowship, she teaches at IUPUI in Indianapolis.


Twitter Username: KarenKovacik

Mira Rosenthal is a past fellow of the NEA and Stanford’s Stegner Program. Her volume The Local World won the Wick Poetry Prize. Her translation of Tomasz Różycki’s Colonies won the Northern California Book Award. Honors include a PEN Translation Award and residencies at Hedgebrook and MacDowell.


Twitter Username: mira_rosenthal

Website: www.mirarosenthal.com

Krystyna Dabrowska is the author of four poetry books and winner of the Wislawa Szymborska Award and the Koscielski Award. Her poems have been translated into twenty languages. Collections of her poems have been published in Italian, German, and Swedish and are forthcoming in Portuguese and English.

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F203.

Creating an Anthology for the First Time: The Poet as Editor

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What are the processes by which poets create and edit thematic anthologies and why? Five poet-editors discuss their experiences with compiling and launching recent anthologies. They consider the challenges of doing this during the pandemic, as well as methods of finding contributors by direct solicitation versus open submissions, making acceptance decisions, organizing the anthology, answering rights questions, looking for a publisher, creating effective publicity, and finding an audience.

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Susana H. Case, a retired professor, is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently Dead Shark on the N Train, which won a Pinnacle Book Award for Best Poetry Book and a NYC Big Book Award Distinguished Favorite and was a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book Award.


Twitter Username: susana_h_case

Website: https://susanahcase.com

Margo Stever’s collections include Cracked Piano, Ghost Moose,The Lunatic Ball, The Hudson Line, Frozen Spring, and Reading the Night Sky. She is the founder of the Hudson Valley Writers Center and founding and current coeditor of Slapering Hol Press. She currently teaches poetry at Case Western Reserve University.


Twitter Username: margotaftstever

Website: www.margotaftstever.com

Caridad Moro-Gronlier is the author of Tortillera. She is a contributing editor of Grabbed: Writers Respond to Sexual Assault and associate editor for SWWIM Every Day. A career educator, she is an English professor in Miami, Florida.


Twitter Username: CaridadMoro1

Katherine Hoerth is the author of four poetry books, including Goddess Wears Cowboy Boots, which won the Helen C. Smith Prize from the Texas Institute of Letters. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Lamar University and serves as editor in chief of Lamar University Literary Press.

Diana Whitney's poetry anthology for teen girls, You Don't Have to Be Everything, became a YA bestseller. She is the former poetry columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, and her personal essays and literary criticism have appeared in the New York Times, Kenyon Review, and Longreads.


Twitter Username: dianawhitney31

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F204.

Teaching Creative Writing for the Global Classroom

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Teaching online international creative writing courses offers unique opportunities for cross-cultural exchanges, building global creative communities, and offering writers and writing instructors increased access to and understanding of narrative, cognitive, and instructional possibilities. This panel of experienced online instructors with the International Writing Program (IWP) at the University of Iowa will discuss the concerns and possibilities inherent in teaching for a global classroom.

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Christa Fraser grew up in California's Central Valley. A graduate from the Iowa Writers' Workshop with an MFA in fiction, she has also been a fellow at the MacDowell Colony and at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Her work has appeared in the Missouri Review and Shankpainter.

Pamela Marston, University of Iowa International Writing Program, has taught and designed literature and creative writing at university level for over twenty years, in hybrid, online, and campus course types. Her course designs at the IWP from 2018 onwards promote emerging genres and inclusion.

Derek Nnuro, a Ghanaian American fiction writer and educator, is Curator of Special Projects at the University of Iowa Stanley Museum of Art and a graduate of the fiction program at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. What Napoleon Could Not Do, his debut novel, is forthcoming from Riverhead.

Micah Bateman teaches library and information science at the University of Iowa, where he has produced Massive Open Online Courses and taught creative writing online since 2013. He is coauthor of Mapping the Imaginary: Supporting Creative Writers through Programming, Prompts, and Research.


Twitter Username: Micah_Bateman

Danielle Wheeler is an online course designer and adjunct instructor of writing, literature, and rhetoric. She graduated from the Iowa Writers' Workshop with an MFA in poetry and was the 2010-2011 Rona Jaffe fellow in creative writing. She currently works and teaches in Iowa City, Iowa.


Twitter Username: https://twitter.com/dance

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F205.

Migrants through Time: Novelists Writing across the 20th/21st-Century Divide

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In Exit West, Mohsin Hamid posits that "we are all migrants through time." In this panel, novelists whose work traverses the border between the 20th and 21st-centuries consider what it means to live and write on both sides of this temporal divide. By examining the legacy of the AIDS crisis, the transformation of a metropolis, the impact of climate change, and the shifting landscapes of art and music, we'll explore how the 20th century continues to haunt, shape, and reverberate in our own.

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Tim Horvath is the author of Understories, which won the New Hampshire Literary Award, and Circulation, a novella. His stories appear in Conjunctions, AGNI, Hayden's Ferry Review, and elsewhere. He teaches for Catapult, Grub Street, StoryStudio, and the Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance.


Twitter Username: tim_horvath

Website: www.timhorvath.com

Rebecca Makkai's fourth book, The Great Believers, was a finalist for both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award; it won the LA Times Book Prize, the Carnegie Medal, and the Stonewall Award. She is artistic director of StoryStudio Chicago.


Twitter Username: rebeccamakkai

Website: www.rebeccamakkai.com

Pitchaya Sudbanthad is the author of the novel Bangkok Wakes to Rain, which was selected as a New York Times and Washington Post notable book of the year and a finalist for the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize.


Twitter Username: pitchaya

Julia Fine is the author of the novels The Upstairs House, and What Should Be Wild. She has taught writing with Catapult and StoryStudio Chicago and at Columbia College and DePaul University.


Twitter Username: finejuli

Marc Fitten is an author and editor. He has written two novels, Valeria's Last Stand and Elza's Kitchen, and has completed a third—American Entropy. He also contributes essays to various anthologies and periodicals.


Twitter Username: marcfitten

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F206.

Into the Void: Faith & Doubt in Contemporary Poetry

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“If God is dead,” writes Richard Rodriguez, “I will cry into the void.” In an age of distrust of institutions—church, state, and everything in between—what draws poets to questions of the divine? In a time of dwindling participation in organized religion, what sustenance might a poetry of faith and doubt offer readers and writers? In this panel, four poets discuss their approaches to traditions of belief and critique and how these traditions may be reinvented to address our contemporary crises.

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Dave Lucas is the author of Weather, which received the Ohioana Book Award for Poetry. In 2018, he was appointed the second poet laureate of the state of Ohio. He teaches at Case Western Reserve University.


Twitter Username: fakedavelucas

Leila Chatti is the author of Deluge), Tunsiya/Amrikiya, and Ebb. She is the Mendota Lecturer in Poetry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Twitter Username: laypay

Philip Metres is the author and translator of a number of books, including Shrapnel Maps, The Sound of Listening, Sand Opera, Pictures at an Exhibition, and To See the Earth. His work has garnered Guggenheim and Lannan fellowships, two NEAs, three Arab American book awards, and the Hunt Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

Natasha Oladokun is a poet and essayist. Her work has appeared in the American Poetry Review, Harvard Review Online, Kenyon Review Online, and Catapult. She holds fellowships from Cave Canem and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and is a 2021 Barbara Smith Writer in Residence.


Twitter Username: NatashaOladokun

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F207.

Translingual Philadelphia: A Reading by the Transversal Translation Collective

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Transversal is a translation collective formed during the pandemic to give translators in the Philadelphia area and across the world a virtual place to form connections, build accountability, and share work and resources. A diverse assemblage of language pairs, backgrounds, and abilities, Transversal has quickly become an important gathering space for many. Five translators from the collective will contextualize their work, share insights into translator solidarity, and give a bilingual reading.

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Liz Rose translates from Spanish and Portuguese and researches Black studies and transnational queer and trans social movements. Their work has appeared in VolumeRaspa Magazine, and The Poetry Project. Liz is a PhD student at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of Transversal.


Twitter Username: translationriot

Hilah Kohen, a Transversal cofounder, translates from Juhuri and Russian to English. She coedited an issue of Words Without Borders featuring young writers across the post-Soviet space. A former news editor, Hilah researches language choice and internationalism. Find her in Gulf Coast and LARB.


Twitter Username: hilahkohen

Nicholas Glastonbury is a translator of Turkish and Kurdish literatures. His translation of Sema Kaygusuz's novel Every Fire You Tend received the TA First Translation Prize from the Society of Authors. He is a PhD candidate at CUNY Graduate Center and a coeditor of the e-zine Jadaliyya.


Twitter Username: nsglastonbury

Meg Arenberg is a scholar and translator of Swahili literature who is based in Philadelphia. Her work has been published in PMLA, Research in African Literatures, East African Literary & Cultural Studies, Postcolonial Text, and Words Without Borders, and she has won recognition from the ACLA and ALTA.


Twitter Username: MegArenberg

Carlos José Pérez Sámano is a Mexican literary fiction author, teacher of creative writing workshops in Mexico, the US, Kenya, and Cuba. With four published books, his work has been featured in the anthology Who Will Speak for America? and in more than twenty international magazines.


Twitter Username: carlosperezsamano

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F208.

Expanding the Fictional Terrain: Four Writers, Four Collections, Four Awards

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From social realism to speculative fiction, from American tales to immigrant lit, from heterosexual narratives to LGBTQ stories—Caroline Kim (the 2020 Drue Heinz Literature Prize), Michael X. Wang (the 2021 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize), Rachel Swearingen (the 2018 New American Fiction Prize), and Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry (the 2020 Raz/Shumaker Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Fiction) will read from their award-winning collections on themes of love, loss, and cultural identity.

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Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, a Russian Armenian, has published fifty stories and won the 2013 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction, the 2015 T. Williams scholarship from the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and the 2020 Raz/Shumaker Prairie Schooner Book Prize for her first collection, What Isn’t Remembered.


Twitter Username: kgnewberry

Caroline Kim is the author of a collection of short stories about the Korean diaspora, The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories, which won the 2020 Drue Heinz Prize in Literature and was longlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Short Story Collections and the Story Prize.


Twitter Username: carolinewriting

Michael X. Wang, born in China's mountainous interior, immigrated to the United States when he was six. He is the author of the story collection Further News of Defeat, which won the PEN/Bingham Prize. His stories can be found in the New England Review and Hayden’s Ferry Review.


Twitter Username: MichaelXWang3

Rachel Swearingen's How to Walk on Water and Other Stories, winner of the 2018 New American Press Prize, was a New York Times "New & Noteworthy" selection and one of Electric Lit's favorite collections for 2020. Her stories have appeared in the Missouri ReviewKenyon Review, and Agni.


Twitter Username: rachelswearinge

Website: www.rachelswearinge.com

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F209.

Wanting a Seat at the Table without Being Eaten Alive: The Elusivity of Success

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Writing is a solitary occupation, but once a book enters the world, it belongs to readers, critics, and marketplace alike. Capitalism’s gaze (which of course is, by default, white, male, cis-het, abled, etc.) fetishizes, tokenizes, sexualizes, and centralizes certain writers, while erasing/overlooking others. At the same time, writers need/want to publish and also to market/sell their book. How can one be an artist without pandering to or becoming complicit with the hegemonies of the gaze?

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Lee Ann Roripaugh is the author of five volumes of poetry, most recently Tsunami vs. the Fukushima 50. She directs the creative writing program at the University of South Dakota, and is editor in chief of South Dakota Review.


Twitter Username: artichokeheart

Website: http://southdakota.academia.edu/LeeAnnRoripaugh

Nana-Ama Danquah is author of the groundbreaking memoir Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman's Journey through Depression and editor of four anthologies, including Accra Noir, which is forthcoming.


Twitter Username: DanquahReads

Website: www.danquah.com

Jan Beatty's sixth book, The Body Wars, was published by University of Pittsburgh Press. She won the Red Hen Nonfiction Award for her memoir, American Bastard. Beatty worked as a waitress and abortion counselor and in maximum security prisons. She directs creative writing at Carlow University.


Twitter Username: janbeatty27

Website: www.janbeatty.com

Allison Adelle Hedge Coke (2021 George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature winner)'s books include Look at This Blue, Burn, Streaming, Blood Run, and Effigies III. Distinguished professor at UC Riverside, she teaches in creative writing and the School of Medicine, directs UCR Writers Week, Lit Sandhill CraneFest, and Along the Chaparral.


Twitter Username: AAHedgeCoke

Website: www.allisonhedgecoke.com

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level.

F209A.

Women Exploring Wild Spaces

(Gretchen Legler, Ana Maria Spagna, Suzanne Stryk)

Wild spaces have historically been a male dominated arena. More than ever, women are exploring remote places and finding voice in the evolving conversation of sustainability. From international trekking or exploring the natural beauty of your own backyard through words and art to translating rural life in Maine from a queer perspective or finding the power rooted in the physical landscape, these women record their experiences to make sense of our human place in the earth’s past, present, and future.

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Virtual

F217.

Fat, Trans & Queer: Growing a Writing Community & Lifting Voices

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As queer lives take focus in life and in literature, fat queer/trans voices remain relegated to the shadows. This discussion, led by established and emerging writers, explores the challenges and rewards of writing while fat, crafting fat characters, and exploring fat queer/trans love, sex, anger, and joy. This session offers ways to transform negative fat and queer/trans narratives into positive ones and celebrate illuminating examples of fat and queer/trans literature and resources.


This virtual discussion room will take place live and will not be recorded for on-demand viewing.

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Miguel M. Morales grew up in Texas working as a migrant/seasonal farmworker. A Lambda Literary Fellow and alum of VONA/Voices and the Macondo Writers workshop, his work appears in several anthologies and literary journals. He is coeditor of the Pulse/Pulso anthology and of the Fat & Queer anthology.


Twitter Username: TrustMiguel

Bruce Owens Grimm is a queer ghost nerd based in Chicago. He is a coeditor of Fat & Queer: An Anthology of Queer & Trans Bodies & Lives. He attended the 2021 Tin House Winter Workshop and taught his "Haunted Memoir" workshop at Story Studio Chicago and the Desert Nights, Rising Stars Conference.


Twitter Username: bruceowensgrimm

Tiff Joshua TJ Ferentini is an associate editor at Kodansha Comics and marketing manager for Monkey Business: New Writing from Japan. Their writing has appeared in the Gambler, Off the Rocks: The LGBTQ Anthology of Newtown Writers Press, and Songs of My Selfie: An Anthology of Millennial Writing.


Twitter Username: Ferenteeny

3:20 p.m. to 4:20 p.m.

Virtual

F239.

Houses Full of Houses: The Structure & Craft of Building Story Collections

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How can a pile of stories become a cohesive book with a beginning, middle, and end? Many collections are assembled after the pieces are written, which can make vital decisions about structure seem daunting. This craft discussion with five debut authors of small press collections will provide a space for thinking both big-picture about books of stories as well as getting into the weeds about all the small choices that help collections cohere—from arrangement and structure to balance and flow.

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Tyler Barton is the author of Eternal Night at the Nature Museum. He's the communications manager for the Adirondack Center for Writing. Find him at tsbarton.com or @goftyler. 


Twitter Username: goftyler

Website: tsbarton.com

Christopher Gonzalez is the author of I'm Not Hungry but I Could Eat, a collection of flash and short fiction. He currently serves as a fiction editor of Barrelhouse.


Twitter Username: livesinpages

Ye Chun / 叶春 is the author of two books of poetry, Lantern Puzzle and Travel over Water; a novel in Chinese; and three books of translations. Her story collection, Hao, is forthcoming from Catapult. A recipient of an NEA fellowship and three Pushcart Prizes, she teaches at Providence College.

Kate McIntyre is the author of the story collection Mad Prairie, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award. Two stories from the collection received Special Mention for the Pushcart Prize. She is an assistant professor of English at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.


Twitter Username: _katemcintyre

Jen Fawkes's debut book, Mannequin and Wife, was a 2020 Shirley Jackson Award Nominee, won two 2020 Foreword INDIES, and was named one of Largehearted Boy's Favorite Short Story Collections of 2020. Her second book, Tales the Devil Told Me, won the 2020 Press 53 Award for Short Fiction.


Twitter Username: fawkesontherun

Website: jenfawkes.com

Virtual

F240.

Unforgettable Latinx Characters

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Five debut novelists will discuss their work and the path to publishing strong Latinx characters that leap off the page. What are the keys to crafting unforgettable characters that will haunt readers? How did they approach creating complex characters that honor communities—Caribbean, Afro-Latinx, Southern, and Midwestern—underrepresented in the US literary landscape? This panel aims to amplify different Latinx voices while celebrating the novelist's pursuit of telling stories that persevere.

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Cleyvis Natera is the author of the forthcoming novel Neruda on the Park.


Twitter Username: cleyvisnatera

Elizabeth Gonzalez James's writing has appeared in the Idaho Review, PANK, the Rumpus, the Ploughshares Blog, and elsewhere. Her first novel, Mona at Sea, was a finalist in the 2019 SFWP Literary Awards judged by Carmen Maria Machado.


Twitter Username: unefemmejames

Website: https://www.elizabethgonzalezjames.com/

Katie Gutierrez's writing has appeared in the Washington Post, Harper's Bazaar, Texas Monthly, and more. Her debut novel, More Than You'll Ever Know, is forthcoming in 2022.


Twitter Username: katie_gutz

Christine Kandic Torres is the author of the forthcoming novel, The Girls in Queens, which will be published by HarperVia in June 2022. Her Pushcart Prize-nominated short fiction has appeared in publications such as Kweli, Catapult, and Lunch Ticket.


Twitter Username: christinekandic

Xochitl Gonzalez has an MFA from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop where she was an Iowa Arts Fellow and recipient of the Michener-Copernicus Prize in Fiction. She was the winner of the 2019 Disquiet Literary Prize. 


Twitter Username: xochitltheg

Website: xochitlgonzalez.com

Virtual

F241.

The Paper Mask: Writing Personas Our Students Put On

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In this panel, writers and educators discuss the ways in which students, particularly first-generation students, wear paper masks—personas in their writing to mask their own voices, which they may see as inadequate in academic settings. Panelists explore this phenomenon across genres in the teaching of creative nonfiction, poetry, and academic writing. We discuss theory, practice, and strategies to empower students to appreciate and use their own voices.

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Elizabeth Threadgill is an associate professor of English at Utica College. She holds an MFA in poetry and a PhD in developmental education-literacy. Her poetry appears in Poet Lore, The Offing, Radar Poetry, Fugue, DIALOGIST, and Small Orange.


Twitter Username: ejthread

Suzanne Richardson earned her MFA at the University of New Mexico. She is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton in Binghamton, New York. She is the writer of the Three Things column at No Contact Magazine. Her nonfiction, fiction, and poetry have appeared in various journals.


Twitter Username: oozannesay

James Henry Knippen is the poetry editor of Newfound. He is the higher education opportunity program writing specialist at Utica College, where he also teaches literature and composition. His full-length poetry collection Would We Still Be won the 2020 New Issues Poetry Prize.


Twitter Username: JamesKnippen

Sara Lupita Olivares is the author of Migratory Sound, which was selected as winner of the 2020 CantoMundo Poetry Prize, and the chapbook Field Things. She works as an assistant professor of English at New Mexico Highlands University.

Daniel Shank Cruz (he/they) is a queer disabled boricua who grew up in New York City and Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He studies creative nonfiction in Hunter College’s MFA program and is the author of Queering Mennonite Literature.


Twitter Username: shankcruz

Website: https://danielshankcruz.com/

Virtual

F242.

The World Split Open: Four Women Poets on Memoir

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“What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life?/ The world would split open,” wrote Muriel Rukeyser in the poem “Käthe Kollwitz.” How does truth-telling and the construction of a voice differ in the genres of poetry and memoir? How do gender, class, and race figure into what is told? What world—if any—is split open? These poet/memoirists discuss the urgency of their turn to prose, also reading briefly from their memoirs.

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Sharon Dolin has published seven poetry books, most recently Imperfect Present and the prose memoir Hitchcock Blonde, plus two books of poems by Gemma Gorga in translation, most recently Late to the House of Words. Associate editor at Barrow Street Press, she directs Writing about Art in Barcelona.


Twitter Username: SharonDolin

Website: www.sharondolin.com

Natasha Trethewey served two terms as the nineteenth poet laureate of the United States (2012-2014). In 2007, she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry and in 2019, she was elected to the Board of Chancellors of the Academy of American Poets. Her most recent book is Memorial Drive: A Daughter’s Memoir.

Jennifer Militello is the author of the nonfiction book Knock Wood as well as five collections of poetry: The Pact; A Camouflage of Specimens and Garments; Body Thesaurus; Flinch of Song; and Anchor Chain, Open Sail. She teaches in the MFA program at New England College.


Twitter Username: JenifrMilitello

Website: www.jennifermilitello.com

Natasha Saje is the author of three books of poems (Red Under the Skin, Bend, and Vivarium); Windows and Doors: A Poet Reads Literary Theory; and Terroir: Love, Out of Place, a memoir in essays. She teaches at Westminster College in Salt Lake City and in the Vermont College MFA in Writing Program.


Twitter Username: NatashaLSaje

Website: www.natashasaje.com

Virtual

F243.

Choices & Challenges in Writing Diaspora

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Writers who write about other cultures and languages have to navigate many issues in how they present themselves and their communities. Should we italicize non-English words? How much should we explain about cultural nuances? And who is it that we’re writing for—a general audience that doesn’t know us or an implied diaspora community? Hear from five diverse writers on the choices we’ve made and how we balance authenticity with the demands of a predominantly white publishing industry.

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Grace Loh Prasad received her MFA in creative writing from Mills College and is an alumna of VONA. Her essays have appeared in Catapult, Ninth Letter, The Manifest-Station, Cha, and Hedgebrook Journal. She is currently working on a memoir/essay collection entitled "The Translator’s Daughter."


Twitter Username: GraceLP

Lillian Howan is the author of The Charm Buyers, recipient of the Ka Palapala Po'okela Award for Excellence in Literature. Her writings have appeared in Asian American Literary Review, Cafe Irreal, CALYX, Jellyfish Review, New England Review, and the anthologies Ms. Aligned 2 and Under Western Eyes.


Twitter Username: LillianHowan

Sunisa Manning is a Thai and American novelist. She’s the author of A Good True Thai, which was a finalist for the 2020 Epigram Books Fiction Prize for Southeast Asian Writers. She is the recipient of the Steinbeck Fellowship, a residency from Hedgebrook, and other honors.


Twitter Username: sunisasn

Website: www.sunisamanning.com

Victoria Buitron is a writer and translator who hails from Ecuador and resides in Connecticut. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in SmokeLong en Español, Entropy, the 2021 Connecticut Lit Anthology, and other literary magazines. Her debut memoir-in-essays is the 2021 Fairfield Book Prize winner.


Twitter Username: vic_toriawrites

Michelle Chikaonda has won awards at the Seventh Wave, the Tucson Festival of Books, and the Fine Arts Work Center at Provincetown. She is a contributing editor at Electric Literature; has attended workshops with Tin House, VQR, and VONA; and has worked at Al Jazeera, Catapult, and Hobart, among others.


Twitter Username: machikaonda

Virtual

F244.

Call Me by My Name: Poetry of Black Womanhood & the Erotic

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Audre Lorde declared without hesitation that the erotic is power. When that force is an expression of Black feminine sexuality, it can be an act of resistance and liberation. What gives us pleasure? How do we write about that pleasure from a place of joy that welcomes vulnerability? To name a thing is to address but also affirm it. When the erotic energy of Black womanhood is allowed to name itself, pleasure becomes unconfined and writing that pleasure, limitless.

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Katy Richey’s work has appeared in Rattle, Cincinnati Review, RHINO, and The Offing. She received an honorable mention for the 2015 Cave Canem Poetry Prize and has received fellowships from Fine Arts Work Center, Maryland State Arts Council, and The Cave Canem Foundation.

Tafisha A. Edwards is the author of two chapbooks: In the Belly of the Mirror and The Bloodlet. She is poetry editor at Gigantic Sequins, and she has published work in the Georgia Review, Poetry Northwest, Washington Square Review, Apogee Journal, Sundress Publications’ Lyric Essentials series, and elsewhere.

Saida Agostini is a queer Afro-Guyanese poet and activist. A Cave Canem graduate fellow, her work is featured or forthcoming in Origins, Drunk in the Midnight Choir, the Black Ladies Brunch Collective's anthology Not Without Our Laughter, pluck!, the Little Patuxent Review, and other publications.


Twitter Username: saidaagostini

Teri Ellen Cross Davis is the author of a more perfect Union, 2019 Journal/ Charles B. Wheeler Poetry Prize winner, and Haint, a 2017 Ohioana Poetry Book award winner. She's a Cave Canem fellow, a Black Ladies Brunch Collective member, and poetry coordinator for the Folger Shakespeare Library in D.C.


Twitter Username: cross_davis

Virtual

F245.

Surviving, Thriving, & Building Creative Community While Avoiding COVID Chaos

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This panel will examine the creative and healing effects provided by the virtual collaborative writing processes implemented during the COVID shutdown. In answer to the Black Lives Matter movement during the pandemic, playwright Deborah Ferguson virtually convened the geographically diverse Nubian Theatre Company after a twenty-year hiatus to reenvision their seminal work, The People Could Fly, as a musical theatre production entitled FLY! Weekly meetings provided interactive writing and editing.

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Cequita Monique is a performing artist and arts educator with a bachelor's degree in fine arts from Lemoyne College. She has performed as a solo and ensemble artist in venues local and abroad while receiving awards of excellence in her field. Monique is a museum guide in Memphis.

Kern Michael Jackson, PhD, is a folklorist with an extensive academic and ethnographic career. He is the director of the African American Studies program and an assistant professor of English at the University of South Alabama.


Twitter Username: kemjacks

Reverend Rhonda Akanke' McLean-Nur is an accomplished NYC-ordained interfaith minister, actress, and folklorist. She is known nationally and internationally for her work with homeless families, prisoners, the elderly, and youth, utilizing the arts to engage and empower others.

Judy Card has told stories in many settings including the Center for Southern Folklore, the Pink Palace Museum, and Brooks Museum of Art. A retired librarian, she was youth services coordinator for First Regional Library in Mississippi and coordinated staff training for Memphis/Shelby County libraries.

Deborah Adero Ferguson, MA, is an adjunct professor of English and American literature at the University of South Alabama in Mobile, Alabama. She is also a poet, playwright, budding screen writer and professional storyteller, and African dancer and musician known as the Dancing Story Lady.


Twitter Username: storydancing

3:20 p.m. to 4:35 p.m.

Michael A. Nutter Theater, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F219.

Celebrating the National Book Critics Circle's First Book Award

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A literary partner featured event focused on the National Book Critics Circle's John Leonard award winners, introduced by NBCC VP/Events Jane Ciabattari, moderated by NBCC President David Varno, featuring Leonard award winners Raven Leilani, Carmen Maria Machado, and Kirstin Valdez Quade. They’ll focus on launching a literary career, inspiration and research for their work, the influence of Leonard and other awards, evolving forms, the unique challenges of writing in these times, and the imaginative process that shapes their work. This event will be livestreamed. ASL interpretation and live captioning will be provided.

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David Varno is the president of the National Book Critics Circle and the fiction reviews editor at Publishers Weekly. His fiction and criticism have appeared in BOMB, the Brooklyn Rail, the Literary Review, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Tin House, and Words Without Borders

Carmen Maria Machado is the author of National Book Award finalist story collection Her Body and Other Parties and the memoir In the Dream House. She is a 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, and her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, Granta, Tin House, Conjunctions, and elsewhere.
Twitter Username: carmenmmachado

Website: http://carmenmariamachado.com/

Raven Leilani’s first novel, Luster, won the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize, the Kirkus Prize, the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, the Dylan Thomas Prize, and the VCU Cabell First Novelist Award. Leilani received her MFA from NYU and was an Axinn Foundation writer in residence.

Kirstin Valdez Quade's story collection, Night at the Fiestas won the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard award, the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction, a 5 Under 35”award from the National Book Foundation, and was a finalist for the New York Public Library Young Lions Award. She is an assistant professor at Princeton.

109AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F220.

Unmake the Patriarchy of Your Mind

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For millennia, patriarchal expectations have shaped literature’s socioeconomic context and making. This intersectional panel brings together five award-winning writers who rewrite the patriarchy's impact on our lives and art as Black, Latinx, South Asian, and white women—from persona poems as a Black womanist or in the voice of Baba Yaga, to centering Latinxs in tales of settler colonialism, to poems that confront workplace sexism, to a mother's essays about wringing the toxic from her son.

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Kristen Millares Young is a prizewinning journalist, essayist, and author of the novel Subduction (Red Hen Press). Named a Paris Review staff pick, Subduction won Nautilus and IPPY awards. Kristen reviews books for the Washington Post, and she is the editor of Seismic, a Washington State Book Award finalist.


Twitter Username: kristenmillares

Website: www.kristenmyoung.com

Alexandra Teague is the author of the novel Or What We’ll Call Desire and two poetry books, The Wise and Foolish Builders and Mortal Geography, as well as coeditor of Bullets into Bells. A former Stegner and NEA fellow, she is a professor at University of Idaho.

Anastacia-Reneé is a queer writer, educator, podcaster, and interdisciplinary artist, She is the author of (v.) and Forget It. Here in the (Middle) of Nowhere and Sidenotes from the Archivist are forthcoming from Amistad.

Laura Read is the author of Dresses from the Old Country, Instructions for My Mother’s Funeral, and The Chewbacca on Hollywood Boulevard Reminds Me of You. She served as poet laureate for Spokane, Washington, from 2015–2017. She teaches English at Spokane Falls Community College.


Twitter Username: lauraread70

Sonora Jha is the author of the essay collection How to Raise a Feminist Son: Motherhood, Masculinity, and the Making of My Family and the novel Foreign. Her essays are in the New York Times, Seattle Times, etc. She is a professor of journalism at Seattle University.


Twitter Username: ProfSonoraJha

Website: www.sonorajha.com

111AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F221.

Multimodal Identities: How Podcasting Can Unbind Creative Voices

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Considering how much the multimodal pedagogical framework lives within the realm of multicultural literacies, there is a strong case to be made that the inclusion of podcasts into the creative writing classroom could prove invaluable, especially given that many workshops fail to serve a significant portion of students who either don’t feel welcome or don’t feel capable. This panel will discuss how podcasts exist within an a priori cultural space, almost as if tailor-made to address these issues.

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Saul Lemerond is an assistant professor of English at Hanover College. He received his PhD in English with an emphasis in creative writing–fiction. He is dyslexic. His book, Digital Voices: Podcasting in the Creative Writing Classroom, has been contracted by Bloomsbury Academic.


Twitter Username: SaulLemerond

Leigh Camacho Rourks is the author of the St. Lawrence Book Award winner Moon Trees and Other Orphans and the recipient of the Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Award and the Robert Watson Literary Review Prize. She is also an assistant professor of English and humanities at Beacon College.


Twitter Username: DrScaredWriter

Website: lcrourks.com

Billie R. Tadros is the author of three books of poems: Graft Fixation, Was Body, and The Tree We Planted and Buried You In, as well as three chapbooks of poetry. She is an assistant professor at the University of Scranton, where she teaches in the Department of English & Theatre.


Twitter Username: BillieRTadros

Website: www.BillieRTadros.com

Kase Johnstun is the author of Let the Wild Grasses Grow  and Beyond the Grip of Craniosynostosis. He is host of the LITerally podcast, one that asks writers about writing, the writing life, and craft, interviewing more than fifty authors in the last four years.


Twitter Username: kasejohnstun

Rebecca Hazelwood is an essayist/memoirist who has been published widely in literary magazines. She currently teaches at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. She holds an MFA in creative writing and a PhD in English/creative writing. She is currently finishing a memoir.


Twitter Username: rlhazelwood

113A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F222.

The Subtle Ethics of Writing About Others

(, , , Elizabeth Miki Brini)

Nonfiction writers often grapple with how to write ethically about others. Memoirists, biographers, essayists, journalists: all worry about hurting loved ones, misrepresenting those of differing cultures, or disrespecting nonhuman nature in their work. This panel explores the various ways writers navigate these tricky issues. Panelists and audience will share their experiences of developing moral standards in this area with the aim of expanding our vision of the challenges and possibilities.

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Helena de Bres is associate professor of philosophy at Wellesley. Her creative writing has appeared in the Point, the New York Times, Aeon, the Los Angeles Review, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and the Rumpus. Her book, Artful Truths: The Philosophy of Memoir, was published in 2021.


Twitter Username: helenadebres

Courtney Kersten is the author of Daughter in Retrograde. She teaches creative writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and is at work on a hybrid biography about the American astrologer Linda Goodman.

Gina Arnold is a writer and professor of rhetoric and creative nonfiction. She holds a PhD from Stanford and is the author of four books, including Route 666: On the Road to Nirvana (1993) and Half a Million Strong (2018). She recently coedited the Oxford Handbook of Punk.


Twitter Username: ginanarchy

113C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F223.

Worth a Thousand Words: Integrating Visual Elements into Creative Nonfiction

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Writers trade in words, but sometimes words aren't enough. A panel of award-winning memoirists and essayists will discuss how photos, documents, original artwork, and other visual elements can deepen, complicate, and illuminate creative nonfiction. Discussion will cover craft concerns, like what can be described vs. what must be depicted and how to go about weaving images into text, as well practical ones, like permissions and convincing publishers that images are essential to your work.

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Chelsea Biondolillo is the author of The Skinned Bird: Essays and two prose chapbooks, #Lovesong and Ologies. Her work has appeared in Best American Science & Nature Essays, Orion, Brevity, Diagram, River Teeth, Passages North, and others. She is a former Colgate O'Connor and Oregon Literary fellow.


Twitter Username: c_biondolillo

Website: http://roamingcowgirl.com

Lilly Dancyger is the author of Negative Space, a reported and illustrated memoir selected by Carmen Maria Machado as a winner of the 2019 SFWP Literary Awards, and editor of Burn It Down, a critically acclaimed anthology of essays on women's anger. She is an assistant editor at Barrelhouse Books.


Twitter Username: lillydancyger

Grace Talusan is the Fannie Hurst Writer in Residence at Brandeis University, and her memoir, The Body Papers, won the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing and Massachusetts Book Award in Nonfiction.


Twitter Username: gracet09

Megan Culhane Galbraith is a writer and visual artist. Her debut, hybrid memoir-in-essays The Guild of the Infant Saviour: An Adopted Child's Memory Book was published in 2021 by Mad Creek Books of the Ohio State University Press. She is the associate director at the Bennington Writing Seminars.


Twitter Username: megangalbraith

Website: megangalbraith.com

Mary-Kim Arnold is the author of Litany for the Long Moment and The Fish & The Dove. A former arts administrator, she now teaches in the Nonfiction Writing Program at Brown University.


Twitter Username: mkimarnold

Website: http://mkimarnold.com/

115AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F224.

Building Sustainable Writing Communities in a Postpandemic World

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The pandemic taught us how to Zoom and adapt, using digital solutions to keep writers connected in a virtual capacity. But as we reenter society, how do we build upon and sustain those writing communities? In this panel, authors, podcasters, program managers, and workshop facilitators discuss establishing strong literary communities online and what approaches should continue to create productive and empowering virtual spaces that foster better diversity and inclusivity among writers today.

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Olivia Kate Cerrone is the author of The Hunger Saint, an American Fiction Award winner. She received Crab Orchard Review's Jack Dyer Fiction Prize and the Mason's Road Literary Award. She teaches creative writing at GrubStreet, Writers Without Margins, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.


Twitter Username: @olivia_cerrone

Website: http://www.oliviacerrone.com/

Serina Gousby is the senior program coordinator of the Boston Writers of Color Group at GrubStreet, with over 2,000 members across various platforms. The group holds monthly events, shares writing opportunities, and provides literary scholarships to BIPOC writers. She is also a poet and essayist.


Twitter Username: serinagousby

Blair Hurley is the author of the novel The Devoted, longlisted for the Center for Fiction's First Novel Prize. She received a 2020 Alberta Magazine Prize, a Best Small Fictions Prize, and a 2018 Pushcart Prize. She hosts the Writerly Bites podcast and teaches at Catapult and McMaster University.


Twitter Username: bhurley

Cheryl Buchanan is a founder of the nonprofit Writers Without Margins, providing workshops in shelters, jails, health centers, youth services and prison reentry. She has received National Association for Poetry Therapy’s Social Justice Prize and is a producer of award-winning film In Their Shoes.


Twitter Username: CherylEBuchanan

Laniesha Brown (she/her/hers) is GrubStreet's programs coordinator. She holds an MFA in poetry and an MA in English literature from McNeese State University. Her work has appeared in the Caribbean Writer, the Minnesota Review, and more.

115C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F225.

Voyage Image Poem: An Exploration of Hybrid Texts

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Photographs, writing, and travel have been inextricably linked since the dawn of the postcard. A photo says, “I was here,” and a poem asks “Where and who was I?” By bringing the two art forms together, these book-length explorations—of Antarctica, of the parallels between dust-bowl migrants and today’s California, of Japanese American incarceration, of the aftermath of a brother’s suicide, and of post-1848 violences against Mexicans/Mexican Americans—show how poem and image dynamically converse.

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Diana Khoi Nguyen is a poet, multimedia artist, and the author of Ghost Of . A recipient of a 2021 NEA fellowship and a Kundiman fellow, she is core faculty in the Randolph College Low-Residency MFA and an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh.

Anthony Cody is the author of Borderland Apocrypha, winner of the 2018 Omnidawn Open Book Prize and a 2020 National Book Award Finalist in Poetry. He is a CantoMundo fellow from Fresno, California, who serves as a poetry editor for Noemi Press and Omnidawn Publishing.


Twitter Username: anthony_cody

Website: www.anthonycody.com

Elizabeth Bradfield’s most recent book is Toward Antarctica. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, Poetry, and her honors include the Audre Lorde Prize and a Stegner fellowship. Founder of Broadsided Press, she works as a naturalist/guide and teaches creative writing at Brandeis University.


Twitter Username: e.bradfield

Website: www.ebradfield.com

Tess Taylor is the author of five collections of poetry, including The Misremembered World, The Forage House, and Work & Days. In spring 2020 she published two books of poems: Last West, part of Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures at the Museum of Modern Art, and Rift Zone, from Red Hen Press.


Twitter Username: tessathon

Website: www.tess-taylor.com

Brynn Saito is the author of two books of poetry, Power Made Us Swoon and The Palace of Contemplating Departure. Brynn is an assistant professor in the MFA program at California State University, Fresno.


Twitter Username: brynnsaito

Website: http://brynnsaito.com

118BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F227.

Fulbright Information Session

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The Fulbright information panel is composed of past Creative Writing Fulbright Fellows who tell of the application process; the experience; and the professional, creative, and personal benefits of this prestigious award. The Fulbright Program funds undergraduates, graduates, and at-large writers to study, conduct research, or pursue creative activities abroad for a year. Our panelists went to Mexico, Barbados, Bulgaria, India, and Paraguay to write poetry, memoirs, nonfiction, and novels.

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Katherine Arnoldi (Fulbright, Paraguay 2008–09), created the graphic novel The Amazing True Story of a Teenage Single Mom (Graymalkin 2016), All Things Are Labor: Stories (2007, University of Massachusetts Press). Her awards include two New York Foundation of the Arts Awards, DeJur, Henfield, Juniper, and Newhouse.


Twitter Username: karnoldi2001

Website: http://www.katherinearnoldi.com

Rashaun J. Allen is a tenure-track professor at Westchester Community College and the first Fulbright scholar in SUNY Stony Brook’s MFA in Creative Writing & Literature program history. He is a Vermont Studio Center residency recipient whose three poetry collections became Amazon Kindle Best Sellers.


Twitter Username: rashaunjallen

Website: www.rashaunjallen.com

Serena Chopra is a teacher, writer, dancer, filmmaker, soundscape designer, and a visual and performance artist. She has a PhD in creative writing from the University of Denver and was a 2016–2017 Fulbright Scholar (Bangalore, India). She has two books and two films.

Eireene Nealand's stories, poems, and translations have appeared in ZYZZYVA, Drunken Boat, Chicago Quarterly, and the St. Petersburg Review. She has won multiple awards including an Elizabeth Kostova Fellowship and two Fulbright Fellowships to write and teach in Bulgaria.


Twitter Username: e7iir

Daniel Peña is a Pushcart Prize-winning writer and assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of Houston-Downtown. Formerly, he was a Fulbright-Garcia Robles Scholar in Mexico City, where he finished his first novel, BANG. He's a regular contributor to the Ploughshares Blog.


Twitter Username: danimalpena

119AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F228.

CANCELED: The Light of the World Came Through

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Unfortunately, this event has been canceled by the event organizer.

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LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) is a novelist, poet, and filmmaker. Her latest book is Savage Conversations from Coffee House Press. Some awards include a United States Artist Ford Fellowship, an American Book Award, and an Oklahoma Book Award. She's the Eidson Distinguished Chair in English at the University of Georgia, Athens.


Twitter Username: LeAnneHowe

Website: http://mikokings.wordpress.com/

Kimberly Blaeser, past Wisconsin poet laureate, is the author of five poetry collections, most recently Copper Yearning. A professor at UW—Milwaukee and MFA faculty member for Institute of American Indian Arts, Blaeser is Anishinaabe and founding director of Indigenous Nation Poets.


Twitter Username: kmblaeser

120AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F229.

Controlled Chaos & June Swoons: Life as a Low-Residency MFA Director

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Four directors, from rookie to veteran, provide a sneak peek behind the scenes of their low-residency MFA programs, from start (proposing the program to a dozen confused committees) to finish (running a fake graduation ceremony). Topics include to MFA or not to MFA; why there are so many low-res programs now; building a program that is diverse, equitable, and inclusive; the difference between traditional and low-res; the "affordability factor"; and the "wow factor."

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Meg Kearney is author of All Morning the Crows, winner of the Washington Prize; An Unkindness of Ravens; Home By Now, winner of the PEN New England Award for Poetry; three verse novels for teens; and an award-winning picture book. She is founding director of the Solstice MFA Program in Massachusetts.


Twitter Username: KearneyMeg

Website: www.megkearney.com

Donald Quist is the author of books of nonfiction and fiction. He has served as a Gus T. Ridgel fellow for the English PhD program at University of Missouri. He is director of the MFA in writing at Vermont College of Fine Arts. Find him online at donaldquist.com. ​

Sophfronia Scott is founding director of Alma College's MFA in Creative Writing for the 21st Century, a low-residency program based in Michigan. She is the author of novels and nonfiction works including The Seeker and the Monk: Everyday Conversations with Thomas Merton.


Twitter Username: Sophfronia

Website: http://www.Sophfronia.com

David Hicks is a novelist and short-story writer whose debut novel, White Plains, was published In May 2017 by Conundrum Press. He directs the Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing at Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.


Twitter Username: hickswriter

Website: http://www.david-hicks.com

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F230.

Wearing Two Hats: Writers Teaching High School

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Young people need meaningful relationships with practicing writers. Writers (living, breathing, coffee-drinking writers) show students that there are other ways to organize their lives. And working writers need regular contact with young people to stay connected to the future. This panel will animate these complementary ideas through the stories of four writer-educators, who will bring to the discussion several decades of secondary school experience as well as robust, active writing lives.

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Geoffrey Hilsabeck is the author of Riddles, Etc. and American Vaudeville. His poems and essays have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, the Believer, and elsewhere. He teaches English at Sewickley Academy.

Khaliah Williams is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and received her MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Her fiction has appeared in the Hawaii Women's JournalFrontier Psychiatrist, and Day One. You can read her nonfiction at BuzzfeedAmerican Short FictionSalon, and Bookcountry.


Twitter Username: khaliahwilliams

Amy M. Alvarez coedited Essential Voices: A COVID-19 Anthology (WVU Press). Her poetry appears in numerous literary journals as well as anthologies and textbooks. A CantoMundo, Macondo, VONA, Furious Flower Poetry Center, and VCCA fellow, she teaches at West Virginia University.


Twitter Username: Amy__Writes

Website: https://amymalvarez.com

Alan Chazaro is the author of This Is Not a Frank Ocean Cover Album and Piñata Theory. He is a graduate of June Jordan’s Poetry for the People program at UC Berkeley and a former Lawrence Ferlinghetti Fellow at the University of San Francisco.


Twitter Username: Alan_Chazaro

121A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F231.

Transparency & Transformation: The Literary Institution at the Tipping Point

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Many literary institutions are reckoning with a history of exclusion and discrimination. However, after accusations have flown and mea culpas been made, most have chosen to work behind closed doors as they try to reinvent the systems of power among their staff and on their board. Come hear from leaders at organizations who are undertaking this necessary DEI work out in the open, where transparency and accountability allow for vulnerability, and where misstep can be an opportunity to grow.

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Keetje Kuipers’s third collection, All Its Charms, contains poems published in the Pushcart Prize and Best American Poetry anthologies. A former Stegner Fellow, Keetje is visiting professor of creative writing at the University of Montana, editor of Poetry Northwest, and a board member at the NBCC.

Ruben Quesada is a gay, first-generation Costa Rican American poet and critic who was raised by immigrant parents. He is the author of the poetry collections Revelations and Next Extinct Mammal. He is currently producing a documentary about Latinx poetry.


Twitter Username: rubenquesada

Website: www.rubenquesada.com

Joyce Chen is the executive director of The Seventh Wave, a literary arts nonprofit that tackles art in the space of social issues through publishing, events, residencies, and education. She has been published in Rolling Stone, Poets & Writers, People, Paste, LitHub, Narratively, and more.


Twitter Username: joycechenchen

Crystal Williams, a poet and essayist, is the author of four poetry collections, most recently, Detroit as Barn. She has received numerous fellowships, awards, and honors. Find more information at www.crystalannwilliams.com.


Twitter Username: crystallises

Website: www.crystalannwilliams.com

Rob Arnold (he/him) is a Chamoru poet, editor, and interim executive director of Hugo House, Seattle's independent writing center. His poems have appeared in Ploughshares, Hyphen, Gettysburg Review, Poetry Northwest, Red Ink, Yes, Poetry, the Ocean State Review, and the Volta, among others.


Twitter Username: _robarnold

121BC, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F232.

Trying for Fire: A Tribute to & Celebration of Tim Seibles

(, , , , Lynne Thompson)

Born in Philadelphia, Tim Seibles is a renowned performer, professor, mentor and poet, reckoning with race, sensuality, belonging and the Divine. For more than thirty years, he taught at Old Dominion University, but many poems and much of his National Book Award-nominated Fast Animal is set in the City of Brotherly Love. He served as Virginia’s poet laureate from 2016–18. The panelists will celebrate his contributions to the world of literature, and afterward, Tim Seibles will share his work.

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Remica L. Bingham-Risher is a Cave Canem fellow and an Affrilachian Poet. She has published three books of poems, Conversion, What We Ask of Flesh, and Starlight & Error. She is director of quality enhancement plan initiatives at Old Dominion University.


Twitter Username: remicawriter

Website: www.remicabinghamrisher.com

Tyehimba Jess's Olio won the Pulitzer Prize, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Society of Midland Authors Poetry Award, and recognition from the BCALA. His first book, Leadbelly, won the National Poetry Series. A NEA, Whiting, Guggenheim, and Lannan Foundation Award winner, he teaches at College of Staten Island.


Twitter Username: TyehimbaJess

Patricia Smith's books are Incendiary Art, a 2018 Pulitzer finalist and winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah; and Blood Dazzler, a 2008 National Book Award finalist. She is a Guggenheim fellow (2014), two-time Pushcart winner, and a professor at CUNY and in Sierra Nevada's MFA.


Twitter Username: pswordwoman

Website: www.wordwoman.ws

Alan King is the author of Point Blank and Drift. Of Point Blank, US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo said, these "poems are not pop and flash, rather more like a slow dance with someone you’re going to love forever." King is also a journalist, videographer, Cave Canem Fellow, and Stonecoast MFA graduate.


Twitter Username: aking020881

Website: alanwking.com

122AB, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F233.

No MFA? No Problem!

(, , , Jae Steinbacher)

MFA programs are not the only way to improve writing skills and craft a robust literary life: independent creative writing organizations can be more inclusive alternatives that can allow a wider range of aspiring writers to build community and careers. Join Redbud Writing Project cofounders and three successful authors who have learned from, taught at, or been inspired by various non-MFA institutions, such as Clarion and Grubstreet. Learn how you can grow, publish, and thrive without an MFA.

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Emily Cataneo is the cofounder of the Redbud Writing Project, a creative writing institution in Raleigh, North Carolina. She is also a writer of fiction and nonfiction whose work has appeared in Indiana Review, Smokelong Quarterly, cream city review, the Guardian, Slate, NPR, the Baffler, and many more.


Twitter Username: emilycataneo

Arshia Simkin is the cofounder of the Redbud Writing Project, a creative writing institution in Raleigh, North Carolina. A former lawyer, she was one of three winners of the 2020 CRAFT Flash Fiction contest; her work has appeared in Crazyhorse and received honorable mention in the James Hurst Prize for Fiction.

Jaymee Goh writes, reviews, and edits speculative fiction. Her work has been published in Science Fiction Studies, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy. She is a graduate from the Clarion Workshop and works for Tachyon Publications.


Twitter Username: jhameia

123, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F234.

¡Órale! Readings from Puro Chicanx Writers of the 21st Century

(, Jen Yáñez-Alaniz, Joyous Windrider)

Current San Antonio Poet Laureate, Octavio Quintanilla, Jen Yáñez-Alaniz, Matt Sedillo, and Joyous Windrider read from and discuss Puro Chicanx Writers of the 21st Century, published jointly by the Black Earth Institute and Cutthroat, A Journal of the Arts. The multigenre anthology features the work of such important Chicanx writers as Ana Castillo, Sandra Cisneros, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Octavio Solis, and more.

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Octavio Quintanilla is an associate professor of literature and creative writing at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, Texas. He is the author of the poetry collection If I Go Missing. Instagram: @writeroctavioquintanilla


Twitter Username: OctQuintanilla

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F235.

Poverty, Violence, Redemption

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These readings showcase the lives of poor and working-class protagonists and were conceived by writers from distinct, poor, and working-class backgrounds eerily similar to those of their respective characters. Exploring various unique and underprivileged rural settings, authors tackle moral dilemmas through richly developed yet poorly compensated characters, exposing them in all of their flaw, vice, merit, and humanity.

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Gonzalo Baeza is the author of the short story collection La ciudad de los hoteles vacios (The City of Vacant Hotels). His fiction has been published in the Texas Review, Boulevard, and Estados Hispanos de América, among others.

Joseph D. Haske is a writer and critic whose debut novel, North Dixie Highway, was released in October 2013. His fiction appears in journals such as Boulevard, Fiction International, the Texas Review, the Four-Way Review, Pleiades, and in the Chicago Tribune's literary supplement, Printers Row Journal.


Twitter Username: jhaske4

Website: josephdhaske.com

Laura Leigh Morris's first book, Jaws of Life, was released by West Virginia University Press in March 2018. She teaches creative writing at Furman University and is the codirector of the Furman Prison Education Partnership.


Twitter Username: lauraleighwrite

Daniel M. Mendoza is the editor of Stray Dogs: Interviews with Working-Class Writers. His fiction and essays have appeared in journals across the country. He is managing editor of Dissonance.


Twitter Username: dissonance_lit

125, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F235B.

Bound, Stitched, & Pressed: On Chapbooks & Community

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Why publish a chapbook? Is a chapbook just a short book? What makes a community of poems a successful chapbook? Ephemera, folk tale, town gossip, political tract: the little book pressed into the hands of everyday people has historically connected tale and song with community. This panel focuses on why poets write chapbooks today. Panelists will share our own chapbook stories to reveal how your poems can sing in this morsel of a form, reach readers, and gleam in the gamut of subjects and themes.

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Tyler Mills is the author of the poetry books Hawk Parable and Tongue Lyre, the chapbook City Scattered and collaborative chapbook Low Budget Movie and is finishing a memoir, The Bomb Cloud. She teaches for the Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College and edits the Account.


Twitter Username: TylerMPoetry

Website: http://tylermills.com/

Philip Metres is the author and translator of a number of books, including Shrapnel Maps, The Sound of Listening, Sand Opera, Pictures at an Exhibition, and To See the Earth. His work has garnered Guggenheim and Lannan fellowships, two NEAs, three Arab American book awards, and the Hunt Prize.


Twitter Username: PhilipMetres

Website: www.philipmetres.com

Hadara Bar-Nadav is the author of several poetry collections, most recently The New Nudity, Lullaby (with Exit Sign), The Frame Called Ruin, and Fountain and Furnace. She is also coauthor of Writing Poems, 8th ed. Bar-Nadav is a professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.


Twitter Username: Hadarabar

Website: www.Hadarabar.com

Kwame Dawes is author of eighteen collections of poetry, two novels, several anthologies, and plays. He has won a Pushcart Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an Emmy. He is a Chancellor's Professor of English at the University of Nebraska and Glenna Luschei Editor of Prairie Schooner.


Twitter Username: kwamedawes

Website: www.kwamedawes.com

Brian Teare is the author of six critically acclaimed books of poetry, most recently The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven and Doomstead Days. An associate professor at the University of Virginia, he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F236.

Forum for Undergraduate Student Editors (FUSE)

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FUSE's annual caucus for undergraduate student writers and editors and their advisors, who meet to network and discuss issues related to the world of undergraduate literary publishing, editing, and writing. Organizational updates are followed by open discussion, Q&A, and planning for the upcoming year, including conference events. This meeting will be accessible to in-person and virtual attendees.

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Michael Cocchiarale is associate professor of English and creative writing at Widener University, where he teaches courses in American literature, fiction writing, and composition. He is the author of Here Is Ware (short stories) and None of the Above (a novel).

S. Craig Renfroe Jr. is an associate professor of creative writing at Queens University of Charlotte and the faculty advisor for the undergraduate literary magazine Signet.


Twitter Username: SCraigRenfroeJr

Rachel Hall is the author of Heirlooms, a collection of linked stories, which was selected by Marge Piercy for the BkMk Press 2015 G. S. Sharat Chandra book prize. She is professor of English at SUNY Geneseo, where she holds two Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence.


Twitter Username: Rach_H_writer

Website: rachelhall.org

Abigail Cloud is an instructor in English, publishing, and creative writing at Bowling Green State University. She serves as editor in chief of Mid-American Review. Sylph is her first poetry collection.

Michener Center for Writers Bookfair Stage, Hall D & E, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 200 Level

F237.

Unsolicited Press Author Reading

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Fiction, nonfiction, and poetry reading by Unsolicited Press authors. The reading will include recently published creative works that span many geographies, time frames, cultural identities, and boundaries. Each author will introduce themselves and read a short excerpt of their work.

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Terry Tierney’s poetry collection, The Poet’s Garage, was published by Unsolicited Press in 2020. He earned his BA and MA at SUNY Binghamton and his PhD at Emory before surviving several Silicon Valley startups. Lucky Ride, an irreverent Vietnam-era road novel, appeared in 2021.


Twitter Username: TerryTierney14

Website: http://terrytierney.com

Amy Shimshon-Santo is a writer, educator, and multidisciplinary creative. Connect with her at www.amyshimshon.com.


Twitter Username: amyshimshon

Lara Lillibridge (she/zher) is the author of Mama, Mama, Only Mama and Girlish: Growing Up in a Lesbian Home and coeditor of the anthology Feminine Rising. She is the interviews editor for Hippocampus Magazine, holds an MFA from West Virginia Wesleyan College, and is a mentor for Writer to Writer.


Twitter Username: only_mama


Twitter Username: ronTsinger

Suzanne S. Rancourt is a US Marine Corps and Army veteran of Abenaki/Huron descent. She is the author of Billboard in the Clouds, which received the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas First Book Award; murmurs at the gate; and Old Stones, New Roads. Her fourth book is forthcoming from Unsolicited Press 2023. 


Twitter Username: FlameSuzy

Website: www.expressive-arts.com

Virtual

F238.

Women of Color Zinesters: DIY Culture as Counter-Storytelling

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The event will be moderated by Tonya Jones, founder of PDX Women of Color (WOC) Zine Collective. The panel will feature WOC zinesters who will discuss how participating in do-it-yourself (DIY) culture can be an act of resistance and liberation. Zine culture provides an opportunity for WOC to tell their stories/truths their own way, including (and not limited to): writing, art/comics, rants, collage, etc.


This virtual discussion room will take place live and will not be recorded for on-demand viewing.

Download event outline and supplemental documents.

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Tonya Jones is the founder of the Women of Color (WOC) Zine Collective in Portland, Oregon. Jones started the group to provide a space for WOC creatives in the predominantly white city. The collective has self-published fifteen issues. Tonya also teaches zine classes at her city's community college.


Twitter Username: woczineworkshop

Sabrina Sims is a Afro Puerto Rican woman and artist. She makes mini books called zines on a wide range of topics including friendships, being femme, and being chronically ill. She is also the organizer of the in-the-works Bronx Zine Fest and a collaborative zine about Black hair.

Cicely Carr recently resigned from teaching high school English to open her bookstore, makerspace, literacy center, and small press called Kindred Creatives Art and Literary Press. She calls herself a creativepreneur because of her love for writing and creating but also needs to pay those bills.


Twitter Username: KindredCreativesALP

Emilly Prado is a writer and educator based in Portland, Oregon. Her debut essay collection, Funeral for Flaca, has been called, “Utterly vulnerable, bold, and unique,” by Ms. Magazine and is out now with Future Tense Books. She is a Blackburn fellow at Randolph MFA and moonlights as DJ Mami Miami.


Twitter Username: emillygprado

5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.

120C, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F246.

K-12 Teachers of Creative Writing

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The caucus creates a space where teachers in K–12 schools, as well as those who work part-time with young writers, can share their classroom experiences with the hopes of helping one another understand the complex and diverse needs of young writers in the twenty-first century. The meeting will feature presentations by caucus members to help generate discussion around issues of pedagogy, and how to build a creative writing curriculum that is accessible to students no matter their identity or background. This meeting will be accessible to in-person and virtual attendees.

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Molly Sutton Kiefer is the author of the lyric essay Nestuary, as well as three poetry chapbooks. Founding editor of Tinderbox Poetry Journal, she runs Tinderbox Editions, a nonprofit press. 

Jeremy T. Wilson is the author of the short story collection Adult Teeth. He is a former winner of the Chicago Tribune’s Nelson Algren Award for short fiction. He teaches creative writing at The Chicago High School for the Arts.


Twitter Username: shiremy

Allison Campbell teaches creative writing at Lusher Charter School in New Orleans. A graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi's Center for Writers, Allison's first book, Encyclopédie of the Common and Encompassing, was published by Kore Press in 2016.


Twitter Username: AC_Campbell

Website: allison-campbell.org

124, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F247.

Sober AWP

Daily 12-step meeting. All in recovery from anything are welcome.

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126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F248.

Indigenous-Aboriginal American Writers Caucus

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Indigenous writers and scholars participate fluidly in AWP, teaching, directing affiliated programs, working as independent writers or scholars, and/or within community language revitalization efforts. Annually imparting field-related craft, pedagogy, celebrations, and concerns as programming understood by Indigenous-Native writers from the Americas and surrounding island nations is necessary. AWP conferences began our caucus discussions in 2010. Essential program development continues in 2022.

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Rena Priest is a poet and enrolled member of the Lummi Nation. She has been appointed to serve as Washington state poet laureate for the term of April 2021–2023, has published two collections of poetry, and is the recipient of an Allied Arts Professional Poets Award.


Twitter Username: RenaPriest

Deborah Taffa is the director of the MFA in creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In 2021, her memoir manuscript won awards from PEN America, MacDowell, Tin House, and Kranzberg Arts. Her writing can be found at Boston ReviewA Public Space, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. She is a citizen of the Quechan Nation.


Twitter Username: deborahtaffa

Website: www.deborahtaffa.com

Shauna Osborn is executive director of Puha Hubiya, a nonprofit literary arts organization, and author of the poetry collection Arachnid Verve, which was a finalist for the Oklahoma Book Awards. They have won awards from the New York Public Library, A Room of Her Own Foundation, and the Taos Summer Writers' Conference and a Crescendo Literary Fellowship.


Twitter Username: tenaciousoz

Website: http://shaunamosborn.wordpress.com/

Kimberly Blaeser, past Wisconsin poet laureate, is the author of five poetry collections, most recently Copper Yearning. A professor at UW—Milwaukee and MFA faculty member for Institute of American Indian Arts, Blaeser is Anishinaabe and founding director of Indigenous Nation Poets.


Twitter Username: kmblaeser

6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Room 302-303, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 3

F249A.

Reception for Salmon Poetry’s Spring Titles

A celebration of poetry collections by Elvis Alves, Sheila Black, Todd Hearon, Eamonn Lynskey, Sandra McPherson, and Lex Runciman.

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Room 306, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 3

F250.

Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices Reception

An intimate gathering for those connected with our magazine and friends to celebrate our new Editor-in-Chief and amazing editors and our almost fifteen years of promoting diversity in lit! Come meet some of our top folks!

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Room 307, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 3

F251.

The Pinch Journal Reception

The Pinch invites masthead, contributors, and readers to a reception in celebration of recent issues. Come meet the editors who selected your work! Meet the writers whose words captured you on the page! Sponsored by the Hohenberg Foundation and the Department of English at the University of Memphis.

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Room 308, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 3

F252.

Madville Publishing Reception

This event is a celebration for Madville Publishing authors, past and present. Friends of Madville or Madville authors are welcome.

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Salon H, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 5

F253.

Sewanee Writers' Conference Reception

We welcome all Sewanee Writers' Conference alumni and guests to catch up with friends at an open bar.

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Salon I, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 5

F254.

Philadelphia Stories Reception

Philadelphia Stories celebrates the Philadelphia literary community at this reception, which will also showcase the special AWP issue of this free literary magazine.

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Salon J, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 5

F255.

Scarlet Tanager Books Celebrates Poetry & Place

Special guests will include panelists from "Indigenous Ecopoetry: Environmental Perspectives from Those Who Came First," as well as poets from the reading "Poetry and Place: Connecting Who We Are to Where We Are." There will be a brief program, conversation, and refreshments.

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Salon K, Marriott Philadelphia Downtown, Floor 5

F256.

Saturnalia Books Twentieth Anniversary Reception

Join us for a wine and cheese reception to celebrate Philadelphia-area poetry press Saturnalia Books' twentieth year.

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6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

126A, Pennsylvania Convention Center, 100 Level

F257.

African Diaspora Caucus

(Alyss Dixson)

Uniting attendees from across disciplines, the African Diaspora Caucus will provide a forum for discussions of careers, best practices for teaching creative writing, and obtaining the MFA or PhD. We will work with AWP’s affinity caucuses to develop national diversity benchmarks for creative writing programs and will collaborate with board and staff to ensure that AWP programs meet the needs of diaspora writers. This caucus will be an inclusive space that reflects the pluralities in our community. This meeting will be accessible to in-person and virtual attendees.

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8:00 p.m. to 9:15 p.m.

Virtual

F258.

LGBTQ Writers Caucus

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